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      21.02.2014 16:39

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      DO NOT USE YOUGOV! IT IS A SCAM! Waiting for & chasing payment since November. They do not reply to emails. On the rare occasion that they have replied they just say they will look into it & get back to you but then you hear nothing. I would AVOID this company at all costs. I think its safe to say now I will not be receiving my payment. The surveys are time consuming & payment is non existent. Its all a BIG CON.I feel like a complete fool for falling for an internet scam. DON'T MAKE THE SAME MISTAKE AS ME.

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      30.12.2013 12:14

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      Not the best but not the worst either.

      Reading the negative reviews on this site, I have to agree with the sentiments expressed. Yes, it does take an age to accumilate sufficient points to qualify for a pay out and surveys co-incidentally, tend to dry up just before the pay out limit is reached. They are not alone in this though. All the popular survey sites seem to work to this principle, it is almost as if it is an unwritten industry rule. I used to get at least one £50 cheque every year or so, but now it is a case of me wondering if I should put a clause in my will asking the executors to give it to charity if it ever arrives.

      Why do all survey sites including YouGov, take so long to post the rewards out ? By comparison, I do internet business with a company in Switzerland. I order my printer inks and memory sticks from them and the whole transaction from ordering, to delivery from Switzerland via Belguim to England, never takes more than a week and sometimes as little as four days. If it only involves a survey company such as YouGov putting a cheque or vouchers in an ordinary envelope, sending it from this country to this country, why oh why must me wait for six to eight weeks ?

      Having said all the things that I have said though, the surveys when they arrive, are clearly laid out, simple to complete and rarely ambiguous or lacking in comprehensive answer options. They are not the best survey site though. The best that I have ever been involved in by a long chalk, is Pinecone. It is not an easy site to join however, because membership is nomally by invitation only but at £3 per survey regardless of length, it is easily the best. YouGov take note.

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      20.03.2013 13:56
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      You won't get rich but add this to your repertoire of survey sites and it's worth it eventually.

      If you've never heard of YouGov then listen to some of the national news bulletins. Sooner or later you'll hear the words, "In a YouGov survey most people thought...."

      However, I must admit that when I first joined the site I was a bit disappointed. There didn't seem to be many surveys available and it took a long time to reach the payout level of £50. In fact it was so slow that after the first payout it took me another four years before I was paid again. Surveys weren't sent all that regularly and they were mostly worth 50 points, the equivalent of 50p. The payout level needs to be 5000 points.

      Last year, in 2012 the site seemed to pick up a bit and in November I was able to cash in another £50. The number of surveys has increased and it is easier to build up points now than it was before. Even at this rate though it will still take me a year to earn £50. Nevertheless there are some very good reasons to stick with the site.

      First of all the surveys are always sent to you via email.
      The links in the email always work. (this doesn't always happen with survey sites.)
      If you are chosen as a respondent you will very rarely be disqualified from completing the survey.
      The surveys are not very long and are often very interesting. Most of them have a political or social slant.
      The site is reliable in that you will be paid if you do the work.

      There's one thing you need to watch. When you've completed the survey you'll be asked to rate it. This is easy enough but when you submit the answers a pop up screen appears and asks you if you would like to convert your points to draw entries. If you want to build up points and don't want to enter the draw, make sure you click on the link that says, "No thanks." This link is smaller than the one that says, "Yes please," and it's far less obvious. Don't be fooled into giving away your points when you've earned them. I find this a cheap trick to save a little bit of money.

      If you're interested in politics you may want to explore other areas of the site. On the home page you have up to date political news plus the latest on how people will vote in an election. You'll also find links to the results of recent surveys and articles written by well known journalists such as John Humphrys.

      Elsewhere on the site you also have the opportunity to complete your profile or Opigram. This consists of a number of profiling surveys for which you don't get paid.

      On the whole I would recommend joining YouGov. You don't get paid very often but when you do get £50 it's very useful indeed. Payment is by cheque and has been very reliable for me. It took around three weeks for the cheque to arrive last time but times may vary.

      I would say go for it. It's worth the small amount of time you need to spend on the surveys.

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      15.10.2012 02:04

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      I've been a member now for several years, and only just hit the $100 reward level - which I claimed - 6 months ago. Not only have I never received the promised check, I can't get any email response to my inquiries about it......although, my inbox is still regularly filled with available surveys. What a waste of time.

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      11.04.2012 23:36

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      After almost 3 years, I finally earned 5,000 points. When I chased a month later, they said I would get the cheque in 7 - 10 days. Since then, they've stopped responding.They don't have a number - so no other way of contacting them.Anyone know where their registered address is ?

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      20.03.2012 02:27

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      I am 125 points from my 3rd £50 payout. Am seriously thinking about closing my account as soon as payout is confirmed.

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      27.02.2012 19:10
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      see review.

      I have been a member of YouGov for about three years and recently I have got my payment for the first time from the survey website.

      About YouGov:

      YouGov is an online survey panel which was launched in the UK in May 2000 and is a member of the British Polling Council. As an international internet-based market research firm YouGov is available in different countries and areas, to name a few, the UK, the USA, Germany and Middle East etc.

      General information:

      1. Sign Up

      I'm from UK so my review is based on my experience with YouGov UK panel. Signing up for an account is very easy. It is free to join for anyone aged 16 plus and living in the UK. You just need to provide an email address and a password. You can also link your account with your Facebook.

      The Surveys:

      Similar to most survey websites you can take part in a survey when you get survey invitation from YouGov. You can also visit the site and click the item of "Available YouGov Surveys" to see if there is a survey available for you or not.

      The surveys are mostly your opinions about different policies taken by British government and news happened around the world. You can also give your opinion about famous companies and different products or services you have used.

      There are two kinds of survey. One is a paid survey, where rewards are calculated in points. The other one is called Oracle survey which gives you a chance to enter a monthly prize draw. Depending on the survey length the rewards vary between 25 points and 50 points or more. Currently 100 points is equal to 1 pound.

      The Payment:

      Once your earnings reach 5000 points you can redeem them into your bank account. Usually it would take one month to complete. You can also spend YouGov points on the monthly prize draw to win prizes.

      The referral:

      Not only can you earn rewards for completing online surveys for money, you can also be rewarded for recommending friends. Once your friend finishes five surveys you will receive 200 bonus points.

      My experience:

      I have joined over 20 paid surveys websites since 2009. YouGov is the first one of them and last one to get paid.

      First, I like the surveys which are mostly about politics and social issues. The layout of the surveys is quite pleasing and easy to follow.

      Second, the survey rewards are appropriate for the time I have spent. Generally the surveys are very easy to answer and take about 5 or 10 minutes to finish. After I've completed each survey, the payment has always instantly appeared in my YouGov account. Last but not least I never get screened out from their surveys.

      Third, YouGov has two payment options: cash and prize draw. I don't like to spend my points on their draws, but I'm happy to get paid by cash.

      I like participating in YouGov surveys, however it seems YouGov doesn't have many surveys. Usually I can get one invitation per week. Also the £50 payment threshold was too high to me. It took me almost three years to redeem my first earning of £50.

      Conclusion

      All in all YouGov.com is a paid survey website that pays you cash. To make more income you need to join in paid survey websites as many as possible. For the reason I would like to recommend YouGov to people who want to make some extra pennies for their free time.

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        19.11.2011 11:04
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        A complete waste of time

        I joined YouGov in June 2009 as a way of earning a few extra pennies. Its now November 2011 and I am still 100 points away from reaching the £50 reward. I only seem to receive 2 surveys per month (and the reward can range from 25-100 points) so you can imagine how long it will take to reach the required 5000 points. The surveys themselves are fairly simple and don't take long to complete and are often based on political views or shopping habits. You get the chance to complete surveys which holds no reward, but does put you into a draw to reach a £50 cheque. Again I don't bother wasting my time. They have recently started to allow you to use your points earned to buy entries into other draws, for example a holiday to Lapland, but again have never bothered to waste the few points that I do actually make on a prize draw that I would never win. The whole concept of YouGov is very disappointing. If they had more surveys available this would be a very good site to join, but sadly the volume of surveys seem to decrease the closer you get to the £50. Please don't waste your time.

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          13.03.2011 23:14
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          Unless you like wasting time or like being ripped of then avoid.

          I am not one for writting reviews but thought I would make an exception in this case in the hope it will save someone wasting their time with this. I joined YouGov over 2 years ago thinking it would be a little pocket money from time to time, not expecting to get rich but hopfully make a little to be worthwhile.

          Well 2 years later I finally got the magic 5000 points and got my cheque. Yes I could have closed the account and given up half way through but I thought why should I let them earn from my surveys and not get anything in return so was determined to stick with it. I suspect this is how they get surveys completed for little cost because most people will give up and not bother seeing it through.

          They say the number of surveys you get depends on weather you fit the profile but I found the surveys started maybe a couple a week then gradually died of and would not receive one for a couple of months. They did regularly send "prize draw" surveys that you don't get credit for but the "chance" to win a prize, needless to say I have yet to win.

          I have given 1* rather than none because at least they did send me the cheque.

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          13.03.2011 21:05
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          You will get your £50 eventually, honest!

          YouGov is a survey website which captures information on public opinion. Quite often the topics are politics and current affairs, but other times you get asked opinions of brands (known as brandindex) and things like use of holiday companies. Surveys are paid at 25, 50, 75 and 100 points. There are also prize draw surveys. You need 5000 points for a payout and when you reach that magic amount of points, a £50 wings its way to you pretty quickly.

          I joined YouGov having been made aware of some statistics they had generated and gone snooping on their site. I noticed you could sign up to participate and did so. There are bonus points available for recommending new members and I've encouraged friends and family to sign up with varying levels of success.

          I've been a member of YouGov since 2006 and in that time I've had 2 x £50 cheques and am very near my third. I have friends who have had frustratingly slow process and have never had a payout, and others who have made progress faster than me. I tend to get at least one survey per week and unlike other sites, you are rarely screened out.

          You have to give them profile information about you, your work, what newspaper you read, your political views and I think this information is used to decide what surveys you will get. This would explain the variance in the numbers that some of us get. I have noticed, for example, that since becoming a f/t student after being in f/t paid work I get fewer invites than previously. They obviously have quotas for participation.

          You generally get emails from them inviting you to a survey with a decent (average two weeks) deadline to participate. Initially emails had the amount of points available in it, but now I find that you have to click the survey link to be taken to a page that tells you the reward. Every so often there are surveys called Brand Index which I dislike because they get you to click through page after page of brands, selecting ones you like and don't like, would like to work for and would be ashamed to work for.

          A relatively new development at YouGov has been the TellYouGov project. It is a website (and now app) where you can comment on any number of things by voting either positive or negative and then writing a short bit of feedback on it. Basically it tracks public opinion on hot topics so Nick Clegg, David Cameron and the Royal Family are regularly at the top of the leaderboard of comments with a host of weird and wonderful opinions of them. There is a chance to win £50 per day in a draw that all participants are entered into.

          Overall, I like YouGov. It is slow to reach payout but I find the surveys interesting and it's well worth it when a £50 cheque drops through the door. It's worth a go to see how it works for you and you've nothing to lose.

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            01.03.2011 20:06

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            Hardly get any surveys from them, I've had one. That you get points for now. You need 5000 to get £50 but I have 100 points and have heard you only get a few a month. Would take years to get the £50, I closed the account and would advise people to stay well clear it's a joke.

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            28.02.2011 17:29
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            Not a bad site if your in it for the long haul.

            I joined You Gov just over a year ago now, I have £14.75 or 1475 in points. You need to reach the threshold of £50/ 5000 to get a pay out. Although at this rate it's going to take me another three years to get there!

            Surveys usually pay about 50p to 70p a time and take about 5/10 mins. I don't feel as though I have to work particullarry hard for my money, some surveys sites demand a lot more effort. The surveys consist of multiple answer questions. I get about one or two a month, but everyones different depending on your circumstances.

            The surveys are quite interesting, they usually focus on politics. You do feel as though your opinion may count for something. You feel like you can trust YouGov it's a nice clean looking site.

            It's not a bad survey site, regular surveys although a high pay out. If I am honest I'm not going to be continuing once I get my pay out, but now I've started I'll finish. =]

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            07.02.2011 18:15
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            It won't make you rich but it's a good site if you enjoy doing surveys

            YouGov is a site which pays its members for filling out surveys on a variety of things. For most surveys you can earn 50 to 250 points (250 is rare) and once you reach 5000 you can exchange for a cheque for £50 (they used to just talk in pounds and pence and I have no idea why they chose to convert to points when they equate to the same thing). There are also surveys where you don't get paid get an entry into a prize draw for various amounts, generally £25, £250 and £1000. It also has very occasional focus groups but they tend to be in their offices in London (they are based near Old Street) and they are in the middle of the day so you have to work near there to go to these really. You can also refer people to the site and if they sign up via your link you earn what they earn in their first 3 months.

            The amount of surveys you get invited to do varies a lot. You might get a couple of weeks when you get loads and then a month or so with none.

            I have been a member for just over two years and in that time I have received 1 cheque for £50, attended a focus group and earned £20 and my current points total is 2275. I enjoy filling out surveys (yes I am that sad) so it's fine but if you don't then it's not worth doing it solely for the cash.

            In my opinion, the thing that makes YouGov stands out from other survey sites and is the best for the following reasons:

            They are totally honest about what a survey pays. All other sites I have used tend to ask screening questions first and then tell you that you are not in the correct group which leads to you wasting a lot of time. YouGov does not do this. If you are invited to do a paid survey and you complete it you will always get paid.

            You can also leave surveys half way though and come back and finish them (before the survey closes) when you have time.

            When you (finally) reach the £50 threshold you receive your cheque within 2 weeks.

            On each survey invitation YouGov send an approximate time that it will take to complete. This is usually accurate and is useful in knowing whether or not you want to do it then.

            The points don't expire. Once you have earned them they are yours.

            In summary I love YouGov but that is because I like doing surveys. It does take a long time to build up to £50 and I have never won a prize draw despite entering pretty much all of them. I think it would be an improvment if you were able to exchange your points at a lower threshold though, perhaps if they followed DooYoo's example and had a lower threshold for Amazon vouchers or something like that.

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              29.01.2011 18:29
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              Not a good site - start with Valued Opinions or GfK if you actually want to see some rewards!

              My mother-in-law does a lot of survey sites and she assured me that YouGov was great. She got £50 from them in under a year. She must've been lucky, though. I went through 3 months without any surveys (worth points) being offered and now, after getting a 50 or 25 points survey every now and again, I'm finally at 4450 points. It's taken two and a half years to get this far and I took EVERY survey that was made available to me.

              I encouraged a couple of friends to join the site last year (for every survey they took, I was supposed to get the same amount of points as a reward) and guess what? For the first few months my two friends weren't offered any points valued surveys! What a scam!

              Once (or should it be, if I ever) reach 5000 points and qualify for my £50 cheque then that's it. No more YouGov. It's annoying that they have obviously decreased the value of surveys but, at the same time, kept the ridiculously high payout amount.

              If you want to join a survey site that actually pays out (although in vouchers), try Valued Opinions. In under 9 months, I've received £50 of Amazon vouchers from them. GfK are also quite good (you usually win a few pounds of vouchers in one or two of the prize draws).

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              24.11.2010 15:30
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              A reputable company offering interesting and easy surveys

              Like most people, I don't do online surveys and opinion polls simply for the love of it. I do it because it's nice to make a bob or two, however slowly, or receive the odd Amazon or Marks & Spencer's voucher. Over time I've discovered there are good and bad survey companies, many of whom seem to be interlinked, and I now confine myself to a select handful, mainly of those who don't let you complete half a survey before screening you out or where I know that I frequently fit the demographic. One such is YouGov.

              YouGov are one of the most well known survey companies, certainly in the UK, and results from their polls are frequently quoted on television and in other areas of the media. YouGov claim to have over 280,000 panel members and their surveys tend to cover such subjects as politics and general reading and buying habits, rather than about specific products, or that has been my experience at any rate.

              The website and signing up

              The website is well laid out and easy to navigate although there isn't really much need to visit to site other than to check your account because, once registered, you'll be sent invitations to take part in surveys via email which link directly to that survey. Apart from the area dealing with the panel, there are other sections dealing with members letters dealing with subjects as diverse as the NHS and the environment to Russell Brand and the BBC. There is also a section covering commentaries on issues of the day from people such as John Humphreys from the Today programme and Anthony Wells, a political analyst. There is also a section dealing with results from recent surveys and current topics that people are sounding off about.

              The surveys:

              I can only speak from a personal perspective but, on average, I receive two survey requests a month, three at the most, and payment is generally 50p per survey, although some of the longer ones pay £1. Like all survey sites, you aren't going to get fabulously wealthy and if you calculate the hourly rate, it's generally way below the national minimum. Payout is by cheque into your bank account and takes place when your account reaches 5000 points which equates to £50.

              Most of the surveys that I've been sent over the three or more years I've been with YouGov, have tended to be either political or asking what newspapers/magazines I read, as well as very general questionnaires concerning my buying habits. For instance, during the General Election period, I was asked to complete a survey immediately following the three televised debates, giving my opinions on who I thought had won the debate, which party had the best policies and for which party I intended to vote. I find the newspaper surveys very easy to complete, because I so rarely buy or read a newspaper. I prefer to get my news unfiltered through the likes of Rupert Murdoch!

              The surveys vary between about ten minutes and twenty five to thirty minutes in length and the questions asked are always very simple to understand and response is generally selecting from the options provided. The general buying surveys usually present the respondee with a screen full of names of manufacturers, for instance, from which you firstly choose those you have a positive reaction to and then those for which you have a negative response. The names tend to be well known ones such as CocaCola, Microsoft, BMW, Sky etc. The most recent survey I completed was about online buying as opposed to high street shopping.
              What do I like about YouGov?

              The thing I like best about YouGov is that if you're invited to complete a survey, you are unlikely to be screened out half way through and at the end of each survey, you're given the opportunity to add anything further you wish to say, not only about the survey, but on any topic of your choosing. As I find that sometimes the questions in online surveys can be somewhat ambivalent, it's good to be able to clarify matters and I also love the fact that I can instigate a topic so that if I'm feeling particularly annoyed at some politician or even a celebrity, I can vent my spleen and see whether others agree with me. It's always good to find out that you aren't the only one who thinks Michael Gove is a prat or that Prince Charles shouldn't ever be king!

              What do I not like about YouGov?

              It takes quite a while to get to 5000 points and when you do, it takes about another eight weeks before you receive your cheque. It's also worth bearing in mind that YouGov not only send invitations to take part in paid surveys but also unpaid ones, too, which offer a chance to win in their prize draws but no monetary reward for completing the survey, so if you're only in it for the money, you have to make sure you're not wasting your time.

              Conclusion

              Although not the best paying opinion pollsters out there, I find YouGov to be one of the better and more reputable survey companies and on the whole, the surveys that I've been sent have been reasonably interesting and easy to complete, especially the political ones. If you have a spare few minutes, it's an easy way to earn the odd 50p and if you're prepared to wait about a year before you amass enough for a £50 cheque it's worth signing up.

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