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John Lewis CCJ100JLU

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    5 Reviews
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      29.08.2011 18:20
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      I absolutely love the taste of freshly squeezed orange juice and dislike the processed juice you get in the cartons from super markets. I have never found a brand of orange juice that i like or that tastes good or real. I only ever drink fresh orange juice first thing in the morning to accompany my cereal and i count that as part of my five a day fruit. I had a hand juicer before but took a lot of time and effort to get half a glass. My mother bought me the John lewis CCJ100JLU juicer when it was on sale.

      John lewis CCJ100JL juicer cost £15 reduced for £25.00. This comes packaged in a white box with the exact picture of the juicer on the front. Inside the juicer and contents are individually wrapped in plastic, i felt the plastic packaging was a bit over the top and once i had unwrapped everything i has a compact box over flowing with clear plastic bags.
      The instructions that come with the juicer and easy to read and take in.

      The juicer is a nice compact size and does not take up too much room on my kitchen worktop , it measures roughly as being 11 inches tall and 6 inches wide. It is made from stainless steel and has black plastic trim around the base and the neck. The lid of the juicer is clear and twists on.
      Cable comes out the back of the juicer near the bottom of the base, it is a good length around 16 inches more that enough to reach a socket or at least in my kitchen anyways.

      The juicer is very easy no real setting up just plug in, cut oranges in half and take the clear lid of and all set to go. When the clear lid has been removed there is a small white cone shaped lump of plastic that sticks up this is where you place the orange and press the big round button in and the cone starts turning. There is one one button on the juicer and its for turning it on and off.
      When the juicer has started turning its loud like a vibrating sound but the juicer machine stays still its just the noise of the cone going round.
      The juice and pulp go through small slits in the cone but the seeds are left in at the bottom of the cone where its deliberately curved up to catch them.
      You have to hold the orange on as the cone turns but don't need to use any pressure nor does it take long to juice around one and a half minutes per slice of orange.
      Once you have used a few oranges you just slide open the drink spout and the orange juice trickles out , just put a glass under to catch the juice first.

      Cleaning is simple because the cone comes out and can be hand washed or put in the dish washer. The outside doesn't really get dirty but i take a damp cloth over it after each use just incase.
      I love the juice i can make although the winter oranges are not as tasty but still good enough. You can juice any citrus fruit in it not just oranges.

      I love this juicer, its stylish and easy to use. I highly recommend it.

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      03.06.2011 09:43
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      We got 1 of these for our Christmas from the Inlaws. They tend to buy quite a few things from John Lewis, and although I would think that all Juicers would be the same, then although this isn't a brand name as such, I imagined that this would probably be just as expensive if not more expensive than a brand name.

      After looking online for the price of this I see that this one sells for around £21. This price may vary though from time of print.

      This looks like the picture on here and it is quite a large product. Well quite bulky, but it can still fit in a gap alright and you just take this out when you want to use this.

      This is easy enough to put together. The packaging inside keeps the unit secure, and the instructions are ok as far as instruction books go. Then again you only have to slot a few bits onto this so not too hard to put together to be honest.

      This is straightforward to use. All you do is cut the Fruit up that you are wanting to Juice. You don't have to cut this too small, but again I wouldn't leave the chunks too large anyway as although the dome part of this where you put the Fruit has some room, it isn't the largest area Due to my experience with a cheaper brand then I didn't want to risk doing this any damage. Sure it can pulp some Fruit with no bother. Just put the Fruti under the Dome bit and push down on it to produce the Juice. Obviously make sure your glass is tucked up tight enough under the spout.

      The Sieve part on this seems to get full of little bits of Pulp quite quick but that is a good thing as your Juice ends up nice and smooth. It's easy enough to stop this and clear out the Pulp with a spoon anyway.

      This processes a glass of Juice in a pretty quick time so have been impressed with this. It is a good product, it looks pretty good and although perhaps a bit expensive in a way for a Juicer then I am happy with this. This comes with a 2 year guarantee as well.

      Makes good Juice

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      03.01.2011 16:00
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      A basic yet very smart citrus juicer from John Lewis.

      One of my New Year's resolutions is so eat more healthily in order to keep the weight from piling onto my hips! I've never managed to go on a diet and luckily I've never needed to, but I think it's only a matter of time now before all those calories I've consumed over the years start of catch up with me... I really do live in fear of this day! In order to keep those calories at bay I really am going to make an effort to eat healthily this year, with the occasional splurge of course, and so for Christmas I'd asked my parents to get me a juicer as one of my presents. I love fresh juice, especially orange, but always find the supermarket brands to be either expensive or unnatural.

      Obviously I managed to find a ridiculously overpriced juicer with a mind blowing amount of gadgets and special features and popped this on my Christmas list... needless to say this wasn't the one I opened on Christmas Day! Instead my parents opted for a John Lewis Citrus Juicer to see if I'd actually use it before they started blowing their life's savings on a more hi tech model... that I probably wouldn't be able to use anyway! This one appeared to be much simpler to work and the fact that there was a lack of additional gadgets to use did make me feel a little more confidant about using it. Now I've tested it out five times I'm ready to share my thoughts...

      The John Lewis Citrus Juicer comes in a white box which features a large picture of the juicer and some basic information. The juicer was all wrapped up inside in plastic bags with foam supports to ensure it didn't get damaged during transportation or anything like that. It's incredibly futuristic looking and very sleek as it's predominately stainless steel with a black plastic base and a clear plastic lid. It looks very smart sat on my kitchen top and the exterior means it's really easy to wipe it clean too. It's 28cm high and has a diameter of 15cm so it really is quite small which makes it easy to store. In fact it looks a little bit like a miniature time capsule!

      The juicer is really easy to assemble, the inner parts simply slot into place and the instructions manual which comes with the juicer makes everything straightforward. There's the main body of the juicer as well as a cover, a juicing cone with a sieve and a juice container with a drip spout. Assembling the juicer took me about three or four minutes the first time around, but that's mainly because I tried to inset all the parts upside down for some reason. The different parts simply need to be aligned and slotted in before plugging in the power cable (which is a reasonable length) and you're ready to go! I've now got the assembling part down to about a minute, go me!

      Operating the juicer is equally easy; firstly you simply need to place a container or glass under the spout ready to collect the juice before pushing the spout down to the open position. After that you need to slice your fruit (it recommends doing this horizontally as it's easier to manage) and place the centre of the fruit on the middle of the juicing cone. In order to start the juicing you need to press the fruit down against the cone using quite a bit of pressure and it'll automatically start the process. Once you can feel the cone through the skin of the fruit it's time to stop, this normally happens after about fifteen seconds as it's quite a quick process really.

      The sieve gets full quite easily, it normally only takes about two to three oranges before you need to empty it but it does mean the juice is really smooth and bit free! Before you empty it the instructions recommend you put the cover back on the juicer and press down, this will activate the juicer and ensure any juice left in the sieve is squeezed out. Another tip is to make sure you close the drip spout when you remove the glass of juice, otherwise it'll keep on dripping out and make a lovely, sticky mess! It normally takes about four oranges to get a decent sized glass of juice which does make it more expensive than buying it from the supermarket... but I don't care!

      I really don't think there's anything quite as healthy or as refreshing as a glass of freshly squeezed orange juice (other than a glass of rose wine or a nice pina colada cocktail but I can't really be having those for breakfast every morning can I?)! I've had no problems assembling or operating this juicer which really is saying something when it comes to me, it really is designed with the more "dim" of us in mind when it comes to electronic products. My friend has the same one and has had hers for over a year now and not had any problems with it so fingers crossed it should last a while, although it does come with a free two year guarantee as well which is good.

      I've found that to get the best results with this juicer it's best to use fairly ripe fruit; if it's unripe it doesn't really yield a lot of juice. It's also good to roll the fruit between your hands or on the kitchen surface as this results in there being more juice as well as using fruit that is at room temperature too. As the name implies, you are limited to juicing citrus fruit only with this juicer, I did think I'd have a go with a peach but it was rather disastrous! So far I've only used oranges on mine although my mum did juice some limes and said it was a great little invention, you could also juice grapefruit, lemons, etc. on this so it is a fairly versatile product to own I think.

      Cleaning the juicer is surprisingly easy, I thought it was going to get really sticky but the exterior parts can simply be wiped clean and then way the juicer works ensures that there are no spillages or splashing. All the removable parts are dishwasher safe and I find as long as I clean it each time there's no mess. The juicer is priced at £21 which I actually think is a very reasonable price. Obviously it is a rather pointless gadget in terms of what is deemed "necessary" in a kitchen as well as being a gadget that you could quite easily live your whole life without and never even miss, but I'm already strangely attached to my John Lewis Citrus Juicer! Happy juicing!

      Thanks for reading.

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        01.09.2010 21:36
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        A great and reliable juicer with a good 3 year guarantee

        We received this juicer as a gift and it has had quite a low of use. In the summer months, it has been used a lot more to juice oranges for lovely fresh orange juice, a perfect accompany to breakfast. The juicer works very well and easily and did not cost much. It even has a 3 year guarantee, which is very reassuring.

        The juicer came in a John Lewis style box and was packaged well with instructions and more papers. The juicer is of a good size but isn't too bulky and we currently sit ours nicely towards the back end of the worktop surface. The juicer is topped off with a stainless steel finish, which is always great with a kitchen gadget as it will not stain when being used around all the potential mess in the kitchen.

        The juicer has a black John Lewis logo on the bottom at the front. It has a widened black base along with a black rim towards the top. A transparent plastic lid covers the juicer when not in use, which helps prevent dust getting in it so you can use it straight away without cleaning all over again.

        The juicer works very easily. You simply half each orange or citrus fruit you have and press it down with the middle part on the device. There is a big 'bump' with ridges on it, which begins turning as soon as pressure is felt on the device. Any seeds, which squeeze out the fruit are prevented from going through to your drink due to the design in which a 'grill' stops large bits going through.

        However you can still get juice 'with bits' as smaller bits will get through, but the design helps to prevent large stringy bits or seeds getting through. If you want your juice without any bits, I guess you can sieve it through after. We usually collect ours in a jug or two and pour individual cups from here.

        All the bits come out with a little pull after use, so you can easily clean it all. You can either do this by hand or put them in the dishwasher as it's all plastic and dishwasher proof. Therefore the maintenance gets a high score from me. It's not perfect though as sometimes the seeds get quite stuck in certain parts. The juice flows through underneath all this into a bowl, where it empties through a nice and wide opening into your jug. The machine slopes back slightly so you can put your jug underneath (or cup) and it should fit well.

        The machine works very well and the spin collects a lot of juice out of the fruit. It can hurt your palms a bit after a while as the top spins right below your hand, but I think this is pretty normal. The machine also has an auto-reverse function where it will spin in the opposite direction to maximise the juice taken out of the fruits as a little spin in the other direction can usually help to get some more juice out. It's a great juicer and works very well - it seems to be of good quality and is reliable. It costs just £21 on the John Lewis site - you could see this as £7 a year considering the machine has a 3 year guarantee. I'm sure ours will continue to last and I'd certainly recommend this if you are looking to buy a juicer.

        Thanks for reading!

        :)

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        26.08.2009 19:35
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        A great little machine for the price

        Let me start by saying that you don't really need this product. Life of a perfectly reasonable quality can go on without one. On the hierarchy of needs it's up there with gas barbecues, classical music mobile ring tones and Dan Brown novels. They're there, so have them if you must. And when it comes to freshly squeezed orange juice, I'm afraid I must. I like my juice straight from the fruit, complete with bits of pulp, pith and a few small pips to give it body. I am not alone. If any of you follow the acerbic, annoying, but always readable Michael Winner restaurant column in the Sunday Times, you'll know he feels the same way, although I like to think that's our only point of resemblance (at the moment - I'm working on the millionaire thing). I'm sure there are others of you in this select band, so read on.

        A one-fruit wonder

        The other thing to make clear at the outset is that although this extracts juice, it is not a Juice Extractor. No. Searching for one of these on Google, you may find yourself absent-mindedly typing in "juice extractor" and an array of attractive products will appear, every one of which will say sternly "not suitable for citrus fruits". Juice Extractors pulp fruit into smoothies and such like; this is a much more exclusive bit of kit and is, of course, a Citrus Press. So here we have a single-use, somewhat superfluous machine with an identity problem, possibly endorsed by a fat bloke selling car insurance on TV. Onwards.

        The fruits of my labour

        I bet all of you have lurking at the back of your kitchen cupboard a plastic juice squeezer consisting of a cone which sits on a collecting dish. Why don't I use one of these, save on kitchen space, electricity and minimise my carbon footprint? Well, I'm weak and feeble and citrus fruits can be real tough cookies, if you'll excuse the mixed metaphor. The blokes in the house wouldn't dream of getting their fingers sticky, but we all want more than a teaspoonful of fresh orange juice for breakfast. I've had an electric citrus press for years now, and when the last one cashed in its pips I reverted briefly to manual labour. For a few weeks it was like a morning workout, and I was shaping up to become a one-sided Popeye until I called a halt and found this machine.

        It's good to torque

        Torque is defined as the force which produces rotation. Amongst petrol heads it is considered a Good Thing, something to do with the mysterious workings of the internal combustion engine. Here, the greater the torque, the more the cone twists against the flesh of the fruit to extract the juice. The electric citrus presses have the same basic shape as the manual ones - a cone on top of a juice collector. A motor generates more power, hence more torque and more juice. Some fruit halves are left as clean as a whistle. It still needs some human input: you set it going by pressing the fruit half down on the cone (there's no on/off switch) and can help it along by squeezing the fruit against the cone as it's rotating to extract more juice.

        Rocket-proportioned...

        All my citrus presses have had the same basic design: motor at the base, juice collector on top, cone on top of that and recently a dust cover to fit over the cone to prevent an interesting admixture of crumbs and dead flies livening up your vitamin C. This particular appliance stands a bit taller, at about 8½ inches, and at first I marvelled, wrongly, at how much juice it would hold. A full 6 inches of this height is motor, leaving the juice collector a relatively shallow 2½ inches. In terms of payload to propulsion think Saturn V rocket. Unlike similar machines which tend to be squat and plastic, this is sleek, the motor section brushed stainless steel and the base and juice collector rocket black. It looks lean, mean and handsome and would not disgrace your elegant kitchen. It positively enhances mine. It also has a trick up its sleeve, or, more precisely, tucked under its dust cover.

        ....and turbo-powered

        When you've squeezed your fruit as normal, put the dust cover over the cone and press again. The dust cover makes contact with connections round the outside rim which switches on the turbo power. The motor develops a deep-throated roar, spins faster and extracts more juice from the pulp and pith left on the cone. I think this dual-purpose is really neat, practical - and effective. It's surprising how much more juice comes out, proving my point that torque is all.

        My cup runneth over?

        No, it doesn't, not even if you're feeding a family of ten for breakfast. Even though the collector is quite small (and a previous one I had was so deep I don't think large areas of it were ever sullied by juice) it has a hinged spout which you leave open when you're juicing, so there's a constant flow out. And into a glass, assuming you remember to put one there, a mistake you make only once. The advantage of the hinge is to stop drips as you're swapping glasses, and when you're done.

        Does it take the strain?

        The design of the filter section has to be a compromise between letting the maximum amount of juice through and holding back as much bitty stuff as possible. From my vast experience of these machines, to err on the side of keeping out the pips means not enough juice comes through and you have to stop every few minutes and clear out the pulp that has gathered. Those of us who like fresh squeezed juice tend to also like the bits that come with it and I'm pleased to say this model has no truck with the no-bits brigade. If you feel moved to sieve freshly squeezed juice I would say you need to get a life and live with tetrapaked reconstituted gloop.

        Coming clean

        The upside is that it's dishwasher proof. The downside is that there's pulp and pith all over everything, including the inside of the dust cover. I recommend rinsing this out right away, as dried citrus pulp has the bonding power of concrete. Get it out of the sink drainer as well. The brushed stainless steel section needs a wipe to keep its good looks.

        Are there any lemons?

        Well, nothing's perfect, so yes, a couple. The faster spin generates such a centrifugal force that the pips and pulp are flung to the outside of the cone section, which has a concave edge, and are a bit of a fiddle to extract, to put it mildly. In the interests of factual correctness, a small digression follows. When I pointed this phenomenon out to the aforementioned blokes-who-won't-get-their-fingers-sticky I was treated to a longish discourse on the fact that centrifugal force doesn't actually exist. It's simply we morons being misled by our senses: the pips and stuff are actually following a straight line while the rotating cone is moving away from them and there is no centripetal force (which does exist) to hold them in place. Or something. Fascinating, although some help in cleaning out the effects of the not-force would have been more practical. Obviously this not-force also chucks the juice out of the spout as the cone is rotating, but even at turbo-speed some is left in the collector. Something to do with flow dynamics, no doubt. I haven't asked. So to get every last drop you have to remember to tip and pour.

        The final segment

        In the £10 - £20 price range I would definitely recommend this. At one time John Lewis didn't sell electric citrus presses at all, but eventually produced this one under their own brand. The next stage up is a more commercial thing with levers, and that's a whole different kettle of physics. Now I expect you're all feeling a bit hot and bothered with all this talk of squeezing flesh, not to mention scientific conundrums, so can I suggest a glass of fresh orange juice?

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      • Product Details

        Short name: John Lewis CCJ100JLU