Welcome! Log in or Register

Westco Vinyl Flooring

  • image
3 Reviews

All tiles are fully self-adhesive which makes them easy to lay. Suitable for any room in the house, bathroom and kitchen in particular, vinyl tiles provide a quick, bright and inexpensive make-over for your floor

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    3 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      28.09.2003 20:42

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      With ref to Nikkisly, I can only guess the PVA hadn't dried out fully before she laid the tiles. The tiles are VERY sticky, and PVA was the correct primer to use, but it is water-based, and the tiles WON'T adhere unless it is bone-dry. (Priming is not needed on every surface, of course). I used Westco tiles on my kitchen floor. As I had floorboards, I tacked 6'x2' hardboard sheets down first, smooth side up to provide an even surface for the flexible tiles. Use 25mm panel pins (not longer, so as not to perforate anything below!) every 3-4" (yep, 100's!!!) to secure the hardboard. I actually used matt emulsion, with a little added PVA, to prime the hardboard using a roller. This adheres superbly to the hardboard and gives an excellent surface on which to apply the tiles. The Westco tiles are very accurately made and fitted tightly together with no visible gaps. The textured 'Green Slate' looks SUPERB, and I am fussy! Possibly a bit slippery when wet, but no more so than any vinyl floor or laminate. A couple of possibly useful tips: Laying tiles DIAGONALLY can make the floor space look bigger. Lay them out both ways before unpeeling to judge. The slate effect tiles I used contained about 5 different patterns. It is worth sorting them into these piles so you can they lay them at 'random', turning some through 90o etc so you do not end up with two identical tiles side by side. In short; easy to lay, superb appearance & looks like a tough, durable finish. Oh, always keep a few extra aside just in case...

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      19.03.2002 03:33
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      3 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      I read Nikkisly's op with interest. However, I am thoroughly impressed with the Westco flooring that my husband and I spent laying on Saturday afternoon in our bathroom. It was relatively inexpensive. £5.29 for a pack of six tiles in homebase. We only needed four packs and as the dozy homebase cashier couldn't count to four we got ours at the brilliant price of£15.87! We chose a fetching marble effect blue tile. It was easy to cut - it said use a stanley knife but our sharp kitchen scissors seemed to do the trick. A lot safer to use as my husband has had battles with stanley knives and lost in the past... but that's a different story! It was a little tricky to work out the jagged edges around the skirting near the door and the nightmare curve around the bottom of the loo, but a lager later and a spare tile or too in the bin and the job was complete. The instructions said to use PVA to prime the floor.. but as every good DIYer knows it's best to not take instructions too much to heart. We found we didn't need any PVA. The self adhesive on the back of the tiles gripped like superglue to the dodgy ceramic tiles we found hidden under the grubby carpet we ripped up in order to do the floor in the first place. We even found that the paper you rip off the back of the tiles to reveal the sticky backs was useful for drawing templates for akward corners. Now I cannot stop myself looking at our gorgeous floor. It looks very professional (if I do say so myself) and you cannot even tell that it is tiles - it looks like a roll of lino. I am glad it was tiles though with a sheet of lino one little mistake and you have wasted the lot. I have had a bath and not gone "arse over tit" as nikkisly would put it. Although we do have a nice fluffy mat in matching blue to drip on... All in all a brilliant buy that we would definitely use again.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        05.11.2000 17:51
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        The ageing cushion floor in our hall (and the shower room off it) was beginning to look a bit battered, so we decided that we should do something about new flooring. As this room gets a lot of traffic and consequent muddy foot and paw prints, our specifications for new flooring were pretty basic - it had to be hard wearing, easy to wash and, of course, look smart as well. With this in mind, we selected self adhesive vinyl floor tiles. (Westco, Colortone) in a fetching black and white 'chessboard' pattern. Last Saturday was floor laying day. We enthusiastically ripped up the old flooring and, as instructed,thoroughly cleaned the concrete floor and primed it with a dilute solution of PVA.The actual tile laying was simple - it was only when we had finished the job that we hit problems. The first thing was that it was very obvious that the tiles weren't actually sticking to the floor, despite the fact that we had followed the laying instructions to the letter. We spent most of the day trying everything we could think of to get the damn things to actually stick - even at one stage, ironing them through a teatowel in the hope that the heat might encourage them to bond with the floor.We pushed and pressed for several hours to no avail,finally deciding that perhaps they would settle down in time if subjected to normal traffic. Problem two. Our two dogs sleep in this room and are also fed there.On Saturday evening, Wesley, our elderly labrador, roused himself from sleeping in front of the fire for his dinner. He entered the hall with an enthusiasm reserved only for feeding times, hit the new floor and continued on his backside straight out of the front door!Luckily he was unhurt, but we were forced to spend the rest of the evening suffering those "this is no way to treat a dog" looks - and, at bedtime, he flatly refused to lay a paw on the new floor. We briefly considered a new career as circus performers for our two dogs and
        cat as they seemed to have developed an uncanny ability to perform somersaults on the new floor, then decided that the RSPCA may object. Sunday morning,first thing. Husband descends stairs, half awake,hits the new tiles and goes apex over base. Sunday morning, 10.00 am.We spend five minutes removing the new floor (that's how well the tiles had stuck)and are now trying to convince ourselves that bare concrete floors are the height of fashion and that the £70 we wasted on buying these infernal tiles couldn't have been better spent. I would therefore advise anyone who is considering vinyl floor tiles to learn from our experiences, particularly those with young children, elderly people and animals to consider. These things are potentially lethal - handle with care.(And, by the way, does anyone want to buy a load of black and white vinyl floor tiles - slightly used - at a much reduced price?)

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments