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The Complete Winnie the Pooh - A.A. Milne

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      05.02.2012 14:56
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      Timeless children`s fiction

      We have all heard about Winnie the Pooh, we have read his stories, watched the Disney films and we have noticed lots of children`s merchandise relating to Winnie the Pooh.But how many of us know how he first began.
      To begin with the books were first written by A.A.Milne who wrote the stories for his son, Christopher Robin,who once had a swan called Pooh (this is how the Pooh bit originated).When Christopher Robin visited London zoo he liked to visit the Canadian bears and he had a favorite one that was called Winifred or Winnie for short ( hence the Winnie part of the name).
      Christopher Robin was given a Farnell teddy bear that was brought from Harrods, originally called Edward, and this was how the Winnie the Pooh stories started when A.A.Milne began to make up stories about this particular toy bear.
      I love these stories because they are really cute and funny and it is hard to believe that these stories were first written in 1926, they are just timeless innocent children`s stories.Pooh has many adventures with his friends Eeyore, Piglet, Rabbit,Owl ,Kanga and her baby Roo. They are all delightful little characters although none of them are very intelligent and Pooh does not have a brain and they all get into some really funny scrapes.
      Winnie the Pooh stories are good for children and adults alike and the illustrations ( originally drawn by E.H.Sheppard) are a pleasure for the eyes.

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      05.09.2008 13:24
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      A book that grows with the reader

      The complete Winnie the Pooh collection of stories is for me simply the best story collection that money can buy.

      I have loved this book ever since it was given to me as a Christmas present by my grandparent when I was 5 years old and since that date I have read the entire collection many times, as has my younger brother.

      This fantastic collection gathers together all of the Winnie the Pooh stories written by A. A. Milne as well as two collections of his poems and presents them in a brilliant way. The book itself is broken down into four sections, two of them full of stories, two of them full of poems. Each section then has its own contents page for easy reference. Each story section contains 10 stories giving a grand total of 20 stories and 79 poems.

      Although the poems are brilliant with some of them being humorous and some more serious, although always appropriate for children, it is for me the stories that make this book so brilliant.

      Each story is follows the adventures of Winnie the Pooh from the first one, which explains who is to to the one in which Eeyore has a birthday, to the one where we meet Kanga and Roo and finally to the last story wher Christopher Robin promises always to play with his Pooh Bear.

      The stories themselves are written beautifully in a way to enchant and encapture a child's imagination. At first they may however seem a little too complicated but as you read along with your child and their reading ability grows you will soon find them happily reading through them themsleves. Whilst they cannot read alone however each story is accompanied by some superb illustrations to allow your child to follow the stories with ease. It is these delicate pictures that really make the book seem so special.

      As you can probably tell I cannot praise this book anymore, as it truly is something I have treasured for a long time and will continue to do so in the future. In my opinion a collection of stories such as this makes the most wonderful present for a child, as it is something that can grow with them and something that can take a bit of pride in owning.

      The collection isn't however the cheapest on the market and wil cost you somehwere in the region of £25 depending on if you shop around or not. The hours of enjoyment that the child will recieve though makes the price in my mimd well justified and I would certainly recommend this book to everyone and anyone, a sit is simply a joy to own.

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        15.12.2004 23:22
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        “Go and pick a bedtime story.” I say. “What about The Very Hungry Caterpillar?” says James. “Can we have Winnie the Pooh, James?” I ask. “Again?” Asks James. “But I like it.” I say.

        So we snuggle up on the bed, and pick a story. This is not an easy task. The Complete Collection has so much to choose from, it could be time for sleep before a decision is made.

        {About the author}

        AA Milne was born in Scotland, but moved to London as a child. Much of his education was provided by his teacher “H.G. Wells”, also a great writer.

        In 1913, he married Dorothy, and they had a son, Christopher.

        In 1924, Alan’s first book, “When We Were Very Young” was published, which is a collection of verses that originally appeared in “Punch”. It was 2 years later that Edward Bear was born. 1927 saw the second book of verses, “Now We Are Six”, and in 1928, the final book, “The House at Pooh Corner” arrived.

        Milne wrote many novels, verses, short stories and plays over the years, but none were as famous as the beloved Winnie the Pooh.

        Alan Milne apparently didn’t write the stories for children, and they were in fact not aimed at any particular market. Contrary to popular belief, he did not often read the stories to his son Christopher, but instead read him stories by Wodehouse instead.

        {About the Complete Collection}

        The book could have a different cover depending on where and when you buy a copy. Ours has the map of the Hundred Acre Wood on it, with a green rectangle in the middle for the title, and a picture of Christopher Robin reading to Pooh Bear. The version sold by Amazon has a purple cover.

        The ISBN on mine is 1-85613-242-0

        The RRP is £29.99, but this can be bought at the moment for £20.99 from Amazon or WH Smith store. There are often offers such as joining book clubs, to get this for as little as £5.

        {BOOK 1} - Winnie the Pooh.

        Chapter 1 - In which we are introduced to Winnie-the-Pooh and Some Bees and the Stories Begin.

        “Here is Edward Bear, coming downstairs now, bump, bump, bump, on the back of his head, behind Christopher Robin.”

        It is in chapter 1 that we meet the main characters. Winnie the Pooh gets his name, and has his first adventure looking for honey. Winnie the Pooh (who has very little brain) tries to devise ways of deceiving the bees so he can get at all that yummy honey. After dropping into a Gorse bush (ouch!) he asks Christopher for a blue balloon, and pretends to be a little black rain cloud under the blue sky. After discovering that these are the “wrong sort of bees”, Christopher attempts to shoot the balloon to get Pooh Bear down (and misses – ouch again), and Pooh Bear is left with very stiff arms from holding onto the balloon for so long.

        The story is cleverly written as if it were being told to Christopher, with questions from Christopher about what he got up to with his friend Pooh Bear. I find this is the most difficult of the stories to tell to a child, as it can be confusing for them to picture another child being told the story.

        Chapter 2 – In Which Pooh Goes Visiting and Gets Into A Tight Place

        In this chapter, Pooh goes for a walk in the Hundred Acre Wood, humming to himself. He discovers Rabbit’s house, and more or less invites himself to tea.

        Now, Pooh Bear is a very hungry sort of Bear, and where honey is concerned, every last drop has to be consumed, so when he finds out that Rabbit has honey, he eats the lot.

        Now, as we all know, eating too much means you put on weight, so when Pooh Bear tries to get back through the entrance to Rabbits house, he’s stuck.

        Rabbit finds Christopher Robin, who suggests that Pooh has to wait, for about a week, to get thin again. At the end of the week, with help from all their friends, they all pulled together until “Pop!” he came free.

        My son likes this story, but can’t seem to understand why Rabbit looks so different in the pictures.

        {Let’s take a moment to talk about the illustrations}

        The illustrations were created by E.H. Shepard, whom Alan Milne met through EV Lucas at Punch.

        As an adult, we can appreciate the beautiful pictures of Pooh Bear, Piglet and Christopher Robin, but what about the children?

        Your children may be familiar with the pictures from Disney. They are bright, colourful, and cartoon like. The illustrations in this book are original, and therefore look somewhat different from the usual Disney pictures we see nowadays.

        Rabbit actually looks like a rabbit, Piglet is a pale pink colour, and Tigger is yellow, and floppy looking, nothing at all like the Disney version. If your children like the bright colours of Disney, they may be disappointed with the pictures in this book.

        Enough of the deviation.

        The other chapters in the book are:

        Chapter 3 – In which Pooh and Piglet go hunting and nearly catch a Woozle
        Chapter 4 – In which Eeyore loses a tail, and Pooh finds one
        Chapter 5 – In which Piglet meets a Heffalump
        Chapter 6 – In which Eeyore has a birthday and gets two presents
        Chapter 7 – In which Kanga and Roo come to the forest, and Piglet has a bath.
        Chapter 8 – In which Christopher Robin leads an “expotition” to the North Pole
        Chapter 9 – In which Piglet is entirely surrounded by water
        Chapter 10 – In which Christopher Robin gives Pooh a party, and we say goodbye

        All childrens favourites and excellent stories. They way I get around the picture problem with my son is to give him a Disney version to look at, whilst I read from this book.

        {BOOK 2} – The House At Pooh Corner

        In this book, you will find more favorite stories and illustrations, and the chapters are as follows:

        Chapter 1 – In which a house is built at Pooh Corner for Eeyore
        Chapter 2 – In which Tigger comes to the Forest and has breakfast
        Chapter 3 – In which a search is “organdized” and Piglet nearly meets the Heffalump again
        Chapter 4 – In which it is shown that Tiggers don’t climb trees.
        Chapter 5 – In which Rabbit has a busy day, and we learn what Christopher Robin does in the mornings
        Chapter 6 – In which Pooh invents a new game and Eeyore joins in
        Chapter 7 – In which Tigger is unbounced
        Chapter 8 – In which Piglet does a very grand thing
        Chapter 9 – In which Eeyore finds the Wolery and Owl moves into it
        Chapter 10 – In which Christopher Robin and Pooh come to an enchanted place, and we leave them there

        “So they went off together. But wherever they go, and whatever happens to them on the way, in this enchanted place on the top of the Forest a little boy and his Bear will always be playing.”

        {BOOK 3} – When We Were Very Young

        This book is dedicated to Christopher Robin Milne, or as he prefers to call himself, “Billy Moon”.

        There are 44 verses in this book, which I love. Some are very short, in fact, just a few lines, whereas others cover about 6 pages.

        My 4 personal favourites are:

        Buckingham Palace – They’re changing guard at Buckingham Palace, Christopher Robin went down with Alice. I remember this one from when I was a child, and I remember singing it outside the gates of Buckingham Palace when I was about 6 or 7.

        Disobedience – James James, Morison Morrison Weatherby George Dupree, Took great care of his mother, though he was only 3. I can still recite this today, which my kids love (especially having one called James).

        The King’s Breakfast – I’m sure that 99% of the population must have heard this one. We used to recite this at school – The King asked the Queen, and the Queen asked the Dairymaid, “Could we have some butter for the Royal slice of bread?”

        Halfway Down – Halfway down the stairs is a stair where I sit. This is another one that I can recite by heart. There is a very cute picture of a child, sitting on the stairs with a very solemn look.

        {BOOK 4} – Now We Are Six

        And now we come to my favorite book of them all. There are 35 verses in all. I was bought this book for my sixth birthday, and I used to read it over and over. I like all the verses in this book, but I do have a few favorites, which I adore. Funnily enough, my dad (who is 57) started reciting Forgiven to me the other day. It must be 25 years since he last read it.

        My favorites are:

        King John’s Christmas – This is about King John, who was not a good man. All he wants for Christmas is a big, red, India-rubber ball.

        Sneezles – Poor Christopher Robin has come down with the wheezles and sneezles. They send for the doctor who has some very interesting advice

        Binker – This is about a child who has an imaginary friend who is always there when he needs him.

        Explained – Elizabeth Ann wants to know how God began. She asks her Nan, an Important Man in London, the Lord High Coachman, and as they can’t tell her, she goes home to ask Jenniferjane (her dolly), who gives her the answer.

        And now we come to my all time favorite verse, written by AA Milne. It has to be Forgiven, which I used to recite over and over on a daily basis, which is probably why my dad can remember it even now. I wish I could type it all in here for you, but I would get into a lot of trouble, so I will tell you what it is about.

        A little boys finds a beetle in the garden, calls him Alexander, and puts it in a matchbox to keep him safe. Nanny let the beetle out when she’s looking for a match, and he is very upset. They set out to find the beetle (It has to be the same one!) Eventually, after making beetle noises (?) they find Alexander Beetle, and place him in a matchbox. This time they write ALEXANDER on the lid. “So, Nan and me are friends, because it’s difficult to catch, An excited sort of beetle you’ve mistaken for a match.”

        {Conclusion}

        I love this book. The stories and illustrations are even more wonderful at the age of 32, than they were at age 6.

        My children are very different to how I was at their age. James prefers the colourful pictures of Disney, and Amy would rather read something by Jacqueline Wilson (She’s 8).

        So who would I recommend this book for? Any adult who is still a kid at heart, or as a special Christening or 1st Birthday present as a keepsake. I wouldn’t recommend buying this for a child of 4 who has already discovered bright and colourful pictures, for they would probably prefer a re-written version with the bright pictures.


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          15.12.2003 22:09
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          On beginning this book I had no idea that Winnie The Pooh was called Edward!! I was given this book by my best friend for my 18th Birthday. A peculiar present you may think! But have you ever read it? The stories, poems and rhymes are heart felt and moving! Some still bring me to tears. But it is a childrens book, I hear you say! Again i ask, Have you ever read it? The cover price for the book is £29.99, but Im hoping Anna did not spend that much on it. I have seen it offered in The Book People with substantial discount at £9.99. It is hardback with a dust jacket. The hard cover is bottle green with gold embossed writing. 'Winnie The Pooh, The COmplete Collection of Stories and Poems, AA Milne with Illustrations by E H Shepherd.' The simple illustration is the back view of Winnie the Pooh and Christopher Robin skipping off in to the hills! The spine is illustrated in the same way. The dust jacket is illustrated with the map famous in connection with Winnie The Pooh, of Hundred Acre Wood. Again the title is embossed in gold. The inside page is autographed by all the main characters, Eor, Triggr, Kanga, Rabbit, Wol, Piglit, Pooh, Christopher Robin. It shows the silhouettes of the characters too, skippping across the countryside. Again in the very elegant green. The colour illustrations begin almost immediately, with Christopher Robin, Pooh Eyore and Piglet catching Tigger in a blanket as he falls from a tree. Page 4 gives all publishers information. The first book of the series, Now we are six, first published in 1927, When We were very Young, 1924, The House at Pooh Corner, 1928, Winnie The Pooh, 1926. My particular copy was published in 1994. Contents Winnie The Pooh The House At Pooh Corner When We were very Young Now we are six A total of 432 pages. Before the first book begins, there is a dedication to HER, it doesnt say who she is, but i
          t is truly lovely. To Her Hand In Hand we come, Christopher Robin and I To lay this book in your lap. Say you're surprised? Say you like it? Says it's just what you wanted? Because it's yours - Because we love you. WINNIE THE POOH This book contains all of the famous stories that everyone knows, or maybe not!! 1 Winnie The Pooh and some Bees 2 Pooh in a tight place 3 Pooh and Piglet nearly catch a woozle 4 Eeyore looses his tail 5 Piglet finds a Heffalump 6 Eeyores birthday 7 Kanga and Roo come to the Forest 8 Chritopher Robin goes to the North Pole 9 The Flood 10 Poohs party and Goodbye Im sorry for not writing the proper chapter titles but they tend be rather long!! Each page is beautifully illustrated. The pictures folow the story along the pages, ie, Bees chase Pooh Bear over several pages, while he drifts on his blue balloon. At the end of the first book, there is a 'Contradiction', rather than an 'Introduction. Because we are saying goodbye to people we have just met, which is the opposite to an introduction, 'So this is the opposite. When we asked Pooh what the opposite of an Introduction was, he said " The What of a What?" which didnt help us much..... Owl kept his head and told us that the Opposite of an Introduction was a Contradiction;' THE HOUSE AT POOH CORNER The second book isThe House at Pooh Corner. 1 Eeyores House 2 Tigger has breakfast 3 Piglet nearly meets the Heffalump again 4 Tiggers dont climb trees 5 Rabbits busy day 6 Pooh Sticks 7 Tigger is unbounced 8 Piglet does a very grand thing 9 Eeyore and the Wolery 10 Good bye Again The first chapter contains my favourite litle rhyme of this book and its perfect for this time of year, "The more it snows (Tiddely Pom), The more it goes (Tiddely Pom), The more it g
          oes (Tiddely Pom), On Snowing. And nobody knows (Tiddely Pom) how cold my toes (Tiddely Pom) Are growing. " "Pooh, said Piglet solemnly, ' it isnt the toes so much as the ears" At the end of this second book is a dedication to Christopeher Robin Himself, 'To Christopher Robin Milne, OR AS HE PREFERS TO CALL HIMSELF, BILLY MOON, This book which owes so much to him is now humbly offered. I am constantly touched by the true feeling put into these works. This dedication is illustrated by a picture of a young Christopher Robin seated on the stairs, hands clasped in his lap. Quite beautiful! WHEN WE WERE VERY YOUNG Next we have WHen We were very Young, a collection of poems. Again A A Mione thanks all those who aided his work, Christopher Robin and Mr Shepherd. There is a contents page for this book but it is very long. I will list a couple of more famous poems to give you the idea. Buckingham Palace, The Christening, Four Friends, Daffadowndilly, Disobedience, The Kings Breakfast, If I were King. 'Halfway down the stairs Is a stair I sit. There isn't any stair Quite like. It. I'm not at the bottom. I'm not at the top; So, this is the stair Where I always stop.' (If you think my punctuation and grammar are bad, I d like to note that these are quotes!) The odd poem in this collection do introduce WInnie the Pooh and the illustrations show him too. As beautiful as ever. The next dedication is to Anne Harlington, ' Now she is seven and because she is SPESHAL' NOW WE ARE SIX ' Pooh wants to say that he thought it was a different book; and he hopes you won't mind, but he walked through it one day, looking for his friend Piglet, and sat down on some of the pages by mistake' Maybe the most unknown book of poems of the set. COntains poems such as; Furry Bear, The Cradle
          Song, In The Dark, The End. Pooh Bear seems to feature more frequently in the illustrations of these poems. My favourite poem is 'Us Two'. Unfortunately it is too long to share with you. Here is a very small snippet; 'What would I do?' I said to Pooh, 'If it wasnt for you,' and Pooh said: True, It isnt much fun for One, but Two Can stick together,' says Pooh, says he, 'Thats how it is' says Pooh. The book ends with a very clever little poem which captures the whole spirit of little people! When I was One, I had just begun. When I was Two, I was nearly new. When I was Three, I was hardly me. When I was Four, I was not much more. When I was Five, I was just alive. But now I am Six, I am as clever as clever. So I think I ll be Six for ever and ever! THE END.

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            22.08.2001 19:20
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            Although AA Milne is mostly known for his story books of winnie the pooh, that loveable bear he also wrote a book solely for all the poems that are in the 20 books that he wrote. Everything that was important to winnie the pooh he had a poem for. These included such things as for his honey, the weather, his friends and most of their adventures. No messing around with the title of his book though he just called it Poohs Poems. The first poem was published in 1924 and was called When we were very young. His second was in 1926 and called Now we are 6 and then came the house at Pooh which was 1927. You would think that being that old that the poems would not be read or even looked at today but they are, and they are loved today by this generation as they were by the 1920s generation. The poems are so simple and have a la di da, la di da, flow to them! Some dont even have words at all and just a hum. Tra-la-la, tra-la-la, tra-la-la, tra-la-la, Rum-tum-tiddle-um-tum, tiddle-iddle,tiddle-iddle Rum-tum-tum-tiddle-um One of the first poetry I ever knew was Isnt it funny How a bear likes honey buzz buzz buzz I wonder why he does. After all these years I still know that off by heart! If you have young children please think of getting this book of poems for them as they will still remember and love them in Adulthood. The illustrations by Ernest H Shepard are so simple yet so detailed. They will love it. If you are adult and havent read it go and read it and relive a bit of lost youth!

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              07.05.2001 04:56
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              • "is this really a children's book?"

              Pooh Bear. A truly classic figure in Children’s literature, Pooh has been translated into dozens of languages, starred in many movies, and spawned trillions of toys across the world. He’s been used to satirise the gentle art of literary criticism ( The Pooh Perplex, Frederick Crewes) and to introduce Chinese philosophy ( The Tao of Pooh, Benjamin Hoff). Poor Pooh. Since being yanked abruptly from the Hundred Acre Wood by the magic of Disney, he’s even graced a brand of yoghurt. And it’s easy to forget, as you wander past racks of ‘pooh’ teethers, dummies and beakers that he’s a literary character, based on a soft toy, which originally belonged to his creator’s 6 year-old son. A.A. Milne wrote the ‘Pooh’ books in the early 1920’s, and Winnie-the-Pooh was first published in 1926, beautifully illustrated with pen and ink drawings by Ernest Shepherd; illustrations that complement the stories, and are sprinkled across the pages, adding to the charm of the book. ‘The House at Pooh Corner’ was published in 1928. The ‘Complete Collection’ gathers these together with Milne’s two books of verse: ‘When we were very young’ and ‘Now we are six’. It’s worth bearing in mind that the poems make scant mention of Pooh - someone must have given him a day off. So in this edition we are dealing with the ‘original’ Pooh bear; before Mr Disney carried him away and gave him a fake tan. We are also dealing with books that were written over 70 years ago. One reason, I think, that they’ve managed to sustain appeal is that they create a little self-contained world; not peopled by adults, but full of animals and toys, and ruled by the benevolent dictatorship of Christopher Robin. Another reason for the continued success of ‘Pooh’ is that this safe little world, coupled with the poignancy of t
              he final stories provoke a nostalgia for childhood. You forget your happy noisy toddler is a noisy toddler, and hand in hand with pooh, reclaim ( a smidgen sentimentally, perhaps) your own ideals about childhood and children. This was probably easy for Mr Milne to do, as he certainly had a Nanny to deal with the less pleasant habits of Christopher Robin. The stories are both charming and timeless', so too are the characters. We meet: Pooh, the much-loved bear who although ‘of little brain’ is always the eventual hero, Piglet, his smaller, timorous, but brighter right-hand-man, Rabbit, the ever busy organiser, running around in circles and achieving little, Owl, the learned, who dispenses advice but cannot spell, Kanga and Roo, the mother and toddler of the group, Eeyore, philosopher donkey with a bad case of the grumps, and Tigger...bouncy,bouncy,bouncy ( need I say more). We all know people like this...and so did Milne....he based them not only on Christopher Robin’s toys, but on his friends and neighbours. The stories compiled in this ‘Complete Works’ show these beloved characters finding all sorts of adventure. I won’t describe them here; like the characters, most people know them; and if you don’t then they are worth reading for their charm alone. But as children’s stories? The ‘Complete works’ is a weighty hardback edition, full of lovely colour illustrations. This is a coffee-table book, not a children’s book. It is cumbersome to read, cumbersome to store...but it does look very pretty on the shelf. I’ve four grubby, much-loved paperbacks of Milne’s stories and poems. If I want to read ‘Pooh’, I read these, not this walloping great thing. If you’re reading a book to a child, surely the child should be able to reach out and touch the pictures, however grubby the fingers? Isn’t that what the idea of a children’s bo
              ok? If not, why did Beatrix Potter make her publisher print Peter Rabbit as a little book, for little hands. This 'Complete works' is a big book, a book for adults. If you want to show you’re a sentimentalist at heart but don’t want your living room stuffed with Care Bears, then this may be the book for you. If you want to introduce your children to a character you loved as a child, then I wouldn’t recommend it. They won’t be able to lift it, and they’ll probably tear the dust cover. Go for a set of paperbacks to start with. I liked Pooh bear, but I’m annoyed that I can’t seem to find a vest for my baby daughter that doesn’t have his image on it. I loved Paddington, too as a child, and Benjamin Bunny. What happened to Lewis Carroll and his own skewed, magical version of a child’s world? Kenneth Graham is equally good. I simply don’t understand why Pooh has achieved the kind of cult status these haven’t ( I suppose it could be something to do with Mr Disney). Another thing. There are some brilliant modern children’s books around. You only have to read the reviews in this section of Dooyoo to see that. The ‘Complete Works’ weighs in at a hefty price of £30 (remainders excepted). I think: "What would my child really like...some great volume of stories that make Mummy feel all gooey, or six equally gorgeous, intelligent, beautifully illustrated children’s books, that she can read ,explore and build entirely her own relationship with?". Classics of the Future. And with that sacrilegious thought, I’m off , Pooh fans, to beat myself about the head with a large orange plush toy ( in penance, you understand, not because I enjoy that sort of thing).

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                04.05.2001 20:07
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                For my thirtieth birthday I was bought a copy of The Complete Tales of Winnie the Pooh. I have long been a fan of Winnie, Eeyore, Tigger and the rest of the cuddly bunch of creatures so it was a wonderful present to receive. Written by A. A. Milne and illustrated by Ernest H. Shepherd, this is the original (and the best) Winnie and friends. Although Disney’s version is fun to watch, you cannot beat the original old bear! The book is beautifully illustrated and a great read for people of all ages – you are never too old to appreciate Pooh stories. Milne’s sense of humour appeals to all ages, even if the very small may not understand all of the nuances. Being such a fabulous book (and one that will be extremely well looked after) I am looking forward to being able to read this to my children and hopefully my grandchildren after that. I have already been to Amazon to order a copy for my godchild – a Christening would not be a Christening without Winnie the Pooh showing up at some point! UK List price £35 Amazon price £21.87 Dutton Children's Books; ISBN: 0525457232

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                  28.04.2001 03:05
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                  CHAPTER ONE In which we are introduced to Nolly and his book review, and the basics about the book he would like to write an opinion on. Here is Uncle Nolly, coming down the stairs now, bump, bump, bump on the back of his head, ready to sit at his PC to write yet another opinion, behind his beautiful darling wife. It is, as far as he knows, the only way of coming down the stairs. He opens a book beside him. It is called ‘Winnie The Pooh – The Complete Collection of Stories and Poems’ by A.A. Milne, with illustrations by E.H. Shepherd. The version he has is published by Ted Smart for ‘The Book People’ (R.R.P £29.99, but he got it for a tenner). The ISBN Number is 1-85613-242-0 CHAPTER TWO In which Nolly remembers back and gets into a tight spot. Neil Jeffery, known to his friends as Uncle Nolly, or Nolly for short, was walking round his garden one day, merrily smoking a cigarette. He remembered back to his childhood, as he did his stoutness exercises round the back of the garage by the compost bin. ‘Oh what a happy Nolly I am, and what a happy life I have had,’ he wistfully murmured. ‘What are you blathering on about now,’ said his beautiful wife who, for the purposes of artistic licence will be called Christopher Robin from now on. ‘Oh, just remembering life in Sussex’, said Nolly, as he tried in vain to reach his toes. ‘Did you know that my mum was born on the edge of the Hundred Acre Wood, or Ashdown Forest as the big people call it?’ Christopher Robin gave a swift and sharp reply, ‘Yes you’ve told me one hundred times already, now have you done the washing up?’ Nolly went strangely silent. He was now in a very tight spot. CHAPTER THREE In which Nolly talks about the book, having been told to hurry up and get on with it by Christopher Robin, who wants to check her own Dooyoo account. Nol
                  ly looked carefully around, just in case there was a heffalump trying to listen in, but Christopher Robin told him that if he was good and hurried up, he could have some hunny for tea, as it would be his birthday two days after the review, if he managed to complete it, and then he could invite Piglet, Eyore, Owl and Rabbit round for tea (Invite Phil, Rob, Tony and Mike for a few beers!) ‘Well what can I say, as a Nolly of very little brain, who shares a house with a wife and baby. The stories are marvellous, and the classic Shepherd illustrations are terrific, and a whole load better than the Walt Disney pictures, although any picture of Nolly, sorry Pooh bear has its place in contemporary 21st century society…’ ‘You’re waffling again!’ cried Christopher Robin, desperately chasing the baby around the living room, hoping to attach a Huggies nappy reasonably securely to the recently de-poopified botty. ‘Okay,’ said Nolly. ‘It contains all the books and poems. There’s ‘Winnie the Pooh’ (1926), ‘The House at Pooh Corner’ (1928), ‘When we were very young’ (1924) and ‘Now we are six’ (1927). The stories and poems are just how I remember them, full of lovely life and whimsical detail, and if you can get the book at a discounted price through ‘The Book People’, it represents extremely good value.’ ‘Are you quite finished now?’ hollered Christopher Robin, ‘Your hunny is ready, and if you don’t eat it up quickly, the baby will have it! Come on!’ So they went off together. But wherever they go, and whatever happens to them on the way, in that enchanted place in a three bed semi in Lincolnshire, a beautiful wife and her husband will be always playing. And the reason for the very obscure title will be revealed eventually, should Nolly be given sufficient time at t
                  he PC to do an update. UPDATE As Nolly opened his copy of 'Winnie the pooh- the Complete stories and poems', he was confronted by a sticker on one of the pages of the book. He didn't know how it had got there. It said 'Thermal Sock'. 'How, funny,' said Nolly, 'Now, where's my hunny?'

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                    01.11.2000 03:35
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                    My favourite A.A.Milne title is Winnie The Pooh simply because it was the very first 'Pooh Book' that I read by myself. This first 'Pooh Book' was written in 1926 and illustrated by E.H.Shepherd. Everyone has heard of Winnie the Pooh, that fluffy bear with 'no brain' who can't get enough honey. Milne wrote the books for his son, Christopher Robin, who features in the stories which are set in the 'Hundred Acre Wood'. Christopher Robin has many animal friends in the wood including Winnie The Pooh, Eyore and Piglet. I recently passed my own copy of this book on to my grandchildren. This is one of those very special children's books thats does not date and remains popular almost seventy five years after it was written.

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                  • Product Details

                    Timeless children's classic about a boy, a bear and his friends.