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Russell Hobbs 18267 Regency

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£33.49 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
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    6 Reviews
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      17.02.2014 23:47
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      Recommended!

      I've had this brand of kettle before but it got badly scratched up over the years. I decided to buy it again and thought it might be an idea to review it.

      *The russel hobbs 18267*

      The kettle is brushed steel and our new one is black (we used to have a silver one). It sits on a plastic base with a little knob filament thing in the center. It has a plastic transparent water indicator that lights up when the kettle is boiling (it lights up blue). The old one never used to light up. On the plastic water indicator are measurements of 1 cup and up.

      *Fill er up*

      This has a flip top lid so you can fill it with water. I find the water indicator isn't very visible when trying to actually fill up the kettle with water so it's best to be cautious and only add a little at a time, check and so on.

      The kettle is cordless and holds just over 1.5 liters of water when full.

      *Boiling*

      This kettle is LOUD! It used to scare any guests in the house. It really does sound like a rocket launching off. It takes about a minute to boil enough water for 2-3 average cups.

      *Price*

      I can't remember the price we paid for it (sorry!) but i see it goes for around £45 online. I'd say this was about right.

      *Overall*

      Im pleased with this kettle. it looks good. it does the job. what more can you ask?

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        27.06.2012 19:44
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        I must admit to being quite pleased when our last kettle boiled its last drop of hot water - I wasn't a fan of it. It was a silver Cookworks one and whilst it done the job, I missed having a fancy kettle. So off I searched (quite happily) for a new kettle when I came across the Russell Hobbs 18267. I purchased it from the JD Williams catalogue and it was £45 - alot for a kettle but I really did love the look of this one!

        The kettle comes in a largish Russell Hobbs box with a picture of the kettle on the front (and far too much packaging inside the box!). The kettle itself is brushed steel with a plastic window which shows you how much water there is in the kettle which glows blue when the kettle is boiling (this is the little effect I love!). The blue light is really quite bright and it glows lovely when the kitchen is dark. It is a very modern looking kettle and would suit any modern style kitchen.

        The handle is black plastic as is the switch to switch the kettle on. Across the bottom of the kettle underneath the plastic water fill window it says Russell Hobbs in their font. The lid easily flips up at the touch of the button at the top for when you need to refill it. And simply clips back into place when you push it back down to close it. The kettle is cordless for ease of moving around the kitchen with it and is really light weight. I do not find this kettle at all heavy, even when it is filled to its capacity.

        Water wise, the kettle holds 1.7L of water. We worked this out to be 6 mugs of tea when we used it which is pretty good going in my opinion.

        Looks wise it is asthetically pleasing and it boils very quickly as it has a rapid boil function. It is everything you could want from a kettle - it is easy to set up, literally just a case of getting it out the box, giving it a boil to get rid of anything unwanted and away you go. The only downside I have found is that it is very loud when it is boiling. Now our kitchen is quite away from out living room so you cannot really hear it boiling if you are in there but if you are in the kitchen and using the telephone whilst the kettle is boiling it is impossible to hear the person on the other end - it is just that loud! But that is really its only fault. We have had the kettle for nearly a year now and it isn't showing any signs of wear. It still looks brand new.

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        22.06.2012 11:59
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        see review x

        I bought this kettle a few months ago from tesco direct for £34.97, I do not normally pay this much to be honest but the cheaper ones kept breaking, and my boyfriend offered to pay, so I took advantage.

        The look
        =======

        The look of the kettle is really pretty basic, it is stainless steel all over, with a plastic little window on the front which shows you the water level of the kettle, including the minimum and maximum for filling, do not fill the kettle over the maximum amount, as it will spill out as the water starts boiling. Also do not fill below the minimum as this can ruin the elements in the kettle. The handle of the kettle is black plastic, with also a plastic base which the kettle sits on. This is what makes the kettle cordless, the kettle sits in a round part in the middle of the base, which will connect to your kettle to make it work once it is all plugged in.

        How to set up
        ===========

        Well this is really pretty easy, you just need to take the kettle out of the box, including the base. Plug the base into the wall, and sit your kettle on the base. The spout of the kettle is pretty small, so you do need to open the lid properly to fill the kettle. To do this there is a little button at the top of the handle, this will pop open the lid, which will stay open on its own, when you have filled the kettle just push the lid back down and it locks into place. To turn the kettle on there is the button just under the handle, just push that down and the kettle with turn on, when the kettle has finished boiling it will turn off automatically.

