Welcome! Log in or Register

Hammerite Direct to Rust Metal Paint

  • image
£14.99 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
5 Reviews

It can be painted directly onto rusty surfaces without the use of a primer. Apply direct to rust. Protects for up to 5 years.

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    5 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      10.11.2011 19:07
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      7 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      The toughest paint around!

      We have just finished painting 15metres of iron railings which surround the balcony of our flat. This mind numbing job has been offset by the wonderful view we have over the sea and the fact that I get to use my all time favourite paint, Hammerite straight to rust paint in the hammered finish! I know, most women rave about other things but I have strange tastes!


      What is Hammerite?

      Hammerite is a specialist paint that can be used straight to ferrous metals without the need to use primer or under coat and can be used on top of rusty surfaces. It comes in two varieties, smooth and hammered finish. The hammered finish is very forgiving and gives an almost orange peel effect which covers many imperfections. It is also quick drying and easy to apply and if like me, you are not Da Vinci , Hammerite can give an excellent finish with minimum skill. It is used a lot in the Marine Industry in which I have worked since Noah was a lad and I have used it to paint our own engine in our sailing boat twice in 15 years I get this job because I am the smallest person on board and can fit where others can only get stuck. It is so tough that if Darth Vader needed a respray this is what he would use.

      How to get Hammered

      Although it claims you can apply over rust, on the can it does say to sand the surface and remove as much rust and loose paint as you can before applying. Therefor Capt Springtide had me, chipping, wire brushing and then sanding the railings before he even let me near a can, sigh! It claims on my can to last for up to eight years but as the Easterly gales howl round our ears in winter, we find that three years is as long as the most exposed area, the front of the railings, can last without a repaint. Things like garden furniture and garage doors should last a good bit longer.


      Hammer On

      Once you have prepared your area you must do a test patch as sometimes there can be a reaction to an existing paint, Leave it for an hour and if there is no reaction you are good to go, BUT, do not shake the can , just give it a light stir. The paint we use is the dark green version and you can see the mix of dark and lighter greens in the can. It can be applied with a roller but we favour brushes for small areas as you get more paint on that way. The paint itself is pretty thick and not too drippy but do not paint outside in anything of a breeze, force 3 or above for fellow yacthies ,as it will blow off your brush and cause much extra cleaning work and old fashioned looks from himself when he sees the speckles!

      Once the paint is on your object you will see the "hammered" effect immediately, it certainly looks very smart and gives all sorts of things like garden furniture, front doors (ours), and garage doors, a new lease of life and a good coat of protection


      The paint takes one hour to dry and is ready for a second coat, if you feel that is necessary, in four hours which is pretty quick compared to other exterior paints I have used and don't get me started on varnish, I will bore you to death!


      One thing to remember though, don't skimp and buy a cheaper type of thinners for cleaning your brush, or, to sometimes add to the bottom of the can when the paint gets really thick. Use the Hammerite thinners or else you can get a bad reaction and the paint goes very strange a bit like a wrinkled sheet. Also avoid using old paint so just buy as much as you need at one go, we had to throw a two year old pot out as it just would not apply properly.


      Anything else before everyone drops asleep? 1litre covers about 5square metres which does make it on the expensive side. It comes in a range of sensible colours, yellow being the most frivolous , the greens are definitely my favourites.and the colour on top of the can lid is a pretty reliable match with the colour you get from the paint. It can be applied between 8and 25 degrees C and on a girlie note it is not a smelly paint whose fumes give you a crashing headache.

      Treat it with care, use in a well ventilated space and store in a cool dry place with no great extremes of temperature.


      My Opinion.

      It has really proved it's worth to me over the years and in my opinion is excellent for anything that needs protecting from the elements .It is worth the extra cost, we paid around 12pounds for 750ml but it is available in larger and smaller cans. The smaller are ideal for touch up works. Use it whever you have ferrous metal that needs protecting and you will end up with a protected, smart, shiny paint job. it is widely available in D.I.Y. and paint shops


      I thoroughly recommend this paint for all tough jobs including Darth Vader's helmet.

      5 stars from me and my railings.

      Thanks for reading my review which may also be posted on Ciao under splishsplash.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        10.08.2011 11:36
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        5/5 stars, I have no complaints. It couldn't have been easier for me!

        After bringing yet another new houseplant home last Friday, I realised I was going to need to find a small table or plant stand, as a whole plant rearrangement was needed to fit it in (possibly because it's 3ft tall, this new one....!) So off to the shed I went, to retrieve an old wrought iron scrolled table base that had been doing nothing but sitting in there rusting. It needed a good sand with emery paper as it was not only rusty, but the whole thing was peeling and flaking all over the place. Having used Hammerite previously, to sort out the vents when we moved into this house, I knew I wanted Hammerite. I remembered the tin saying it could be applied directly to rust, and even though I was going to sand my table down, I thought this wouldn't hurt. And I knew the quality of Hammerite.

        So a little later we were browsing the colours available in our local discount/random we-sell-everything-homewares shop. I wanted a cream colour but unfortunately they did not have any, so I settled on a copper colour in the smooth finish as it looked to be a nice creamy mid brown and this would match my decor just as much as cream. I paid £6.99 for a 250ml tin, and I think this is around the same price I paid for it from a different shop a few years ago. This paint has a coverage of 5 square metres per litre, so the 250ml will cover 1.25 square metres.

        So it comes in a small round tin with the usual flip up paint tin lid. I use a butter knife to pop it up; this works easily. The front of the tin tells us this is "direct to rust metal paint" in the smooth finish (as opposed to the 'hammered' finish which I think is a little shinier and textured) and it offers 5 year protection from further rust. There are some small graphics on the tin of the sort of things you can use this on, including outside lanterns, gates, pipes, bicycles and furniture. There are loads of safety considerations which for obvious reasons I am not going to copy into this review. But you should of course have a quick skim through them so you know what you are dealing with. It has a high VOC (volatile organic compounds) content so should be used carefully and in a well ventilated area. I used it simply in my kitchen with the window open and didn't really notice any fumes. I could of course smell it but even though I was right up close to it (due to the nature of my table) it wasn't overpowering at all.

        The great thing about Hammerite Direct to Rust paint, is that you do not need a primer, undercoat or a topcoat (you may need a primer though if using it on bare zinc, aluminium or galvanised surfaces). This not only saves money but also time, which is a huge winner for me as once I get going on something I am so impatient to get it finished and in place! Using this paint is pretty simple - just clean the surface, removing any loose paint or rust and grease or dirt. If you want to do a patch test, this will take an hour (I didn't though!) Once your surface is ready to be painted, on it goes. It will be touch dry in 1-2 hours and you can use a second coat if needed after 4-8 hours. This is quite quick anyway, but I found the process could be even faster.

        Applying this was a little tricky at first, as it didn't seem to be sticking on even though my table was not too smooth. But I soon got the hang of it. You have to be careful not to apply it too thick as it will run or sag. I needed 2 coats for my table, and in my usual style I done the second coat only 3 hours after finishing the first! It was because I was determined to get the second coat done the same day before I went to bed. I found the second coat went on easily though, much faster than the first, and although there were a couple of small areas where the brush dragged due to the first coat not being completely dry, my finish was not affected. The finish I got is flawless and looks beautiful.

        You can clean your brush using white spirit when you are finished (though the tin suggests using Hammerite Brush Cleaner & Thinners.....of course), but you should not thin this paint, or stir it too thoroughly on opening. In my experience, the colour swatch on the front of the tin is very true to the finished colour. This was the case when we used a matte silver to do the vents as well. I think I could even go so far as to say that it's probably the most accurate colour preview I've stumbled upon in paints!

        Overall, I am delighted with Hammerite, as I knew I would be. It can seem a little pricey but it works so well and it does go quite a long way; my tin is still almost full. I would definitely recommend this if you need a good metal paint without all the fuss of primers, undercoats and topcoats. And you don't even need to remove any rust present (so long as the flakes and loose bits are gone, or your finish will be rubbish). It covered all the rust on my table brilliantly, and went over the leftover white paint as well. A brilliant product I will return to every time I need to paint metal.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        01.10.2010 22:02
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A recommended paint that can be applied directly to rust

        I've used this on many of my jobs for years now as it has never let me down. It is touch dry in an hour and supposed to last for up to 5 years. This is a great paint for your exterior paint work and it's easy to apply. I usually use it for old cast iron down pipes and railings, however, you can use it for lots of different metal objects. Apparently you can use it for certain woods and plastics, however, I've only ever used it once on some plastic pipes. The results were good, however, I'm not sure how long it will last.

        I once used hammerite on some galvanised beams, however, as they had never been painted before I primed them with special water based hammerite primer. You can use this primer on Stainless steel and other non-ferrous surfaces such as brass aluminium and copper. Always degrease the surface first.

        Bare metals need priming. I always prepare the metal before priming with one of the two primers special metal primer (for non-ferrous metals) this comes in a red or light grey colour, or hammerite red oxide for bare iron and steel. If the metal has already been painted I spot prime it, this is where you can just touch up the bare bits and then go over all the metal with the finish coat.

        The top coat comes in all different colours such as dark blue, black, white, dark green, copper, red and silver. It also comes in different finishes such as smooth, mat and hammered finish. Hammerite comes in different sizes from 500ml up to 5L. It also comes in a handy 400ml spray can which is great for giving a nice even coat, especially to things like wire work, however, you must be careful not to over spray.

        When cleaning out your equipment (if you have expensive brushes or want to use the brush again) I would recommend buying the hammerite thinners as other types of thinners will not clean out the paint from your brushes.

        The paint I would say is quite expensive, however, it is reasonable for the amount of time it's going to last. Prices start from around £6 for a 250ml tin going up to around £60 for 5L.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          03.07.2010 19:59
          Very helpful
          (Rating)

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          A nice finish, lets see how it lasts!

          I've used Hammerite Direct to Rust Metal Paint for the the first time ever today, so here I am reviewing it! I should say first of all that I'm not a DIY expert at all so this written from a 'newbie' point of view.

          I was mainly attracted by the 'Direct to Rust' aspect, as the gates and railings I needed to paint have been a bit neglected and there is some quite severe rust that no amount of sanding had managed to remove.

          The paint is very easy to use, just open the lid, give it a bit of a stir and away you go. Its quite thick and gloopy in consistency so be careful about overloadding your brush and leaving blobs of it everywhere. I got a little bit on some laminate flooring but it easily came off with a clean damp cloth, don't leave any spots too long before cleaning them though as it will get harder the longer they're there!

          The paint dries to a tacky consistency quite quickly but then its quite a while before its dry enough for a second coat. You do need to wait for it be thoroughly dry before the second coat or you'll end up with blobs, flakes, and a rough texture to your final coat.

          I needed to use two coats, as the rust I mentioned before wasn't quite covered with just the first but with two it seems fine. The final result is a very glossy, very attractive finish, with no obvious brush strokes and no drips. I'm happy with how it looks and would use Hammerite products for other jobs.

          One pot has been enough for two coats on two gates and two railings and there's still some left over so I'd say its good value for money. I can't comment on how long it lasts obviously, but I shall come back in a year or so and let you know how it lasted!

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          25.02.2009 12:33
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          2 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          a good all around covering paint for any metal object

          I know what your thinking this is an unusual subject for me to be writing about and you would be correct in that thought. I thought I would give it a go however as my son is giving his first car the once over and thought it could do with a bit of tender loving care in the body work department.
          Hence my writing this review.
          It all started when he passed his test and his dad gave him his first car via an old client and friend. My hubbie got it in part payment for a job he did for said friend and was at a loose end as to what to do with it next, so giving Tom his first car seemed a logical choice.
          This is where Tom all fired up starts getting new bits for it and then decides to attack the paint work which if truth be told it really needed some help.
          So off we all trot to the car parts shop and start trying to find a matching colour for the existing paintwork which proved harder than expected and we found ourselves coming up empty, we then tried to think of other ways to cover the slight rusting around the base of the car and found these tins of Hammerite paint. You can get them in various colours but not all the colours of the rainbow which is a shame.
          We as a collective group decided the best thing would be to get Black.
          This in itself not a great problem as Tom decided to paint the bottom half Black anyway. So we bought three tins of the spray and one of the paint on variety.
          The spray worked out to be the better buy for Tom's car but the paint on variety worked for Gerry (Hubbie) on another project.
          It has to be said that both in their own right were equally good and did a bang up job.
          To use the spray on variety it is suggested that you cover up with some protective clothing and I would suggest a mask and goggles too as it can be quite messy and the suggestions on the tin say that the paint is very flamable and can cause some discomfort if it gets onto skin and into eyes and they suggest if this is the case to seek medical help straight away.
          The reason for this is easy to see as on the tin it tells you the contents contain ethyl, methyl, and ketoxime.
          These are highly flamable and irritant materials and not to be played about with.

          Toms Car.

          He Prepared the car by rubbing it back and filling any small holes. Then rubbed it smooth again. Washed and rinsed it and waited for it to dry. Taping off any areas he did not want covered.
          He sprayed as it suggested on the tin again in sweeping actions about 5 to 6" away leaving a smooth and steady covering all over the area he wanted
          painting. He left this first coat to dry and this took about half an hour then he painted another coat and another for good measure. It tells you that one coat should be suficient but he wanted to make sure that the whole area was well covered and looked like it belonged there.
          It was a good job well done and once he peeled off the protective covering from the rest of the car it looked like it had always been there.
          A nice smooth covering which will protect his car from rust for up to five years according to the can. It does tell you not to spray in concerted spots as this can cause the paint to run and the overall look to be a bit blotchy. We played a little bit on some old scrap metal to get it right first and then proceeded to the car.
          This is a good covering paint and is well worth the £7.15 a can we payed for it. The size of can is 400ml. It comes in smooth, matt or hammered finishes, and a variety of colours as I mentioned before.
          The colours are pretty basic but for a rustproofing paint what more do you want as it is easy to put the original paint colour over it if you should want to.
          So far the paint is standing up to the job, and the car gets some pretty rough treatment as we live up a dirt track and there are stones and other debrie thrown at it constantly from this track. It is holding fast and we have only found one or two little flakes where the paint was at its thinnest.
          So overall a pretty good paint for rustfree car.
          The other tub of Hammerite was used for a tailgate that Hubbie was reparing and it did a wonderful job covering the whole thing reasonably smoothly with a good brush.
          It looked brand new by the time he finished it and then painted over it with the required colour he then proceeded to sell it to a well happy customer and told him the colour matched his car perfectly when he fitted it. So everyone was happy including hubbie who got paid for his efforts.
          So it cannot be that bad can it.
          Overall this is a good rust protecting paint and we would reccomend it for what ever job you have in mind. It tells you that you can use it on lampposts, trailers, guttering, bikes, old metal seating, railings, gates and cars and pretty much anything metallic.
          We say it is a good product and made by Hammerite which is a good reputable company you cannot go wrong unless you do not follow the instructions properly.
          Keep out of reach of children and remember it is a solvent and flamable material so no under 16 year old can buy it.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments