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Breville Lightning Kettle

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    8 Reviews
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      07.09.2009 20:38

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      Nice and quick to boil, but keeps you on your toes!

      We have had this kettle for around 3 months and I must admit, it has been well used, its normally boiled every 2 hours or so (dictated by our 3 month old baby on formula milk). It boils quickly but it does make a racket. The illuminated case is ideal when wandering about at silly o'clock on a night feed and gives a positive indication that the unit is placed correctly on the stand. I like the 360 degree circular socket, which is slightly tapered to aid replacement. There are a couple of negative point though; firstly, the operation of the lid (by use of thumb trigger at the top of the handle) causes drops of water to flick onto you hand. No great issue, unless you have just boiled the kettle and are refilling it; my partner and I generally refill immediately after boiling (one less thing to do when you are carrying baby), we have both found that hot water flicks off the lid. Once the lid is up, the opening is limited and is difficult to get under the tap. We have also found that the case of the kettle gets very hot, which makes you jump when using the back of your hand to guage when it was last boiled; needless to say we both take care now, but it caught us both out when we first had it.

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      19.02.2008 23:00
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      Good kettle.

      We have had a Breville Lightening Kettle for a couple of years now and it has proved a good but. We paid about £40 for it at the time so it was not cheap. We opted for the stainless steel one rather than the white colour in the picture above.

      It certainly looks stylish although you do have to constantly clean it as it does show the marks on the stainless steel frame, it has a very stylish black handle however teh really cool thing is that when you switch it on it lights up a bright blue colour. This would be a good safety feature who cannot hear the noise of teh kettle boiling as well.

      The kettle can hold 1.7 litres of water which is enough to make a lot of cups of tea and it is fast working as well thanks to a 3000w element. It also has a stay warm option which saves you having to keep switching it back on if you want a second cup.

      It has an automatic cut out option and a boil dry option which switches itself off if the water level drops below a certain level. Overall I'm pleased with my kettle, it works well and it looks really good.

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        17.09.2006 23:06
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        Good kettle with some stylish features.

        After a number of year my once immaculately white kettle was beginning to look like it belonged on a building site and as it was a hand me down that I have had ten years of service from I could not really complain so I decided to use some of my hard earned Amazon vouchers to buy a stylish funky little model and to get a kettle at the same time.

        The Breville Lightning electric kettle certainly looked the part in the pictures and when I got it out of the box I was very pleased with my choice. Now I do not use my kettle much so I wanted something that did the job but more importantly looked cool and initially I was impressed. I opted for the stainless steel body colour, rather than the white one in the picture, and the kettle has a stylish ergonomically designed handle with a black rubber grip. There is an opaque plastic section underneath the handle with black markings on which allows you to see the water boiling and also the water level. It is marked off indicating the number of cups each water level will deliver and naturally there is an upper marker which you should not exceed otherwise water may splash out of the spout when boiling temperature is reached. The kettle sits on a round base of the same colour within which is wound the plug flex.

        The really stylish feature of this kettle though is the fact that when you switch the kettle on the opaque plastic lights up a rather attractive blue colour which was for me the reason I got it. Not while it is boiling the kettle looks really cool however my only fault with this is that when it is not in operation and the blue light is not illuminated the water marks are clearly visible on the plastic section and it looks a bit messy. To be honest it is one of those kettles best hidden away until it is time to use it and then produce it with a flourish, flashing lights and all.

        In terms of operation this kettle is the bees knees, it is a little loud when it is in full swing but it certainly lives up to its name in the speed that it heats the water. The kettle holds an impressive 1.7 litre of water and the fast boil 3000w element will have that bubbling away in no time at all. The element is concealed and easy to clean although so far I have not needed to do this as I have only had it a few weeks and it does not get that much use.

        The other feature that I really like is that fact that it has a stay warm button which when operated will keep the heat of the water at a constant temperature of about 77 degrees according to the manual. This is ideal for those lazy Sunday mornings spent with the newspaper sipping a hot drink and means that you are not constantly having to turn the kettle on and off as it works really well. There is a small light illuminated on the top of the kettle when you select this option.

        The kettle will rotate a full 360 degrees on the base allowing operation with either hand without having to reach across yourself and it comes fitted with a removable anti scale filter which in an area like mine is a necessity. It is easy to fill the kettle either through the spout or if you prefer the lid which is button activated.

        The kettle has a number of safety features, it has a boil dry fail safe device in case the automatic shut off does not work when it reached boiling temperature and there is a manual off button as well. Also should the kettle be removed from the base accidentally without being switched off there is an automatic switch off function that comes into operation.

        I paid £38.99 for my kettle from Amazon however I may have got the last one as they no longer stock it.

        I would certainly recommend this kettle for its ease of operation and the fact that it works so fast however my only disappointment is that it looks a lot better when it is in operation than it does when it is standing idle.

        Breville
        Pulse Home Products Ltd
        Middleton Road
        Oldham OL2 5LN

        Thanks for reading and rating my review.

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          06.06.2006 17:50
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          Looks like it is going to take off!

          Making a kettle sound interesting and exciting is a pretty tall order – at the end of the day a kettle is just a kettle, a means to an end to get a cuppa, right? Wrong! The Breville Lightning Kettle is more exciting than your average fairground ride – its got the lot- flashing lights, eerie lighting effects, visual effects…oh and you can use it to make drinks too, which is more than you could say for the Ghost Train! How much excitement do you want for £38.50? …


          I wasn’t desperately in need of a new kettle, I must admit, my old one was still functional, but then I saw my friends new kettle – the Breville Lightning and I was sold – ITS GOT FLASHING LIGHTS!!


          DOES MY BUM LOOK BIG IN THIS? …


          The first thing you notice about the Lightning is the size of it – it’s a big kettle holding 1.7 litres with a large bottom, which sits on a base plate. It looks attractive and feels weighty enough to be substantial without being too heavy. The handle has a rubber grip which all adds to the feelings of ‘kettle euphoria’ that this little beauty gives you.


          It is made in a white plastic finish. A stainless steel version has just been launched but it is a different shape (it doesn’t have such a big bum!) and whereas the white version looks new and different the stainless steel version is very’ ordinary’ looking.


          LETS TAKE A LOOK THROUGH THE BLOB SHAPED WINDOW…


          On the front of the kettle is a window through which you can see the water boiling. This is tinted blue so unlike some of the other brands of clear boil kettles (the ones where you can watch your water boiling) this one never looks ‘dirtied’ by limescale even if like me you live in a very limescaly (I know that’s not a word but I think it should be and I think people living in very hard water areas would agree!!).
          The window is blob shaped like a ghost (the stainless steel version is obviously aimed at more grown up kettle purchases because the window is a very sensible tear drop shape!) When the kettle is boiling the window lights up which is very effective in the dark (if like me you are easily amused that is!)


          HUBBLE BUBBLE…


          But looks aren’t everything of course – there wouldn’t be much point in a fabulous looking kettle that was no good at boiling water. I’d only heard of Breville before in reference to sandwich toasters…could they cut it in the cutthroat world of kettle manufacture?

          It does boil very quickly even when it’s filled to its 8 cup capacity (although we must have large cups in our house because when I tried to be economical and only boil the right amount of water as indicated on the measure on the side of the kettle I didn’t have enough water!!) It has a 3kw Rapid Boil element (I don’t know or even really care what that exactly means but any kettle anoraks out there will no doubt be impressed!)

          There is a water filter too which is easy to remove for cleaning.

          The thing that sets this kettle apart though from all the other jug kettles on the market is the Keepwarm System that means you will always have hot water on hand.


          NOW FOR THE SCIENCE BIT


          This is the sort of science I like - its simple!!
          The kettle sits on a hot plate that can be activated at any time during or after the initial boiling process to keep water hot so there is no need to re-boil the kettle if you need a cuppa in a hurry (Hooray!)
          As the promotional blurb that comes with the kettle proudly announces this makes it idea for commercial breaks in the middle of your favourite TV programmes or ‘busy breakfasts’ (or in my case just sheer laziness!)
          When the hot plate is activated a row of red lights around the bottom of the base flash so you can’t activate it by mistake and not realise. The flashing lights are one of my favourite bits!

          You might have guessed by now I really like this kettle. It may be sad to get so excited about a kettle but this one is well worth the money. At £38.50 it certainly isn’t the cheapest model on the market but I think its well worth the money. It’s available from Argos or all electrical retailers.
          The stainless steel version is £49.50 – unless you are really into stainless steel I’d say the white model is far better.
          There is also a toaster available in the Lightning range but that doesn’t have quite the same level of exciting gimmicks as the kettle so I can’t get too enthusiastic about it I’m afraid!

          Buy yourself a Lightning kettle at let off some steam!

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            02.12.2005 16:01
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            A superior kettle, fast and efficient but a little bright and loud in operation.

            It's only a couple of years ago that we bought an expensive Dualit kettle in the hope that it would last a lot longer than its cheaper plastic cousins. Three months ago rust started peeling off the inside and I knew that I needed a new kettle urgently - chewy coffee is not my thing. I went down the list of best-selling kettles on Amazon and bought the first one that was available for immediate delivery. The Breville Lightning was on the working surface a couple of days later at a cost of some £26.

            I know that you can get a basic electric jug kettle for a lot less than £26, but this is a well-constructed superior kettle. The first thing that struck me was that there were no rough edges and no chances of catching your hands on protruding corners. In fact the only straight line is the base - the rest of the kettle is a series of curves. As I did the preliminary boils to clean the kettle out I could see that there was no danger of steam escaping other than through the spout. Having tried a cheaper kettle (and scalded my hand) I know that this isn't always the case.

            The capacity is impressive at 1.7l. It allows me to fill my pasta pan or the stock pot to a reasonable depth with just one kettle of water. The last time I had visitors I filled the teapot and the hot water jug from the same kettle of boiling water. I hate having to refill and wait for it to boil. If you're into making mugs of coffee then you can do eight in one go - or as few as two. The markings are on the large clear blue plastic window and are in white. At certain angles they are not easy to see and I have once or twice over-filled the kettle and had to pour some water away, but that's a minor annoyance.

            When the kettle is full to the maximum it is quite heavy at about 2.5kg - the kettle itself weighs just short of a kilo - but the centre of gravity is low and I've never felt unsafe moving the kettle when full of boiling water. I have felt very nervous when moving tall slim jug kettles, even when they held a smaller quantity of boiling water. There's a non-slip grip on the outside of the handle plus finger indentations on the inside and these mean that you have a firm grip above most of the weight of the water. I have problems with both of my hands and one of my wrists, but I have no difficulty in using this kettle.

            When full the kettle boils in 3 minutes 40 seconds and switches off automatically in a further 10 seconds. It's fast, but probably not the fastest. The on/off switch is large and chunky, making it easy to either press with a finger or even just to tap with the side of the hand. No great accuracy is needed. There's also a handy switch to keep the water warm after boiling if you're not intending to use it immediately. After boiling, the water is not allowed to drop below a temperature of 77°C until the keep-warm switch is released. I've found this useful when I'm cooking and don't want to have to stop to boil a kettle or if I want the kettle to boil and stay hot for my coffee whilst I do something else.

            The kettle can be filled either through the spout or by lifting the lid. The spout is wide and filling by this method is simple. It's also a very good spout for pouring - there are no drips and it's possible to pour a thin stream of water if it's needed. Filling via the lid is a little more complicated. To open the lid it's necessary to depress the sides and lift the middle. This might sound difficult, but it's simply a knack that needs to be mastered. Where I do quibble slightly is that the lid needs to be shut firmly. If it isn't, steam can escape and this will affect the automatic cut-off when the kettle boils.

            There's an anti-scale filter fitted in the spout. I have removed it once to see if it needed cleaning, but, thankfully, scale is not a problem in this area. The filter came out and was replaced easily. For people who do have scale problems an additional advantage is that the 3000w element is concealed in the base of the kettle and does not therefore attract scale. As for cleaning the kettle itself, a wipe-over with a damp cloth is all that's needed.

            The kettle has a reasonable, if not generous, length of flex. Mine sits about 20cm from the socket and a small amount of flex has been wound back under the base. The base seems flimsy but has not caused any problems so far. It has a central connector so that the kettle can be swivelled to wherever the handle is needed, be that for left- or right-handed use or because it's more convenient in a certain position when you're cooking.

            What don't I like? Well, if the kettle is plugged in the handle stays warm. I'm not certain that this can be considered a benefit, but there doesn't seem to be any way of stopping this waste of electricity. It's also a little, well, obvious, in operation. Once the kettle is switched on red indicator lights shine in the base and the interior of the kettle is illuminated and a blue light shines through. As it's also quite noisy I keep expecting an aircraft to land. These are minor niggles though and ones that I'm quite happy to live with.

            The kettle is recommended, particularly if you cook regularly or need to make a lot of cups of coffee at once. I only wish we'd bought it instead of the Dualit a couple of years ago.

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              28.11.2005 07:29
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              A good looking kettle, but an expensive one

              My flatmate is something of a gadget freak. If it does something technological or lights up in pretty colours whilst doing something mundane, he has to have one. After building himself a shelving unit to hold all his home entertainment equipment, he added a string of blue lights around the edges to make it all look that little bit more impressive.

              So when our 2 year old kettle started showing signs of being on the way out, taking more time than was necessary to make a cup of tea and being covered in a thick layer of limescale that seemed to be impervious to descaler, it was a pretty obvious bet that he would come back with a Breville Lightning kettle, which lights up in blue when you turn it on. Even then, he wasn’t entirely happy, as he’d heard of a kettle that lit up in both red and blue and he really wanted one of those.

              For my part, I’m the one that uses the kettle the most, being the caffeine addict that I am. I just wanted a kettle that I could put on to boil as I stepped out of the back door for a cigarette and not have to wait for it to finish when I’d stubbed it out and come back inside.

              It’s an interestingly shaped kettle, especially for someone who is used to the straight up and down shape with a handle that most cheap kettles seem to come in. For the first time, I can see where the name “jug kettle” could apply. It’s a nice rounded bulgy sort of shape, a little like you’d get a jug of cocktails turning up in at a bar and sits snugly on a circular base. There’s also a nice little Perspex window so that you can see the water level, which is a vast improvement on most kettles, where you just get a little bar and, occasionally, a floating ball to judge by. Of course, the little ball always seems to get stuck, so it’s rarely a reliable judge.

              Thanks to my past history of kettle use, there are a couple of features here that are particularly useful for me personally. The first is that the switch to turn the kettle on and off is very large and very chunky. I often set the kettle to boil as I’m walking past to do something else, which means my method of turning on a kettle usually involves me bashing at the switch, rather than turning it on. The way the switch on the Breville Lightning is set up makes it easier for me to do this and it’s also a good switch if you’ve not got the greatest of motor control. The way it lights up is another bonus, as it leaves you in no doubt whatsoever as to whether you have successfully turned the kettle on, as in the past I have thought I’d turned a kettle on and, on coming back from the “something else” I was doing, promptly poured cold water into a cup of coffee, thinking it had boiled while I was away.

              The other feature that could have been made for me is that circular base, with the connection to the kettle being right in the middle of it. This is a lot easier that having to push the connection into the base of the kettle and a lot safer, as it means you’re not going to be touching anything electrical with hands you might have just splashed water on. It’s also going to be a lot easier if you have grip problems, possibly with arthritis or something similar. For me, it’s going to prevent a repeat of something I did a few years ago with an old style kettle, where I didn’t push the connecting bit in far enough, caused a short circuit when I turned the kettle on and set fire to it. Yes, I can’t only burn water, I can burn it in an electric kettle! In our house as well, the circular base has another bonus in that it means the kettle can be used just as easily by left and right handed people, of which our household contains both.

              Maybe it’s just because our old kettle was so scaled over, but it does seem pretty fast to me as well. It will boil the maximum 1.7 litres of water in a shade over 2 minutes, which seems very quick to me. That said, Breville are calling it a “Fastboil” element, so if it was going to take any longer than that, you’d have to argue over the wording. I suspect this could also have something to do with the shape and size of the element, which is a circular one, taking up most of the base of the kettle. This should also make it a bit more resistant to limescale and easier to descale than the old squiggly shaped elements. For someone like me, who usually wakes up and needs a cup of coffee to get going, that’s about as long as I would be prepared to wait, so I am appreciative of the speed of it. I like the wide spout, which reduces spillages and means you can fill it up straight from the tap through the spout without having to take the lid off, which is a bonus for ease of use as well as reducing the danger of getting scalded if you’re refilling straight after boiling, depending on how many cups of tea you have to make.

              It’s not all good, however. As impressed as I am with certain features of the Breville Lightning, others aren’t quite as good. Whilst the blue Perspex window is handy, it does tend to pick up a fair amount of condensation on the inside, which means picking up where the water level is, especially if it’s not that bright in the kitchen, isn’t too easy. The silver writing on the outside to measure the water level can also be a bit difficult to see and read in dim light. That said, the way the kettle lights up from the inside does remove both of these problems, as the back light makes the water level easier to spot and shows up the writing in a much more obvious way. But it could be annoying if you turn it on to make multiple cups of coffee, only to discover when you can read the markings that there isn’t enough water in for the number you have to make.

              The handle isn’t the best, either. It’s nicely curved and fits in with the design of the kettle very nicely. But there isn’t an obvious “no slip” section on it and the shape is such that if you do lose your grip on it, possibly trying to grab it with wet hands, it’s likely to tip before you can grab it back again and you could end up pouring boiling water all over your kitchen units or floor.

              I’m also slightly less than impressed with a couple of the features Breville are using as a selling point for the kettle. They talk about the “safety locking lid”, which is all very well, until you try and open it. It took me a couple of attempts to realise that there are a couple of plastic parts that need to be pushed down before you can grab the lids top and open the kettle. It’s a little more complicated than it needs to be and if either of these parts gets jammed, you’re not going to get the kettle open again. Most of the time, this won’t be a problem, but if it does need descaling or if you want to remove the built in filter for rinsing, you’re going to struggle.

              It’s the “removable” filter that is my other cause for complaint. I can’t work out how you remove it at all. At least, not without using more force than I have done so far, which I’m reluctant to do in case I break it. The filter is easily the least sturdy part of the kettle and if there’s something you have to press to release it as opposed to using brute force, it’s certainly not obvious. Of course, I could just read the instruction manual, but that really wouldn’t be my style! Being quite a small peace, there are again going to be issues for people with a less secure grip than others.

              The 1.7 litre capacity, supposedly enough for 8 cups of tea or coffee (they haven’t seen the size of my favourite coffee mug!) is likely to be enough for anyone. But 1.7 litres of water is a fairly hefty weight. Again, this isn’t something I have a problem with personally, but I have a couple of flatmates who have experienced problems with their wrists and it’s a heavy weight to be carrying with one hand if you have problems in that area.

              I’m not convinced by the “keep warm” function, either. They say it’s ideal for making coffee in commercial breaks. But as the kettle boils from cold in 2 minutes, when filled to maximum capacity, why bother? After all, most commercial breaks are around 2-3 minutes, so you’ve got plenty of time with a kettle this fast. The same would be true in the other situation Breville mention, for when a group of people don’t always want a cup of coffee at the same time. But if they can’t wait two minutes for a caffeine hit, they’re possibly drinking too much as it is. Incidentally, this is an accusation that could also be levelled at me, with some accuracy. But never mind that for now! It’s not likely to be any good as an energy saving device, either, as it will take the same amount of energy to heat the water from cold to boiling as it would to keep it at boiling point over a period of time.

              For all its faults, I do like this kettle. It’s not going to be suitable for everyone, particularly arthritis sufferers, as it has a few too many fiddly bits that wouldn’t suit anyone who can’t grip terribly well. But for me personally, aside from a couple of minor gripes, it does all that I could ask of a kettle. It heats my water quickly, it’s easy to fill and empty and I’m not likely to either set it alight or fail to realise I hadn’t turned it on.

              The major problem with the Breville Lightning is that it’s overpriced. Horribly so. You have to expect to pay a little extra for the novelty value, but at £25.14 from Tesco and a standard price of £29.99 from Argos (although this is currently £19.99 at the point of writing), you’d expect the kettle to be pretty much perfect, especially when you can easily pick up a basic kettle for as little as £5-£10 in your local supermarket.

              If they had got everything perfectly right with this kettle, I wouldn’t mind paying the extra for it. Sure, it’s prettier than any kettle I’ve ever seen before once you turn it on, but there are just a few things that are either badly designed or not completely thought through for it to be worth the money for me, even with the pretty lights. It’s not the lightning part of the kettle I object to, it’s the lightening of the wallet that makes this a bad choice. I’d pay around £15 for a Breville Lightning, no questions asked, as it’s got some features that suit me perfectly, but I’d want to see some design improvements before I paid £25-£30 for one.

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                11.10.2005 11:50
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                Super quick kettle with 'keep warm' facility.

                We have a habit of breaking kettles in our house, possibly due to over use, so when the last one went bang I decided on the Breville Lightening Keep Warm kettle.

                It has been a good little performer, boiling water in super quick time and then, by pressing the ‘keep warm’ button, it will make your next cuppa an even swifter affair. It is one for the tea or coffee junkie and I fit that bill quite nicely as I get through far more cups of Earl Grey than is good for me.

                To look at, it is a reasonably attractive unit as far as these things go. Mine has a silver body and base unit with two shades of grey for the handle, and there is a viewing window so that one can check the water level.

                Filling it to maximum gives one 8 cups, although with the super-sized mugs I use it is actually closer to 4 of those. Boiling it full with cold water takes a very swift 3 minutes and 40 seconds. One can then hit the ‘keep warm’ button and the kettle will subsequently boil up within a minute. I cannot imagine that this is particularly environmentally friendly in terms of energy use and I do get a small spark of concern every time I use it, but my desire to prop up Twinings almost single-handedly gets the better of me.

                I will reserve final judgement on its longevity as I have only had it for a few months, but so far it has appeared to be robust and reliable. The only problem I have had was my own fault: I got the underside of the kettle wet while filling it up and tripped all the circuits in the house.

                In summary then, the kettle is fast, nice looking and (so far) reliable. I struggle to find anything to criticise about it.

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                24.10.2003 01:57
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                I had just got home after a long tiring shopping trip. All I wanted was a nice cup of tea. Mmmmm. I went into my kitchen put the kettle on and POP! Why is it that kettles always wait for you to want your cuppa most before they decide not to work? Well after trying all the usual things (unplugging it, plugging back in, shaking it and then banging it on the work top) Before throwing it in the bin in disgust. I had no choice but to buy another. My search took me to Argos after looking at many different makes, I settled on the ?Breville lighting?. It seemed all singing and all dancing. The main thing that attracted me to the kettle was that it had a keep hot facility I thought this sounded very handy. It cost me £34.95 at the time. (January 2003) The kettle was packed in a box, which contained the kettle, the base and a quite informative instruction leaflet. The kettle is cordless and sits on a white, round, 18 cm plastic base, which has 80cm of electric cord attached. There is a small round connection point, which is risen up from the base by 2cm. This is where the kettle sits and draws it electricity from. There is place to wind any surplus cord that isn?t required so to aid safety. The base also has six little lights, which are only visible when they are lit. The kettle its self is approximately 25 cm high and like the base is white. It has two large windows, shaped like someone has just cut them out roughly. There is a measuring facility on the clear part of the window to help judge how much water you have put in. The kettle its self is quite light and weighs about 1.2 grams. It has a very sturdy handle which stays warm while the kettle is connected to the mains with rubber down the back of it to aid a good grip. This I think is very safe and easy to hold even for the weakest hand. The lid is hinged with two large buttons to open it. There is no chance of the lid falling off and it opens quite easily when the buttons are pr
                essed. On the top of the kettle handle are not one but two buttons a large one and a small one. The buttons and rubber on the handle is grey. In side the kettle is a flat round metal plate. This conceals the 3000W element to heat the water and can heat the smallest amount, just as long as it is covered. Being flat it is so easy to clean. There is a removable washable filter, to help collect all those little hard scales that some people have the misfortune of getting with hard water. This removes easily from the kettle and has little grooves to help you replace it properly. To wash the filter you just rinse it under a warm tap and brush with a soft brush. You must make sure when you replace it that it clicks into place then it wont fall out when your pouring the boiling water out. As I have said there are two buttons on the kettle handle. One is to switch it on and off. Although it is automatic and normally switches its self off but if you don?t need the water quite boiling you can switch it off via the big button when you want. The small button is to keep the kettle hot after it has boiled. After it has switched its self off, you just press the small button and it stays just below boiling point at 77c. We find this very handy indeed in the mornings. In our house we all get up at slightly different time so the first one down in the morning fills the kettle right up boils it, then leaves it on the keep warm mode. Then when the next person wants it, it takes just a couple of seconds to reach boiling point. Then they leave it on keep warm for the next person. We would not want to be without this feature now has it is so handy. You can leave it on the keep warm feature for a maximum of 12 hours. But this you have to switch off your self. Inside the kettle, just behind the lid is a blue light. This comes on while the kettle is heating the water to boil. It illuminates the entire water chamber to a beautiful electric blue, which loo
                ks very impressive when the kitchen lights are out. The blue light is not lit while on the keep warm mode, only the red lights on the base, which stay on while the kettle is boiling. When in keep warm mode the red lights flash. If you are careful in the use of your kettle it should never boil dry but as we all know even the most careful of us can have accidents. A boil dry fail-safe device protects the kettle. This will automatically turn the kettle off and keep it switched off until you put at least enough water in to reach the minimum fill mark. While it is in the fail-safe mode it will light the blue and the red lights as a warning that it has boiled dry. I tested the speed of the kettle on boiling. Filled to the minimum level, Two cups (which does mean two cups not mugs. I found this measure filled one & a half mugs) took one minute two seconds to boil. The maximum, which holds 8 cups, took 3 minutes 51 seconds. The actual capacity is 1.7 litres. Personally I find this the best and most useful kettle I have ever bought. I would recommend it to anyone. If I was asked for any concerns I think in all honesty the only one I could think of is, that children might be attracted to the kettle while it is boiling due to the attractive blue light. However, as you can shorten the electricity cable by winding it around the underside of the base I suppose it is up to you to make sure as with all dangerous things in the kitchen, that they are made safe. Thanks for reading.

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