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33 Reviews

Brand: WD-40 / Type: Oven, Hob & Grill Cleaner / Category: Cleaning & Disinfectant

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    33 Reviews
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      30.11.2013 20:05
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      I wouldn't want to be without it now! It cleans, protects and stops squeaks!

      WD-40 is something that I've heard of many times in the past but never bought cos I never thought I needed the stuff in my life. In fact I never bought this can of the stuff that I own either to be fair! My Step-Dad bought it for me saying he swears by the stuff and he felt that it was something I should have in my home. Me, after he used it on a squeaky door of mine shoved in back under my sink and in the cupboard and then I forgot all about it! However recently I have been using it so thought I would review it and impressed.......well I really am!

      The Packaging:

      This comes in a mainly dark blue, aerosol style can which has a white push button to the top of it the WD-40 sprays out of out you get a tube of red plastic with it (straw) that attaches on easily. On the front of the can we are clearly told that it is indeed WD-40 and that it 'Stops squeaks, drives out moisture, cleans and protects, loosens rusted parts, free's sticky mechanisms' and we are told that it is Flammable and is Silicone Free and that my can is 100ml in size then on the back of the can other information listed includes being told (and shown via little diagrams) where you can use it and contact details for the manufacturer are clearly stated and its all finished off with a plastic red lid/cap to the top of it. Informative enough can this is!

      Using It:

      Using this is really simple. It sprays out a clear and somewhat gritty but at the same it's clear liquid (like a thin oil) that has a strange sort of chemical smell to it though it isn't all that pungent and certainly isn't vile and this stuff certainly has a lot of uses! You can use this on rusted parts to help clean them, on hinges, knobs, handles that struggle to open, around taps that are stiff and even to remove crayon marks, tar and glue. Me, well I have sprayed a little bit of this in to my keyhole as I struggled to get my key in and turn it and it really fixed that issue! I have used it on all the hinges to my bedroom furniture to stop the horrible squeaking noise on the drawers and doors of that furniture and again it worked really very well. I also had a problem with a coat of all things! My zip struggled to be pulled up and down, I suddenly thought I wonder and tried it and it fixed that problem quickly and its been fine since and you really don't need to use very much at all per job either!

      It never does damage anything, that's the great thing about it, the scent doesn't linger too long and it really can be used on almost anything! Cars, caravans, boats, homes and even personal items, its just so versatile at cleaning things, protecting things and fixing things that are jammed or squeaky and for that reason it really does get the thumbs up from me!

      Available from all good supermarkets etc, Google if interested and my can came from a local discount store and cost my Step-Dad just a pound and it is available in lots of different sizes to, all at different prices of course!

      This review is also posted on Ciao under this same username.

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        06.09.2012 21:45
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        brilliant product for easing stiffness and squeaks!

        So my car is quite old, (9 years hence why I am saving for a new one!) and I have had it for 2 years since passing my test and it has served me well. However since couple of weeks or so the passenger door on the rear has just been extraordinarily stiff and requires an extra shove to close it. After using WD40 in the past whenever I have had squeaky doors at home I decided to give it a go in the hope it would ease the door a bit!

        WD40 stands for Water Displacement, 40th formula. That's the name straight out of the lab book used by the chemist who developed the product back in 1953 (info I extracted from the website as I always wondered what it stood for so thought I'd let any other curious people out there know!)

        I got the 250ml can for £3.50 in my local petrol station on my way home, although I am sure it can be picked up cheaper elsewhere! The can is deep blue, with yellow area and says in bold blue that the product is WD40. It also comes with a very handy and ideal plastic tube which looks like a straw which can be attached to the spray spout. This makes application much more easier so you can spray with accuracy into hard to reach places.

        The can works as a normal spray with a nozzle to push down and the liquid extracts spraying onto the desired area. With my car I simply sprayed the WD40 onto the crease and hinge in the door and left it for about 5 minutes to loosen the door hinge and I was extremely happy with the result! It really loosened my door and it now closes with absolute ease - just what my car needed! It didn't squeak to begin with, but from past experience I know WD40 works as great and efficiently at solving these issues.

        I would definitely recommend WD40 as it is a great product, easy to use and not much is necessary to be sprayed in order for it to be effective. It has an indefinite shelf life so is great to keep around the home for occasional uses from time to time!

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          01.09.2012 11:41
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          A great product to help in many situations

          Helping people move into a new home is a problem at times when some of the items in the home have got products and equipment which are stuck together by rusty old screws.

          Recently I had to pay a visit to the local DIY centre to get some WD-40. I had used this years ago on my car to help remove some oil which has got stuck on one of the parts so it worked for that occasion but I needed it this time to help on numerous situations.

          The can is funny in my view because it is so simple in design with the red cap and yellow logo of the company and it looks just cool to me. Attached to my can was a red straw which you should keep with you at all times.

          As I began to use this item I had to figure out where best to spray the contents. People claim you should just spray large amounts to get the problem sorted quickly but in my experience if you use the red straw and accurately aim for the problem area you need very little.

