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The Magic Faraway Tree - Enid Blyton

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Author: Enid Blyton / Format: Paperback / Date of publication: 03 May 2007 / Genre: Children's Traditional Stories / Publisher: Egmont UK Ltd / Title: The Magic Faraway Tree / ISBN 13: 9781405230285 / ISBN 10: 1405230285

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      20.12.2012 23:15
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      A really enjoyable book

      ABOUT THE BOOK
      This book was first published in 1943. It is part of The Faraway Tree series of books which also includes 'The Enchanted Wood', 'The Folk of Faraway Tree' and 'Up The Faraway Tree'. What I do find a little strange is that each of these four books in the series was written a few years apart with 12 years between the first and last in the series. I suppose this is because Enid Blyton was a very busy lady with over 700 titles including many short stories for magazines.

      On The Cover - The copy I picked up was a 2005 edition which is a small hard back copy with a light yellow cover and blue spine. There is a picture on the front of some children sitting in a large basket which is hanging from a try by a rope, I find the picture quite funny as I'm sure if that was most children they would look a little more terrified than delighted, but I suppose it is fiction!

      Pages - 178 divided into 36 chapters.

      Cost - The R.R.P for this book is only £4.99 which I think is a good price.

      THE STORYLINE -
      The book is about three children, Beth, Joe and Frannie, who live in the countryside with their parents. Their house overlooks the 'enchanted forest'. Their father works away a lot of the time so the children help their mother a lot with housework. In their free time they love to adventure into the forest to 'The Magic Faraway Tree'.
      They find out that their cousin Rick is coming to stay with them as his mother is ill. When he arrives he tells the children how boring it seems to be in the countryside compared with the city where he lives. The children tell him how much fun he will have when they take him into the forest and to the tree.

      When they get to the tree they introduce Rick to lots of their friends who live there such as Moonface and The Saucepan man, who, for some strange reason likes to dress in saucepans!

      At the top of the tree is a magical land, this changes regularly so they have to make sure they leave the land before it changes or they will be stuck in that land.
      The lands include the Land of Magical Medicine which they visit to pick up some medicine when their mother isn't feeling well, The Land of Topsy Turvy where everyone walks upside down and The Land ofThe Old Woman Who Lives In A Shoe where she decides she's had enough of her shoe full of children and tries to move into one of the houses down the tree.

      Each land reads a bit like a short story, each containing some fun and excitement.

      OVERALL OPINION

      I enjoyed the book and imagine I would have done so even more as a child. I like the fact that it has a lot of chapters as it means if you wanted to read it with children it doesn't have to be too time consuming as there are plenty of breaks in the book.

      The stories are entertaining and magical and do contain subtle messages such as how the children are very helpful and get rewarded for helping their mother. Also in one of the lands you can get whatever you like but it can't be for yourself so it teaches a little about sharing and generosity. There is also a land where they can eat as many sweets as they like and Rick ends up paying for his greed.

      These little messages are included in a subtle way and don't take away from the magical story. I think if I had read this as a child I would have found the idea of a magical land very exciting so it is definitely one I would recommend for reading with younger children.
      I'm don't think older children would enjoy it as much, but for those that believe in all things magical I think it's a great book!

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        04.08.2011 11:43
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        A timeless classic that's fun to read silently or out loud.

        From my latest reviews, you'll notice that I spend as much time as I can with my grandson, Jack. I think most grandmothers and mothers as well would say that you couldn't give any child a better gift than the joy of reading. It not only helps them with their schoolwork, but it impacts on almost every part of a child's life.
        From my point of view, I get enormous pleasure out of reading to Jack and also re-discovering some old favorite books of mine and some I read previously to my daughter.

        We didn't consciously start to buy Enid Blyton books, although it would have been impossible not to start off with one of her most famous children's books, that of Noddy. It was quite by chance that a year ago we were holidaying as a family near Arundel in Sussex and came across a quaint little bookshop where we found a copy of the Magic Faraway tree. Jack could read a bit then and reads quite well now for a six-year-old and he chose the book himself. That night I read the very first chapter of what was to become a firm favorite, which Jack returns to every now and again, although he has been through the book many times since then.

        The Author and The First Book.

        Enid Blyton was born in 1897 and died in 1968. She had written many series of children's stories by then, among them; -'The Famous five', 'The Secret Seven', 'Noddy', and a short story about an enchanted wood that lead to a whole series of books written about 'The Enchanted Wood', 'The Magic Faraway Tree' and 'The folk of the faraway tree'. The first publication of 'the magic faraway Tree was in 1943 and has been re-printed many times since then, with a little confusion over the names of the children in the stories as they became updated. I will go with the version I know best, the one that has captured the imagination of children, including myself for many years.

        The Magic Faraway Tree

        The book starts with the arrival of the children's cousin Rick, who has come to stay with them while his mother is convalescing from an illness. The children, Joe, Beth and Frannie (Jo, Bessy and Fanny) tell Rick all about the Enchanted wood and the magic faraway tree. This leads the young reader into the book if they haven't read the previous one about the enchanted wood, which is near to the children's home.
        They tell him about the tree and the people who live there and the secret heart of it all, the special and magical lands that arrive in the clouds above the tree every few days or so. Naturally he is eager to start his adventures with his cousins but he has to wait a while as the children have chores to do before they can go out to play.

        The next few chapters are about the tree and the people who live there. The characters are Moonface, who, as his name suggests, has a large round face. He is one of the main characters as his round house has a hole in it where the visitors to the tree come and go by way of a staircase and the 'slippery slip' a curved slide that goes right through the tree to the very bottom. From his house the entrance to the land of the faraway tree's magical places are accessed.

        There are other main characters in the tree. Silky is a life-size fairy with lovely blonde silky hair. She makes amazing cakes with some magical properties, bursting in the mouth with delicious flavors. Then there is Saucepan Man, he is a man covered with pots and pans, kettles and other clanging things. Naturally the noise makes him a bit deaf, so he mishears some words with hilarious consequences. Children adore this and I remember laughing myself as a child.
        The other characters don't join in the adventures so often, but there are a few that should be mentioned.
        Dame Washalot does exactly that and pours the dirty water down the tree landing on anyone unfortunate enough to be climbing up.
        The Angry Pixie also does similar things when people peer into his window, which they can't help doing.
        Then there's Mr. Whatsizname, he's a bit vague though comes in handy when others are in trouble. Each character enters the stories on occasions.

        The main stories are about the magical lands that arrive just when the clouds around the tree part. Sometimes Moonface can predict what land will arrive other times they surprise everyone. Now magic can be great fun, but adventures are risky and what often starts as a lovely place can get the children into trouble. This happens frequently, leaving them needing another land to help them. One time this happens is when poor Joe gets into trouble by laughing at a policeman in the land of Topsy-Turvy, where everyone and thing is upside down. He has a spell put on him and immeadiately has to walk about on his hands with his legs in the air. He has to wait a day until the land of spells arrives next.

        This is the content of the book and why children of all ages love it so much. Even nowadays with technology seeming to outstrip magic, there is still a need for that type of fun and adventure. There are plenty of basic stories but I find that I imagine the lands myself. I also have fun getting Jack to think about what he sees in his own mind. Naturally a lot of the content is dated, children sadly cannot just go out with a packed lunch and come home on their own. Neither do they have chores to do (I imagine so), or have toast and honey for tea. I don't have to explain too much to Jack though. I think he likes to take that on trust, it's part of the magic.

        Just to whet your appetite a bit more, there are some exciting lands, some indulgent ones (the land of Goodies and the land of Do as you please), and some dangerous ones (the land of toys sees one character locked up by toy soldiers). Then there is the uncertainty of getting stuck in one land. So it's not all light and fun. Each adventure comes with a moral, though it's well hidden. The children and their magical friends have some good times and everything turns out well.

        Conclusion.

        This is a lovely book. A bit old-fashioned, but it has a sense of timelessness that comes with happy stories. You might have to explain some things to younger children; older ones can usually figure it out. I love doing all the voices, though I sometimes get a slightly sore throat when I've read a few chapters. It's all part of the fun though and I do enjoy it. Jack goes along with it and I feel that he gets some security in its unchanging theme of goodness triumphing every time.

        There are many different copies of this book but all are just slightly older or newer imprints. Therefore I'd say that a good quality paperback is fine to buy if you aren't sure whether it would suit your child.
        Amazon has a good range and the copy Jack has is currently priced at £ 13.99. (His old book has been renewed as it was getting rather worn). Each chapter is about four pages long, so you can tell a child,'Let's have just one/ two etc chapters tonight.'

        Thanks for reading and I hope you will enjoy reading it as much as I do.

        ©Lisa Fuller August 2011.

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          02.05.2011 13:46
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          Follow the magical adventures of 4 lucky children!

          The Magic Faraway Tree by Enid Blyton follows the adventures of siblings Bessie, Jo and Fanny and their greedy cousin Dick. The premise of the story is based around a magical tree in a nearby enchanted wood which the children love to climb. On the way up the tree there are various memorable characters (who live in the tree) including Moon Face, The Saucepan Man, The Angry Pixie, Silky the fairy and Dame Washalot.
          At the top of the tree is a ladder which leads into the clouds and into a different universe or land, which changes every now and then. The land might be anything from Topsy Turvey Land, where everything is upside-down, to the Land of Take-What-You-Want, which speaks for itself.

          This book is the most imaginative story I can remember from my childhood. The characters are funny and easy to relate to, and there is no limit to what might be at the top of the tree in any chapter. I recall reading and rereading the faraway books with constant excitement as a child.

          The language in the book is quite old-fashioned, as are the characters' names, and a lot this has been updated in modern versions of the book. I prefer the older versions however, as they provide an insight into a different time, which I was aware of even as a child reading the books.

          I will definitely read the Faraway collection to my own children one day, and I recommend it to all parents with little ones. Prepare from some limitless adventures!

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            01.03.2011 10:37
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            for boys and girls

            I remember reading Enid Blyton books when I was a little girl and the other night my grandaughter came to stay and brought this book with her it was one of the books I had bought her for christmas and she likes to have a bedtime story every night whilst drinking her hot chocolate before sleep time.

            This cost me 99p in the Works Book Shop in Hereford town, they have these book shops all around the country and they are great for getting good childrens books at less than half the price.
            The Magic Faraway Tree is the second book in the series as The Enchanted Tree is the first book, then after this book is The Folk of the Faraway Tree and then the last in the series is Up The Faraway Tree.

            Enid Blyton was big on series books and I can still remember saving my pocket money up when I was little to buy the next book in the series i was reading, my sister also collected them too so she would get a different series and we would swap books after we had read them. My grandaughter is now collecting them too so Enid Blyton has become a time held favourite for the girls in my family.

            The story is set in an enchanted forest which the children Jo, Bessie, and Fanny discover and then they find The Faraway Tree.
            Their cousin Dick comes to stay with them and the adventures begin. there is a magical land at the top of the tree and when they climb up through the clouds they can visit new worlds. Each visit takes them to a different land.
            They discover a new topsy turvy world, the land of toys, and the land of birthdays and other such places.
            As well as meeting the pixies, faeries and elves and all manner of other beings and have lots of adventures where they get into situations where they have to think about getting out of them.

            This is a very entertaining story book and time hasn't ruined it's mystery or enchantmnet, although the writing is old style with some of the wording relating to the 1950's, words like gosh and other old style words which aren't used any more nowadays, but this doesn't spoil the reading and my grandaughter was fascintated by the book and is looking forward to the next in the series.

            I would highly recommend this book to you if you have a young chlild that you read to, although you may have to explain a few of the words to the younger child. These books are timeles for both boys and girls and will give them a great story that they will love to read again and again and I enjoyed reading it too as it took me back to being a child and remembering times with my sister that I had forgotten about.
            A classic book for any age.

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              18.01.2010 11:57

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              I loved this book as a young boy as its just so magicial and enchanting and I now read it to my own children at bedtime.

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              02.01.2010 20:05
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              A great children's book which is in a league of its own

              As a child I always used to have my nose in a book, I read a lot of different books but this is really one which sticks in my mind. It just doesn't compare to todays popular children's books such as Harry Potter (which I also loved reading), it is in a league of its own.

              A simple concept, a group of children climb a tree and at the top of it each time is a different world, such as 'the land of do as you please' with some moral tales intertwined in the fairytale. Some lands are very pleasant and exciting and some are not so pleasant. And of course who could forget the reoccurring characters of Moonface and Saucepan Man who accompany the children on their adventures.

              The book is excellently written for children, very accessible and includes some very memorable and unique adventures. I am now an adult and have never come across anything similar, and occasionally find myself imagining exploring a faraway world at the top of a magical tree. When I come to have children I will definately pass on this to them as my dad did to me, a true classic!

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                31.12.2009 09:44
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                fab book

                This is a book from many peoples childhood,many will remember being read this or reading it themselves locked away in their bedroom as a child this being the second in a series of books a sequel to the enchanted wood and in a very definite Enid Blyton style of writing today's kids books seem to be all fighting and moralistic where are these books are pure make believe.

                I fell in love the first time round with the characters in the tree moonface and his magic slide, the deaf saucepan man, dame washalot slopping her dirty laundry water down the tree and silky the fairy making fab toffeepop biscuits for tea,amazing what you keep locked up in your memory huh,I adore these stories for kids she takes you into the wonderful world of make believe so easily, I read this as a child and i had no qualms about buying it for my four year old son although its too difficult for him to read yet its going to be our night time read for the next month or so a chapter a night is enough to keep him focused and interested i will also buy the others in series, the book has been brought bang up to date with beautiful graphic pictures of all the characters. I cant see any bad points to review on this book as it can be handed down child to child and enjoyed by many and also the reading is no chore as it takes you way back to your childhood for me thirty years but still has not lost its magic good old saucepan man !!!

                I have looked many times for these books in charity shops and second hand book stores but you never come across them I think that says a lot for the precious memories Blytons books bring us we hold onto the books.They retail anything from £2.50-£5.00 at present and make ideal gifts also.

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                  21.11.2009 17:16
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                  Another Blyton classic: sequel to The Enchanted Wood

                  While The Magic Faraway Tree is the better known of this series of books, it is not the first. This is actually the sequel to The Enchanted Wood, whihc saw Jo, Bess and Fanny as they discovered the enchanted wood and the wonders of the Magic Faraway Tree.

                  This second book features the children returning to the tree once more, this time with their cousin, Dick. Set back in the 1930s, there is a lot of language associated with Blyton and her writing, whether it be this seris of books, or the Famous Five, or other publications. It was the era: the way of talking was a bit different.

                  Don't let this put you off in any way shape or form. It's still completely understandable, there are just a few phrases every now and then which aren't used any more, is all. It all adds to the magical feel of the book, anway. The Magic Faraway Tree is a magnificent place, full of wonderful abandon, where the children can let their explorative nature take over, and experience a number of different adventures at the top of the tree.

                  At the top, above the clouds, something wonderful happens. Each day, there is a different land up there, and Blyton basically creates these lands as individual tales with the children and the inhabitants of the tree being the continuous link between the tales. We see the return of Moonface and Silky, and of course the very deaf Saucepan Man. We even meet his mother at one point.

                  The tales are concise and to the point, which means that anyone experiencing is less likely to get bored. We read this one to our son immediately after finishing The Enchanted Wood, and he was enthralled by every page. At the time, he couldn't quite read the book himself - too many words and he was only 4. However, now he is getting into reading in a big way, challenging himself and reading whenever he can. It's great to see, and stories that are magical like this one really help towards making him keen to read.

                  The Magic Faraway Tree features short enough chapters so you can read one at a time to your children. Also, they can read it themselves as the language isn't particularly tricky, no long and descriptive passages opr tricky sentence constructions. Simple and entertaining. The storytelling is magnificent, the tales captivating. I highly recommend getting this, which retails for around the £5 mark. A great one for kids.

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                    12.08.2009 09:29
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                    A beautiful book to share with your children

                    My oldest son is almost seven and is becoming a fairly confident reader, thankfully going past the stage where reading was becoming a chore rather than a pleasure. Given his rediscovered interest in reading, I have taken a great delight in dusting down some of the books that I enjoyed from my own childhood now that he is of an age to appreciate them. I am a bit of a hoarder when it comes to books, so I still have the original copies of most of my old favourites including the Magic Faraway Tree which is just one of the many Enid Blyton classics that I loved as a child.

