Welcome! Log in or Register

Inheritance Cycle: Brisingr - Christopher Paolini

  • image
£0.01 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk Marketplace See more offers
7 Reviews

Genre: Junior Books / Author: Christopher Paolini / Hardcover / 704 Pages / Book is published 2008-09-20 by Doubleday

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    7 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      23.12.2009 14:26
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Great fantasy for younger and older readers alike

      Originally this book was meant to be the final installment in the Alagaesia series making it a trilogy, however one book was not enough to finish the series and another will come. This book was a thrilling read (as well as Eragon and Eldest) and I would recommend it to anyone who enjoys a sword and sorcery style book. Following Eragon's attempts to overthrow the tyrannical rule of the evil King Galbaltorix Brisingr explores a number of important concepts including people putting duty before love and the moral dilemma of using power for yourself or for the people. The book's plot is gripping and you will quickly begin to find yourself becoming absorbed in the story, when characters die you will find tears in your eyes after having grown so attached to the characters by Paolini's descriptions of them and their actions. The Alagaesia series is one of my favourites and reading Brisingr will have you eagerly anticipating the next book in the series with passion.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      26.09.2009 10:39
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      3 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      The third installment in Paolini's Inheritance Cycle

      The third book in Christopher Paolini's Inheritance cycle was supposed to be the third and final installment of a trilogy. However, the author soon realised that to condense what was left of the tale into one book would not have been possible, and thus extended it to four books. Brisingr is the third chapter in the cycle, with the promise of the fourth being published just as soon as he's finished writing it.

      If you are planning to read this, then I strongly suggest you read Eragon and Eldest, the first two books in the cycle. The books are best read as a series, as those I have spoken to who have read the books out of sequence have been rather unimpressed, and confused, with the whole thing. Brisingr does contain a good sized synopsis of the two previous books, but there's nothing like reading the whole thing.

      This review may contain elements that could spoil the first two books for you, in a way, but for the sake of plot development and explanation, it must be so. Brisingr starts up the story where the second book left off, with Eragon and his cousin Roran reunited, the former reeling from the attack that Murtagh and Thorn subjected them to. The book certainly feels like filler as opposed to a thrilling read right from the off, as Paolini sets about answering some of the questions he has made us pose in the first two books.

      Eragon is a Dragon Rider, the latest in a long string of historical tradition, supreme warriors and special 'chosen' ones. The heroes of the piece are the Varden, who strive to wrestle control of all lands from the evil tyrant, former Dragon Rider Kingh Galbatorix, who has slain all other dragons and their Riders and who is magically and physically virtually unassailable. Eragon must unite all races of man, dwarf, elf and Urgal (who I believe to be like trolls with a bit of sense), and in this respect, he is sent off on errands by the leader of the Varden, Nasuada, while Roran stays behind.

      There is a huge array of characters involved in the tale, and if you haven't read the first two books, you would be forgiven for being confused as to who any of them are. It is important to understand the basics of the book, and that is the Varden are mounting an assault against Galbatorix's Empire, and that their main (and possibly only) hope lies in Eragon's ability to become the most powerful Dragon Rider ever.

      Paolini manages to incorporate a lot of previous characters and develop them and their involvement even further. Eragon and his blue Dragon, Saphira, visit Oromis and Galedr once again. These two are Rider and Dragon respectively, kept hidden deep in Elven land, away from where Galbatorix's mind can reach them. They are Eragon and Saphira's masters and trainers, and this is one way that the saga takes on a bit of a Star Wars feel, with the whole Jedi training. In fact, the whole Varden vs the Empire has a bit of a Star Wars feel to it as welll, and coupled with some of the characterisation, I found there were a lot of similarities between the two.

      There is also an element of Tolkien present here. I suppose it is hard for any fantasy writer to be able to create a mythical world full of dwarves and elves and magic without such comparisons being made, and in a way that I respect, Paolini has almost resigned himself to this and embraced some of the concepts that Tolkien used. The idea of uniting different races such as dwarves, elves and man to face a common foe, as well as Galbatorix being a far distant foe that is at the end of the quest (as was Sauron for Tolkien's Lord of the Rings), are just a couple of similarities, and while these comparisons will inevitably be made, I feel it's important to understand that the overlying concept is about Dragon Riders, and this is indeed a bit of a new theme. Sure, Tolkien had his villains flying around on great birds of evil, and Lucas has his stormtroopers on X-Wing and Tie Fighters, but Paolini's Dragon Riders are a different concept, and one that is lovingly explored by the author.

      Paolini uses ancient languages for the speech of some of the elves, dwarves and other races that emerge in his saga. Some words, such as brisingr itself, are derived from the Norse language. Others are taken from fictional languages, but all are lovingly and carefully explained in the back of the book in a sort of glossary of terms to help us understand them. This is a nice littel addition to the end of the book.

      The 'higher being' element of Dragons and elves is explored in a bit of detail in this book, as is the customary electing of a new Dwarf King to unite the various clans. While these elements can be very interesting at times, I did feel as if page upon page of endless description was coming out, and this was, at times, a turn off, something that made me put the book down. These customs and descriptions regarding Eragon's mission were thrilling as creations, but in fitting with the stories running alongside them in alternating chapters with Roran fighting his way around Paolini's Alagaesia to earn his ranks in the Varden's army, the click just wasn't there. Some may argue that this provides something for different types of fans of Paolini's work. Those interested more in the historical side and the customs are rewarded with clever and extensive descriptions, while those looking for gore and battle get it in a good chunk. However, it made the reading stuttery for me. I like a tale I don't want to put down, no matter the topic at the time.

      In a way, I was confused and surprised at the decision to make a fourth book, especially considering how much time Paolini spends on drawing out customs and events. What could have been done in a few pages often becomes a few dozen, and the book still ends up beign 750 pages long. In his acknowledgements section, Paolini gives thanks to his editors, saying that the book was a LOT longer before they got their hands on it. All I can say is, 'Thanks!'

      Who knows? Perhaps Paolini will finish the cycle and then continue to write about the land of Alagaesia, much as Tolkien did with Middle Earth. Then we may see books dedicated to the history of the land, specifically for the fans. This may be an idea, and could keep the tales themselves to a shorter and more enticing length.

      Still, this is all personal opinion. I still rate the book as a very good read, and one I would definitely recommend. It is, I feel, essential to read Eragon and Eldest first, as despite the synopsis of the two at the beginning of Brisingr, you don't get a feel for the characters as much, and a lot of the writing is character specific. Paolini has done a good job, make no odds about it, but I would have preferred less descriptive areas and the book being kept a little shorter.

      Either way, I eagerly await the release of his fourth book, whatever it may be named and whenever it may be released. I am completely caught up in the story, and ache for the knowledge of how it all ends. The characterisation has proven worth the time and effort, as you get a true feel for them all, and isually in my mind I found it easy to picture the characters, be it dragon, man or other. Those of you put off by the disappointment that was Eragon the film, cast it aside and pick up the books. They are a damn sight better, and well worth your time. Paolini is a good author, and has created a good world here. I suggest you enter it from the beginning. Happy reading!

      Brisingr is currently available from amazon.co.uk for £7.81. No doubt you can pick it up for cheaper elsewhere. Either way, it's a nice one to have in your collection, especially if you already have Eragon and Eldest. Paolini is set to release an extended edition of the book at some point in October 2009, which would contain extended scenes (deep breath!) and some furtehr artwork. The artwork on the front cover and with the internal maps is excellent, particularly the attention to detail on the covers, each one of the cycle featuring a different Dragon. Eragon's cover features Saphira, Eldest's has Thorn (Murtagh's Dragon), and Brisingr has the golden hue of Glaedr as its cover artwork. Paolini himself doesn't know how artist John Jude Palencar can top his efforts for the fourth book. I'm interested in seeing how Paolini will....

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        26.07.2009 18:38
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A great book, I would recommmend it to anyone

        This book is the third of four books in the Inheritance Cycle. The book is still not as good as the first in the series but it is much better than the second.

        There is a lot more happening in this book and although Eragon still does a fair bit of learning and boring travelling, it is more balanced as he is involved in more key events and there is more action as the Varden step up there campaign against the Empire.

        One of the best things about this book is that it starts to answer some of the questions posed in the first two books. Such as where Galbatorix gets all his extra power from and how Eragon gets a weapon from "under the roots of the menoa tree"

        This book is also quite a bit darker than the previous two as Galbatorix brings out some of his more evil spells and strategies. there is also more violence than the first two books. This leads to more tension and anticipation as the book reaches it's climax.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          01.06.2009 16:46
          Very helpful
          (Rating)

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          The best book in the inheritance cycle

          Brisingr is the third book of the Inheritance trilogy. Written by Christopher Paolini who wrote his first book (Eragon, the first book in the inheritance cycle) at the age of fifteen when he graduated from high school.

          Brisingr is set in a magical land called Alagaesia which is ruled by an evil king called Galbatorix who has enslaved Eragons half brother Murtagh and his dragon, Thorn, who have no choice but to obey Galbatorixs every command.

          Eragon and Saphira are the last free rider and dragon alive with the exception of their teachers Oromis (an old elf rider) and his dragon (Glaedr) who both have serious disabilitys from past battles. They are fighting with a rebel group called The Varden which is lead by Nasuada and a strong willed woman who wants nothing other than to see the evil king overthrown.
          Fighting along side The Varden Are Urgals: Huge muscular beings with horns. Then theres the Surdens, humans who managed to survive Galbatorix's reign or terror and create there own small country called Surda which is in the south of Alagaesia. The book is filled with war and fights between brothers, dragons and riders.

          This book is a fantastic read and I would recommend it to anyone who likes fantasy books. its one of the best books that i have read so far and has got to be the best one in the Inheratance Cycle.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          26.05.2009 10:32
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          2 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          The series just gets better and better

          Brisingr is the third book of the Inheritance cycle (Eragon and Eldest were the first and second). Eragon finds himself tangled in promises he's made and needs to get them off of his conscience. His main promise is to his cousin who's bride to be has been kidnapped and wishes to go and rescue her, Eragon has his own reasons to kill the kidnappers as well. Eragon goes in search of a new weapon, as his friend had stolen his sword 'Za'rok' from him, but will he find a new one in time in time? Brisingr is an amazing book just bursting with information at every page; you'll just want to keep reading. Roran has his separate path also in this story, where he joins the ranks of the Varden and begins to fight for the people of 'Alagaesia'.

          Brisingr is defiantly the best of the three books. Although none of the others were bad at all, this one caught more of my attention and held it throughout the entire story. Paolini's writing just seems to get better and better. Now I really can't wait for the forth book to come out.

          Brisingr is captivating, fun, interesting and a good read. Enjoy Eragon and Eldest? Then you'll be thrilled to know that this book is the best.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            22.02.2009 12:14
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            3 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            A meandering tale that may appeal to fans of the series.

            'Brisingr' means 'fire' in the ancient language of the world Paolini has created; unfortunately, 'fire' is exactly what this story lacks. In fact, it plods. Conversations are followed by internal moralising (of a very limited nature) which is followed by some political debate (ie. more conversation) and every once in a while there is an extended action sequence (more on these later). I find it very revealing that this should have been the final title in the 'Inheritance' trilogy, but it became so lengthy that Paolini decided to publish (at least) one more book to create a (VERY profitable) series. Realistically, this was not necessary: so much of what is in this book is mundane and unnecessary and - somewhat bizarrely, given the length - undeveloped. By which I mean that that after pondering, pontificating and pouting, the characters act and that section of the story just closes, without really changing anything or anyone, or anyone's opinion of anyone.

            I have not read the first two in the series, so I cannot comment on how far the style here is similar, but I would imagine that to create such a successful fantasy series, you would have to include more elements of fantasy. Instead, Paolini mainly switches between two styles: extreme violence and gore; political/ moral conversation. Rather than seeing the main characters learning spells or exploring elvish or dwarvish customs (other than an extremely dull section regarding electing a new chief), we see copious amounts of slaughter.

            The novel opens when Eragon (our hero) and his cousin, Roran, are hiding from a cult and about to witness a rather unpleasant custom. As part of their sacrifice to their Gods, these people hack off their own limbs and smile beatifically as they spray blood over the altar. Although Eragon reflects that it seems wrong to deliberately mutilate yourself, it is revealing that there is a 'spark of excitement' in his heart as he watches them. His cousin is horrified, exclaiming that they are cannibals. Our hero calmly points out that this is not strictly true because 'they do not partake of the meat.' His reasoned approach is perhaps sensible, but it seems that war has dulled his own senses. Later on this lack of empathic response is emphasised when he and Roran fight in seemingly endless battles, repeatedly slaying soldier, after soldier, after soldier. Obviously, war does inure soldiers to death to some extent, but some genuine discomfort in the hero would make him more realistic and likeable. Instead of giving him this sensitivity, Paolini emphasises his violent credentials by describing how he and Roran kill each individual soldier and are hailed as magnificent heroes. Yes, there is a lot of violence in war, but I found it disturbing the way the author and his characters seemed to revel in carnage.

            At the beginning of the book, Eragon has three main aims: rescue Katerina, Roran's beloved, continue his training with Oromis and defeat Galbatorix. One of these aims is tackled early on, another is touched upon towards the end of the book, but where is Galbatorix? After 750 pages, the dread warlord himself has not been seen and Eragon is almost exactly where he was at the beginning of the story: preparing to do battle against the evil King. This is slightly disappointing. After a few initial skirmishes, much of the book follows Eragon as he tries to meet the demands of the many oaths he has sworn, some of which are almost conflicting and result in important people trying to assert their control over him.

            There is a continuous sense of plot, and although the reading never becomes exactly dull - how could it when you are describing interactions between dragons and elves? - it never becomes gripping, either. I read this book slowly, because I was never compelled to find out what happened next. Perhaps, for me personally, it is almost too clearly a saga. There is never any real sense of stories opening or closing, only a gradual build-up of information. Some characters seem to appear briefly just to say: "look! I'll be important later on! Remember what I said/did/looked like." Because of this, I read along fairly contentedly, with no real impetus to complete the experience.

            It is possible to read this book without having read the previous two, since the author has usefully provided a synopsis of each before the 'main feature', but I question why anyone would want to. I suspect that those who have read and enjoyed 'Eragon' and 'Eldest' might be more willing to tolerate the lack of drama in this instalment because they share some bonds with the characters. Those who haven't read either should probably start there, because I suspect this is the weakest link in the series so far.

            So is it worth reading? Personally, I think not. It was not a bad read really; it's just that there must be much better books out there, and 750 pages is a long time to spend on something that doesn't really grip you. I will qualify my review by stating that I do not typically read fantasy stories and much prefer science fiction or crime fiction or - well, most other types of writing, really. I read this as part of shadowing the 'Berkshire Book Award' with a group of pupils and will be very interested to hear their views on it, as they are the target audience.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              29.01.2009 13:19
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              1 Comment

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              well worth reading

              This is the third installment of the Inheritance title, there was only supposed to be three books but as it would have been to big they have split into two. This is quite disappointing as I really wanted to know what happened but also quite good as there will be more adventures of Eragon and his dragon Saphira and the rest of the Varden, and usually when a series has finished I really want them to carry on.

              The story starts with the rescue of Katrina by Eragon and Roran from the Razacs lair deep inside the Empire, after they have succeeded Saphira flies Roran and Katrina home to the Varden whilst Eragon has other business to attend to this is one of the first decisions that will trouble him through the course of the book. He is learning with his new and increased powers that there is also a lot more responsibilty and consequences that could happen when he uses them.

              This book follows many characters although it has been done in a really good way, they fit in with each other and actually have a purpose for the rest of the story. Roran is now a member of the Varden again he is shown as a great leader gaining the trust and respect of the soliders he rides with. His relationship with Katrina also develops and we also learn something of her character. Nasuada the leader of the Varden also comes into the story more she is shown as a clever, resourcful leader. Her personality is also shown more through out the book. This book does develop charaters a lot more than in previous books, I enjoyed this as I feel it is important to known what the characters are like then you understand thier decisions more, although other people I have spoken to feel that this is boring and would rather the book to concentrate on the action rather than the personalities.

              Paolini also tells us more about the culture of the different races of Alegasia as well we learn more about the elves, dwarfs and also the urgals. I enjoyed this and thought it was well done as it helps to create a whole world rather than a few characters.

              It has more happening in the book all the way through rather than a big climax at the end as has happened with the other books. There are battles and coronations. This keeps the reader more interested and helps the story flow more without slowing down in the middle.

              It also continues Eragon and Saphiras training with the elves with a big revelation. This does slow the book down a bit as a whole chapter is used to describe the making of a sword when I read thi book a second time I actually skipped this bit as it didn't really add anything and it was quite boring.

              I really recommend this book it has lots of action, twists and also has more descriptions of races and charater development than in the previous books.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
            • Product Details

              Forces collide in Book III of the phenomenally successful Inheritance Cycle. Eragon represents the greatest hope for a better Alagaesia. Can this once simple farm boy rise to become a leader who can unite the rebel forces and defeat the King? Following the colossal battle against the Empire's warriors on the Burning Plains, Eragon and his dragon, Saphira, have narrowly escaped with their lives. Still there is more at hand for the Rider and his dragon, as Eragon finds himself bound by a tangle of promises he may not be able to keep, including Eragon's oath to his cousin Roran to help rescue Roran's beloved, Katrina, from King Galbatorix's clutches.But Eragon owes his loyalty to others, too. The Varden are in desperate need of his talents and strength, as are the elves and dwarves. When unrest claims the rebels and danger strikes from every corner, Eragon must make choices - choices that take him across the Empire and beyond, choices that may lead to unimagined sacrifice. Conflict, action, adventure and one devastating death await readers as Eragon battles on behalf of the Varden while Galbatorix ruthlessly attempts to crush and twist him to his own purposes.