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How To Write A Good Computers Review

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  • Not the best dooyoo we have had
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  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
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    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

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    9 Reviews
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      04.05.2014 12:25
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      • "Third time lucky"

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      • "Third time unlucky?"

      Will it work this time?

      I''m getting just a little impatient here.......

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        03.05.2014 12:37
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        • "Not the best dooyoo we have had"

        I saved dooyoo!

        Ok dooyoo members this is how to try and post a review here. If you can log in ,first locate your product. Then Press ''Write Review'' on the top left corner of the product. Pen in the first line of your review and fill out the other boxes...Advantages and Disadvantages etc. The ''Write A Conclusion'' box will be your title so fill that out. Then rate out of five. I ask you to do the minimal just to make sure its going to bite and so goes up on dooyoo. You dont want to tap out 500 words for nothing. Because its broken it will save one sentence or one word at the moment. Then ENTER your review and ***LOG IN*** as you do. It should say Thankyou! If it does you are now in control of dooyoo.

        Check to see its gone up and then seek out the edit button and grow your review. Hand typing online seems to speed things up but you can cut paste the rest of your review in chunks and then keep saving in by pressing enter. Its worked for me. You can also log in as normal and hand tap your review in online if you want. This also works sometimes. DON'T LOG IN AND CUT N PASTE straight away. If we don''t get reviews up soon its game over here. Did I just save dooyoo, or does dooyoo want to wither and die? Its up to you guys now.

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          16.09.2011 15:55
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          Go for it !!

          I was unfortunate, or stupid enough to spill coffee on my 4 year old pc a few weeks ago! I changed the keyboard sharpish and everything worked fine until I re-booted. It would not start! I got it going for a few days then zap! Exit pc to pc Heaven.

          Now I needed a new pc so I went to the guy that built my last one. " We don't build them from our own parts any more", he said, "but if you get all the bits, we will". No, I thought, I've got to find someone else, but who?

          I thought about Imesh. I had heard good and bad reports about them but they had just gone to the wall so, that settled that!

          I did a great deal of web crawling and finally found PC Services. The reviews from this company is quite frankly outstanding! I found one or two negative comments which did not put me off in the slightest.

          All you do is go to their site, choose a case and all the parts you need to get your machine built. They are with you every step of the way! If you go over the top with any of your parts, (which I did), they will contact you and tell you that you are wasting your money! Never have I known that before. My build took about 10 days. You are informed of the pc's progress at every step, you are told who built it, who tested it and so on. Finally my machine arrived, I've been using it for 10 days now without a hitch. Their customer services is second to none if you do have a problem. They have their own forum you can go to for advice and help. All in all a truly outstanding company who charge very reasonably for their services. I thoroughly and wholeheartedly recommend them without hesitation. You can find them here, pcspecialst@.co.uk

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            30.01.2008 21:26
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            Another once great British company is no more.

            For many years I have recommended Evesham computers to everyone I know. No longer. My latest Evesham desktop broke down just outside the 3 year extended warranty period. No problem, I have "Lifetime Telephone support", although the former freephone number was now 0870. After hanging on to speak to someone for the first two days, I then found it impossible to get through at all. No problem still - buy another computer I thought, sales soon answered the phone. I felt something was wrong though. No brochures, unhelpful staff. I queried the extended support - no longer exists. What about the In-home repairs for the first year - er, no, not at the moment. So... I bought a new hard drive to repair my old computer. Wrong connections. Asked for a returns number, eight days later they replied to say I was now out of time according to distant selling regulations. YES, but only because you kept me waiting eight days ! OK, I can take being ripped off. I now find that Evesham actually have major financial difficulties! And many staff have been laid off. But still they take your money. BEWARE.
            I now have a wonderful Dell computer, thanks to Tesco.com. Brilliant.

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              09.10.2006 16:51
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              Remember, your experience matters.

              The computer department of a site like Dooyoo is extensive. It covers all the components that consumers need to look at and decide upon in an effort to make wise purchases. Let's face it, there are millions upon millions of consumers, and the percentage of those consumers that will have limited knowledge or product savvy will be large, when you consider that technology is for ever changing, and that people like me are endlessly trying to keep up with the times, updating our computers, consuming in an attempt to keep up with ongoing technology.

              What I have found is that many reviews tell me about products that interest me, but that a certain element is often forgotten when writing about products in the computer department. That element is human ignorance. Take someone like me, and believe me I am a typical consumer and know what I am talking about. Give them a technically perfect review that is written in a technically perfect manner, and what happens is that it baffles me. It doesn't enhance my knowledge, because the writer forgot that they were not writing it for a geek audience, but for consumers like me, who source out information in order to make a wise buying decision.

              Of course, there is a need for technical data to serve comparison purposes, and sometimes if a writer explains some of the technical terms in a simple way, it is so useful to me, as a consumer, and aids my purchase experience.

              So what do you need in a computer review to make it helpful to the public ?

              There are many aspects here, because the subject matter is enormous, although whatever gadget or upgrade or computer component you are describing, knowing what that component is supposed to do in simple terms to me is a must. Makers can tell us that machines perform in a certain manner, although what they are trying to do is so different from what a review writer is trying to do. They are selling products. As a review writer, we are examining that product and explaining how it performs at home, and whether it lives up to the promise made by manufacturers.

              Build.

              I feel that build is important because the durability of a product can mean a big difference. If flawed, it can make that component flimsy and unworthy of consideration. A solidly built, well designed product is something I look for when spending money on computer components, because I do not have money to burn. If the product that you are reviewing doesn't stand up to day to day use, or fails in some manner, then it is important to tell the public how it really is.

              Ease of use.

              I believe that ease of use is important as well. Put a technically difficult component into the wrong hands, and it can spell catastrophe. Here, does the component come with good, clear instructions that anyone of any level of ability can understand ? Does it come with all the cables needed ? Does it give detailed instructions. Can it be installed easily by someone with little expertise ? All of these are important.

              Cost

              Weighed up against the competition, how does it fare against other products on offer, and why was this the choice that you made ? Comparison is always healthy in a review if you know the alternatives and what differences there are between that which you are reviewing and perhaps others that you have used in the past ?

              In use.

              What is the product like to use ? Is it something that enhances your computer experience ? Tell it like it is. Printers, Web cams, Mice, memory cards, Memory sticks etc etc. Tell us the whole experience from installation to use over a period of time. Quality of prints, quality of image, reliability of the product, performance quirks, and why it suits you so well, or fails.

              Computer components that need expert installation.

              Here, as technology grows, there seem to be more and more people doing their own installation of components, though for people who are not experts, telling them whether in fact the instructions provided would suit their level of expertise would be really handy. I use a shop to install items within the tower of my computer, although I have found, little by little, that certain items like drives are simple to install if adequate instruction is given. Letting the consumer know this information can greatly assist them in their decisions, as they may need to allow expense for installation costs if an expert is needed to perform the task.

              Lists

              I really am not keen on lists. I am more interested in what people say about the features of an item. It's not only easier reading, but you should be able to gage from a review how the person using that component found it to be. In the case of a keyboard for example, how the touch responds, and how easily the special keys can be used to enhance the experience. A mouse – does it have a ball like the old fashioned ones ? How often does it need cleaning ? Or perhaps it's one of those fancy wireless ones. If so, how long do the batteries last ? How responsive is it ? And more importantly does it come with a charger, and how efficient is it ?

              Price, Guarantee and Manufacturers Help.

              Price plays a huge factor for me as a consumer. I need a price in order to be able to compare that which a reviewer is reviewing and other similar items that I have discovered on the net. Does the price include guarantee ? How long a guarantee and what guarantees does it give ? Are the manufacturers approachable online ? This is quite important because in instances of losing handbooks or instructions, many sites have downloadable instructions, and help pages, and their response time is important when you are struggling to install something, but fail to do so because of some small niggle.

              Your experience.

              The most important facet to a review of a computer component is your experience. It's something that manufacturers do not have. Sure, they may have tested their product, but it is you who is out there using it under normal conditions where things can go haywire. Your experience of the product, of its' performance, of its ability to keep the Manufacturer's promises are a thing that only a user can describe, and by missing out this essential ingredient in a review, the review becomes less than helpful, as the sole purpose of a review is to give members of the public feedback on your use of a product.

              Style

              Although people seem to write to a formula a lot of the time, one should never forget individual style. As long as the information is complete, the style should belong to the writer.

