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17 Reviews

Brand: Dylon / Type: Fabric Dye / Category: Laundry

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    17 Reviews
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      20.06.2013 15:03
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      A no-mess simple way to update your fabric.

      I wanted to liven up my breakfast room with a bit of colour but didn't have the budget for decorating or even new curtains. I had some perfectly good cream curtains up already but wanted a bit of vibrance.

      My mum used to dye fabric when i was a kid and I remember there being losts of soaking in buckets and stirring giants pans on hot stoves. I also remember there being lots of variously coloured stains on our kitchen floor lino! So I was a bit weary about using dye at home and wanted to use a dye I could put in the washing machine.

      I read some reviews online and lots of people warned about staining your washing machine and subsequent washing in the machine but they seemed to have cut corners with the instructions.

      I followed the instructions to a t and have had perect results! Here's a handy guide..

      1. Make sure youre fabric is suitable for dying! - Cotton is best and suitable fabric is in the instructions.

      2. Weigh your fabric - if you want the true vibrant colour of the pack, you need to use 1 pack per 600g of fabric.

      3. Wash your fabric - to get rid of any stains. The fabric also needs to be damp before dying.

      4. Don't forget salt! - you need 500g of salt regardless of the amount of dye. Add the salt directly over the powder into the washing machine drum before adding your fabric.

      5. Dye and wash - run the machine on a normal wash until the fabric is dyed. Then run a normal cycle with detergent as though you're washing the dyed fabric.

      6. Dry and enjoy!

      7. Run your machine EMPTY on the hottest wash setting you have - this will clean the machine afterwards.

      So in total you will have run your machine on 4 cycles.


      No stains, no mess, no fuss. I had great results and would recommend to anyone!

      Now, what can i dye next..................?

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      27.09.2012 18:50
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      A great way to rejuvenate clothes

      Dylon makes really good quality dyes which are excellent for reviving faded clothes which are otherwise in excellent condition. There are various sorts of dyes available including this dye, which is to be used in the washing machine at 40 degrees along with 500g of salt, hand dyes and wash and dye, and I have tried them all at some stage.

      ~Using the Fabric Dye~
      The dye comes in a cardboard box with paper instructions inside. The dye is powdered and enclosed in a sealed plastic bag, which needs cutting open to empty the dye out. I always cut the bag open inside the washing machine over the clothes I am dying so not to end up with the powered dye everywhere. If it gets on my fingers it does stain a little and takes a few washing to get it off. Next add in 500g of salt, Dylon does a 500g bag of salt, or you can use ordinary table salt from the supermarket. Switch the washing machine on to a 40 degrees cycle and wait for the results...

      ~How Much Clothes Vs How Much Dye~
      There are instruction on how many clothes (in weight) can be sued to dye to full colour. Only a few times have I dyed something that was light black, which is when you need maximum amount of dye to clothes. Usually I am regenerating colour in faded clothes so I can put more clothes into the wash. To give you some idea; the other day I regenerated one pair of smart wide legged trousers and two shirts with one pack of dye, all previously black but a bit faded and all came out nice and black again. Realistically I think I could have put another top in too, but nothing else needed doing.

      ~What I have Dyed~
      About 13 years ago I bought two, reasonably expensive cotton cardigans from Hobbs, they are identical except one is black, the other navy. They have been washed countless times and lost their colour. I have regenerated the black one twice with Dylon and the navy one once and they look as new.
      Linen clothes also seem to loose their colour and I had a black linen skirt and navy linen trousers for many years which I re-dyed when they lost their colour. Quite a number of my favourite clothes have been "saved" by Dylon and I would say its saved me a lot of money as I wouldn't have worn them in their faded state so otherwise I would have replaced them.

      ~Dying Things a New Colour~
      This is a bit more tricky, ie. if you were to dye something red blue it may end up purple, same with something yellow, it may end up green. This depended on the starting shade and the amount of dye to material used. I wouldn't suggest dying something another colour as the few things I have done don't seem to have worked as I expected. Dylon is very good in that you will get very consistent coverage, it's just you may end up with a shade you really don't want.

