Welcome! Log in or Register

The Beasties - Jenny Nimmo

  • image
£5.34 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
2 Reviews

Genre: Junior Books / Author: Jenny Nimmo / Paperback / 32 Pages / Book is published 2010-10-04 by Egmont Books Ltd

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    2 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      22.06.2011 20:35
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      4 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A beautiful story book

      When Daisy's family move house, she can't sleep in her big bed in a strange room. She doesn't notice when the Beasties, Floot, Weevil and Ferdinand, creep into her room. After they spread their treasures under her bed, however, Daisy hears a growling noise. It's Ferdinand, and he tells Daisy the story of how he prevented robbers from stealing a king's treasure. As a reward, the king gave Ferdinand a ring; Daisy keeps thinking about the ring and eventually drifts off to sleep.

      The following night it is Weevil's turn to tell Daisy a story. Weevil used to sail on a ship and feed a beautiful bird with biscuit crumbs. After being shipwrecked, the bird rescued Weevil from dangerous creatures. The bird gave Weevil a feather for friendship. When the story ends, Daisy falls asleep and dreams that she is flying with the beautiful bird.

      On the third night, Floot, who has a musical voice, tells Daisy about how he used to sing a princess to sleep. The princess goes missing, but Floot eventually finds her in a forest and sings her favourite song. She gives Floot a button for faithfulness and he takes her back home. Daisy has already fallen asleep as the story ends.

      On the fourth night Daisy, hearing noises, plucks up enough courage to switch on the light. Looking under her bed, she sees the Beasties for the first time. They tell her not to be frightened, and she asks for another story. This time, however, they convince her that she can tell her own story. She starts off very tentatively, but a sea shell inspires her to make up a story about a mermaid. When she has fallen asleep, the Beasties whisper 'Night night, Daisy!' and set off with their treasures. Daisy doesn't need them any more, so they are probably off to stay with another lonely child.

      In 'The Beasties', Jenny Nimmo has created a delightful book of stories within a story. Each of the inner stories that Ferdinand, Weevil, Floot and Jenny tell are unique little gems. There is a sense of adventure as faraway places are visited and young imaginations will be stirred by the desert island, the friendly wolves, the beautiful bird or perhaps the mermaid. Children who actually have moved house will probably be able to identify with Daisy's feeling of strangeness in her new room. 'The Beasties' is also a book that should give young children confidence in making up their own stories, having seen how Daisy was able to do this herself when encouraged to.

      There is a little more text per page than the average picture book. It is always superimposed on an illustration, and sometimes it is printed in light blue on a dark background. The font is not the plainest one, but it is large enough and sometimes certain words or phrases are set in a larger size for emphasis. The vocabulary is quite varied but not to the point of being too complex. 'The Beasties' is definitely a read-aloud book; it will require a fair amount of concentration and is probably best suited for children aged three and a half up to about six. However, the fact that there are four short stories within the book means that it could be read in more than one sitting. It would be quite difficult for the average young independent reader, but a confident one would enjoy the challenge.

      Gwen Millward's illustrations for 'The Beasties' are gorgeous; any adult is likely to admire them, never mind the child being read to. There is a splendid wealth of colour and detail within the pages to bring the stories alive. We see the Beasties' treasures under Daisy's bed: shells, feathers, flowers and buttons. Ferdinand does look rather scary as he roars, but then he sits meekly in front of the king, who wears a turquoise robe patterned with purple leaves. Weevil is tiny enough to ride on the back of the wonderful peacock who rescues him. Floot has a long stripy snout and always looks surprised; Daisy is almost engulfed by curling turquoise waves as she tells the story of the mermaid.

      It might sound as though 'The Beasties' is a girls' book rather than a boys' one, but there are robbers as well as a shipwreck, and most children would enjoy the adventures. It could be a good bedtime read, unless a child might be afraid of the idea of beasties under the bed. The Beasties here, however, are so friendly, and this is clear from the illustrations as well as from the stories. It is a delightful book, crammed as it is with little stories and more than the usual quota of characters, all beautifully illustrated. Highly recommended by the group of three- to four-year-olds to whom I read it.

      The Beasties
      by Jenny Nimmo (author)
      and Gwen Millward (illustrator)
      Paperback, 32 pages
      Egmont Books Ltd, 2010
      ISBN 9781405243353
      Price £5.99 (Amazon £3.53)

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        05.02.2011 17:07
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        4 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A surprising book for bedtime!

        You wouldn't think that a book entitled The Beasties would make good bedtime reading for a small child would you? However you would be wrong because this enchanting picture book holds a delightful tale to share with small children especially as it is all about the magic of bedtime stories.

        A small girl called Daisy is trying to get to sleep in her new bed in her new house. As she tosses and turns, she does not see three small Beasties creep into her room and under the bed. There they spread out all sorts of treasure such as buttons, feathers, pearls and rings. These items are going to be very important for what happens next in the story. At this point Daisy hears a noise and sits up in bed wondering what it could be. It's a growly sound but as she listens more closely she realises that it actually sounds like a story. One of the Beasties, Ferdinand, is telling an enchanting story all about a ring that belonged to a faraway king. Before long Daisy falls asleep wondering about the ring. During the following to nights similar things happen as she hears noises and then realise that Weevil and Floot, the other two beasties are also telling their lovely bedtime stories about sailing ships and beautiful princesses.

        Unfortunately, on the fourth night there are no more stories, so Daisy bravely looks under her bed to where they have been coming from. At first she is scared but then she spots the three Beasties and she soon realises that they mean no harm. In fact, They encourage her to make up her own stories and so, on picking up a light, wispy feather, Daisy starts to tell her on wonderful story. The Beasties have enabled her to become her own storyteller and, as their work is now done, they creep away knowing that her book will no longer feel so big and strange.

        I read this book with my five year old daughter and she absolutely loved the main story and also all of the extra stories within it. It was almost like five stories for the price of one. She particularly liked the way that all of the bits and pieces under the bed inspired the different stories. There are also some gorgeous illustrations that go with the story and very cleverly, these change in style whenever one of the Beasties is telling their story. The Beasties themselves are pictured in great detail and although at first they might appear a bit scary, small children will soon realise that they are not. It is definitely worth while taking time over the pictures in order to appreciate everything within them.

        The way that the book is written seems perfect for small children. There is quite a lot of repetition in the structure of the story which means that it is unlikely to take long before they are able to join in with the story. We also like the way the text is set out on the page with some words drawn attention to as they are bigger and bolder than the rest.

        Overall this is a lovely book to share with young children and although you might not think it at first, it does make perfect bedtime reading.

        The Beasties is currently available on Amazon for £4.99 (February 2011).

        This review has previously appeared under my name at www.thebookbag.co.uk

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments