Welcome! Log in or Register
£14.59 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk marketplace See more offers
13 Reviews
  • Can do large areas quickly
  • Paint pad kept coming away from the base
  • Not as neat a finish as I usually get
  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    13 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      04.08.2014 19:06
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      • "Can do large areas quickly "

      Disadvantages

      • "Paint pad kept coming away from the base "
      • "Not as neat a finish as I usually get "

      I'll stick with my brushes and roller

      A friend of mine decorated using a paint pad and she said it was so much easier and more convenient than using a brush or a roller so I decided to buy one and try it out for myself but I have to say that I wasn’t as impressed as she was.
      I bought an Anza paint pad from B&Q for £5.98. This was for just the larger sized paint pad on its own but you can also buy a set which includes smaller ones and a tray as well as the larger paint pad. I’m glad I didn’t waste my money on buying the more expensive set as I didn’t really get on with the pad I got.
      The paint pad is fairly easy and straight forward to use and as the actual pad itself is 9 inches it can do a fairly large area of painting quickly. Once the pad is attached to the base you just load it up with paint then scrape the excess off on the side of your paint tray and then use it on your walls.
      The paint pad has a handle so it is easy to use and hold and maneuvers quite well around the wall. It really does do large areas a lot quicker than with a brush or a roller. Also as long as you use it correctly there are no splashes to worry about unlike with a roller.
      The problem that I had with it was that I just thought this was a bit flimsy and the pad kept coming loose from the base and I spent ages attaching it back on. I also just didn’t think it gave as smooth and even finish as I get with brushes and rollers. Perhaps I was doing something wrong but when the walls were dry I kept noticing areas where the paint was very thin and I could see the colour underneath so I needed to redo these areas of the wall.
      I also didn’t think it was anywhere near as good at keeping things neat as I was lead to believe. I thought I could go straight to the skirtings and the coving as it had a flat edge but this ended up getting paint on them so in the end I had to leave gaps and still had to use my brush to cut in and keep it neat round the edges.
      I can understand why people like these as they do save a lot of time but for me I just didn’t think that it was as effective as using a traditional roller and brush. I looked at my painting after having used this and could see so many areas where I wasn’t happy with the finish and when I use a roller and a brush I find that it is neater and gives me personally a better finish.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      05.10.2012 10:32
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      I found it easy to paint with

      This is a review of the paint pad we have used recently when decorating our brand new Utility room. As the walls were freshly plastered, we decided to just go with a plain white emulsion to keep the room bright and working around the skirting boards, light switches and door frames can be a bit hard with a brush, that's where these pads come in handy.

      Purchase
      I had seen a tv advert showing the paint pad and was interested to have a go with one as it made it look very easy. We bought the Anza Solutions Edging Pad from B&Q for only £3.98. You can also buy the refill pads for £1.98 but we only needed the first kit for this room.

      What is it?
      The paint pad is a small square pad (a bit like a scouring sponge pad) - we had the 115ml sized one. The pad sits in a holder with a handle and you dip the pad into a paint tray and then smooth it over the wall to apply the paint. The pad separates from the holder for cleaning or disposal.

      In use
      Using the paint pad is so easy, it doesn't make the marks a roller or brush can make when it puts the paint on to the wall and the edges make it very easy to go around door frames and light switches. You can get the paint pads in larger sizes so I'd be tempted to try this for doing larger areas next time we paint a room.

      My thoughts
      It is impossible to over load the paint pad, but you do have to be careful when doing the top of the wall as it can smudge on to the ceiling. The bristles in the brush feel really spongy when you use it on the wall but they are actually tiny nylon threads a little like Velcro. You don't get any hairs loose from it like you can with a paint brush. I find it ideal to work around light switches and totally mess free. We used a roller for the rest of the walls and the ceiling although it is tempting to use the paint pad because it is so quick and easy to use.

      After
      We just kept the holder and threw away the actual paint pad when we had finished with it, rather than trying to clean it up although you could keep running water through it to clean it. As the refills are so cheap it's easier to buy a new one next time.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        30.11.2010 13:10
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        7 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        Painting system designed to replace roller and brush

        A GADGET? WITH NO ELECTRONICS? AM I GOING SOFT?

        You just KNOW you're really missing Woolworths when you haven't stood in front of a tape-looped video screen looking at some new JML product lately. Oh those were the days, and what I don't know about ironing board covers or mouli-graters isn't worth knowing...............what I do know isn't either.

        I suppose the new way to watch such presentations is to wait for one of the minor TV stations to go off air, leaving behind it a succession of advertising features until the re-runs of Judge Judy start all over again.

        Thus is was that I found myself looking at the Paint Pad Pro, endorsed by your favourite Bob the Builder look-alike, Tommy Walsh.

        I'm not sure why I was watching this for any length of time, but it may be to do with setting up my latest set-top box. Eventually, and despite the complete lack of iffy cutting edge electronics, I bought one.

        It helps that I'm in the midst of decorating a room whilst trying to keep it habitable for as long as possible, so anything that was going to help me apply emulsion paint without dripping it on the carpet and bedding was going to be really useful. OK, the carpet was going to the great shag-pile recycling plant in the sky soon after, but a bedroom, with winter fast approaching, was no place to be walking on bare boards in the morning, especially given the fact that I have to be dragged screaming and shackled to the spot before I'll do any decorating.

        PAINT PAD PRO

        No it's not YABGP (yet another bloody graphics package) for your PC, but a few bits of blue and orange plastic. That's not to say that it isn't ingenious. Everything about PPP has been thought through seemingly (well, MOST things anyway!).

        For example, the paint tray, which you top up with the emulsion paint to be used has a removable roller, which you only re-insert after you've poured the paint, which is hazardous enough as it is, given the width of the average emulsion can, without having to aim it past the roller. Once the roller is clicked back into place it acts as a sort of inverted waterwheel to dispense paint from the reservoir below onto the actual paint pad. Thus it's like an upside-down version of those machines they use to lay down white lines on sports pitches.

        The tray also has a raised lip at one end, the idea being that you withdraw the paint pad rearwards over it, squeezing out excess paint, which then finds its way back into the tray.

        Unlike a typical emulsion paint tray, this one is just about hand-held in size, although people with pixie-like hands might want to argue with that. In Tommy Walsh's "York Hams" it looks small anyway!

        The paint pad device itself looks rather like a lightweight 'travel iron', and is lighter still, thanks to hollow plastic construction and the fact that it isn't intended to flatten clothing!

        To get paint onto the pad, you draw the pad slowly over the wheeled roller in the paint tray. This loads up the fine almost downy bristles of the pad with just enough paint to cover a considerable area, say a square metre at a time. As I said before, excess is dealt with neatly but be careful not to let a build-up of scraped-off paint start dripping.

        The secret to the pad's non-drip properties and its coverage lies in the thousands of soft bristles, which are way in excess of those you'd get on even the widest brush.

        The pad is backed by foam which helps the pad comply with rippled surfaces, like heavily-embossed wallpaper, thus with the addition of a circular hand motion, nooks and crannies are dealt with almost as quickly as a smooth wall.

        AH YES, BUT WHAT ABOUT FINE WORK?

        PPP tackles edges and other tricky bits in one of two ways.

        Firstly, the pointed leading edges of the plastic 'iron' overlap the wet area of the pad, so by guiding the pad using this edge, the paint line is accurate. For example, you can run it along the edge of a ceiling without getting any on the walls, or vice versa. You can even 'cut in' around light switches without removing them, but my favoured method is to slacken the screws, raising the wall plate, so that the pad can just about paint under the edges. This way, the paint DEFINITELY appears to disappear underneath rather than passing itself off as well masked, for the simple reason that it DOES.

        Secondly, there's a 'son of Paint Pad' masquerading as the handle to the main unit. Detaching this gives you access to a much daintier pad, the nose of which comes together in a sharper angle (well under 90 degrees), and its this very shape that lets you tackle tight corners. If I have one criticism of this, it's that as a handle it can't have a pad fitted (yet), and as a mini Paint Pad it can't be returned to being a handle for the 'big blue jobbie' without removing the wet pad. It therefore follows, if you don't want to have to break off from what you're doing, you should leave all these mini functions till last, so that all the pads can be washed at the same time.

        There are very few areas that you can't use PPP on, but I found a few needing a brush for back up. One, the ornate coving in the room I'm decorating. No amount of backing foam would help the pad get anywhere near wetting all of that with paint, and just inside the door there's a strip of wall that even a narrow brush has trouble with.

        DRAWBACKS

        It's actually quite hard to find anyone with a good word to say about PPP, apart from Tommy Walsh, and he's being paid! Personally, I didn't find it too bad, but rather pricey for what it is, and given that in the end I only used it for accurate edging.

        You really need to work with thinner paints, like 'trade emulsions' for two reasons. One, a fully loaded pad if holding, say, a non-drip paint, will be heavy and possibly come dislodged ruining the whole concept of making little mess. Secondly, it's only the thinner ones that will transfer from tray to wheel to pad without half ripping the pad off its mountings. Normal 'non-trade' emulsions are bloody hard work. I can only assume that the demo on the TV commercial was using watered-down paint, overlaying one pastel colour with another. Come to think of it, they never did give you a close-up

        Likewise, you really do need to fit the foam-backed paint pad with a resounding click around all of its edges. They don't stress this enough, but having a poorly fitted pad is just asking to have it fall off once it's loaded with paint, and I can't help feeling that many of PPP's detractors on home decorating forums may have encountered this.

        I don't find the pole for working on a ceiling very useful, as the pad doesn't cover as much as a paint roller can in my opinion, which makes for yet more looking up and an aching neck next day! Likewise, it's difficult to charge up the pad when there's a four foot pole attached to your paint pad. I found it easier to put the paint tray on the ground, but this gives its own difficulties when it comes to drawing back to remove excess paint although there are four rubber feet to help keep it in place.

        It is however far better at 'doing the edges' even of a ceiling, but I'd recommend getting on a chair, and not using the pole for this.

        The major drawback is that it's quite expensive for what it is, viewed against buying a new paint roller and tray every time you need one (are these things ever useable again?)

        I paid over £40 for the bumper pack including the pole, not realising that I didn't really need to order the extra pads, but given my success rate at cleaning brushes, maybe it's just as well!

        CONCLUSION

        I've tried ever so hard to like this product, if only because it's made of jolly orange and blue plastics!

        Despite the 'bad press' on various forums, I don't think its as black as it's painted, if you'll pardon the expression but a paint roller covers far greater surfaces when using thicker paints without knackering your arm. To be fair, it didn't drip once, which is more than I can say for my efforts with a roller.

        However, at least the paint tray is capable of being held in one hand, so if working on a chair, you're not forever getting down to reload. It does indeed do quite a good job of edging, having made a neat effort of the transition between coving and wall, but if that's all it's superior at doing then it's bloody expensive.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          11.05.2008 11:14
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          2 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          not bad takes some getting used too but worth a try

          My paint pad experience derives from Focus DIY store. I bought their own brand of paint pads which came in a set of one small tiny pad for those tiny hard to get into places, one medium one and a slightly larger one. They came with a backing plate and a handle for each one. Nothing too impressive so far and I seriously wondered if the would work. Also there was an extending handle that you could buy that attatched to this set to make the out of reach places more easy to reach.

          I took them home as I say with doubt in my heart, and set to work. I used them on the hall and stairs so it was a baptism by fire. Would it work?

          I found them to be a little tricky at first but once I got the hang of them they were not too messy. I think this depended on how much paint you loaded on the pad to start with. As I progressed with the hall way I found it covered really easily and quite well not leaving the usual brush blobs on the ceiling as I have been known to do, as I am somewhat a novice at this type of thing.

          The edges were cleaner better and by some degrees less messy than previous attempts with roller and brushes.
          I found the extendable handle a bit tricky and the attatchment fell off once or twice so this was awkward for ceiling use and I prefered the roller method for this. But for walls yes I would consider using pads again.

          I paid about £9.99 for the pads and can't remember what the extension pole was, but seriously unless you really needed the extension I would do without.

          I think also it depends on the quality of paint used as well the thicker the better and on further use of the pads I found the best one to be Dulux solid which is sold in flat trays.

          I think these products should be given another go as it is slightly less messy than a roller as it stops paint spatter and although I didn't use the little pad I thought this set was a good buy.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            29.03.2006 21:34
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            5 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            it doesnt work

            This is a short story of my decorating disaster due to the infamous el pad’o.

            Today has been on a bit of a decorating mission in my dining room as its long awaited a coat of paint. After prepping the walls I went for the good old roller and paint brushes. AHHHHHHHHHH their not their, now I remember I discarded of them after my last painting endeavour. So off to town I went “now where can I get a roller from at a good honest price”. Wilkinson’s that’s always a good a safe bet for quality goods at a descent price. Down the isles I walked until I reached the decorating section. Destination reached and their it is the trusty old roller. “Hang about” what’s this it looks like a sponge on a stick but the packaging says it’s a quick hassle free painting implement. Fair enough i'm always open to new ideas £2.79 not a bad price compared to the £4 ish I would have spent on a roller. Sold! Purchase complete home I go to complete my mission before my lady gets back from work. The paint pad consists of sponge pad of about 200mm (8”) and detachable multi angle handle. How this is meant to revolutionise the way we paint I don’t know guess theirs only one way to find out. After pouring the paint on the tray I lightly wiped the pad over the paint giving a light coating on the surface. Now its time to see what all the fuss is about. Using the paint the fence technique as taught by mr Miyagie if you’ve ever seen karate kid (vertical stripes) I started to apply the paint to the wall. This is good I remember thinking as a nice neat stripe appeared before my eyes. Now for anther run this will take me no time at all at this rate. Yet again I wipe the pad across the paint tray and approach the wall up I reach for the second run. SPLODGE a cold sensation runs down my face it raining paint this must be a message from the gods I thought. Then I noticed that the sponge hade absorbed more paint than I had wanted ok then ill drain some back into the tray. Up I reached again more paint hits me in the face so I went for the second run anyway that’s when I encountered my second problem. It seams that every time I caught the recently applied paint it acted as an adhesive to the pad. Clump by clump the previously applied paint is ripped of the wall giving a mottled affect. Drip by drip the paint runs down my face and hits the floor I can’t go on I thought this just looks a mess. Know ill have to wait for the paint to dry so can either remove it all or smooth it with some sand paper. What a big waist of time and money the following day I purchased the roller I had initially set out to buy and managed to correct the mess that the pad had made in halve the time.

            I don’t know if any one else has experienced these problems or if it’s just me but going on my personal experience I would say stick to what we all know best the user-friendly roller

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              10.05.2005 17:56
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              8 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              I have painted for most of my life, both for myself and for other people and am very acquainted with new products that come on the market as well as knowing a lot about painting techniques.

              When I first saw Paintpads, I was a little cautious. They looked as if they could work, though a little voice inside me told me that my nine years of training preferred traditional methods such as rollers and paintbrushes.

              Open to all new inventions, I decided that I would give this little gizmos a go, and in some ways was pleasantly surprised. These are made by Flock Development and Research Limited, and they have obviously done their homework. What they found was a marketplace for people who were inexperienced at painting, and the U.K. was an ideal place to launch a product like this, because many housewives take part in what has always been part of a way of life in England, people wanting change.

              These products come in a range of all shapes and sizes, and each is designed for a different purpose. There are pads for flat areas, pads with more flocking for areas that are textured, pads that are angled to cope with corners where normally a roller would not go, and this space is normally tackled by a paintbrush.

              The paint dispenser is a handy little bucket with something that ressembles a hamster wheel in the middle. The design of this is very good, because you simply roll your paintpad over the wheel, and it gives you sufficient paint without it being enough to spill.

              For walls and ceilings, you can buy a telescopic handle so that you do not need to reach too much, and here the advantages outweigh the disadvantages in that by using pads as opposed to rollers, the weight factor comes into play and the paintpads win hands down against traditional rollers, in that their weight is less than half of the weight of a normal roller, thus making the whole job lighter and easier to manage without back strain.

              The sash wand was interesting. This is a very small paintpad for areas such as window woodwork, where you really do not want paint to go onto the windows. It also works very well on small areas around light switches and is very easy to use, although here I find because of my experience, I prefer a brush, though for the inexperienced, these little gadgets are really well thought out.

              There is another applicator for skirting boards, and because you apply the paint with a paint applicator, you are unlikely to stain areas below and above the skirting board, as only sufficient paint for the job in hand stays on the applicator.

              AND THERE'S MORE

              This idea took off and imagination got added to the range. They have now come up with a rounded applicator to deal with coving, an applicator for outside surfaces, a complete woodcare range, and sponges with which you can make tailor made pads to fit the job that you have in hand.

              Something that impressed me enormously about this range of products and also the amount of thought that has gone into them is that the inventors realised that washing out paint pads into our household drainage systems was not such a good idea. To get around this, they invented a system called "Green British Painter" range. This is a superb range because instead of washing out, these are adhesive pads which throw away at the end of the job.

              The company was also innovative enough to take into account that there are new paints hitting the market all the time, and they constantly update their products to match the paints which are now available.

              Really the choice of products is endless. From £7.50 for mohair pads, to £15 for a beginners set of pads and accessories, the paint pad range is well within the reach of the average householder. I like the idea that you can buy adhesive pads, because I live in an area that has septic tanks, and washing out pads in the sink is not an option.

              The hardest paint to remove from the pads has to be oiled based paints, though I do find that the small applicators needed for areas that are indeed painted in these paints are simple and easy to clean in white spirit, and then rinse in a bowl of hot soapy water, which I then throw away at the bottom of the garden, rather than into the septic tank !!

              Overall, I think that the makers have put a lot of research into their product. I thought that I would find the experience of using them a novelty only, although I noticed a difference in back strain immediately. I noticed that coverage is excellent, and also that the applicator is superbly engineered in order to use the minimum of paint to the maximum of effect.

              Whilst not completely convinced that I will swap completely from paintbrushes, I will use the specialised pads because they really do save time and give such a nice even finish.

              www.paintpads.co.uk give all the relevant information on the products which are available and these are certainly worth looking into for someone who lacks confidence with painting work. You obtain even results fast, and the very fact that the paintpad has been designed with such thought means that there are no question marks about how much paint to put on a surface. The paint dispenser deals with this issue.

              Overall a superb product and one that should not be dismissed lightly. There are cheaper versions available in hardware stores, although in my experience, you do get what you pay for, and if you want to experience the best you can get, then these products give you exactly what you would expect from a reputable dealer.

              Happy painting folks.
              Thanks for reading.

              Rachel

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                08.03.2004 04:30
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                3 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                • "handle can slip"

                It is great having an artist as a husband, but his ideas of painting is totally different to mine. Darling the Hall needs painting, should we do it this week? I come home from work and fine a 3ft by 3ft canvas on the wall and the walls are the same colour as what they were when I left for work that day. He seems to think this is hysterically funny but no matter what I say his idea of painting is only on canvas. He has tried all sorts of get out clauses in the past and one of his favourite is to get a paint brush and paint the walls but I usually find the floor has more on it or he has so many drips on the wall, I am better off doing it myself. However this time it will not wash! Now up until 2 years ago I had always used paintbrushes and when you have a lot to do, it is quite tedious and with osteoarthritis, I suffer for days after. A friend suggested I borrowed her pads... The thought of borrowing pads, mmm I just burst out laughing. She came back with this spongy thing which was around 5 inches by 2 inches with a handle attached to the back of it and said they are the newest thing on the market and it would have my Hall done in minutes. Been a bit dubious, I said right ok, I will try them and see how it goes. Time went past and the hall was papered and now ready for a blast of paint. I forgot about the paint pads and used brushes, but the long job was making my arms hurt, so I stopped and went under the cuboard for a cloth to wipe excess paint off the brush. Out fell this paint pad and I decided to give it a go. I dipped it in the paint and whooosh applied it straight to the wall and the gently pushed it back and forward and it covered the area with an even coating and I was really impressed as the paper was a bubbly paper and it even covered that and did not damage the paper.
                So this little paint pad had a red hard plastic covering with grooves in the back and you slide the handle part into position on the back and push down the button to secure it. I got rather carried away with using it and within an hour or so my Hall was completely covered with one coat of paint. As fast as I was painting the paint was drying so when I finished I touched it up again. At first I used a paint brush for where the ceiling met the wall joint, but later found out you can buy different shapes and sizes of these little gems. You can buy an arrow shaped one which will get into all the corners and also small ones about 1inch by 1 inch that will do for touch ups or if you rip the paper and need to add colour to it for cover up. So when we moved house, we had 2 weeks to decorate from top to bottom and we had friends who used the paint pads to cover the rooms. It was so fast, mind you we have new walls which helps, that we did the whole place in a week. Not ideal colours but it would be clean and tidy to let us move in. The time has come now to start properly decorating with all the colours that we want to have. I have bought a set of paint pads which has about 5/6 different paint pads in it. They are all different sizes ranging from a large one when you are doing large areas down to a touch up one. I hate the smell of gloss paint and it causes mega problems with my asthma, but I have one set that I use only for glossing and they are great, it glosses really quick and I do not have any drips or marks on my doors. The only problems that I have found with paint pads is that you have to be very careful that you remove any nails or wall hangings before as they tend to rip the sponge quite easily. I have done this on several ocassions. You can buy paint pads from most supermarkets and DIY shops either s
                ingularly or in sets starting from £1 for one up to £10 for a set of them. I have bought cheaper ones before and sometimes the handles seem to slip when paint drips on them and it has been very easy to drop the pad on the floor which is what you do not want when you have a nice new carpet. However the more expensive ones now have a little tray under the sponge so it catches any mischievous paint trying to aim for the carpet. They are normally made out of a soft sponge material or the more expensive ones are made out of mohair but they are very easty to clean. All you do with emulsion is run it under the tap and give it a thorough go. When I have used the pad for all the doors, I normally throw it away as it is sticky but could be washed in turps. As this was a new gadget two years ago in our house, Mr Bubbles was gutted that he did not get his little mits on it first and decided to have ago. He was really suprised at how easy it was and decided his art studio need a quick coat. He was most impressed with his results until I came home and said Whoops... After feeling a bit dejected he said that he was so chuft as his art studio was now a lovely bright turquoise in colour. The only problem had been he had ran out of paint and as he went along, the walls were nicely covered down to a part where there was a smattering of paint! He blamed the tools. I blamed him as he thought he could decorate a full room with 1 litre of paint. Oh well, I will get him used to this DIY malarky sooner or later. But now he knows how to use a paint pad, he has no excuse. I would recommend these to anyone who wants to have an even decorated room in a quick time and without having to pick out the bristles in their walls. Karen :0)

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  15.02.2002 19:31
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  17 Comments

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  Paint pads have been on the market for a good few years now, and I honestly thought that just about everybody who’s done any recent decorating would’ve tried them at some point. Not so. My best friend had never tried them. She’d stuck with her faithful roller through thick and thin. Well there’s nothing wrong with loyalty, but sometimes it’s worth trying something new. It’s a long time since I last used a roller and I doubt anybody could persuade me to go back to them. We built our own house once, and part of my job was to paint the whole thing. It was a big house too and I wanted it to look nice without getting too fed up with the painting. You know what happens when you get fed up. You start botching it, and end up just having to do it again later. I started off with a roller, but a friend told me that she’d used paint pads and found the result to be much better. Well, I like to move with the times and thought I’d give them a whirl. From that day onward, I was hooked. Paint pads are just so much easier to use. Less splatter, even coverage, and very easy to clean. What more could you want? Well, they’re actually more economical too. After switching to paint pads, I found that the paint goes much further. The pad picks up excess paint and spreads it out further than a roller does. This gives a much more even cover as well as being economical. Because the paint is applied in a thinner layer, it dries quick too, so when painting with emulsion, more often than not, by the time you’ve gone round once, you’re ready to go round for the second coat. Pads are mostly used for ceilings and walls and the ideal size for this job is an 8 inch pad. To apply the paint to large surfaces, paint an X first with each stroke being about 16 inches long (this is what I’ve found gives the best result) and then spread the X out in upward and sideward strokes. Paint is loaded onto t
                  he pad in much the same way as when using a roller. Pour the paint into a standard roller tray, press the pad against the paint and drag it across the edge to remove the surplus. The pad consists of a short mohair surface bonded onto a flat foam sponge. The sponge is usually attached to the handle by sliding it onto a narrow holder and securing with a button/lever on the back. As with any other tool, you get what you pay for. I’ve found that the short hairs easily work loose when using cheap pads and the hairs aren’t as soft as those on a better quality pad. The softer and more tightly packed the hairs are, the smoother the finish. I never buy them in sets because a) the quality of the pads are rarely much good when bought in sets and b) I don’t need all those small pads. I prefer a brush for painting smaller areas so all I’ve ever really wanted is the large pad and an angled pad for the corners. For the same money, I can get two good quality pads instead. Expect to pay about £5 for a decent pad. There are extension handles available to use with some pads, just as with rollers, making ceilings, stairwells etc easier to paint. Not that a stairwell is ever easy to paint, but without special ladders, you’ll never do it with a brush! There are also pads available that have small wheels on the sides for painting along edges. I haven’t tried one yet, but I bought one for doing my stairwell so I’ll update and let you know how I got on with it. Don’t expect that to happen just yet though, I’ve a lot of painting to do and the stairwell is one of those jobs that I know I’ll keep putting off. It’ll get done eventually though. I never use pads with solvent based paints, and if I did, I doubt I’d bother to clean them. I always end up getting into a terrible mess so anything that’s used with solvent based paint gets binned in my house. However, if you’
                  ;re using them to emulsion the walls, cleaning them’s a doddle. Just slide the pad off the handle and hold under running water while you push your fingers down the pad, pressing any excess paint out of the pad. Even I can do that, and cleaning isn’t my strong point! If you haven’t tried them yet, I’d highly recommend that you get yourself one next time you plan to paint a wall or ceiling. I know there are those who still swear by their faithful old roller, even after trying pads, but if you never try, you’ll never know will you? They’re available from all the major DIY stores, and most independent DIY and hardware shops stock them too, so there’s really no excuse y’know. Now, back to the painting! The porch is finished but daughter no. 2 is nagging me to get started on her room. No peace for the wicked! ~~+~~+~~

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                    More Comments
                  • More +
                    08.02.2001 20:07

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    The first time I saw these was advertised on a late night shopping programme! They looked too good to be true - claims were made about using half the amount of paint, that they were much quicker and easier than brushes or rollers and NO MESS! However, they were selling them for about forty quid. Not likely I thought to myself! Several months later I started decorating my bedroom with the help of a friend. We used rollers, but ended up splattered with paint from head to toe! I then bought 2 paint pads, having spotted some for under £10 in my local paintshop (also available in B&Q, HomeBase and most DIY shops). I cannot tell you how much better they were than brushes or rollers - we painted the rest of the room in half the time and then went off to the pub for a celebratory drink! I have used them ever since and most recently painted my bedroom without changing into old clothes or covering up the furniture! Amazing huh!!! Those of you poor people who haven’t yet dicovered the ease with which a room may be painted should THROW AWAY YOUR ROLLERS & BRUSHES AND INVEST IN A SET OF PAINT PADS!!!

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    14.11.2000 04:56
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)
                    7 Comments

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    Is there anyone out there who actually likes painting and decorating? Well, apart from the professionals, I don’t imagine that there are many of you who do. However, I have found that Paint Partner makes painting a lot quicker and easier. I purchased mine a few months ago from QVC but, as far as I know, it is available to buy in some DIY and hardware shops. In my kit there was a paint tray with a roller wheel type contraption. There were also several differently sized sponge pads and red plastic holders. You attach the pads to the holders (make sure they are secure!) and you are ready to go. Basically you put paint in the tray and roll the paint partner over the wheel which loads the pad with a thin layer of paint. Any excess can be wiped on the edge of the tray. You are then ready to paint. The paint glides onto the walls so easily and quickly and leaves no brush marks. As the pad is square, you can also paint in straight lines and get pretty close into the corners and to door frames, etc. To get at those hard to reach parts you could either use the small, toothbrush style accessory or resort to your trusty brush if you wanted to. I used the Paint Partner set quite recently and, along with my daughter, we painted our living room in record time with no mess (as there are no drips!) One tip I do have, though, is to slightly water down the paint as it is much easier to load onto the paint partner and glides on a lot quicker. The only problem with that is if you are painting over a strong colour then you may need an extra coat of paint. However, by the time you have finished one coat, the other coat will be almost dry as, with paint partner, you don’t apply it as thickly and it dries a lot quicker. You also use less paint too!! So for around £14-16 (depending where you get it from), it may be a worthwhile investment, especially if you are left to do the painting on your own!!

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      05.11.2000 05:54
                      Very helpful
                      (Rating)
                      2 Comments

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      Having used brushes and rollers in the past, I was a bit reluctant to try paint pads. Then I was bought some for a present. We have just had an extension built and I had to paint a large area so I thought I would give them a try. They really are easy to use and a lot quicker and cleaner than other methods. Before the extension was built the room was obviously a lot smaller and when I have painted this in the past using a brush it took me approximately double the amount of time that it took me to paint the new larger room using paint pads. My paint pads were bought for us from our local Focus Do It All Store. We got a whole set of different sized ones and different shaped ones for only £13:99. I have now also seen them in lots of other decorating shops as well and also on shopping channels on t.v. They are definately worth a try and I think that once you have used them you will never use anything else.

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments
                      • More +
                        16.08.2000 04:31
                        Very helpful
                        (Rating)

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        Paint pads are foam pads you can use for gloss,emulsion or varnish. They come in a variety of different sizes to suit all jobs. The benefit to these is that they paint a much bigger area than a paint brush. With a brush it's only the tip of the bristles that makes contact whereas the whole of the pad is in contact This makes them far quicker to use. Also they use less paint to cover the same area, brushes absorb paint up into the bristles, this never finds it's way onto the wall, pads have very small bristles that stay in contact with the wall so less paint is lost.Also if used properly you don't get any drips so even ceilings can be painted without having to cover all your furniture. These save time and paint, the quality of finish is also very good.

                        Comments

                        Login or register to add comments
                      • More +
                        09.07.2000 07:19
                        Very helpful
                        (Rating)

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        Instead of using rollers to apply paint to the walls try using paint pads. They are made of similar material to the rollers but because they are flat they are not prone to spraying the paint as it is applied to the walls. I have found them to be really easy and quick to use with no messy paint splatters to clean up afterwards. They are also fairly easy to clean after use. They are made in a variety of sizes with detachable handles. I found them great for getting into small spaces and a lot more useful than the traditional roller. At around £3.00 each they are a worthwhile purchase.

                        Comments

                        Login or register to add comments
                    • Product Details

                      Please try to include as much information about the paint pads you are writing about, including their make or which shop you brought them from