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Hammerite Metal Finish

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  • Good finish
  • Quick and effective
  • There's still a lot left
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    11 Reviews
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      20.07.2014 19:34
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      Gold Hammerite - just the thing when you want some bling

      My husband buys presents for his shed. Yes, I know that sounds strange but men are strange. His most recent shed present was a weathervane with a cockerel on top. He was satisfied with it for a while and then decided it needed a bit more bling. When he needs advice on matters of bling, he asks his ‘clients’ at work - especially those from traveller community. They advised him that the best way to liven up his cockerel would be with a can of gold Hammerite so that’s what he bought from a hardware store for a few pounds.

      The weathervane was supplied pre-painted with glossy black paint. Hubby rubbed it down with some ‘wet and dry’ paper to stop the new paint just sliding off the surface and after removing all the dust with a soft cloth, he set to work with his paintbrush. The can was easy to open, the paint was easy to control and went on smoothly and easily giving a good even coat. Always the thorough worker, he applied two coats, though one might well have been enough. With a whole can to use, he wasn’t in the mood to be mean with his paint. The cockerel looked splendid. Hubby was so pleased that he then decided to paint the letters on the North - South - East- West part of the vane.


      The problem now is that there’s still a lot left. He’s looking for other things to bling up and the cats are looking nervous.

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        15.12.2012 09:24

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        the original hammerite paint was quite good,but over the years ,with reformulations to meet health and safety rquirements has become very poor .The aerosol cans will require around 4 coats to cover and is so thin and lacking in pigment that it will take a very long time to harden properly and as the top coats surface dry, before the first coats have properly hardened ,this will usually result in patches of wrinking and a bad orange peel effect as it dries .Coats need to be applied at short intervals and then cannot be recoated for several months as you end up with the same effect.if you feel you have to use it, use the brush on version or better still avoid it altogether.the modern product is a quite expensive complete waste of money.

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        06.06.2012 11:25
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        When we were sorting out garden out we had some concrete lions that were quite big and heavy. They are like statues and about 3 foot high when sitting on their pedestals. We had painted them in the past with some masonry paint but decided we wanted to vamp them up a bit for this year so we went to B & Q to have a look at speciality paints to see what we could find. We decided to look at the aerosol paints as they would be quick at applying and would be easy to get in the corners and groovy bits.


        We found the Hammerite aerosol paints and decided to get one of these in silver to give them a metallic look. The can contains 400ml of paint which we thought should be plenty to cover two garden ornaments. The price of the can was £11.98 which we thought was a good price considering it would revamp two ornaments.


        The lid of the paint was quite hard to get off, I had to get my Other Half to prise it off for me to do the painting. I took some old newspapers out in the garden and selotaped them to the wall and laid some on the floor then got Other Half to lift one of the statues on to the paper for me. The paint needed to be shook well, when you shook it you got a rattling sound in the can. This is supposed to be something like a small ball that mixes the paint up to stop it clogging up inside as it needs to come out through a tiny nozzle.


        You need to hold the can away from the item you are spraying, if you hold it too near then the paint would go on too thick and you would get drips. I found it was best to hold it about 12 inches away and to give it short bursts of paint so giving it a light cover as you can always go back over it if you have places left not covered where as if you put too much on you can't put it back in the can again.


        The aerosol was good for aiming the paint in all directions and it didn't take long to finish painting one of the lions. The paint smelled quite strong but it was a nice smell, but I was glad I was doing it out in the garden. It does tell you to make sure you are in a ventilated place to work and you can't get more ventilated than in the garden.


        The paint was quite quick at drying as I was only putting on a thin coat. I found there were a few little spots around it that still had the old paint showing through but a quick squirt on these spots did the job. Once it had all dried then Other Half moved it out of the way and put the other one there. The can of paint covered both lions easily and we had enough left over to do their pedestals that they sit on (they are separate and are just concrete flower tubs that are turned upside down). Once they were all finished and dry the lions looked lovely with their new metallic appearance and it makes them look very expensive.


        I would recommend this kind of paint as its easy to apply, and it dries quickly and you could use it for many different things.

        Copied from Ciao under username Harveydog52

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          18.08.2009 23:55
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          I always use this for exterior metalwork restoration

          This review will contain lots of facts and opinions and will then end with a little tale from Cumbria. Read on!

          And before you start, despite there being suggestions that Hammerite have finished trading, I can report both that the website is alive and kicking and that I have had no problems buying paint recently.

          Hammerite is an extraordinary product. It says on the tin that you don't need to prime or use an undercoat. You just prepare the surface and paint. And you can do it directly on to rust. Those are some claims to live up to.

          The metal paint is available in smooth, hammered or satin finish. They do what they say. It defeats me how the hammered finish gets there because you paint it on the same way as the smooth and it looks the same in the tin but it comes out hammered just like an army of little men have been out there with little metal hammers about half an hour after you have done your work with the brush. The smooth is just smooth. I have not seen or used the satin - sorry!
          You get a reasonable choice of colours - about seven in hammered, eight in smooth and just black or white in satin.

          Cost

          It's about £5.50 for a 250 ml tin, and £10 for 500 ml. BUT you have also to buy Hammerite Brush Cleaner and Thinners if you ever want to use your brush again, as it is based on solvents other than the usual white spirit. A good sized tin of this costs another five or ten pounds, so really you have to think long term about using Hammerite, or simply buy cheap brushes and bin them, although I am not keen on that approach environmentally.

          One of the great things about this paint is that you don't have to go overboard on preparation. You do have to do some. It isn't just a question of prising the lid open and slapping the paint on. But you don't have to remove every last vestige of rust - just sand it down to a reasonable surface. You need to have surfaces clean and free of grease, as is normal.

          It's positively gloopy, this paint. If you were to tip a tin upside down, it would eventually come out, but it would have a good think about it first. The reason for this viscosity is to get the paint on thick, so that you put the equivalent of three or four coats on in one go. You just both load the brush and paint normally except that you have to work quite fast with complicated surfaces as it dries quickly, being touch dry in 30 minutes. This means that you have to have a painting strategy. Aha!

          Once you have got your tactics organised, then you don't have to wait long between coats. You should do at least two coats, and get the second one on within one to three hours, or wait about six months and then do it, as it takes that long to cure fully, apparently.

          The effect on what might have been a rusty old gate is magical. I can write with assurance about rusty old gates because that is what we had. NOW, we have a handsome green one that I go out to look at for pleasure.

          You can also get Hammerite in spray form - which might be OK for large flat surfaces. There are also preparatory paints for very very rusty surfaces and for metals that don't rust, like aluminium, both galvanized and stainless steel, chrome, brass and copper.

          (PS If you ever go by train to Oxenholme in the Lake District and drive from there to Sedbergh, at one point quite soon you have to turn off from the B5254 into Hayclose Lane. There's a pub on this corner but I forget the name. If you saw the road sign, you can thank me and a friend because one day, a few years ago, we were so fed up that it had become almost illegible, we went and did a guerilla painting job on it in black and white Hammerite. We both left the area and so never got back for the second coat, so I would love to know how it's looking.)

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            20.11.2008 17:05
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            Effective paint treatment for metal

            I was purposefully trying to de-clutter the shed, removing all the unwanted items and trying to organise the remainder, when I came upon a neatly stacked batch of Hammerite paint tins. Most were still well over half full. I carefully dusted them all off and then left them just exactly where they were and here is why.............

            ** Direct to Rust Metal Paint **

            Originally a British invention this is the lazy mans answer to simple DIY for metal surfaces. Hammerite paints are designed to directly apply to sound metal surfaces. You do need to be careful however that the metal you are coating is not aluminium, or other alloy mixtures since the paint itself actually contains metal and can react with other metals if they are more reactive or galvanic than the components in your paint pot. However, please don't despair since all you need to do is coat the surface you wish to paint with a protective primer layer, then you will be able to slap on the Hammerite to your hearts content.

            This paint is especially formulated to be applied directly onto rusty metal with minimal surface preparation. Simply remove any loose rust with a wire brush or coarse sandpaper. Then apply the paint directly onto the rusty metal surface. No primer nor undercoat needed. I know it sounds almost too good to be true, but yes I can confirm that it works. I have successfully painted metal down pipes, garden furniture legs, parasol base, metal gates, steel car wheels, outboard engine legs all with a long lasting and to a relatively aesthetically pleasing effect. The paint I am going to focus on now is the smooth finish, since with careful application this gives the smoothest and most professional finish I have found. However the product is available in a hammered finish (which basically means uneven colour and surface texture) or as an aerosol spray. I confess I have never been brave enough to try the spray for fear of overspray. The brushes that you use with Hammerite are once and done only, no solvents I have in the household have ever managed to rescue a used brush, so just contemplate on how difficult any overspray might be to remove!

            ** So How Does it Work **

            As the paint coating dries, millions of heat-hardened glass flakes interlock with special resins forming a super-tough barrier that seals out moisture to prevent rusting.
            The Hammered Metal Finish has two different silicones with Aluminum and glass beads that give the "Hammered" effect.
            The Smooth finish contains no silicones or aluminum.
            All this technology is suspended in a cocktail of Volatile Organic Compounds ( or VOCs if you prefer, notably xylene and petroleum distillates) which quickly evaporate (but unfortunately pollute the environment whilst so doing) to give a touch dry surface in about an half an hour, and total hard cure within 3 days.


            ** Applying the Paint **

            Once the surface has been roughly cleaned of any loose material and shaken the tin I always try a small patch first; just in case. To date I have never had any problems, but there may always be a first time given the mixture in the tins. Although the paint contains volatile solvents the smell is not unpleasant nor overpowering, but is obviously best applied outside if at all possible, otherwise ensure adequate ventilation.. Similarly there is a risk of fire from these solvents so naked flames or sparks would be best avoided.

            For a large surface area it will be necessary to mix the paint again during application or the metals will sink to the bottom of the tin. You will need to work quite quickly and avoid over painting once the edges start to dry. With just a little practice it is possible to achieve a good result. Be prepared to ditch the brush you have used unless you want to buy the specialist thinners to clean it, but I have never bothered with this.

            ** Choosing Your Paint **

            Sold in tins of 250ml, 500ml, 750ml, 1litre, 2.5 litres and 5 litres at most DIY retailers or online, the most common sizes are the smaller ones. Typically we buy the 250ml or 750ml size, since once opened if kept in cool storage (like the shed) the paint will last for many years even when opened, provided you take care to reseal the lid. Currently a 250ml tin will set you back approx £4.97 and the 750ml size some £13.98. You might wish to be quick since ICI was incorporated into Akzo Noble (the international chemical giant), there have been plans to discontinue Hammerite but it is still available from various locations now.

            Colours available include Black, white, silver, gold , blue, green , copper and red, and I have most of these in storage waiting for their moment of glory in my shed........

            Thanks for reading

            Posted on Dooyoo and Ciao under the same author.

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              27.10.2008 21:15
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              So many uses and really easy to use

              At some point everyone must have come across Hammerite. It's uses seem endless and some people swear by it. I like to tinker with my car from time to time so most of my experiences have been with rust treatment and repair so this is what I'll write about. The first time I used Hammerite was to seal the underneath of my car in the Winter and it works a treat. I used it all on the parts the are prone to rust and it lasted through 2 years of daily use. Lately I've been using Hammerite as a temporary fix for some rust on my 20 year old VW. Hammerite is great for small fixes like this due to its all in one nature acting as rust treatment, undercoat and finish. It is also quite thick which makes it good for use on doors and other vertical surfaces. On these small, awkward spaces Hammerite is good temporarily until you can do a proper repair. Never be without it!

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                30.06.2001 17:30
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                The first thing I used Hammerite for, a bit unconventionally, was my fireplace and hearth. When we first moved in to our current house, the tiles round the fireplace were a kind of dark brown, very 1940s, which is fine with the right decor, but didn't really go with the lilac and blue we had planned! So, I primed the tiles and slapped the Hammerite on...apart from nearly getting gassed by the fumes, I was really impressed. Two and a half years down the line and the paint is still holding up well, and has even withstood lots of scrubbing, not to mention toddler attempts to sabotage it! So impressed was I, that before long the living room doors and the window frame got the same treatment, although this was a bit trickier than the hearth, as it was bigger and vertical, and I ended up with a few drips, I was very pleased when I had finished, and think the drips were more to do with my limited painting skills than the product! The paint on the doors has again held up well, even to being rammed on bikes etc by my sometimes boisterous toddler! I then changed colours from silver to gold, and moved onto the dining room doors (OK, maybe I was slightly too taken with Hammerite by this time!). To be honest, I wasn't as pleased with the gold Hammerite as I had been with the silver; it seemed to come out a kind of greeny gold colour, but its still just as durable as the silver Hammerite. Hammerite is a great product for giving a room a special , unusual and durable finish, although if you do your doors with it, my advice would be to not be lazy as I was and take them down and lay them flat first!

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                  01.04.2001 15:09
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                  [Actually, I wouldn't recommend painting the baby with Hammerite] Hammerite is a wonderful paint that used to come in just a couple of colours, and dried to a 'hammered' finish. It was so popular as people discovered how good it was, that Finnegan's [the makers] bowed to presuure, and added a range of colours, and then, glory be, extended the range to 'Smoothrite'. This paint comes in 6 bright colours, has all the advantages of Hammerite, but is smooth, and looks great. Hammerite needs minimal surface prep before using; just wire brush off all the loose rusty bits and loose dirt, and get rid of grease, then get busy with the paint. The busier the better, as it dries very fast, and if you're trying to paint a large area, it's difficult to keep a 'wet edge', which can mar the end result. The paint forms a tough skin [with minute glass flakes in] over what you paint, and stops rust by excluding and more penetration by water or air. If you want to recoat, you either have to do so on the same day, or wait for it to cure fully [about a week]. The special solvent that you have to use to clean brushes is rather expensive, so it's an option just to throw away after use- just be warned that very cheap brushes tend to lose bristles all over the place, and Hammerite is very sticky, and will pull them all out. It's a great paint for all outdoor metalwork, and for redoing that bike you rescued from the skip. The smoothrite can be used from a paint sprayer as long as you dilute it first with the correct thinner. Even better, the smoothrite now comes in a spray can, which makes it much easier to get a good finish, as long as you are somewhere that overspray is not a problem [take that fridge outside on a calm day, or into a garage.

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                  13.11.2000 03:35
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                  This is a brilliant paint product so much so that my dad swears by it. Many years ago he decided he was fed up with the colour of his car. Oh No Dad!!! Yes you guessed it, home he came with two tins of hammerite. He said he could not afford a new car or a garage paint job. His poor car was covered in rust and the paint peeling off. So he set to work and within a few hours he had done the Job!!! Dare we look, well to be honest it didn't look too bad in fact a lot better than it had. The colour was a dark grey and from a distant (the further the better, wink) it looked pretty good. I would not recommend doing this, especially in this day and age and to tell the truth we still laugh about now. He still uses hammerite paint but his uses and techniques are far, far better. He has just painted his fire and it looks great. Also the fridge, washing machine and even the garden bucket. This is a good hard wearing paint and comes in a good range of colours. It has a great finish with good effects, is very hard wearing and has to say the least a lot of uses. Make sure the room is well ventilated as it has quite a strong smell as with any paints. This remember is great for painting your car but I would recommend it be a toy one!!!

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                    29.10.2000 21:15
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                    My fridge and washing machine had both seen better days. They were getting fairly scruffy and marked on the outsides. The washing machine had a few little rust spots. I treated the rust spots. Scrubbed down both appliances and applied Hammerite in blue to them. The finish is wonderful. I am so proud of them and everyone who comes in admires them. Hammerite comes in a range of colours (metallic) finish and gives a very hard tough finish. It costs about £6 for a small tin and goes quite a long way. The only difficulties with using it are that you have to apply rapidly or it starts to dry and spoils the finish. The smell is quite strong. I would certainly recommend it if you want to revamp your kitchen appliances (not recommended for the cooker though!)

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                    12.10.2000 17:42
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                    I first used this product in the Garden. I was looking at the garden and seeing a lot of metal looking very sorry for itself. So I used The Black Hammered finish. Now the habging garden brackets,Gate, hinges bolts All look great. Everything that I have used it on now looks as good as new and that was over a year ago. Since then I have painted A cycle with the silver and used the smooth finish as well. It is so easy to use, the finish (smooth and hammered) is first class and it has stood the test of time in the garden. A product I rate highly.

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