              Your experience may be funny, frustrating, agonisingly stupid, technically superb, with hitches, without hitches, but every facet of that experience helps someone like me who will be buying a component based on your review. I want to know that I am not the only dumbo on the block, and that other people do make mistakes, but am more interested at the end of the day as to whether those initial mistakes can be easily remedied, and whether the product does what it purports to do.

              The bottom line.

              From my point of view as a non technical person, the easier the review is to read, the better. I get lost in too much technical jargon, as I am sure many consumers do. When you consider the amount of new products, and also the amount of households who use computers on a regular basis, taking the safe road with a review, and not assuming reader expertise is essential. What makes me the expert ? Well, I am a consumer. I buy on the strength of what I believe to be honest opinion, and at the end of the day, it is for consumers such as myself that you are writing reviews. Balancing technical with non technical, your experience with accuracy of price and performance can make a difference to those wanting to advance their technological skills, and not make expensive mistakes.

              Rachel

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                18.10.2004 21:01
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                The Computers category has been pretty quiet of late, so as the new guide I thought I'd try to drum up some interest in the category with some suggestions for writing opinions.

                You don't have to be a nerd or geek to write a computer opinion. The most important thing is your *experience* of using the product.

                I'm not going to go into spell checking, proof-reading, being honest and not copying other peoples reviews, or the minimum word count thing here. If you cover everything I'm about to mention you will probably have put a lot of thought into your opinion anyways.

                ====== What To Include ========

                I've seen a lot of reviews that look, to the non-geek, as probably being very detailed, but are actually just the specifications page of the manual typed out verbatim. It's all well and good hearing that:

                "The new GeForce 6800 has Dual 400Mhz RAMDACs and 16 pixel pipelines, is 8x AGP and supports UDA."

                What I'd MUCH rather know is something along the lines of this:

                "The new GeForce 6800 is an AGP card which means it should fit in nearly all modern motherboards - if you want to play games, but don't have an AGP port then you most likely need an upgrade anyway. It's also DirectX 9 compatible, which means games such as Doom 3 will look great in it."

                Also, little details such as running a benchmark on your new product, if it's something like a high end processor or graphics card will be helpful. For something like a printer or a keyboard this doesn't really apply though.

                ====== Think About Your Target Audience ======

                This is very important - no matter what you are writing about, there's always the possibility that the reader isn't really that into computers. Keep the technobable to a minimum, but do include all relevant details. A good way to do this is to actually explain what the features of the product mean - e.g:

                "The graphics card has 256MB of RAM - this is a decent amount of memory and should be more than enough to play modern games with. If you just want to use your computer for email and internet access however, this may be a little more than you need."

                "The printer is USB 2 compatible - USB (Universal Serial Bus) is a very common standard for connecting things to computers these days, and any computer made within the last 5 years should support it. If your computer is fairly new then you should benefit from the extra speed USB 2 gives above the older USB standard."

                Also, think about what people will need to know - if you are reviewing a top end graphics card, mention the fact that it's an expensive piece of kit targetted at gamers and people who do heavy graphics work - note that it's probably not worth the investment if you don't need that kind of power.

                Same for other hardware - a cheap, low specced piece of equipment shouldn't be reviewed as if it's a top end piece of hardware, look at the low price and consider if it would be useful to it's target audience.

                For peripherals such as keyboards and mice, think about the ease of use and ergonomics, the build quality, and any software that comes with it.

                For printers - remember that different printers cater to different needs. A huge office laser printer will probably be specialised at high quality, fast, black and white printing, but a home colour photo printer will probably be slower and cost more per page to print.

                In a good review, I would hope to see a brief description of what the product is SUPPOSED to do, and who it is aimed at, followed up by comments about how well it actually does that, and any notable benefits / flaws the product has.

                ====== Talk About Your Experience!======

                This cannot be stressed enough. It is often easy to tell if a product is being 'reviewed' by someone who has only read about it. In a good review there is lots of the users own experience showing through.

                Start with why you bought the product - what attracted you to it? Did it live up to your expectations?

                When you bought it, how was it packaged? Was the packaging good enough? This isn't an excuse to say "The packaging was black, with a large IBM logo in the top left hand corner, and the words '60GB Sata Drive' written on the front." Everyone knows things like that are just filler. The important thing here is - was the packaging sound enough to protect the product? Is the packaging easy enough / safe enough to open? I've gotten some nasty cuts opening some computer equipment when you cut the plastic and it creates sharp edges! I've also damaged cables or scratched items when unpacking them.

