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International Tile System

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3 Reviews

Specially formulated to provide excellent adhesion on glazed ceramic tiles. So now it is easy to give your kitchen or bathroom a complete transformation at a fraction of the cost and hassle it takes to re-tile

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    3 Reviews
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      16.07.2002 22:40
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      I've used this stuff a couple of times and was quite impressed. The top coat is hard to put on, though. It seems to be very heavy so it drops off the brush easily and runs down the wall. We did a pattern of blue and yellow tiles in the kitchen and blue paint ran down onto the yellow, but it wipes off if you notice when it happens. Using coloured paint is probably more work than slapping on white, unless you don't mind coloured grout. In the kitchen where we used 2 colours we used the white primer/undercoat to paint the grout white again afterwards which was rather fiddly; in the bathroom we just covered it all with white. When it's been on your brush for a bit it gets a rather sticky, which makes it hard to get a smooth finish, so you have to make sure you keep re-loading the brush (but if you put too much on your brush it falls off - can't win!) We got a bit tired and careless towards the end in the bathroom, so the coverage is a bit patchy in places but it doesn't show from a distance as the tiles underneath are mainly off-white (with a blue and apricot streak - yuk!) My only major reservation is that after 3 years the paint on my bathroom tiles is starting to flake where it gets wet frequently, but we only did one coat each of base and top coat so it's probably our fault... The flaking is very bad on the windowsill, presumably because it's the only horizontal surface that we painted, so water stays on it for longer. I'm not sure what to do about this: scrape off the very loose bits of paint and sand the edges, then re-paint, re-tile over the flaking paint (would the tiles fall off??), remove tiles and re-tile, or what? Any advice gratefully received!

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        14.03.2001 01:27

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        Hubby or not as he was at the time. Where going to get married. Yes I know this may sound like it has nothing to do with International Tile System paint. But it does. So just hold your horses. We where going to have the wedding reception at home. I needed to have a quick cover up of the tiles in both the kitchen and bathroom. As I did like them at all. I had looked at this paint before but held off, as it was a tad expensive at about £8 per can. You need an undercoat and a then you top off with the colour of your choice. Well not quite as there are only a few colours that you can choose. We choose the colour they call sunflower it was a nice warm yellow. Not to bright and not too dull. We then went and scouted for prices. Looked in B&Q and then Homebase. They where much of a muchness for price. So I waited until 10% day at Homebase and then bought them. We got points to for their loyalty card as well. Well I did buy a wall store and few other things. So we saved in total about £12 in total. Can’t complain too much as needed the stuff. Never mind. After getting the stuff home. The tins stayed in the cupboard for a month of two. One day I went “hon we are due to get married in 8 weeks time don’t you think that you should put this paint on?” “Suppose so” said hubby to be. Hubby is made to do all DIY. So I can then blame him. He has not worked out yet that if he got me to do it, Then he could blame me. Husbands are rather silly sometimes. (But I do love him dearly and would not be with out him) Any way another reason for him doing this painting is that he suffers from problems with his sinuses, which means that he can not smell a thing. Which is good thing considering the smell of this stuff? Before applying the primer all the tiles must be clean and dry. So we washed the tiles down and then waited. The applied the primer. It was runny a little bit like
        whitewash. It had a slight smell. But not as bad as what was to come. Once dry the primer seemed to crack in places and we had runs in places as well as it was so thin. But it looked ok. Then came the fun. The tile paint itself. Open the tine and stand well back. Make sure that all windows and doors are open. As other wise you might just float to the ceiling. It is an oil-based paint. So it is thick and smelly. I had to sit out in the garden, as it seemed to worm it’s way in to every part of the house. One coat later and a hubby that was so high that it saved him the money on getting drunk. It didn’t look to bad. Then we have to leave it a few days to dry. We could not have a bath or shower. Yes we are really dirty people. Well we had to have strip washes for a few days at the sink. And be careful not splash any water on the tiles that from the splash back for the sink. I took another look at found that you could still see some of the green colouring on the titles. Out came the tin and brushes. Another coat later with hubby as high as kite on the ceiling, we left it to dry. It did not seem that much of a bad job. And as long as it saw us through the wedding it would be ok. And the major reason for not wanting to re-tile is 1) I am as lazy as they hang together 2) We have loads of tiles in the bathroom and it would have taken ages 2) I would like to get rid of my bathroom suite, as it is avocado green. Who ever thought that was trendy? Just let me at them. (Yes I know that someone might be really needy for it. If they come around to my flat they can have it) And when we put in a new suite I want to then replace the tiles at the same time. All was fine for about 6 months. The winter came and that was the start of the problems. In my bathroom they have tiled right up to the window. And we get condensation really bad in the window. It runs off
        the window and pools on the painted tiles. Well this paint does not like to be sat in water. It starts to bubble up. When it bubbles up the water seems to get underneath. I think that it must create little holes. More water can get underneath it and causes real damage to the paint. Where I have tried to dab the water way. I now have a huge gap in the paint. Now the water can spread underneath. The only way that I have found to stop the condensation is to leave the bath window open all night. So even if it minus outside the window has to be open. I reckon that sometimes I pee ice cubes that it is so cold. Also I have found that where the paint meets the sealant around the bath I have mould. The sealant has gone mouldy and it is starting to creep up the walls. Also it now seems to be pulling the paint away from the tiles. I am not sure if it is the water or the sealant pulling it away. But I have huge air bubbles of this paint at the bottom of the tiles that meet the bath. I do like the idea of being able to paint your tiles. But in practical terms it might be ok as a cover up job for a few months. But in the long term you are better off re-tiling. Re-tiling is hard work. But I think that it would look better and last longer than this paint. A disadvantage could be that you do not get as high as a kite painting it on. ;>(Joke )

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        23.01.2001 01:51
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        I must admit to being a reluctant DIYer – slapping paint on things or replacing the odd dimmer switch I am happy with – anything more I feel uncomfortable with. Don’t start anything which you can’t finish (or you will cock up) is my motto. This motto applies to tiling. Never done – never will. My attempt would no doubt come out wonky and uneven with too much/too little grout. It always seemed more sensible to me to paint tiles – to remove that awful flowery pattern or passé colour scheme without having to replace them. And then after Christmas my Wife twisted my arm sufficiently to persuade me to paint the downstairs loo. It had dreadful non-descript grey wallpaper and needed some decorating. It also had drab grey tiles with outdated flowery patterns on them. I needed to re-decorate but re-tiling was out of the question. Painting them was the only solution! However, until 3 or 4 years ago – you weren’t advised to use normal emulsion on tiles. Presumably it wouldn’t stick or the finish was patchy. That was until International created their range of tile paints. I’ve used them to paint the tiles of 2 bathrooms and for a non-tiler, am very impressed with the finish. There may be other paints on the market that do the same job – but I can only speak the about the International brand. Like most paints, to do the job properly, you need a coat or two of primer followed by a coat or two of overcoat. The primer comes in 750ml-sized tins and is water-based. Cost is about £8.50 per tin and I purchased mine from B&Q though I am sure any decent DIY store will stock the stuff. The overcoat comes in the same sized tins and costs about the same amount. One tin of each type will allow a 2-coat coverage of the tiles in a small to medium sized room. As with any painting job – preparation is everything. The primer is runny and so ensure that the floor
        is covered with newspaper or plastic sheeting. Sand down the tiles to be painted to remove some of the gloss. Although the tin says the paint gives off a low odour, I would strongly suggest that you open the window to ventilate the room – especially if it’s small. Apply the primer with a roller to get a good finish with ridges and lumps. I tried applying the paint directly with a roller but found it as quick to use a brush and then a roller to get the desired finish. Don’t worry if the pattern still shows a second coat of primer will cover that. The primer should be left for about 8 hours to let the paint fully dry. And leave the window open to let the smell out. Your brushes and rollers can easily be washed out in cold water. Repeat the process to create a really good base for the overcoat. The overcoating is where the fun starts. For a start the paint is oil-based and is very smelly. Like its primer counterpart it’s runny, but there is the added difficulty that the paint is also sticky. You’ve seen the gags with the wallpaper sticking to the brush. Well you get it with this stuff. I gave up wearing anything on my feet – it just sticks to shoes/slippers/socks. You just have to put up with painted feet! And off you go. The overcoat goes on well though you need to watch for drips etc. I covered all tiles in the bathroom with one coat, but didn’t bother to re-coat those areas which were too fiddly or out of harms way. I used the same principle for painting as with the overcoat. Put the paint on with the brush and us the roller to smooth it out and remove ridges. A small bathroom took me an hour to paint and I was glad to escape the paint fumes. The odour is far stronger than the primer and will permeate other rooms in the house. Leave the paint to dry for about 8 hours and keep the window open for as long as you can. I hate cleaning oil-based paints off brushes and rollers
        – so I cheated. Wrap them in cling film to stop them going dry. Once you have finished the last overcoat – throw them away. I know this is wasteful but with the price of brushes and rollers being so cheap – its worth the expense and lack of hassle! Once dry, the finish is gloss and if you have painted the tiles properly – you will not see the original flowers! The pong goes after about 2 days too! The overcoat comes in many colours (16 in all) though we have only used white gloss. The tiles can be stencilled on very easily. We have blue/purple dolphins in the upstairs loo and yellow/orange suns in the downstairs one. The tiles can be wiped down with a damp cloth. To conclude, it takes a bit of work to get the paint onto the tiles and it is smell; but the finished result is impressive. International produce an interesting leaflet called ‘Tile Style creative tile effects’. Other than paint, they sell stamp kits, stipple bushes, stamp pads and bristle brushes for stencilling with. They also have a web-site www.plascon.co.uk though I haven’t investigated it yet. PS Just in case you wanted to know – The walls of our downstairs bathroom are a pale yellow, the tiles are white, there is an orange and yellow border just above the tiles and small stencils dotted around the room on tile and wall. Very nice indeed! The living room is next on the agenda. No tiles there though!

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