          My first port of call was a toilet seat which needed removing. Unfortunately under the toilet were some screws which over time had got stuck and began to develop all sorts of grease and they would not move at all regardless of what tool I used. I sprayed a small amount of the WD-40 onto the screws and left them for 20 minutes.

          I returned and managed to remove the screws with a pair of pliers and this showed me that this product is still one of the best around. My second problem was in my view the toughest out of them all.

          We found a door which had hinges which were extremely noisy but also very sticky and solid and we wanted to move the hinges to a new location but the screws seemed to have been moulded onto the hinge bracket. I sprayed some of this WD-40 onto the screws and the bracket and it helped to remove one of the screws but the other one was still jammed.

          After using a pair of pliers and bending some metal and then spraying again it all became lose after an hour. The product works so well because you do not need to spray everything you put the red straw onto the end of the spray container and accurately spray this on the area which needs the help.

          This product is meant to help sort out squeaks which it did for me when I used this on the door. It did help me free some sticky screws and hinges so it does this as well.

          I am not sure how it can help drive out moisture but removing dirt it does as well as mentioned with my car oil so this is a great product and one we should all own as you never quite know when you need it.
          Prices can vary on this product depending where you shop but a 250ml can cost about £3.25 and above and it is a product which does work and helps you out of many sticky situations without a doubt.

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            18.01.2012 15:28
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            An essential for your home, car, boat or Lear jet!

            A little while ago we had a good tidy out of all the boat lockers and the store cupboard at home and found we had accumulated no less than 4 cans of that magic spray WD 40. Although this might sound a lot, the environment in which we live and work often calls for a quick spray of this multi talented, penetrating oil.
            I had a look on the web site to find out some more information to add apart from our own experience over 30 years, of using WD to loosen, protect and clean various boaty and other things in our lives. I found lots of info but not what I wanted which is what are it's ingredients, that's a secret!

            WD stands for water displacement and the 40 is because, in 1953 when it was developed by Norm Larsen, it was the 40th attempt. Glad that you persevered Norm!. The ingredients are secret but the site does state that the aerosol spray does not contain any cancer causing substances. The cans come in various sizes we have the larger 400ml cans and a 5.5oz can which I think we got in Florida. They are easily recognisable by the blue and yellow colouring on the can and the bright red top. They come with the all important red straw which you can insert into the nozzle, taped to the side of the can. Somewhere in the world is a pile of all the straws that I have lost from these cans, but, if you are prudent you can put the straw cross ways on the insert on the red top made especially to secure the straw. On the front of the can it gives you a general idea of the things that WD can be used for. Stops squeaks. Cleans and Protects. Loosens Rusted parts. Frees sticky Mechanisms and Drives out Moisture.
            There is also a danger warning saying that this is a flammable product under pressure and harmful or fatal if swallowed and to keep out of the reach of children.

            In our time we have used WD for many uses, particularly to loosen rigging screws and fittings.The fittings on Winter mooring lines always stick when the time comes to take them off and so does the huge monkey wrench we use to loosen them Give them a quick spray and leave for 24 hours if you can. More often than not one spray will do the trick. Another frequent use is a quick spray on battery terminals to drive out moisture the same goes for spark plugs on jet skis and ribs, particularly if the jet skis have been capsized and the engine compartment has been full of salty water When dealing with batteries ( I hate batteries I wish someone could invent something else!), make sure all the electric is turned off and do not touch the terminals with the can or you might get a perm!

            Door locks and padlocks always attract damp salty deposits and WD can dispense with a locksmith or a night spent in the car if the lock has become sticky. Bicycles, hinges, antenna connections, the list goes on. Any tools that have to be stored for a while will benefit from a spray or smear of WD. Some of the weirdest uses I found on www.wd40.com were, removes hydraulic fluid from Lear jets and frees stuck Lego bricks! I have also learnt that it is a good cleaner too and will be trying it out on residue left from masking tape and such like very soon.

            My Opinion.
            I wouldn't be without it , it is a great problem solver and I can recommend that every house, car or whatever should have at least one can, perhaps 4 is a little excessive! Treat it with care and it will see you out of many a tight squeak. It does have a rather strange smell but I would rather have my engine start please. Don't forget to shake the can before you use it.
            A small 100ml can will only cost you around 2.00pounds, so get one in, and, it never goes off!

            5 stars from me.

            Thank you for reading my review which may also be posted onCiao under splishsplash

            Available from garages, supermarkets and DIY stores, indefinite shelf life!

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              03.11.2011 16:33
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              If it sticks or squeeks then hit it with this...

              Everyone must have heard of something called WD40 ... no, it's not a tribute band to the 80's group UB40, nor is it a new name that this coalitions call the unemployment system.
              It is in fact possibly one of the most useful little inventions that has graced the world of sticky bolts and squeaky hinges.

              What is this WD40 I hear you ask?, (or is that just the voices in my head at it again..?).

              Well, firstly, here's a bit of one of those facts that may be classed as 'useless information', although it may come in handy one day in a pub quiz or something...
              (This information was found after a quick search on the internet)...

              WD40 was created in 1953 by an American chap named Norm Larsen who initially developed it to displace standing water in nuclear missiles, (Hence the WD, for Water Displacement). The 40 in the name apparently comes from the fact that it was his 40th attempt to find the perfect water displacement product before coming up with this idea, soon realising that his new idea was far more useful than just for displacing water.
              Since then it has become one of the most popular pieces of equipment in any trades person or DIYers tool kit.

              WD40 was initially made by Rocket Chemical Company from 1953 but in 1969, due to the sudden popularity of the product, the name of the company changed to WD40 due to the fact that this was all that the company actually made.
              Recently though the company has branched out and now owns companies that make certain household products such as carpet shampoos, toilet cleaners and more.

              Anyway, WD40 can easily be recognised by it mainly blue casing with it's blue name embedded in a yellow background, with the spray cans usually having a red, or even a blue nozzle.


              What's it used for then..?

              The main use of it is to dispel water without damaging anything that it is used on, but it was soon used just as successfully in lubricating joints and helping release sticking mechanisms.
              It cleans away dirt and grease and can even help clear away that annoying adhesive residue that is left behind when you take something like a sticky label off something.
              It also protects metal surfaces from moisture helping avoid rust and corrosion.

              In other words it does such things as help free those tight nuts and bolt so that you don't break your wrists when trying to undo that 200 year old rusted up nut from the brickwork of your house, (example of course). It lubricates and then helps keep rust from such things as bicycle chains, wheels and gate hinges.
              It's also very helpful in allowing you to get a good nights sleep as it can miraculously silence those squeaky door/gate hinges that have been annoying you for many years.
              It also can be used to get rid of moister in such things as engines and electrical units, (although it can't get rid of flood water from the inside of your PC...).

              So it is useful for several purposes in the DIY, engineering, mechanical and several other trades.

              In fact, here's just a few things that it can be used for in helping you out in your day to day life...

              * Removes sap, tar, glue residue and even dried up flies from the front of your vehicle without damaging any surfaces
              * Helps clean tools and leaves them protected afterwards
              * Can even help removed such thongs as gum from carpets
              * Can free up tightened locks to help turn keys

              What about the Environment..?

              To help the liquid spray out of the cans they pump in CO2 , (carbon dioxide), which helps it be a very good friend to the environment.

              ** So what makes it such an all rounder..?

              That's the million dollar question, a question which will possibly never be publicly answered as the secret ingredient that makes WD40 is a well kept one. In fact, according to what I have read, this product hasn't even got a patent on it so that the secret ingredient doesn't have to be disclosed... talk about 007?

              NOTE:
              Although this can be used on most materials without causing any damage what so ever there are some material which contain some forms of 'polycarbonates' that may react in a bad way with WD40.
              And, I have read somewhere that this can be more harmful to bike chains, but I have used it for years on mine and have had no bad experience with it as yet.

              And there's no need to worry about expiration dates as WD40 will last as long as the container has some in it.

              ** Buying the product...

              WD40 is sold in most, if not all good hardware shops, petrol stations and even in supermarkets as well.
              It comes in several size containers, such as...

              * Smart Straw 8oz, 11oz and 12oz
              * Big blast 18oz
              * Handy can 3oz
              * Trigger Pro non aerosol 20oz
              * Spray Applicator Bottle 16oz
              * Bulk Liquid 1 gallon, 5 gallon or a massive 55 gallon.


              ** How do I use it..?

              This depends on what you need it for and which container you buy it in.
              In a spray container you simply shake, aim the nozzle/straw at what ever you need to spray and push down the top. The spray should then hit home and do what it is supposed to do, albeit lubricate, loosen or simply clean.
              As for the 'non-spray' containers, these can be used via a cleaning cloth or a brush of some kind, but these sort of containers are more for larger users, maybe industrial, so the smaller spray cans are adequate for the general house user.


              ** My opinion...

              I have used WD40 for many years now and always have a spray can in my garage, maybe having one in the house as well, and find it to be so useful indeed.
              I use it on many things, especially when I have a squeaky door hinge as it quietens that down on the first spray, after a few opening and closing motions of the door hinge in question.
              I also use it to help protect my garden tools after I have used them and before storing them away, just a quick spray over such things as hedge trimmers, spade, fork and the like, and my tools can then be stored in the shed without the hassles of them rusting over, even if they are slightly damp.

              Using it is a breeze, although the smell it omits can be a bit 'strong' for some people, my wife's not to keen on the smell and tends to moan a bit when I use it indoors, but the odours and the spray aren't excessively dangerous, although I wouldn't recommend a direct spray into your face or mouth as that won't be good at all.

              What more can I say about what I think is the greatest invention since sliced bread, so to speak, it cleans, lubricates, protects, penetrates and displaces water... all this in a can.
              What more do you want from something as big as a can of deodorant?

              Just don't be fooled by imitations as nothing is as good as the miracle in the blue and yellow can.


              What about the price..?

              You can pick up a small can for a couple of quid, but if you use more than a few sprays per week then you can get the larger size containers for prices around £20 £30.

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                03.11.2011 14:49
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                A brilliant product that delivers

                I've been aware of WD-40 so long it's as familiar to me as a chair, or a tree, it's a fact of life. It was my dads cure all and now it's mine.

                WD-40 was first sold to the public in 1958,and was initially developed in a small lab located in Calafornia for the aeronautics industry to prevent corrosion. Perfected by Norm Larsen the name was literally what it was listed as in the 'Lab book'. Water Displacement 40th attempt. If you'd like to know a little more about the history of the product you could look here http://www.wd40.com/about-us/history/ or just Google it yourself.

                I always have a can of this product at home, sometimes more than one. The current can is the basic old design aerosol with a little red straw that if you wish you fiddle into the outlet of the aerosol to create a finer jet for intricate use in small fiddly places. On the front of my can some of the uses are listed they are : Stops squeaks. Cleans and protects. Loosens rusted parts. Frees sticky mechanisms. Drives out moisture. I've used it for every one of those purposes and more. WD-40 comes in a variety of packaging now, one of the best in my opinion is the one that has provided an attached straw (known as 'Smart Straw'), which you can flip to use the wider aerosol spray or flip back to use the fine straw. A simple idea but one which stops your father bellowing at you not to lose the straw (flashback moment), also he had a point, I've literally just lost the damn little red straw. The costs vary from size to size and place to place, as an example a basic 250ml can costs at time of writing £3.00 at Tesco. Sadly the smart straw costs a few pounds more, so I'll probably continue to use the loseable straw variety. I've had mine for few years now, we use it quite a lot and there's still a good third of a can left.

                The ingredients have been well protected by the manufacturer, but a geeky magazine called 'wired' sent a can off for analysis, they have written in detail on what it contains but here is their synopsis  "WD-40 is mostly a mix of baby oil, Vaseline, and the goop inside homemade lava lamps". I think the goop inside home made lava lamps is along the lines of 'rubbing' alcohol or similar.

                The spray is quite generous, and when using the slim straw like nozzle you will almost certainly see some overflow spilling out from wherever you squirt it, bringing whatever dirt or dust or grease is in the area with it. The smell in my opinion is quite pleasant and very distinctive, there is a hint of petrol in the aroma, I love the smell of that too so no surprise that I like this.

                During the recent cold snaps of the last few winters it came in very handy. Because some of it's ingredients have a molecular structure which is also a common ingredient in gasoline it remains liquid at low temperatures. This was a great benefit as we had terrible trouble with the mechanisms of our front and back doors seizing up in the cold, a couple of squirts of this helped save one door from permanent damage. The other one sadly is jiggered, but the handle still worked during the cold winter so we could get in and out.

                In the last twelve months alone we have used WD-40 to loosen and lubricate stiff bicycle chains and gears, it has unstiffened stiff door handles, got sticky Sellotape marks of my front door (after the dog broke my letterbox and we had to temporarily tape it in place). Freed up ancient rusted screws for removal and replacement. A jammed stop cock yielded in seconds when this was used after half an hour of concerted twisting and yanking without. Since my father in law 'improved' our garage everything we store in there rusts of rots, so WD-40 has helped us protect some of our garden equipment and general tools from rust in an atmosphere that would otherwise turn them to red dust within a year.

                A tip from my uncle compo (who featured as the dishevelled gardener in my 'Tomatoes' review) regarding wooden handled tools it to also rub some WD-40 into the handles when storing. Because it's a water displacement thingy it will stop any swelling in the wood due to absorbing moisture from the atmosphere where the varnish may be thin or non , and help prolong the life of the item (and stop splinters apparently). I have to admit I haven't tried this one, and have a shed full of grotty handled scythes trowels and shovel blades without handles to show for it, going out to the shed with my trusty can right now.

                Other things we've used the magical stuff for is to make stiff zippers glide with ease, remove a ring that was stuck tight on my daughters finger, it also removes chewing gum quite well from hair, but I would recommend washing the hair afterwards, or at least the patch you used the WD-40 on, as it's flammable, doesn't smell brilliant as a hair care product, and if the chewing gum is tangled in a little ones hair, as it usually is... not always though.. (blush) it will need washing in case they somehow get it into their mouths because it is toxic when ingested.

                There is a claim that there are over 2000 uses for this wonderful smelly stuff, and if I had the time I'd love to try them all out .

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                  27.10.2011 02:40
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                  WOW!

                  My husband bought a small can of this from Poundland the other day as my son's bike chain needed oiling as did the hinges on the bathroom door.
                  I however found another use!
                  My black shiny tumble dryer has had a bright yellow sticker on the top since I have had it, and picking and peeling it hasn't worked and has just made it look awful, but the other day I sprayed this over the top of the sticker and managed to get it all off!
                  I didn't realise it smelt so bad though and was choking on the smell but I percervied and got that sticker off.

                  The can is blue and yellow in colour and has the usual aerosol can type spray button, but this comes with a red straw type thing to insert to make it easier to spray into certain places.

                  It fixed my son's bike chain and stopped the door from squeaking.

                  There's endless amounts of stuff it can be used for from lubricating chains to removing crayon from walls!
                  Plus much more.

                  It worked for what I needed it for so I will give this 5/5!

                  There's even a fan club!

                  ~~~~ http://www.mywd40.com/protips/ ~~~~

                  This versatile, multi-purpose product can be bought in poundland but it is a small ditty can or Asda stocks a larger 250ml can for £3.
                  It also protects metals from rust and loosens rusty chains, it removes stickers, grease etc.

                  ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Fun facts (taken from WD40 site) ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

                  Fun Facts About WD-40

                  A bus driver in Asia used WD-40 to remove a python, which had coiled itself around the undercarriage of his bus.

                  Police officers used WD-40 to remove a naked burglar trapped in an air conditioning vent.

                  Crayola® Stain Removal Tips recommends using WD-40 to remove (regular) crayon marks from a variety of surfaces.

                  The WD-40 Book, featuring many user testimonials and the wacky humor of Jim & Tim, The Duct Tape GuysTM, was published in 1997. The familiar blue and yellow can has been featured in other books ranging from The Big Damn Book of Sheer Manliness (General Publishing 1997) and Polish Your Furniture With Pantyhose (Hyperion 1995) to WD-40 for the Soul: A Guide To Mending Everything
                  Leslie Nielsen portrayed agent Dick Steele (a.k.a., Agent WD-40) in the 1996 movie Spy Hard.

                  WD-40 has a Fan Club with more than 100,000 members. Join today and share your stories, get free, fun downloads, check out the eNewsletter, receive the eTip of the week, and much more...

                  WD-40 has its own social network, the Money-Saving Tool community, where members can submit stories, photos and videos about ways to save money.

                  As The Duct Tape Guys say, "You only need two tools in life, Duct Tape® and WD-40. If it's not stuck and it's supposed to be, Duct Tape it. If it's stuck and it's not supposed to be, WD-40 it."

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                  19.06.2011 11:34
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                  A great addition for the car and home

                  WD-40 is an essential for any home. It is a multi-purpose household lubricant and has been around for over 50 years. It has no shelf life so the bottle you buy could last you for years.

                  *History*

                  WD-40 stands for "Water Displacement - 40th Attempt". It was developed in 1953 by Norm Larsen. It was originally designed to repel water and prevent corrosion,] however it was found to have numerous household uses.

                  *Price and availability*

                  A 600 ml can costs around £5.00. I think this is a good investment for how long the can will last. A 450 ml will cost about £4.00. They are widely available from supermarkets and garages.

                  *The product*

                  The design of the tin has not changed in many years; however they have changed the size and shape of the nozzles to become more user friendly. The bottle I have is 600ml and comes in a pressurized container.
                  The canister comes with a thin red straw that attaches to the nozzle at the top of the can. This allows you to aim the spray into small areas such as hinges and those harder to reach places without you having to soak the whole area. This little straw gets misplaced easily as there is nowhere on the can to store it. Nevertheless it is not a significant part of the design and you can manage just fine without in.
                  The directions are simple: Use in a well ventilated area and saturate the area you wish to lubricate. You can use the product on a variety of different surfaces such as metal, wood and plastic. It is even safe for painted surfaces.

                  *Uses*

                  There are over 2000 uses listed on the WD 40 website. However the main purposes of the lubricant are that you can use it to protect metal surfaces against moisture and other corrosive elements and lubricate all moving parts. For example, a squeaky hinge. It can also be used to penetrate rusted or frozen metal parts for easier removal.

                  WD-40 displaces moisture and is ideal for use on electrical systems to eliminate moisture-induced short circuits; however you always need to turn the power off before you spray.

                  WD-40 can also be used to remove sap, tar, adhesives, labels and tape from surfaces without damaging existing paint. It's an effective cleaner for tools, equipment, and vehicles. It can be used to remove splattered bugs from the front of cars. WD-40 will even help remove chewing gum from carpet. Just spray, wait, and wipe with a clean cloth.

                  *Overall*

                  Every home needs a tin of this stuff so it is always there for when you need it!

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                  11.04.2011 09:12
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                  A great household product

                  ==WD-40==

                  WD-40 has got to be the product that every household should not be without! It has so many uses which make the product really very versatile indeed. The fact that it is also bought fairly cheap per bottle makes it one of those home staples to go along with white vinegar and Vaseline.

                  I get my can of WD-40 from Poundland as it can always be found in there (just like me Lol) and for £1 you get a nice size can for your money. I think generally you can get a can for around £1 in most places but they also sell them in slightly smaller cans as well as a slightly larger one but as expected the price varies accordingly.

                  WD-40 comes in a very recognisable can which has seemingly been exactly the same for many years. The bright blue tin can is splashed with a bright yellow and the red plastic lid makes it most certainly stand out on the shelf. The design is nothing special although it does come with a toughened plastic type of straw stuck to the outside of the can. This enables you to get a more direct application in those hard to reach areas and is another great little idea the company have come up with.

                  The main reason that I would ever buy this product used to be for squeaky doors or anything in the home that needed a bit of lubrication to make it work better (didn't work on Himself mind you). But having tried WD-40 on many different things now I find that no home should be without a can. Okay so the smell is not the nicest and can in fact be rather strong even if you use a mere squirt of the product. But it is truly magical....

                  Not only does this product prevent squeaking doors or the like but it will also help you with stuck fast screws or bolts in and around the home which there always seems to be a lot of. It will clean tools for the garden and protect them at the same time. You can use it in the home for removing sticky labels from things such as CD cases or boys bedroom furniture!

                  Having had a look on the WD-40 website, I have found there is another lot of really rather obsure uses for the product that I wouldn't of thought of before so I was pleased I had a look. These include things like using it to remove water marks from your shower screen (tried it but it doesn't work as well as I would of liked), getting chewing gum off of clothes, a stuck clothes zip (why had I never thought of using this before) and a ton of other really interesting and helpful suggestions for what else to use this product for.

                  If you haven't already been to have a look at the site I would say it is well worth a quick look because most people have a can of this in their home and its much better to unlock the full potential of the product! Visit www.wd40.co.uk

                  All in all this product is a great one. It is cheap in price whilst still being majority versatile in the home and garden. It has over 2000 uses (it says so on the can) and even though it is a rather smelly product this is outweighed by the fact that it is well worth having a can of this in every home in the country.

                  I think it has to be a top rating of 5 out of 5 stars for this highly useful product! Exceptionally high recommendation.

                  I do hope that this has been of some help/interest to you.

                  Many thanks for taking the time to read,

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                    08.02.2011 12:48
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                    5 starts is nowhere near enough for WD40

                    I had a little bit of trouble earlier this morning trying to get in to my garden shed for the first time this year, following the cold and wet winter. My problem was that the padlock on the shed door had rusted and totally seized up, and I just could not get it to open. I was becoming concerned that if I applied too much pressure to the key in the padlock, then the key would just end up sheering off, leaving me no option but to hack saw through the lock (a very long and hard job), and then buy a replacement padlock.

                    I instantly knew what I needed to do to get myself out of this situation, and that was to give it a good old spray with the most useful can of spray ever known to man - WD40, but suddenly I realized that this was going to prove a little difficult, as the only can of WD40 that I had left was . . . . . . Inside the Shed!!

                    I had always kept a can of WD40 in my garage, but back in early January my boiler packed in, and my Dad insisted on coming round to have a quick look at it, before I started to trawl through the yellow pages to find the cheapest quote for someone to come out and repair it. After stripping off the protective boiler cover, and fiddling around for 20 minutes or so, my Dad came to the conclusion that the fan was seized up, and because the fan would not run, it was stopping the burner on the boiler from kicking in. So - You guessed it, we soaked the fan, and especially the shaft of the fan in the remaining dregs of WD40 from that can, and sure enough the fan started to turn, followed by a couple of clicks, and the boiler burner fired up! Even though I have seen this sort of result so many times from using WD40, I was just as amazed as ever and hugely relieved that I would not have spend a fortune on calling someone out to repair it. I remember saying to my dad that I would have to buy another can of WD40 the next time I saw any, as I seem to always be using it!!

                    Anyway, back to the shed lock, as I hadn't got round to buying any more since the boiler incident a few weeks earlier, I therefore went and purchased another can, from a shop up the road from me, and within a few minutes of soaking both the key and the padlock in WD40, The lock came open virtually effortlessly!

                    Therefore I think it is time to write about this 'miracle in a can' that is WD40.


                    ~~ What is WD40 ~~

                    WD40 was developed by a guy named Norm Larsen in California in 1953, and was named WD40 because Norm was trying to develop a Water Displacement spray, to displace standing water, which caused corrosion, and this was his 40th attempt at doing it.

                    WD40 comes in an instantly recognizable blue and yellow pressurized can. It has a little red straw attached to the side of the can which can be inserted into the nozzle at the top of the can, and is used to get the WD40 in to those hard to reach areas (such as the shaft of my Boiler fan). If the straw is not used then the WD40 comes out of the nozzle in a kind of wide mist, which tends to cover a large area, so the straw is also useful if you need to just concentrate the spray into a very small area, or hole, such as a key lock, as it saves the spray from going everywhere.


                    WD40 is a clear, greasy solution, which is predominantly used to penetrate, lubricate, and protect a whole manner of moving parts or mechanisms, such as locks, fans, hinges, springs, taps, tools, engines, zips, etc etc.
                    I really hate squeaks, and so I often use WD40 on the hinges on our house doors whenever they develop a squeak, as well as my car doors, and car boot pistons, the running tracks on draws and cupboards, window hinges and locks, the washing machine and microwave doors, the sliding mechanism on the patio doors. . . . The list really is endless!

                    The 5 main purposes of WD40 are that it:

                    Stops Squeaks
                    Drives out moisture
                    Cleans and Protects
                    Loosens rusted Parts
                    Frees sticky Mechanisms.

                    On top of that it has literally 1000's of other household uses, which might sound ridiculous, but if you visit WD40's website (www.wd40.com), there is a list on there with 2000 uses for WD40, which I obviously won't put into this review.
                    It is also absolutely great at cleaning, as it loosens stubborn dirt and grime effortlessly. For example, I use it regularly to clean the glass doors on our shower cubicle which tend to get covered in water marks. Not only does the WD40 clear the water marks, but it also acts as a kind of protective layer over the glass and stops the water marks from returning as quickly.


                    ~~ Conclusion ~~


                    All in all WD40 is an absolute must in every household. If I was to even try to start listing all of the number of times, and different situations that I have successfully used WD40 over the years then I really would be here all day. Suffice to say that it really is fantastic stuff, and has probably saved me hundreds - if not thousands of pounds in repair bills, and by helping me to get things working again, that otherwise might have been rendered useless.

                    The can I bought this morning cost me £2:50 for a 250 ml can, but I have also paid around the £3:50 mark for the larger 400 ml can.

                    This really is a small price to pay for this 'miracle in a can'.

                    I should also mention that WD40 is flammable, and so should not be sprayed near any sparks, naked flames, or any other sources of ignition. It should always be kept out of reach of children, and contact with skin should be avoided at all times.


                    Thanks for reading.


                    © L500589 2011

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                      01.11.2010 16:23
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                      Highly Recommended

                      WD40 is an all-purpose lubricant that has been around for simply ages. It comes in a 400ml pressurised container, typically with a red straw sellotaped along the side - more of this later!

                      The product is extremely popular and is used to stop squeaks, dry out moisture, clean and protect, loosen rusty parts and free sticky mechanisms. I have used it twice recently - once to spray the hinges on two of our downstairs doors that had developed a squeak and the second job, which was a bit more demanding and took a bit longer, was when I was engaged in replacing the wooden slats on our garden table. The old screws were rusted onto the cast iron ends and I had to spray the screws and leave them for a while for WD40 to do its work. It was still a bit of a struggle, but with the help of my trusty pliers, we got there in the end - quite satisfying.

                      Now then - back to the red straw. This product is best applied by detaching the straw supplied from the side of the can and then reattaching it to fit on the hole at the top from which the liquid is sprayed. This arrangement allows you to direct the WD40 to the specific part where it is required. The instructions tell you to saturate the area to be treated, but in my experience you should avoid using too much - it will just get wasted - as often happens when you are treating vertical surfaces such as door hinges - have a cloth handy to wipe off the excess as depending on the surface it may mark.

                      Hint: many of us lose the red straw following the initial use of the product so a) find somewhere safe to store it and b) remember where that safe place is! (When you have decided on a safe place, put a spare corned beef tin opener thingy there as well, as my wife always seem to buy tins where the key is missing)

                      The product is flammable and is to be used only in an area which is well-ventilated. It is silicon free and has been since it was first invented. Since 1981 it has also been CFC free.

                      I think it is a cracking little product and most handymen and DIYers always have a can to hand. You can get it in all the DIY stores as well as hardware shops, most major supermarkets and Arkwrights Stores (G..G..G..G..Granville!)

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                        26.08.2010 16:50
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                        A must have for every household.

                        Is there anything that WD-40 doesn't do? OK, most people know it as a light oil for lubricating things. So you can give a little squirt on a hinge or bolt or whatever and the super fine consistency of this oil will penetrate into the mechanism and lubricate the moving parts. Put it on rusted up assemblies and that fine oil is renowned for being able to penetrate into the joints and surfaces and lubricate up and free the most stubborn of bits.

                        But it is also known as a multi-purpose oil. So as well as lubricating, it also protects by displacing moisture. So you can spray it over components and parts to keep the damp and moisture away. In addition, it is also useful on car electrical circuits where it will dry out the circuits and protect them.

                        OK, so we have it as a lubricator and protector. Then some bright spark found out that you can clean with it. Spray it on dirt and grime on a fabric and it gets underneath to lift the mark off where it can then be wiped away. Then the clever so and so also found that it can dissolve solvents, particularly those stubborn sticky residues that manufacturers specially develop and select to super glue the labels on their products, and that normally take a flamethrower to remove. A quick squirt and a rub and hey presto, the residue is gone. In fact, if you go on the WD-40 website, they have a file that actually lists 2000 uses for WD-40. So it is definitely one of those products you need to keep in the home.

                        The only thing I find with it is that little red plastic tube that is normal held on the side of the can by a piece of tape. You insert it into the head if you need to squirt the oil precisely into one area. Great idea, but I keep losing it and then have to rely on the general area squirt from the head. However, all is not lost because they have now developed a new can which has a sort of dual head with the tube attached on a sort of hinge, called the Dual Action Smart Straw. So you can now do a general area squirt or lift the tube into position around the hinge and do a precise area squirt. No more lost tubes when you need them most.

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                          09.06.2010 14:58

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                          You need this in your tool box

                          Before I talk about the product I want to talk about the can. It comes in a nice handy can in various sizes. However you also get a nice red long thin nozzle that fits on the spray head so you can get into all the hard to reach places. This stuff is wonder it truly is. The can states it has thousands off uses and this is not an exaggeration. I have using this product for over 15 years and I am still discovering new uses every day for it. One off the basic uses it for stopping squeaks in door hinges. Not just in the house or the garden gate but on your car or windows. I new use I have been using it for is cleaning the contacts on vintage video game cartridges. If you spray a small amount on the contacts then rub it off you will be surprised now much dirt will be removed. Old games will start to work again after a good cleaning.It is very hard to think off a down size to this stuff, however the only bad thing I can think off is a word off warning. If you stray to much on something it will no evaporate so you you will need to clean it all off yourself. When you have this in your tool box you will never be without it again.

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                          03.04.2010 16:17
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                          WD-40 has many uses.

                          WD-40 is a water displacement liquid that lubricates just about anything in my home. It comes in a can with red cap that securely covers the nozzle spray. The can has a red, thin and hard straw that is attached by a tape into the can. It is very important not to lose the straw.

                          MANUFACTURER'S CLAIMS

                          LUBRICATES - The lubricating ingredients of WD-40 are widely dispersed and firmly hold to all moving parts

                          CLEANS - It gets under grime, grease and dirt. It even dissolves adhesives.

                          PROTECTS - With its corrosion-resistant ingredients, it protects metal surfaces and and shield them against corrosive elements.

                          PENETRATES - It loosens rust that bonds with metal and frees rusted metal parts.

                          DISPLACES MOISTURE - It dries out electrical systems and eliminates short circuits which are induced by moisture.

                          I hate squeaky doors for they remind me of creepy stories in horror movies. A spray of WD-40 on doors' hinges instantly removes the creepy sound they make. My toddler used to write on walls with crayons but WD-40 makes the walls clean just by spraying on them and wiping out the crayon.

                          I also use WD-40 on hard-to-remove ring on my finger. It makes the stuck ring slide out of my finger easily. When I mess with the glue and it dries on my fingers, WD-40 and a little rubbing gets the glue off quickly. I also use it on my sling bag's stuck zipper.

                          When I was a kid, my mum used to cut my hair when a chewing gum got stuck to it. Now, I use WD-40 on my kids' hair to remove a stuck chewing gum.

                          Price: £3.17 for 100ml can

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                            05.02.2010 15:06
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                            The handiest tool in any DIY kit.

                            It would be wonderful if I could take a photo of my desk right now. I have my laptop, my mobile, my landline, my glasses, spare batteries for the camera, the camera and a myriad of stationery. But right there, on the right hand side, is my can of wonder, the WD-40, taking pride of place with my most treasured possessions!

                            See, I have an aversion to squeaks. I hate them. And my computer chair develops one all the time. So I keep it here to spray the swivel mechanism. I don't need to do it very often, maybe once every couple of months, but the WD-40 stays here as I always seem to remember where to find it that way! I also keep a can in the car, and that ahs been a life saver on occasion!

                            So what is it? I think it's a lubricant, as that is it's major use around here. It's some kind of oily compund in a bright yellow and blue spray can. It's called WD-40 because it was the 40th attempt by it's inventors to develop a Water Displacement product. Being a girl, I don't care what's in it, as long as it doesn't kill me and makes my life easier! It does as it says on the can:

                            *Stops Squeaks

                            *Drives Out Moisture

                            *Cleans and Protects

                            *Loosens Rusted Parts

                            *Frees Sticky Mechanisms

                            Obviously squeaks being top of the list, they must annoy more people than I thought! I've used it to loosen bolts which are too tight for me to open, I've used it on my son's bike chain when the bike has been really wet from the rain, to drive out all the water and protect the chain. My washing machine wasn't working and made a grinding noise - I don't knw what casued it, but I took the top off, had a look inside and couldn't figure it out, so I sprayed the whole of the mechanism with a light spray of WD-40 and have so far had an extra two years out of a machine I would otherwise have replaced. I've used it on door hinges, the car battery when it got wet and wouldn't start, the wheel nuts on the car, the locks that froze in our recent cold spell, the lock on the front door, my dressmaking scissors that were getting harder and harder to open, my son's metal bed that squeaks all night, our Wahl hair trimmer, drawers that won't open and best of all, the roller on a computer desk that was jammed and I was given the desk for free as it was "knackered"! Not with WD-40 though, it's now fully functional again! It's also brilliant for padlocks when the key doesn't appear to want to turn - Our shed one got a bit rusty and a quick blast of WD-40 stopped us from having to saw it off and buy a new one!

                            It has thousand's of uses, and I wouldn't be without it. It's ok for you people who are great at DIY, and I'm not bad, but I have found this does the job very quickly and it has saved me 100's of pounds in callout fees and replacement items.

                            It also comes with a little red straw like tube which attaches to the nozzle for more direct spraying in hard to reach places. I have taped mine to the side of the can so I don't lose it!

                            For more details about WD-40's vast array of uses, go to www.wd-40.co.uk. I paid £4.95 for a 440ml can and I have had it for about three years. My 200ml can in the car was about £2.50, and worth it's weight in gold.

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                          • Product Details

                            A product which has thousands of uses at work and around the home.