      ~Materials Which Can Be Dyed~
      Basically linen and cotton work best and anything synthetic, silk or nylon doesn't work. There are warnings on the box about this. What the instructions don't warn you about is most cotton and linen garments are stitched with synthetic cotton and this does not dye. So, if you died a white top black the material would end up a nice covered black with white stitching.

      ~The Washing Machine~
      After the dying cycle has finished the instructions tell you to do one normal wash of the clothes you dyed. This does get most of the dye out of the machine, however it does get dye on the rubber seal and the door of the machine, so it need to be wiped and I always do a coloured wash next just in case anything gets on my whites. I have always been careful and never had any accidents.

      ~Now Does the Dye Work and Last~
      The dye lasts very well, just as long as anything you would buy in that colour and can be washed as normal in future washes. Dylon for machine washes is always very consistent in its coverage and I have always had very good results. However I did try the hand dye once in the bath and I could not get even coverage so I wouldn't recommend it.

      ~ Dylon Colours~
      There is a large variety or reds, blues, greens, links, yellows, black etc and of course you can always mix them to make another colour, although I don't think I would risk it.

      ~Cost~
      I bought my last dye from John Lewis and it was £5.99 plus the salt which was 49p. Not many places sell it, you can also get it from Dunelm or Robert Dyas, otherwise you would get it online.

      ~Summary~
      Great for regenerating faded clothes. It has saved some of my favourite items and in the long run quite a lot of money. I give it a full 5 stars!

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        07.05.2011 17:10

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        Neither of these items did anything for my items. They didn't even make one iota of difference to the original colours. Very disappointed.

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        14.06.2010 14:33
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        Recommended to all!

        I couple of weeks ago I got bleach on my favourite blue dress. It wasn't pure bleach but watered down; so rather than a bright white mark it left an area that was a lighter shade of blue. It was still very noticeable.

        I bought Dylon Pre Dye to strip the colour out and was amazed at the results! The dress is 100% cotton and it left it an almost-white grey colour. The bleached area was totally invisible.

        I then bought the Dylon machine dye in Ocean Blue to restore the dress to its former glory......it worked! The dress came out looking almost perfect! The bleached area has a very slightly different shade to the rest of the dress but its so faint I didn't notice it at first (I went outside into natural light and could see it) and other people will definitely not see it.

        Overall I'm thrilled with the results and am so glad that I tried to redye the dress rather than give up and just get rid of it! I would absolutely recommend using Dylon pre dye and dye!

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        24.05.2010 14:48

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        Look for a better alternative

        This product is useless on the vast majority of fabrics. I agree with other reviewers that product not as good as previously. I tried to dye a pair of trousers which ended up the same colour only covered in black smuts and dots.Even the lining was a mess. Dylon's consumer response is to send you a questionaire without a return postage or envelope which you are required to send back with the label cut off the garment and a piece of the garment cut from a seam. After a couple of weeks the reply is 'do not use for dying dry cleaned fabrics is written on the outside of the packaging'. I called them to query this and I was right it does not say that on the packaging but she then said it was written on the inside instructions which I had to send to them with the packaging. Handy that..Do not buy this rubbish product.Had to put 1 star for review engine but product actually ruined a good quality pair of trousers

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        07.12.2009 00:26
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        Highly recommended!

        Last summer during our (very) brief heatwave my black linen trousers were a staple item in my wardrobe. They were comfortable, great to wear in the hot weather and as they were black went with pretty much everything. After many washes though the colour had begun to fade. It was about to go into my 'charity shop' bag and I was contemplating heading down to Next to buy myself another pair. At £18 each though they're not cheap. My mum then suggested dying them black again, something which hadn't occurred to me. So I headed down to my local Wilkinsons to buy a box of Dylon black dye.

        The Dye
        Dylon dyes come in a small black box and can be found near the washing powders section of the store. Each box contains 200g of powdered dye which is enough to dye 600g of fabric. As most of us are not used to weighing our clothes, that's the equivalent of a pair of trousers. If you want to dye more items then you can but the shade will be lighter. Alternatively you can add more than one packet to the machine.

        The dyes come in a variety of colours although Wilkinsons only stock a limited range. For a more extensive choice I recommend heading over to places like John Lewis. The dye itself is for use in washing machines.
        Having never dyed my clothes before I was expecting it to be something that you'd have to do by hand and I imagined it would be a rather messy process. So in this respect I was pleasantly surprised. Each box costs around £4.99.

        How to use
        The back of the packet has clear, easy to follow instructions on how to use the product. The dye is placed in the drum of the machine, along with 500g of salt (just ordinary table salt) and the item of clothing you wish to dye. Then run a 40°C cycle. Then run a second 40°C cycle to wash and rinse. Couldn't be simpler really! Once the item has been dyed remove it from the machine and run a blank cycle to ensure all dye has been removed.

        The results
        My black trousers have been brought back to life! The colour was evenly distributed across the fabric and the trousers looked like they've never been worn! The colour is permanent and doesn't run, either on touch or in subsequent washes. I guess like all colours it will eventually start to fade when washed repeatedly but it can then be re-dyed. Dying my trousers saved me around £13 which is great! Overall I was immensely impressed!

        I have since dyed many other items of clothing. I have a favourite white top that had a couple of stubborn, hard to shift stains. I'd tried many products on the market but nothing did the trick. I then bought some white dye, followed the procedure above and the top is now as good as new. My sister bought a coat from Primark that she loved the style of but wasn't particularly keen on the colour (a creamish colour). She has now dyed the coat a deep burgundy colour and it looks great!

        What can be dyed?
        The dyes are suitable for cotton, linen and viscose. Lighter shades will be achieved for linen/viscose mixes. It is not suitable for items made of wool, silk or synthetic fibres such as polyester, nylon or acrylic, or on items that have a special finish such as those that are waterproof. It is also best used on items that don't have a printed design or logo, unless of course you want that to be dyed as well. There is also a promise at the back of the box that the dye will not damage your machine.

        Some safety notes
        Always wear gloves when handling the dyes. They may cause sensitisation by skin contact and are irritating to the eyes.

        The verdict
        If you hadn't already gathered I think these dyes are great! The process of dying your clothes is easy and not messy at all. The dye is evenly applied and doesn't run after washing. It has bought staple items of clothing back to life and in the process saved me a lot of money. So if you have some items of clothing lurking in your cupboards that are looking a little worse for wear or just fancy changing the colour of that top you like then give these dyes a go!

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          02.08.2009 21:36
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          A great product for dying your clothes

          A few years ago I bought a lovely pair of black trousers. They were comfortable, and they were smart enough for work. I loved them, and so I proceeded to wear them often. So, two years later, they've probably been washed more than 100 times, and they were looking decidedly gray and not nearly so smart as they once were. I didn't want to throw them away, so I decided to dye them.

          I bought Dylon Machine Dye in my local hardware shop. It cost £6.99 which is very expensive. I've seen it on the internet for less than half what I paid. However, as I'd never get round to actually buying the dye this way, I decided to buy it on the spot. I chose the Velvet Black colour.

          I pondered whether it would be cheaper to buy a non-machine dye. I had used these before tie-dying t-shirts when I was a teenager. I remembered it was a messy and lengthy process involving buckets of dye. I opted for the machine dye, as I didn't want to make a mess of the flat or have the bucket hanging around.

          I put my trousers in the washing machine, and then, as directed by the instructions, I poured the dye on top in the drum. I then measured 500g of salt and added this to the drum on top of the trousers - the salt isn't included with the dye. I set the machine for a 40 degrees wash and let it do its thing. Once the cycle had finished, I put in detergent and ran the cycle again. Once it had finished I removed my trousers and hung them up to dry. As the instructions stated, I had to then run another cycle to clean the drum. I added some soda crystals to ensure that it was clean.

          The product guarantees that it will not linger in the drum and dye anything else once you've followed these instructions. However, I was not convinced. Having carried out the instructions to the letter, I then put another wash on with old tea towels to check that they weren't dyed. The verdict was that they came out the same colour they went in as - the guarantee was correct!

          I was very impressed with the results of the dye itself on my trousers. It has given them a new lease of life. They are now a dark black colour and they look extremely smart again. I've washed them since, but only with other black clothes, so I can't tell if they have run in the wash. They have retained the colour, so I am confident that they didn't.