                If you need a degree to open the packaging safely then I think there's a problem.

                Installation is another interesting area - were there any nasty problems? Anything important a buyer should know? An example would be the product being large, so hard to fit into the case, or the product requiring power connectors from the PSU when most rival products don't.

                Over prolonged use any information like reliability, support, driver updates, or quantity of user information available on the web is also useful. If it is a product like a printer, handheld or anything else that has consumables such as batteries or ink attached to it, a comment about how long these last would be good.

                ======= To Summarize ========

                You need both fact and opinion in a Computers opinion. If you don't know the technical side inside out, then just explain WHY you bought the product, WHAT you wanted to do with it, and HOW WELL it did that.

                If you do know the technical stuff, then elaborate, say who should buy, or not buy the product, and explain why. Give others the benefit of your knowledge, don't just use this place as a chance to spout jargon to sound clever. The people who will understand you won't be reading a consumer site, they'll be on the sites aimed at techies!

                If you had problems with a product, that doesn't always mean the enitre range is bad - remember computers are strange beasts and there can be any number of conflicts or issues you might not expect at first. Rate the product low if you must, but don't rant too much unless their tech support really is dire.

                I don't think I cover all these points in all my reviews, but now that I've actually sat down and thought about what should and shouldn't be in a computer review I intend to take my own advice! It would be great to see more people writing computer reviews, and hopefully this will be of some use.

                These are just suggestions, I've lazilly made them sound like instructions because it's easier than writing 'I think you should...' every sentance, hope nobody thinks I'm being bossy :)






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                  30.01.2004 21:15
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                  Some advice on writing reviews within the Computers category.

                  There are generally two extremes of Computers opinion on Dooyoo. The first type lists all the specifications of the equipment and tells you in minute detail about every single component. It mentions DDR, CPU, Northbridges, Southbridges, Serial-ATA, AGP, USB, PCX, PCI Express and a million other acronyms and pieces of jargon that you've got no idea about. The other type of opinion is very short, and barely says anything to help you.

                  You may be surprised to hear that the first type of opinion can be as useless as the second type. This opinion will concentrate purely on Computers opinions and my feelings about what makes a good Computers opinion and hopefully banish the myth that only 'nerds' can write good Computer opinions. I don't believe this is the case and certainly a lot of the things that make a good Food and Drink review or a good Movies review can be applied to Computers and Software reviews.

                  The aim of any good review on Dooyoo is to offer the reader your thoughts and experiences on the items you are reviewing. It's this information, your personal thoughts, opinions and experiences that set your review apart from anything else available on the internet. People can get product specifications from many places on the web, not least the manufacturer's web site, but not everyone's in a position to mention how a printer, a keyboard, a DVD writer etc. performs after prolonged use.

                  Step 1:

                  The first step to a good opinion is the same first step for any opinion on Dooyoo. Put yourself in a position where you can write an opinion with the least amount of spelling and grammatical errors possible. This might mean using something which has a built-in spell checker like Microsoft Word or Outlook Express. If you don't have access to either of these, don't worry, there are plenty of alternatives. Have you heard of Open Office? It's a free Office-like software package that's available for PCs that's really quite good indeed. If you don't like all that fancy dan software, then you can use a traditional paper dictionary or even trot along to www.dictionary.com to help you out.

                  Writing your review offline (i.e. in a word processor rather than Dooyoo's review submission box) is always helpful. You can write reviews, save them, alter them and even leave them be for a few hours before coming back with a fresh set of eyes. It's amazing what you can pick up if you leave a review alone for a few hours and go off and do something else.

                  There are plenty of opinions dedicated to writing general opinions on Dooyoo, and you can go to: http://www.dooyoo.co.uk/internet/internet_sites/the_site_in_general/ to read a selection of them.

                  Step 2:

                  It's vitally important to understand your subject, or at the very least, not to be intimidated by it. Computer opinions can (but not necessarily) include lots of technical specifications, jargon and information. In these cases, you must be able to determine what to include and what's not necessary. If you are in any doubt, leave them out. It's a rare thing that adding complicated jargon on a consumer site such as Dooyoo will improve an opinion over one which is written in good old plain English. A good understanding of your subject will always be incredibly useful in Step 3 too, although it is still possible to write a good opinion without being a complete nerd and obsessed with the detailed workings of computer equipment. If you've bought a computer, component or peripheral yourself then you're off to a good start as you'll be able to describe why you bought that particular item and what exactly made you choose that over other items on the market.

                  Step 3:

                  Apply the KISS principle. The KISS principle, for those who are unaware, is "Keep It Simple, Stupid". Dooyoo is primarily a general consumer review resource. The theory behind it means that people come to Dooyoo looking for information on various things. In order for people to make the best use of Dooyoo, we have to supply this information in a manner that's as accessible as we can make it to as many people as possible. In my opinion, that means that jargon has to be eliminated, where feasible. A good description and review in plain English should always gain better ratings than those from nerds trying to show off, which can actually happen on Dooyoo at times.

                  This will invariably mean that your opinion will be longer than if you used the fancy computer acronyms, but the benefit will be that lots of people will be able to understand your opinions. The down side (to those that care about such things) is that you might not immediately appear to be as clever as you would like, but the benefit will be that your opinions will make sense to more people, hence more reads and perhaps even further rewards in the shape of Crowns!

                  There's nothing worse than an author trying to look clever by cramming as many pieces of jargon as they can into an opinion and making the whole thing unreadable and difficult to understand. It doesn't help the writer and it certainly doesn't help your fellow member or a non-member consumer.

                  Step 4:

                  As hinted at in Step 2, keep to the essential information that pertains to you. People don't need to hear your story about how you went to the shop, bought the item, returned home etc. We don't need to hear about the packaging unless there's something important you need to tell us - perhaps it wasn't adequate for the product or it was indestructible. Think about what you considered before you made the purchase and put yourself in the buyer's situation again.

                  Why did you buy the item? Is it because you wanted something new or because your current item wasn't good enough? Was it broken/worn out and needed replaced? If you got the help of someone who knows computers better than you, did they explain why they suggested one piece of equipment over another? If so, then let us know! Don't try and claim it as your own because it could be apparent that you have no clue (or they could be wrong!). Don't be afraid to say "Big Jim said that this mcguffin is better than that other one because I don't play games and it was better value for money" if that's what Big Jim said.

                  Step 5:

                  Keep specifications lists to a bare minimum. If you're referring to complete PC systems, a brief overview of the important components is all that's necessary (for example, graphics card, sound card, processor, memory and one or two other pieces). If it's a single component, then it's probably best not to mention specifications at all and link to the manufacturer's website so that those who require the specifications can find them by themselves and the people who don't care can get on with reading. In the case of a software package, I try to include the minimum specifications under which the software will run plus the relevant specifications of my own PC to give people a better idea of how things work. You might come up with a better way of doing this, but it certainly helps to provide "real world" experiences in all the aspects of computing I've referred to above.

                  Step 6 (an aside):
                  This is kind of off the beaten track for computers a bit, but does overlap into Internet and Shopping while still being slightly relevant to this category. If you're doing any shopping for PC stuff on the internet or in the High Street and you're telling us about it, then please give us as balanced an account as you can. Feel free to go off on a huge rant at the end of your opinion, but it helps people a lot more if they find out why you chose that particular shop or site over any other. Give your experiences of the actual buying process and then what happened afterwards (if anything). It's rather like writing complaining letters to companies - if you write it in a calm, controlled way, you'll get better results and it's exactly the same for opinions too. Rants rarely help anyone, whereas a calm, but ultimately negative review is a lot more trustworthy in my opinion.

                  The end bit:

                  These are my tips for what I believe make up a good Computers opinion. Of course, you might disagree and I must state that these are my views, not necessarily those of Dooyoo or of any other member. However, please keep in mind that the people who read here on Dooyoo are more than likely, going to be less technically aware than those who go off to the specialised nerd sites for their information. If you write with these people in mind, then you're probably not going to go too far wrong.

