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That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown - Cressida Cowell

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Author: Cressida Cowell / Format: Paperback / Date of publication: 04 October 2007 / Genre: Picture Books / Publisher: Hachette Children's Books / Title: That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown / ISBN 13: 9781843624530 / ISBN 10: 1843624530

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    4 Reviews
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      09.05.2011 10:19
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      A potential classic

      My child is 16 months so she dosn't mind what I read to her. So books from the library are chosen by me. If they look good I will read it too her. We always get hard board books for her to explore herself with feely bits
      and soft backs for me to read her at bedtime that shes not aloud to touch and rip.

      That rabbit belongs to Emily Brown is a lovely picture book. It was chosen for the Richard and Judy Christmas book, and is a nestle book award winner. The book is fantastic to look at. It is a quirky mix of collage line drawing and photography. With real motorbikes , fish , rainforests ad space rockets.The whole book oozes imagiantion.

      Most books about girls are pink and fluffy and princessy, where this one is not. The story is about a horrible
      silly spoilt Queen, who will do anything to take Emily Browns beloved rabbit Stanley. But Emily Browns not the type to give up easily. The Queen sends her loyal servants to bribe Emily. In the end the Queen steals the Rabbit. But Emily gets him back in her own way.

      There are lots of ways to do actions to keep a small childs attention.

      Overall this is an entertaining read for young and old alike.

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      10.07.2010 01:17
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      One of the best picture books around today

      I have always read to my daughter and encouraged her to enjoy books. I was delighted when she came home from nursery at the age of three and described the book that had been read to them in class. Up until then all her books were ones that I had picked and if she mentioned stories from nursery then it was only to say that it was one we both knew. It felt like a very "grown up" moment with my three year old going into great detail about a girl who would not give her rabbit to the Queen. She knew the exact title of the book so off I rushed to Whsmith and bought "That Rabbit Belongs to EMILY BROWN".

      My copy of "Emily Brown" is a paperback version. It is quite large in size and has a fun cover that would catch your attention. The cover shows Emily cuddling her rabbit with two potential bunny thief's watching from behind a wall and others watching them from the sky. The title is large and spreads across the middle with the words Emily Brown in red being the only bright colour on the page. There are thirty one pages in the book; every one having a picture which vary from drawn to photo types.

      ***The story***

      Emily Brown had an old grey rabbit called Stanley. Emily and Stanley seem to do everything together and in Emily's make believe world that could involve launching into Outer Space, riding through the Sahara Desert, diving off the Barrier Reef and climbing through the Amazonian rainforest. Unfortunately for Emily Queen Gloriana notices Stanley and decides she wants him for herself. Her offers to Emily are very generous up to the point where she offers all the toys Emily could ever desire in return for Stanley. Emily makes it quite clear that Stanley is NOT for sale.

      The Queen would not give up she sent her Special Commandos to steal Stanley. On discovering her missing rabbit Emily Brown runs to the palace. Poor Stanley has been washed and stuffed and is looking miserable. The Queen is distraught that Stanley is not the same and she asks Emily what to do. Emily gives the Queen one of her own new golden teddy bears and gives her advice how to treat him.

      A couple of years later Emily hears from the Queen again simply with a note saying "Thank you".

      There is a lot of repetition in the book which encourages the children to join in more as they know what to say. The writing is very clear, it changes in size and font often which I think makes the whole reading experience more fun. It is an easy book to read and add different voices to. My daughter used to like it when we changed the words to her name and her beloved pink bear.

      This book won a Nestle book prize gold award in 2006 and was also chosen as one of the Richard and Judy Christmas books.

      ***Illustrations***

      The illustrations were done by Neal Layton. I have just googled him to find out some facts and it says that he like his illustrations to appear as fresh and spontaneous as possible. He says he uses all sorts of different media to make the pictures. This would explain a lot as some of the pages in the book look like they have a photo with drawings on them. What ever way you explain his style Neal certainly has an eye for detail as there is so much going on in each picture. Even now after reading the book many many times we find something else going on in a picture we hadn't noticed before.

      ***The Author***
      Cressida Cowell grew up in London and on a small, uninhabited island off the west coast of Scotland. By the age of eight she started writing stories. She has also written the series of books called "How to train your dragon" which has just been made into a film.

      ***The Price***

      Being impatient I rushed out to get my copy from Whsmith at a cost of £5.99. I have just looked on Amazon and it is available new for £3.98 or used from £1.44.

      ***Verdict***
      A truly wonderful book that will stimulate any childs imagination. I think this book would appeal equally to girls and boys from the age of three up to ten. This story is so well written, it is charming, funny and touching. I think everyone can relate to that special toy you would never part with.

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      18.01.2010 16:33
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      5 stars

      That rabbit belongs to Emily Brown, is a story of imagination and adventure between best friends Emily Brown, and an old grey rabbit called Stanley. It follows them along their adventures in outer space looking for alien life forms, through the Sahara Desert on their motorbike, deep sea diving off the Barrier Reef, and through the Amazonian Rainforest. Along the way they have a barrage of rat-a-tat-tat's on various doors, from various members of the Queens employees. They vary from the Chief Footman, the Capain of the Army, the Admiral of the Navy and the Wing Commander of the Air Force. They all have the same request and that is that Emily Brown hand over 'bunnywunny' (or Stanley as Emily keeps reminding them) at once in exchange for as many toys as Emily Brown wishes. Of course, Emily Brown wants nothing more than her lovely, cuddly Stanley, but will she get to keep him?! I was rather strangely hooked on this book the first time I read it to my daughter and couldn't wait to get to the end to find out what happened! That sounds slightly strange, but all parents will know that story time can throw up some horrendously boring and dull childrens books, so when you find one you actually like.... well, your hooked!!

      This book is absolutely wonderful. There is so much going on when your reading it, that each time you read this aloud to your child, it can be done in a different way. The variety of posh admirals, footmen, etc are just crying out for stupid voices, and my daughters absolute favourite is when I stick my finger over my nose and start to talk as the Chief Footman. It has her squealing with delight, and I will always remember this story for those lovely moments. The illustrations also allow for this book to be read with different tasks each time. The illustrations are coupled with photographs every couple of pages, adding depth to the adventure and making it seem even more lifelike. My daughter likes the page where Emily and Stanley are on their adventure in the Amazonian Rainforest with an endless view, with cartoon flowers over the top. She likes for us to count together, and spot new things each time we read.

      The text of this book is fab with different font sizes and certain words emphasised in bold, allowing for the less established story time reader to add a little oomph to their read out loud story. My husband in particular is pretty bad at reading stories out loud to our girls - he would be the first to admit it - but he loves reading this story!

      Given how utterly fantastic this book it, it's no surprise that it was a Nestle Book Prize winner - Gold no less!

      RRP: £5.99.

      Pick this book up for storytime - you'll love it (and your children might just do too!!)

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        06.11.2009 17:15
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        One of my favourite picture books

        Emily Brown loves her grey rabbit, Stanley, to bits, even though he is old. Together they have adventures around the house and garden, imagining that they are going up into space, crossing the Sahara on a motorbike, climbing through the Amazonian rainforest or diving off the Barrier Reef.

        At the start of 'The Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown' life seems wonderful until the Queen notices Stanley and decides she wants him for herself. She sends envoy after envoy: her chief footman, the captain of the army, the admiral of the navy and the wing commander of the air force. Emily is offered a brand new teddy bear and a tempting lists of toys in return for Stanley, but she refuses them all. She becomes even more angry when the envoys refer to Stanley as Bunnywunny. Eventually she pins a large notice on her back gate stating in no uncertain terms that Stanley is not for sale and that his name is not Bunnywunny.

        This seems to work for a few months, but unfortunately the Queen has not given up. Eventually she send her special commandos in the middle of the night to steal Stanley. Emily is distraught when she wakes up, and she marches up to the palace to confront the Queen.

        The Queen has done unforgiveable things to Stanley and is in tears. Poor Stanley has been through the wash, stuffed, and stitched up. He just isn't right any more. The Queen begs Emily for help. Emily says she will take Stanley home, and she tells the Queen to play with the brand new golden teddy, take him to bed at night, hold him very tight and have lots of adventures.

        Two years go by until Emily and Stanley hear from the Queen again. One day they are exploring the Milky Way when they hear a knock on the door. This time it's the postman with a letter from the Queen that simply says 'Thank you'. At the top, in the middle of the royal crest, is a portrait of the Queen and her golden teddy, both smiling.

        It is not hard to see why 'That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown' was a Nestle Book Prize Gold Award Winner. Cressida Cowell has given us an original story chock full of imaginative adventures and a brave little heroine who defends her beloved stuffed toy to the end. What's more, she knows much more about playing with toys than the 'silly naughty Queen'. This is a story that has plenty in its variety of situations and characters to appeal to both boys and girls alike.

        Neal Layton's accompanying illustrations have a comparable amount of originality. Layton combines photo-montage with his colourful drawings to create the environments where Emily and Stanley have their imaginary adventures. There is plenty of scope here, from sea life and treasure chests at the bottom of the ocean to toucans and monkeys in the canopy of the rainforest. Such pictures could inspire plenty of discussions and provide opportunities for counting or spotting little details.

        The text is in a large, clear font and almost always on a light background. Sometimes there are a few words in a larger font than the rest or in capitals. Speech bubbles add variety on several pages. The vocabulary Cressida Cowell uses is rich and laced with humour. There is a certain amount of repetition, with phrases such as 'there was a Rat-a-tat-tat! at the garden door' or 'And his name isn't Bunnywunny. It's Stanley' occurring each time an envoy visits Emily. Children listening to the story are likely to be able to join in with these, as well as items in the list of toys such as the ten talking dolls that say 'Mama Mama'. A confident young reader might enjoy the challenge of this story, and the repeated phrases will give them encouragement along the way.

        This is a wonderful book to read aloud, as it gives the reader the opportunity to take on several very different types of voice: Emily's, the captain of the army's, the Queen's, as well as those of the other envoys. I have also used it as the basis for a drama session with a group of bright four-year-olds. They loved acting it out and pretending to be an admiral or a wing commander. I can imagine it would work equally well with a group of five- or six-year-olds.

        As there is quite a bit of text and not the simplest vocabulary, I would say that this is a read-aloud book for children of three-years-old and up. Both the story and the characters are wonderful, and I can't think of any other story book that resembles this one in any way. I borrowed a copy from the library, but 'That Rabbit Belongs to Emily Brown' would be a book worth having to keep, I'm sure; one that would certainly make an ideal present.

        Also posted on Ciao and Helium.

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