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The Big Cheese Mouse Trap

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£4.10 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
6 Reviews

A quick, easy and humane trap to catch mice. For a very affordable price, it catches the mouse inside, allowing you to remove it safely. Can be a little tricky and unpleasant to clean out afterwards, however.

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    6 Reviews
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      29.09.2011 07:04

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      These mouse traps are a complete failure and hopeless manufacturing design. They are branded Big Cheese Live Catch and are the smallest they make. I bought four of them from Bunnings Hardware and set them up. The next morning, three had been triggered, all the bait was eaten and the mice had wriggled their way "easily" out of the traps. The manufacturer should do a mass recall and stop wasting people's money.

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      28.10.2010 01:54

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      My house mice were a source of much amusement for weeks, but when they started getting up onto the kitchen tops it was time to say farewell. The humane mousetraps didn't work for a week or so until I sited them in a floor-level kitchen cupboard and baited them with chocolate (leaving a very small sample outside the trap as a tempter). Thereafter it was adios mice. I could hear the trap as it fell and collected each mouse within seconds for removal. Don't leave these traps unattended or baited overnight as the trapped mice are stressed and the humane aspect will be lost.

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      25.06.2010 01:23
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      Perfect for quick mouse removal.

      Recently I had at least one uninvited mouse scurrying around my bedroom. Despite being rather fun to watch, they are unhygienic and leave toxic droppings everywhere. After battling for sometime with the little scamp with my shoddily built homemade runs and traps, I relented and bought one of these humane traps to see what results it would yield. Within 24 hours the mouse was caught, and I could sleep in peace again (the phrase "quiet as a mouse" is a total misconception - they make one hell of a racket scurrying about when you're trying to sleep!)

      The trap is a simple box with a cantilever tunnel and the bait inside. The bait is a pungent cheesey puree, which mice no doubt smell from a long way off. I discovered that I had unwittingly lured a mouse into my room by leaving a bar of chocolate under my bed for it to nibble on, so I added some Dairy Milk as extra bait. It also gave said mouse something to munch on while I was out at work.

      For the price, this trap was just what I needed. Killing the mouse is, in my opinion, unfair as it's just trying to make a home for itself like any creature would, just in an unsuitable area. There's no mouse corpse to clear up, so you can release them back into the wild and feel a bit of positive karma in doing so. Be sure to release the mouse at least a mile away though, otherwise you'll have to evict the same mouse again. If you do have mice, I can recommend this trap. If you have a significant mouse problem, then placing a few round the house and checking them regularly might be a good plan.

      If there is a criticism to be made, then it is that the trap is hard to clean. On discovering the mouse had been caught, it had also defecated profusely all inside the trap, and it was tought to get all the toxic droppings out. On the whole though, a good, humane and efficient way to remove unwanted little rodents (who knows it may even work on bank voles and shrews too, though I doubt these species target domestic properties)

      4 stars - 1 knocked off for the trouble cleaning it out.

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        28.11.2009 10:26
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        Far easier to use than traditional wooden mousetraps

        Living out in the sticks surrounded by fields we have all sorts of unwanted visitors ranging from foxes to birds of prey and the odd visiting badger. Whilst these are mostly harmless visits using us as a short cut en route to somewhere else we do the occasional visitor intent on taking up residence and these are usually the visitors that end up causing the most damage. We do have a semi-feral mouser who prefers to spend her days tracking down these unwanted visitors and devouring them for dinner but once in a while they manage to get in somewhere that she can't and an alternative method of removal is required. The simplest method would be poison but with livestock and small children around that's not the best idea in the world and so an alternative was required.

        That alternative was a mousetrap but not the dubious looking traditional wooden contraption with a giant spring and a tiny tray on which to attempt to balance your bait only to catapult it across the room as you set it or more likely trap your fingers.

        A visit to the local farm store revealed that the world has indeed moved on and the variety of traps available was seemingly endless. Whilst I like the idea of a humane catch and release trap with it comes the problem of where do you release the contents and more importantly if you do catch something but not know its in there its likely to starve to death which would be far more unpleasant than simply being whacked on the head by a giant spring resulting in a dislocated neck and so we purchased the modern equivalent of the traditional mousetrap. This one came packed in a technicolour cardboard outer (looking nothing like the one in the picture) containing two white plastic "easy set" traps. Theres nothing easy set about a mousetrap, well not normally anyway. I had a quick play without baiting them to figure out just how they worked and most importantly to check that they did work. I've been caught out by that before too. Surprisingly they clonk shut with a resounding thwack in an instantaneous and fluid motion. More surprisingly they did it without trapping my fingers or removing any chunks of flesh. Most impressive. It's a bit like a giant clothes peg. Simply squeeze very hard to set and position it where needed. Most unusually I didn't have any accidental triggers whilst putting them in place. Baiting the trap was incredibly easy, it comes with a small fixed cup into which you place something gloopy with a bit of a smell. Dairylea cheese spread works well on mice and voles and cat food and peanut butter works a treat on rats (although you need a much bigger trap).

        Having filled the pot with bait simply squeeze shut. This shrouds the bait from view and ensures that your intended victim can only enter via the trigger plate. Once in place check on it every day, topping up where needed and removing corpses as required. Death appears to be instantaneous with the neck being firmly crushed without being severed. To empty place trap in bag and release clip, theres no need to touch the dead mouse or vole.

        The traps are reusable and other than a quick squirt of WD40 on the spring every few months they need no maintenance despite being left outside permanently. At £5 a pair they're excellent value for money.

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        15.10.2008 13:12
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        Does the job...eventually and maybe with a little help.

        These are some of the most humane mouse traps on the market...why? because the mouse took bait off them 10's of times without the trap snapping shut. So heres what happened, my dad set four traps in our attic after my little sis was complaining she heard scrambling and scratching...my dad then went away on business for a week and we forgot completely about the traps. When he came back he checked the traps and none had gone off so we thought my sister was going a bit cukoo ;p however after she said the noise was still there my dad decided to step the mouse catching up a bit.

        Now these traps are SUPPOSED to contain a smell that attracts mice to the trap and they may well have but as it seems they are not very sensitive. So my dad then put a small piece of chocolate on each trap and left them for a few more days, upon checking back the chocolate was gone (no it wasn't me!!!) but none of the traps had snapped shut. So again he now put a tiny piece of sausage on the traps, checked back a few days laeter and the sausage had gone from all of the traps!

        Eventually he decided there was nothing for it and tied pieces of cheese slices to the traps...surely enough a little splattered mouse was found a few days later.

        If I had anything to do with it I would've chosen a humane trap but as it happens these are cheap at just £1.99 for two and also if we had caught a mouse and let it go it may well have got back into the loft.

        So over all, I would urge the makers of these traps to make them more sensitive, as it turns out we just teased a mouse with bits of food for a couple of weeks before squishing it and thats just cruel man.

        If you do want these traps then use a piece of thread to tie bait to them I think it must be the slight bit of tugging the mouse had to do to ultimately bring on its own brutal squishing death.

        R.I.P. mousey.

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          22.04.2008 10:31
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          If you find yourself with an unwelcome mousey visitor then invest in these humane traps.

          Because I live in such a rural area I was aware when I brought my bungalow that I may have to get used to mice, foxes, rats and even badgers causing havoc in my garden. I have very nice moles who only make their little hills at the very bottom of my garden where I think they look lovely, I might change my mind if they ever move up to the lawn though.

          I have a very annoying mouse though and none of my 3 rescue cats have had any success in finding it. I am not a silly squeamish girl screaming about mice but this mouse is living in my outhouse and keeps leaving his droppings everywhere. Jam making season is almost upon us so I need my outhouse hygienic enough to store however many jars of jam my berry patch will provide this summer. My son in law is going to seal all the draughty openings where the mice may be coming in but first I have to get rid of the mouse who has already set up residence among my plant pots and gardening gear.

          I was in Wilkinsons when I saw these humane mouse traps and because I did not want to poison the little fellow or crush him with the traditional trap my postman recommended I thought they might be the answer to my prayers.

          The trap is made so that the mouse will run in after food and tip the wedge shaped box so that the lid slides shut and traps the mouse. It is already baited but I added a few pieces of cheese as an added incentive for the mouse. The bait is a little pad of foam that has been impregnated with a scent to attract a hungry mouse, I am assuming it is cheese scented but is more likely to just be a load of chemicals to draw the mouse in. It is not poisonous though and will not hurt your mouse at all.

          I put it in my outhouse, making sure that the lid was properly latched up so that it would close if the mouse went inside. I was not expecting to catch him really because if he has evaded 3 hungry and playful moggies then he must surely be too clever to fall for this trap. I actually had success on the very first night. I woke up and wandered into the outhouse with my cup of tea when I heard a scratching noise and remembered putting the trap down before I went to bed. I did a very silly thing and let him go outside the door and then realising my mistake I had to suffer the embarrassment of watching him turn around and run straight back into the outhouse.! I was outsmarted by a mouse.

          I washed the trap out and put fresh cheese in it but he would not come back and I thought I was stuck with him. I think he remembered because sometimes there was droppings by the trap but he had not gone inside even for cheese. After about 3 weeks I had him again after I had put some Wensleydale in the trap, I think he wanted a change and was bored of Cheddar or perhaps he associated the smell of Cheddar with being stuck in the trap the first time.

          This time I took him out in the car to a field where I used to walk my dogs and let him go. There are plenty of airholes in the trap so I knew I could leave him in there for a while as long as I did not move the trap because he would get very upset and start scrambling at the sides and I didn't want to panic him too much.

          My son in law sealed the holes and there have not been any more mouse droppings in the outhouse. We gave it a good clean with bleach and it is now fit to store the queens jam. The traps are sold in packs of 2 in Wilkinsons and they only cost £1.99 and I think this is a bargain because they do work well. I think the bait would wear off after a while and you should probably replace them then but I think the traps would work just as well with cheese even after the smell of the bait had gone because I think it was the Wensleydale that attracted my tiny little field mouse that had caused so much stress.

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