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                  18.06.2002 08:12
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                  An accusation often correctly leveled at reviews for Computer items, is that they are often written in pure technical jargon. This has 2 discernable consequences: a) Only the computer literate will tend to understand them, and to be quite honest a large percentage of those will already know a significant amount about the product being reviewed. This is especially true if it's a product such as a graphics card. b) The non - technically inclined will be at a complete loss as to what the review is about, or at the very least what the review means. This is a pity, as the product may genuinely interest the reading consumer, if they knew what the opinion writer was talking about! It is for this purpose, that I will always from now on do my best to cater for all users, for computer aficionados, and computer novices alike. In the main at the end of any of my future reviews, I hope that you at least know more about the product that I reviewed, and whether or not it would hold any value for you. There is always room for improvement for any writer however, so my tips for writing better Computer opinions are: 1) Ensure you are factually correct, and the information is relevant This is quite a big bugbear with me, I have read many Computer reviews in the past that have contained quite large technical inaccuracies or just glaring omissions regarding the abilities of the product. In this instance I will always comment to that effect regarding the inaccuracy, and more often than not I will rate low because of this. At the end of the day, if you are unsure about the technicalities of a product, it is best not to mention them at all, instead of just guessing about them. ~Relevance to the user~ Sometimes when I read a review it can go into immense detail regarding the packaging said product came in, this is unnecessary detail in my opinion. At the end of the day, it's all
                  about prioritizing what does, and what doesn't go into your opinion. In short, I'm not too bothered about the aesthetical qualities of the box it came in; I want to know everything about the product that came in the said box. The only time when I consider the box to be a relevant aspect, is when you are talking about packaging for the sakes of protection of the item, an example of this is: Good usage = If I were reading a review on a Pre-Built Computer that was delivered by Courier to your door, then packaging detail would be relevant. Bad usage = Describing the box in great detail that your shop purchased card, peripheral or other such item came in. The main problem is that going into detail on such things is that it can detract from the actual opinion itself, and look like 'padding'. 2) Try to cater for all users - if possible include a definition of terms at the end of your review where necessary I have in the past been guilty of this aspect, of not catering for all users. This is why, from now on, my opinions will always be written in such a manner that is universally readable and accessible regardless of computer experience. Including a short definition of terms at the end of the review, or links to websites that carry these terms is also something that I would also consider advantageous. By the same token however, your main target audience for all computer reviews will always be those who are into the subject matter. So whilst catering for all levels and types of user is important, ensuring you reach the target audience is even more so. 3) Ensure you mention how much the product actually cost As per the title, ensure you mention how much the product cost you. If you got it from a specific retailer for a good price, then by all means mention make a small mention of that as well. At the end of the day adding price details helps the end consumer
                  who may be interested in buying that product after reading your glowing review of it. Of course, even if the review is the opposite of glowing, the pricing information should still be added. If only to inform the reader of how much they stand to save by reading your review, and potentially shunning the product :-) 4) Include personal opinion These tips can be applied to virtually any Dooyoo category this one is no exception. If I wish to read a list of specifications and little else, then I can just as well do that on any other website, or from the side of the box in which the product comes in. Feel free to rant or eulogise about the product or service being reviewed, however be sure to not get carried away, particularly in the case of a rant. If you are particularly irate regarding something it is often good to type up the opinion in word, and then delaying posting of the opinion until the next day. This is because opinions can sometimes be clouded by bad feelings present at the time of writing. 5) If you have problems with a certain product, try to ensure that user error isn't the problem - rather than blaming the software/hardware straight away - I have read countless reviews whereby a reviewer has slated a product quite severely, from reading the opinion though it becomes readily obvious that user error is the determining factor involved rather than any fault of the actual product itself. - I hope these tips have been of some help to you, I will update this opinion with extra information as and when required. Thank you for reading, Kev

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                    05.04.2002 00:08
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                    • "but then that's not the point!"

                    But saying as the master can't do it, I'll have to try instead. Being the category guide for the computers should make me have a pretty good idea of how to go about writing a good opinion. At least you'd hope so........wouldn't you? Whether or not I'm a computer-lyrical genius is doubtful, but I have read enough about computers to give you a few pointers on what to write and what not to write. I have a few things to say as a guide, things I've noticed when reading, then I have a few things to say in general, then I have a few unofficial things to say. So anyway, here goes Top Tips - From a Guides Point of View ====================================== First of all my biggest tip would have to be don't write about stuff you don't understand or haven't got a clue about. Cos its worthless. Would I write an op about a breast milk pump thing? Hell no, to be honest I didn't know what they were till I read someone's op on one (I was curious, OK!). So if you don't know your floppy gigabyte from your USB drive then don't bother writing about them. There's really nothing worse than reading someone's op on a PC component, only to find they just bought their first PC and have never even switched on one before. Please don't write a review on your Pentium 4 chip in your PC saying 'It's really fast, it is' because anyone seriously looking for help on buying computer parts isn't going to find it much use. At all. If you've just got your new PC then review it, as a new PC. Tell everyone how well it works, how easy it was to set up, stuff like that. Basically point number one is don't review something you haven't got a clue about. Next up are the reviews that list the technical specifications. You know, the ones that buy a new graphics card and write 'This card has a 350Mhz RAMDAC, a revolutionary NX-401 processor with a cor
                    e speed of 200Mhz, 64Mb RAM and is capable of Direct3d, OpenGL, with support for FSAA and resolutions of up 1600x1200 @ 90Hz'. Or something like that. And I'll tell you what, I really like to know that kind of thing. Everyone who's going to buy something likes to know that too. But that isn't a review, or an opinion, that is stating facts. Do state facts, but then state opinion too. Guess that goes for all of Dooyoo. Point 2 - Include opinions, don't just recite specifications. Leading on from that, are the people who go the other way, and buy a new graphics card and write 'It is really good and it plays Quake 3 really really fast and it is brilliant'. That it maybe, but then the same thing could be said about tonnes of cards. If you've paid £300 for a top of the range GeForce then I'd bloody well hope it was good at playing games! So point 3 has to be; don't just say something is great and leave it at that. Next up are a set of reviews bordering on needing deleting. I call them 'generic reviews'. Computer are the kinda thing you can do it with, say you have the same graphics card chipset (GeForce 2MX 400 for example), it may be made by 8 different manufacturers, but at heart be the same card. You get people who write amazingly similar ops on similar products, if you know what I mean. Like those forms you have where you just fill in the blanks. Borderline cheating in my books, so....... Point number 4 - Don't do generic reviews Which leads me swiftly on to the next one, please don't review things you don't have, as a lot of people obviously do. I know you can string together a credible review by reading a review of something in a magazine, but it's pointless and defeats the point of Dooyoo Point 5 - Own what you review. Top Tips in General =================== Ok. Quick few little tips on how to make your review better
                    . 1. Cover as much as you can. If I'm buying a graphics card I want to know what I get with it, how easy it is to install, and of course how well it works. Lots of people miss out the first couple of bits. 2. Say how much it costs. It's quite annoying to read a raving review, think 'I'd like that' and then not know how much it costs! 3. Make your opinion understandable to the masses. Not everyones a computer genius, so don;t baffle people with technical jargon. 4. On the other hand, don't make it too simple, find a balance. 5. I know Dooyoo's for personal opinion, but try not to get too worked up about a single experience. Say you bought a Seagate hard drive, and it broke, it doesn't mean they're all crap! Unofficial Tips =============== Things I probably shouldn't say as the guidey person. 1. NO MORE REVIEWS ON PC WORLD OR ELSE I'LL KILL YOU! Yes, we all know how crap it is, no we don't need one more person to tell us that the staff are stupid and that they always try to sell you warranties. Everyone knows that, at least 200 times over. Stop them, PLEASE I BEG YOU! 2. Don't pad. It's stupid. I've seen people write pages on a mouse. You can't do if you stick to relevant info. No one minds the odd deviation from the topic at hand, but people just set their sites on a long review and write tosh to get there. Do you really want to know 'The mouse comes in the standard beige PC colour, has 2 buttons on the left and right hand side and uses the traditional ball in the underbelly method of control. It connect to your PC via a beige lead about 1m long and uses a PS2 plug which connects to the mouse PS2 socket on the back of you PC' when you could say 'It's a bog standard mouse'. Some people even tell me what the GOD DAMN box looks like, colours and all. All in their struggle to write lots, and hopefully get
                    a crown. Well you won't get a nomination from me, infact you'll probably won't even get a VU! 3. I said before not to write on stuff you don't know about, but infact please do. It's hilarious to read someone writing, in complete confidence, about their new computer part, only to get it totally wrong and make a fool of themselves. Hilarious, really it is! And um, that's it, apart from the general use decent English, spell check and try to make it make sense, don't use awful grammar. That applies to everything on Dooyoo though, so happy writing! PS. Don't take offence if I've laughed at something you think you've done, I too have written an op on PC World, and the other stuff I complained about is usually done by the churners anyway. So it's not you I'm getting at! Oh, and good luck with anything you choose to write (I really want an op on a Seagate 40Gb ATA-100 hard drive cos I might buy one!).

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