                    The Magic Faraway Tree is actually the second book of a series. I can remember reading the first book 'The Enchanted Wood' but can't find that one so we ended up starting with this book instead which didn't spoil our enjoyment at all. This one features the same group of siblings, Jo, Bessie and Fanny and also introduces their cousin Dick. (I must admit that I had a little giggle to myself when first re-reading their names but my son remains in blissful ignorance about any alternative meanings.) The children have discovered a magical tree in the middle of the Enchanted Wood which is home to many magical creatures including pixies, fairies and the unforgettable Moon Face. The main reason that the children keep going back to the Magic Faraway Tree is because of the strange hole at the very top of the tree that leads into a magical land through the clouds! Every few days the lands revolve and a new and equally magical land will appear. The children were always getting into 'fixes' and 'scrapes' as kids in Enid Blyton novels are prone to doing, most of which was the fault of naughty Dick who couldn't help letting his curiosity or greed get the better of him.

                    When I first started reading the book to my son, it only took him a little while to really apprecriate the beauty of the stories within it. Once the chldren actually got up to the first magical land at the top of the tree, he was absolutely enthralled and, as I only read one chapter per night to him, on some evenings he would stay up continuing to read the book to himself as he was so desperate to discover what would happen next! The language seems basic enough for him to master by himself but most of the story was shared between the two of us. (I didn't want to miss out on a book I loved so much first time around!) Some of the language used in my 1986 Beaver book edition is a little archaic with lots of typical 'Blytonisms' - lots of 'gosh', 'I say' and 'gracious' in there. (The story was actually first published back in 1943.) I also had to explain a couple of words as my son had never come across 'spanking' or, for obvious reasons, 'golliwogs.' Some aspects of the story clearly depict a very different lifestyle to that of modern children. It is hard to imagine a world where children would be allowed to disappear off to the woods for hours on end without some parental concern! My son, however, had no difficulties engaging with the story despite these differences and his imagination was totally set ablaze by the adventures that the children got up to.

                    My son's favourite parts of the story were the nicer lands that the children visited. It's not hard to see why a six year old would be so entranced by the idea of the 'Land of Goodies', 'Land of Toys' and the 'Land of Presents', not to mention the 'Land of Do-As-You-Please!' He also loved the Saucepan Man's character particularly as he was so deaf and always ended up hearing the wrong thing, usually with hilarious consequences. Some of the magical food featured in the story was also guaranteed to have my son sitting there with his mouth open and eyes glowing in amazement - any other Blyton fans remember Toffee Shocks, Pop Biscuits and Google Buns? Fantastic stuff!

                    Both of us have really enjoyed every minute of this story and I'll no doubt be searching the internet for copies of the other stories from this series. There are many different issues of this particular book available and some of the more modern versions have been modernised, changing some of the characters' names and removing references to some of what is now seen to be inappropriate language. Personally, I'd prefer to read the books in the original form as I think they are a product of their era and it is unrealistic to try and impose modern values on classic fiction. If anything, the outdated language and social values are a useful starting point for children to start to understand how our culture has developed over recent times. Thankfully, there is still room within modern life for a young child to be left spellbound by a tale about magical creatures and magical lands.

                    This is a book that still has the power to enchant different generations and proves that kids don't need computers and special effects to be transported into a different world. A few words by Enid Blyton still works its magic for us.

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                      02.08.2009 09:40
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                      A real blast from the past!

                      I grew up with a healthy addiction to Enid Blyton's children's books, devouring every single one of her series' including Mallory Towers, The Twins at St Clare's, The Secret Seven and the magical tales of the Faraway Tree. So when I noticed 'The Magic Faraway Tree' was only a few pounds on Amazon, I decided to use my vouchers to get a blast from the past and, despite my 28 years, I wasn't disappointed!

                      The Faraway Tree series of books tells the tale of two young sisters and their older brother who move, against their wishes, from the hustle and bustle of the city to a sleepy house in the country. They feel that life there will be very dull, until that is, they discover the Enchanted Forest and its magical and mystical inhabitants. At the centre of the forest stands the Faraway Tree, which reaches up into the clouds and is home to a variety of strange folk including Moon Face, Silky, Watzisname and Saucepan Man. The fun doesn't end there though, because there is always a magical land at the top of the tree, which changes on a irregular basis and a trip to the top can land you in anything from the Land of Birthdays to the Land of Tempers.

                      This particular book is the second in the series and was originally printed in 1947, although the copy I have was published in 2007. The story as a whole has changed very little from what I remember as a child, although there are a few little tweaks that have brought it into the 21st century. The most notable of which, is the changing of the children's visiting cousin's name from Dick to Rick. Aside from that there are plenty of 'wows' that were once 'oh goshes' and 'cools' that were once 'simply wonderfuls'!

                      None of this though takes away from the magic of the story, which will still awaken a child's (even a 28 year-old one's) imagination and carry them off into a land more traditional but equally as fun as Harry Potter's.

                      There are traditional themes and tales of morality running through the story that will warm the heart-strings; sibling's looking out for one another, children being rewarded for completing chores and strong friendships being built in the most unlikely of situations.

                      Overall, I would think the story would make excellent bedtime reading - it's a story that will entertain the young, whilst reminding the parent what it was like 'in their day'! I definitely recommend this book to anyone who enjoys a little piece of harmless fun and to those who, against all the odds, still believe in magic!

                      Published by: Egmont UK Ltd in 2007
                      Pages: 210
                      ISBN: 978 1 4052 3028 5

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                        01.08.2009 09:19
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                        One of the reasons why Enid Blyton will always be in lists of top writers of children's fiction

                        Although Enid Blyton has become less fashionable of late and some of her characters are rather un-PC, she was undeniably the doyenne of children's fiction for several decades and some of her books are as relevant to twenty-first century children as they were to their parents and grandparents, and possibly even great-grandparents.

                        The Magic Faraway Tree is just such a book. This is the second in Blyton's wonderful trilogy about this magical tree.

                        Back story: Jo, Bessie and Fanny move with their parents to a house on the edge of a wood. Whilst exploring the woods where the trees whisper "wisha, wisha, wisha" the children find right in the middle, a huge tree known locally as the Faraway Tree, the top of which seems to reach into the clouds. They begin to climb and as they do, discover that the tree has houses within the trunk in which live many different magical people. At the top of the tree is a ladder which reaches into the clouds. And at the top of the ladder is a magical land which only remains their for a while before whirling on to be replaced by another.

                        Synopsis of The Magic Faraway Tree: Jo, Bessie and Fanny are joined by their cousin Dick who has come to stay. Dick, of course, is rather skeptical about the stories his cousins tell him of their adventures up the Faraway Tree, but he soon discovers that everything he has been told is true. And so begins another series of magical adventures.

                        The three books of the series are:
                        1. The Enchanted Wood
                        2. The Magic Faraway Tree
                        3. The Folk of the Faraway Tree

                        It isn't essential to read these books in order, although I guarantee that if you read one of these to your children, they will want to read the other two! And chronologically it helps because the first book introduces the main characters who live in the tree. These magical folk are very appealing, even to an adult. There is the Angry Pixie (self-explanatory), Dame Washalot, who disposes of her washing water quite frequently, leaving various people soaking wet. And there is the Saucepan Man, who my children loved. The clanging of his saucepans has made him slightly deaf so he often hilariously misinterprets what is said.

                        But the main characters are Moonface (another self-explanatory character) and Silky (the beautiful fairy) who guide the children through this wonderful fantasy world.

                        This book, plus the other two in the series, would appeal to any child aged approximately 5 upwards. The language is simple enough for them to understand and the storylines are great for stimulating young imaginations. And for the adults who read them aloud, there is the delight of revisiting childhood fantasy and seeing the pleasure these stories will bring to new fans.

                        It must be 50 years at least since my mother read these books to me and since then I've read them to my children and grandchildren, always with the same results. Sheer unadulterated pleasure.

                        My copies of these books date back to the 1950s and I understand that names have been changed in more recent editions and that one of the characters, Dame Slap, is no longer allowed to mete out corporal punishment! But that won't make any difference to the sheer enjoyment you and your young audience will get from this delightful book.

                        And if your children enjoy these books, they will also love Enid Blyton's two Wishing Chair adventures.

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                          01.11.2007 22:04
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                          This is a book that will never age, generation after generation can read it.

                          The Faraway Tree - Enid Blyton

                          Jo Bessie and Fanny lived close to a forest, but this was not ordinary forest. Only the three children knew that it was an enchanted forest. They have had many adventures here, and it all starts with the faraway tree, a magical tree.
                          In each branch lives a magical creature, such as the Angry Pixie, who very much lives up to his name. The next branch up, is home to a fairy called Silky, who loves to bake pop biscuits and toffee shocks.

                          Other living in the tree are Mr Watzizname, Saucepanman, Dame Washalot and Moonface. Moonface lives at the very top of the tree, and getting back down is always easier, thanks to Moonface's helter skelter. Which takes you all the way to the bottom of the tree.
                          The children all like Moonface very much, and they are all very good friends. Moonface always goes with them on their adventures, and makes sure that no one gets into any mischief.

                          At the top of the tree is a cloud, which plays host to a variety of enchanted kingdoms. These lands are always on the move, and every time the children go up, there is always a new land waiting to be explored.

                          Not all of their adventures are pleasant, but not all of the lands are pleasant places to be. One particular horrid one, is the land of dreams. Almost as soon as you arrive, you will be lulled to sleep, and should you not wake up before it moves, then you would be stuck there.

                          A much more pleasant land is the land of 'take what you want', where you really can take anything that you want. On the land of nursery rhymes, you can meet all your favourites, such as Little Bo Peep and Mother Goose. Beware of the woman who lives in a shoe, as she has so many children, that she may think that you are one of them, and you will get sent to bed with the rest of her children.

                          The Faraway Tree is an absolute joy to read for anybody, young or old. When I was a child, all I ever read was Enid Blyton. I had every book that she wrote. My favourite by far, is the Faraway Tree. Just wondering what the next land would be, would be enough to keep me reading.
                          A gift for someone, or for yourself, one thing that you can be sure of, is the faraway tree is magical.

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                            02.10.2007 18:07
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                            Imagine living on the outskirts of a forest and knowing it was enchanted. What child could resist the temptation to enter within and see what kind of mysterious and magical things you might encounter in its depths. Not Jo, Bessie and Fanny (no sniggering boys!) that’s for sure. Tempted by the trees sighing' wisha, wisha' over the breeze, they travelled inside and found...

                            ...The faraway tree! A tree covered in magical fruits with a new magical creature living on each branch. Creatures like the Angry Pixie, who lives up to his name. But don't stare into his window, or he'll throw water at you.

                            Venture to the next branch of the tree and find an altogether more appealing creature, Silky the fairy, who will entice you with trays of freshly baked pop biscuits and toffee shocks.

                            Other characters you will meet include Mr watzizname, Dame washalot, Saucepanman, and Moonface. Moonface is the children’s favourite of all the magical people in the tree, and always accompanies them on their adventures. He lives at the top of the tree, and within his home is the slippery slip, a helter-skelter type affair that takes you right out of the bottom of the tree again.

                            But we don't want to leave now, do we. We want to carry on climbing, up to the very top of the tree, and the mysterious cloud that hovers there. So let’s leave the slippery slip for later.

                            The cloud plays host to a different enchanted kingdom every time the children venture up the tree. Sometimes the lands are wonderful places, such as the land of 'Take what you want' where you can indeed take absolutely anything you please from among the selection of interesting things to be found there.

                            Or maybe the land of nursery rhymes is more up your street, where you can get to meet all your favourites, like Little Bo Peep, and Mother Goose. But watch out for the old woman that lives in a shoe, she has so many children she might mistake you for one of them.

                            Not all the lands are so good though. Be careful in the land of dreams, for almost as soon as you get there you are lulled indo a deep and dream filled sleep, and you might wake up to find the land has moved on again and that you’re stuck there.

                            The books are very simple to read and are absolutely enchanting for young and old alike. I loved this book as a child and I still adore it now, as it brings back the wonder I felt as a child. This is a great book to either give to your child and read to them, or just to keep for yourself as it’s so full of magic. Overall, a book I’d greatly recommend.

                            This book is available from amazon.co.uk for 4.99, and there is also a childrens animated film of the Faraway Tree series available for 9.99 which is nice for younger children.

                            Thanks for reading.

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