          So all in all, this was an excellent product that worked really well. I have knocked a star off, because it was expensive and I had to run my machine 4 times to ensure that there was no dye left - at 50p a go, that's another £2.00 on the price. However, this is still a lot cheaper than a new pair of trousers, especially ones I love. Definitely worth buying if you want to smarten up your faded clothes.

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            09.03.2009 13:08
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            Dyeing at home pays dividends if you do it right!

            I decided to dye my 3 seater blue sofa-covers grey to save replacing them for new - Dylon is the leading home-dye brand and so just one 'Robert Dyas' shopping-trip later I was armed with all the tools; salt/dye/gloves and a spare 3 hours on Sunday to undertake the task! Each carton of dye is circa £4 per kilo of material but prices vary. Unfortunately I neglected to weigh the dry-material and so made 'guesstimates' to the dye/cloth weight ratio which was a fatal flaw in the process leaving me with just a darker shade of blue albeit a bit steely in appearance it's still blue. I used the correct pre-dye stripper too but again it was the 'chef's-error' and not the recipe which, I should've followed more closely. I'll be back at Robert Dyas later to buy greater quantities of dye and this time will be sure to reduce the washer-load and weigh material properly too. Other than these simple 'school-boy' errors (always read and follow the instructions) using Dylon products are reliable and much more affordable than a professional dyeing service, replacing covers or buying a new sofa! The temptation is too tempting to become dye-crazy, I've already ear-marked a bathrobe, a set of curtains and about 10 loose cushion-covers for the next session!! I'll let you know the result next-time.

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            14.01.2009 23:27
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            -

            If any of my friends ever had to describe me, and put me into a nicely labelled box, appearance wise, I'd probably be classed as a goth, or maybe an emo.

            I like black clothes - always have done. Maybe its the fact that I'm a big girl, and blacks pretty slimming . Mayeb its the fact that I have a very messy daughter, and black clothes come clean much easier after jammy little hands are planted on my clothing. Either way, I like darker coloured clothes .

            Now, as already mentioned, I'm a big girl - or at least, I was, a few months on weight watchers means I'm steadily shrinking, and this shrinkage has led to something of a wardrobe problem- every couple of months, I drop a dress size . My trousers start showing builders bum, my tops flap loosely about and make my bosoms look small and insignificant (if theres one body feature of mine I LOVE, its my bosom) and generally, I look like a scruff. But its just too expensive to be buying new clothes each month, so I trawl charity shops, picking up pretty much anything that will go on and stay on .

            While this saves me money versus buying new clothes I'm only going to slim out of, it does mean I have to take whats on over, so I customise , and usually the first step, is to die items black, or occasionally red, just because I like those colours .

            Dylon die is available from Wilkos, at least thats where I purchased mine . Theres an array of different colours - bright pinks and purples, muted greys and blues, and, of course, black.

            Using this is simple - stick in the washing machine, add salt (which fixes the dye) stick on a cycle, and its done!

            I've used this many times, and its always dyed my clothes well and evenly . It is worth noting thts its important not to try and get your moneys worth by overstuffing the machine, otherwise the dye will struggle to get into the creases . I've dyed denim, cotton, and all manner of clothing items .

            Its worth noting that sometimes detailed stitching doesn't dye, and that, of course, plastic buttons and zips don't dye, but with a good sewing kit, these minor details are easily fixed .

            I'm starting to come out of my black addiction a little now that I'm slimmer, I recently tried a bright pink dye on a stretchy vest top, and again, the colour came out evenly, and was exactly as shown on the box . I've also used the red one to dye some cheap polo shirts red as school uniform for my daughter.

            Despite the items being washed numerous times since dying, the colour has stayed strong, and more importantly, hasn't ruined other items

            The one disadvantage (which lies with wilkos rather than dylon) is that they don't keep the shelves well stocked, and occasionally I have to wait til they get dye in . But for a good cheap way to reinvent an old item of clothing ( a fiver a packet) Dylon is a wondeful product .

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              19.10.2008 00:32

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              No result and will email Dylon

              I've had the same experience as Caroline and am very disappointed. Having previously used the Dylon round tins to dye things by hand I tried one of the new sachets in French lavender to even up the colour on a faded lilac cotton T-shirt and it didn't do anything. I followed the instructions to the letter and thought the colour of the water with the dye in it was rather pale and dilute looking but pressed on hoping for the best but the result was just as if I'd washed the T-shirt in water - no difference in colour at all and no evening up of the fading. When I've dyed items previously for the same reason the fading has evened up nicely and they have come out really well. I don't know if the problem is down to the new formulation or whether the instructions are wrong and less water should be used or what the problem is. I'm going to email Dylon about it.

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              31.07.2008 11:12

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              Hi, I make costumes and use a lot of dylon dyes over the years. I bought one of the 'new' higher priced pouches that replaced the cheaper round containers and followed the warm water instructions.I was redying to black, a 100% cotton small size light bomber jacket that I had previously dyed from white to mid brown using one old container of your product. It absoulutely did not take at all and the jacket is marginally darker - still brown, not black. Never had this problem before. Also noticed one of the gloves I was wearing was not water tight - and the black dye came off my hand much easier than it should.Anyone else had the same problem ?

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              04.01.2005 21:02
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              It is not often that I’m impressed enough with a household domestic product for me to be filled with the need to put pen to paper, or finger to keyboard, to sing it’s praises but having seen the impact this product has had on a faded pair of work trousers I felt duty bound to do a review.

              Dylon all-in-one colourfast fabric dye comes in a 400g pouch and is ready to use straight from the packet. The packaging has the product name on the front with a picture of a washing machine beneath it and the colour of the dye labelled on the front. On the reverse are some very comprehensive instructions on its usage as well as guidance on the expected results and some helpful hints. There is also a safety warning as well as the contents guide.

              Available in a range of colours each packet can dye loads between 500 and 1250g in weight. For items weighting 500g e.g. a pair of trousers it will colour to the full shade shown on the packet, for heavier loads up to the maximum the colour may be a few shades lighter. When this product was recommended to me I was told that I would need to use salt with it however the dye came ready mixed and no salt was required.

              Using the product could not be simpler, merely dampen the item of clothing and using protective gloves snip of the end of the packet and pour the contents directly into the drum of your washing machine. Then place the clothing into the machine and run a 60-degree colourfast wash. Once the wash is completed add powder and run a second wash at the maximum temperature that is recommended for the fabric. Once this is complete dry the item away from direct heat and sunlight.

              In order to ensure that all of the dye is removed from your machine it is recommended that you run another wash with the drum empty on 95 degrees which means that your machine will complete three cycles which is not very environmentally friendly an adds to the cost. It is also recommended that the dyed item be washed separately on the next couple of washes.

              Suitable materials for dyeing include Cotton, linen and viscose and poly cotton mixes however it is not suitable for use with wool, silk nylon or polyester. If in doubt check the product details on the back of the packet. The health warning on the back does warn against skin contact and inhalation and the dye can cause irritation to eyes and skin and any contact should be washed off with cold water.

              I was very impressed with the results, my old faded pair of Dockers have received a new lease of life and was well worth the £3.99 the product cost me from Tesco. The colour is consistent throughout and there are no streaks on the trousers. There has been no colouration to the labelling on the outside and the buttons have not been stained.

              This product is manufactured by
              Dylon International Ltd
              Worsley Bridge Road
              Lower Sydenham
              London SE26 5HD

              www.dylon.co.uk






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                09.09.2001 19:12
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                Once again there is no absolutely accurate category so this is going here. This sia review of Dylon in general and their COLD WATER dyes. Sorry. I bought a large cotton hooded top a few years ago. You know the type of garment that says: 'Wash by hand separately in water that is as cold as ice, don't iron or even warm it up and if anything ever bad happens to it then it's your fault not ours.' It was a kind of organic red if you know what I mean, the type of colour that says- this top was made in a cool hippy way and not the typical industrial exploitation of Indian workers type way that you had in mind. I bought the top in Glastonbury- I'm sure someone somewhere on this site has reviewed Glastonbury, anyway for a bit of a brief intro to Glastonbury it's a place which attracts people who want to be weird. There's a representative from every cult on earth and a few from elsewhere and it's a place to be hip(py). I have nothing against real hippies, or those most people would call weird but people who want to be weird and try to be odd, oh dear it's a shame. Well anyway this top is kind of hippy, I liked it and bought it. After wearing it a few times, I don't know how many, I decided that it was time to risk the inevitable and wash the top. I'd finally gone too far and the balance had tipped. You know how it is you try to keep the top quite clean and you ignore the slightly musty smell as you don't want to risk shrinkage or fading of a favourite piece of clothing. Well I thought to get it clean will require some detergent and so I went on a hunt for a cotton friendly, colour locking, anti shrinking cold water effective detergent. When I'd decided on Persil non bio or whatever it was I got a bucket of cold water and immersed my garment. Lots of dye came out. My mother told me not to worry (and being a worldly wise lady (my mum not me) I of course listened to her) it was probably only excess dye and j
                ust carry on and wash the top and be cool. So I was cool, washed the top and ignored the fact that it was bleeding profusely into the oh so cold water. Well I hung my dripping wet top on the washing line in the garden and left it in the rare sunlight in the glorious summer of the south west of England. OK, OK I'm a student and I'm a little lazy but with a busy life style I forgot about my top and it stayed out for maybe a few days longer than it should have -that being one. Anyway when I pulled it in off the line it had bleached a little, more down the centre where it had been over the line and less elsewhere so there was an interesting pink fading to natural fibre effect. Now I'm secure in my masculinity, I have nothing against wearing pink (apart from pink shirts which just make people look like they're trying to look rich) but this top had this interesting fading effect and thus it was not wearable. OK I told myself I'll dye it. Dark green I thought, I'll dye it dark green. Two reasons, one the darker colour will go over the faded stuff and also Dark stuff goes with anything. That was about three years ago, I may be exaggerating a little here. About last week I actually bought some Dylon Pre Dye, stuff you put into water to take the colour out. I had only one pot of it and used that. It worked like a charm, even though I was supposed to use warm water and I used cold, also to avoid shrinkage, and the colour fled from the fibre like the Israelites from Egypt. I then left it to dry in the sun hoping the ultra violet would work it's magic. And so it did. My top went a bad pink/natural fibre cross and looked, if anything, worse than it had before. When I then bought more pre dye and tried the same again very little happened. Although I was doing something not suggested on the label I thought more might happen than this, but no. So if you use Dylon pre dye use it all in one sitting. Each small tub costs about £1.65 and is
                supposed to be effective on four ounces of material. I think my top is nearly three times that but also think much of the bleaching effect was due to the sunlight. I bought three tubs of dye, two black and one green. The black dye is supposed to be half as effective as the coloured ones and so I thought this would work as a balance. Thus I had enough dye to dye 8ounces of material. There are some small packets of fix you buy to set the colour into the material. Dylon do a free leaflet with their dyes that gives you instructions on how to use their different products. I plumped for Dylon Cold Dye as I thought that would be the best to use for my top. The leaflet says to use salt to fix your colour into your garment. OK I thought I've bought my packets of salt and my dye lets go. So I opened dye pack one and read the instructions. The dye comes in tubs about as round as an old ten pence piece and about a centimetre deep. The tops are metal and are folded around the rim of the plastic container. Underneath this is a fold up list of instructions packed into the bundle by wrapping the whole lot in plastic. This costs you about £1.65. So I looked at my instructions and it said to wash your top, in a machine, with detergent. So we scanned the washing machine handbook looking for a wash that was in cold water. No luck there. The only option was to use a rinse cycle, all cold water, and apply the detergent onto the top directly. No problems, this worked really well. The instructions say fill a container with enough cold water to easily cover your garment. I used a stainless steel sink as this isn't supposed to stain (doh!). Then you mix your dye in a separate container with a pint of hottest tap water. Pierce the top of the dye container with a knife. Oh good, that shoots a mini mushroom cloud of dye everywhere. Don't do this unless you are outside, in fact don't do this, the best way is to squeeze the plastic container and the metal lid w
                ill lever off. It doesn't say whether to use a pint per tub or a pint overall. Having done it I think it's a pint overall but don't sue me if this doesn't work for you. Then it says to dissolve the fix into hottest tap water, no amount specified this time, with four ounces of salt. One packet of fix and four ounces of salt per tub of dye. Now when I read this I realised it meant table salt, not the fix salt in the packet. Not made at all clear on the free instructions Dylon provide as an advertising leaflet. By this point, because I was following the instructions step by step like a good boy, I had already put the dye in hot water. We didn't have a pound of salt at home funnily enough. So I blagged a lift to buy some salt. You get funny looks buying two large containers of salt from a 24 hour store at about 7pm I can tell you. Anyway salt doesn't exactly cost much so I wasn't objecting too badly. Having misread the instructions I added the large amount of salt and fix to the water the dye was dissolved in, now much colder than hottest tap water as we'd rushed out to buy salt. Well I thought I'll pour some boiling water over it and stir until it dissolves. This worked too. Pour your dissolved dye and salt/fix mixture into the cold water in the dye receptacle and then immerse your damp garment in it. Easy. At this point everything looked pitch black. Oh well, a black top is cool too, and as it fades it'll go green. Agitate every now and then for about ten minutes and keep lifting it out and putting it back to prevent folds forming. I did this, with gloves which split as I have big hands. I gave up and used my bare hand which dyed a dark greenish colour, MMMMM. Well after dunking it about for about three hours (on and off obviously) I then pulled the plug and rinsed the top until the water ran clean. This took me about an hour, no seriously, what with stopping for needing the loo. What is that about? run cold water over
                hands and soon enough toilet time? Huh? Well the top was now looking a gorgeous dark green colour, not the pitch black I'd been convinced of earlier and all in all I think it a good thing. After rinsing for so long I had wrinkly hands I put the top in the washing machine for another cold wash. That was last night. The top is now hanging on the line looking quite good. Not so good as it did wet but that's just life. On close inspection it looks like it is dark green dyed over reddy brown but only from close up so I'll get away with it. Overall I am quite pleased with the result. The trouble is if I total up the cost: Three tubs of Pre Dye @ £1.65 => £4.95 Three tubs of Dye @ £1.65 => £4.95 Three sachets of fix @ £0.45 => £1.35 Two 350g tubs of table salt @ £0.35 => £0.70 Total cost => £11.95 Ouch! More than a tenner to dye my top. That's nearly as much as it cost in the first place. So overall the dye worked fine but it was quite costly. Also the instructions that Dylon provide for free are next to useless apart from for estimating how much dye to use. I think I slightly overestimated the weight of my top but better that way around than the other. If dyeing something black I would suggest that you place a very small amount of coloured dye in too to give the black some depth. I would also suggest you see if you can find some larger tubs of dye for a better value. If I dye anything again I will look for alternatives before turning to Dylon.

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                  21.02.2001 04:02
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                  I recently redecorated my dining room in shades of green and gold. I was really pleased with the result but the curtains and cushions on the chairs didn't match. I priced some new ones and was quite horrified to discover that I would have to pay more than £30 for plain cotton curtains and another £20 for the cushions. I hadn't allowed for that. A friend offered me a set of light coloured cotton cushion covers and some curtains that were the correct size but didn't match the room. I thanked her and smiled sweetly as she suggested we put them straight in the washing machine so that we could get them up before night time. What she didn't tell me was that she had bought a box of Dylon Dye from Woolworths. The colour on the box looked exactly right (a gorgeous shade of green) but I must admit that I was sceptical when she poured it into my washing machine, added a handful of salt (to make the dye fast, she said), and switched on. I needn't have worried. The curtains were exactly the shade that was shown on the box. I inspected my washing machine carefully expecting to see residue from the dye but there wasn't any. Later that week I did a 'whites wash' and there wasn't even a trace of the dye. If you are changing your decor in the bedroom you could have matching curtains and sheets at low cost. Since my friend showed me this product, I have bought some plain white cotton sheets from our local charity shop, boiled them (just in case!), and dyed them to match the main colour of the wallpaper in my bedroom.(Fabrics won't dye properly unless they are cotton. If you want to dye anything with nylon in it use the special Dylon product for that.) I have a host of other projects in mind as well. Use your imagination and refresh your furnishings for next to nothing.

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                    17.02.2001 21:32
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                    Brilliant. They where hubbies words when I pulled out his jeans out of the washing machine after using Dylon Denim machine dye. I have never dyed anything before. However, hubby and I are going through a frugal, belt tightening section of our lives. Moreover, buying new clothes is a big no no. I had mentioned dyeing his jeans before. And he said yes. However, we never got around to doing it. Today while in Wilkinsons one of my favourite shops I picked up packet of Dylon Denim machine dye. It was £3.99 a packet. We bought one. I know that it they sold it in my local Asda cheaper. They only do the liquid one in black and navy. I suppose navy would have been all right but I wanted the Denim one as they where jeans. Hubby jeans are a couple of years old and hardly worn. However, have faded never believe that I use colour washing powder when I wash them would you. Around here the cheapest non-brand jeans are £8 a pair. And the dye was £3.99. We read the packet in the shop and bought a pair of rubber gloves (Not sure, why you need them. But it say to use them) They where 35p a pair. In addition, could be used for other jobs. After buying the above items, we went to the supermarket across the street to purchase the salt. Yes I did say salt. You need a 1lb of salt. That cost 27p. We rushed home. Due to the nice weather, we pulled out the instructions to get started. They are easy to follow and read. On the other side of the paper is more information and helpful hints. One thing that Dylon do say that if you follow the instructions then it will not damage your machine or effect any subsequent washes. Well it is really easy. Just wash the items that you want to dye. We ran them through a quick wash. I told hubby in the store that he would have to strip when we got home. As he was wearing one of the two pairs of jeans that, I wished to dye. You should have seen all the funny looks that I got. (Ha might have gi
                    ven a few old biddies some thing to think about) After washing the items to be dyed. You don your rubber gloves open the packet of dye. Pour it in to the bottom of the drum. Then on top of that pour all the salt in and make sure that it covers all the dye up. Then place the damp clothes on top and start the machine. It needs to go on a 60-degree colourfast cycle. I started it and wandered off to do some other things. I came back half way through the cycle to see all this blue water in my machine. My first thought was what have I done. Once the machine had finished its cycle, you then have to wash the clothes on there normal cycle with detergent. After this has finished you, put them out to dry. But not in direct sun or heat. Not sure why. My have gone on the line outside. But guess what the sun is out. The colour depth is very good considering that I washed two pairs of jeans and the colour depth that they match is what it should be one pair. The colour looks even. However, they have not finished drying yet. So I will wait and see. Finally, you should run you machine again at 95-degree cycle. Yes as if my old machine has that. So I put it the first part of an 85-degree wash with some bleach. The machine had already been on 2 twice this morning. Am I made of money not. I also had some other washing to do. Mostly darks. I chucked in a peach cotton towel just to see how much dye was left. I also wiped around the rubber seal between the door and drum. I not just got blue from the dye out but a load of other gunk as well. Once washed I checked there seemed to very little or no dye left. The peach towel was still peach. However, it had seemed to dyed some white stitching on the inside of a pair of boxers a nice shade of blue. The other white things like linings in trousers seemed to be ok. The only thing that I did because I forgot, was to turn off the economy and half load options, it did
                    say that you should not use them. Not sure why. I always do use these options to save money. I could see nothing wrong with the jeans that came out of the machine. I must say that I am more than happy to dye things again. As I was always worried that I would have dye coming out on my clothes for weeks and weeks. I will be careful when I put my next load of whites through. But a blue tinge to your whites are suppose to make it look cleaner. (Now who told us that? The detergent manufactures I am sure) The only thing is that if you did not wash the items at 95-degree wash you will have to be careful when you wash the items for next few times. However, as they are jeans they always go in with the darks. So it should not cause to many problems. All I can say is that £4.61 (Dye, gloves and salt) saved me having to go and buy 2 pairs of new jeans at £8 a pair. Therefore, I saved my pocket £11.39. And things being chucked in a landfill site. I am sure that hubby will get at least another year if not more of wear out of them. If he does not wear them too hard. In addition, if they still are in fairly good condition I might even dye them again. I have now decided that I might dye my towels. As I said above I have a load of peach towels and they are starting to look a little dingy. One obvious thing is that original colour of the item will effect the result. However, Dylon do something called fabric colour stripper. Have not tried that. But then I will not be dying really dark colours any way. Well Worth the time and effort. I think I better go and check to see how well they are drying. And If I get any problems I will give you all an update.

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                  • Product Details

                    DYLON Pre-Dye makes it pretty easy to do this, it lightens fabric to a neutral shade, creating a ‘blank canvas' that you can dye any colour.