        Boiling and noise
        =============

        The kettle is pretty fast at boiling and only takes a matter of minutes to boil, which I find really good as all my other kettles have taken longer, with 3kw of power this is supposed to be good, although the power does not mean much to me lol. Now the noise on the kettle is a little above average, I find it to be too noisy but luckily with it boiling fast you do not have to put up with the noise of this. I do not think I would like one of these if I had a bedsit as it would drown out the noise of the tv.

        My overall opinion
        ==============

        Well what more can I say about a kettle really, so far I have had no problems with this, and it looks pretty nice in my kitchen even if it is only a basic look.Its really simple to use, but so are most kettles, so now you are thinking so why pay extra?, well I have never known a kettle boil as fast as this one, although it is noisy but it is a noise that you can cope with and also get used to. As for if it lasts longer than other kettles, I can not really answer that at the moment as I have only had it about three months, but I have never had any trouble with it so far. So I would recommend this, unless you do live in a bedsit then you would want a quieter kettle.

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        15.06.2012 12:05
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        4/5 a nearly perfect kettle.

        I don't know why but it our flat Kettles seem to be cursed, we were given one from my partner's mum when we moved in which was barely used which started to leak so it had to be chucked. Since then we've had to get rid of two new kettles one because it broke and the other was very small and useless when we had anybody over. I decided rather than buying another kettle relatively cheaply at Argos that I'd use some of the Amazon vouchers and get a decent one in the hope of it saving us a bit of money in the long run. My Mum recommended that I buy the Russell Hobbs Regency Kettle, as she'd bought it nearly a year ago and she'd had no complaints. I looked it up on Amazon and it was I bought the Regency Kettle for just over £30, which I didn't think was a bad price at all.


        The kettle is very stylish and sleek looking, the metal is the brushed steel effect and this kettle would fit in perfectly with any modern kitchen. The main body of the kettle is metal, but for obvious reason the handle in black plastic, along with the base and part of the lid. There's a large window on the kettle which makes it really easy to see how much water you've put in. There's also a blue light inside this window so it's very easy to see when the kettle is switched on. This blue light can also be seen on the clear plastic switch just under the handle which flicks the kettle on.


        The Russell Hobbs Regency can hold up to 1.7l of water which, in my opinion is enough for nearly all households. Even when we have lots of people over we never have to make teas in two lots, it holds enough water for about six decent sized mugs. The kettle has a concealed element and a 3kw rapid boil function which really is very quick, even when the kettle is full. The kettle isn't that heavy, although obviously when it's full it can be, but I find that the chunky handle sits nicely in the hand and does make the kettle easier to lift. The kettle is also really easy to pour, even with a lot of water inside. As it's cordless it can be used with either your left or right hand and when you tip it up the water comes out at just the right speed, you aren't left with water spilling everywhere. Another useful thing is that when filling the kettle there's a button on the top of the handle which, when pushed just pops open the lid which makes it really easy to fill.


        So far this does seem like the Regency is the perfect, easy to use kettle although I do have a couple of niggles with it. The kettle is very noisy, this doesn't really bother me most of the time as our kitchen is a separate room but it is very loud and if our flat was open plan I would imagine this would get very annoying. Also the limescale filter isn't that good, although I clean it every so often it still seems to let bits into our drinks, although I wouldn't say this was a major problem it can just be a little bit unpleasant.


        Overall, I've been pleased with this kettle, it's lasted me a few months so far with no sign of giving up just yet which, in itself is a big positive. Although there's a couple of annoying things on the whole this kettle is pretty much perfect, it's easy to use and looks good and has a couple of nice features which makes it stand out from other kettles. I'm glad I bought the Russell Hobbs Regency, it's well priced and touch wood it will last me for a long time to come.

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        16.03.2012 16:03
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        Time to metal up

        As you guys know, plastic kettles don't last long, however much you pay for one. The kitchen is a grave yard for them; one semi busted one tucked away in a cupboard and another one on top of the freezer. As they are so cheap our mums and other halves tend to buy another one when they start to go wrong whereas guy hang on in there until they get the last flicker of life out of them, all manner of electrical tape and tinkering applied to make them last. It's like ball-point pen. Don't lob it until it stops writing. Auto cut outs on kettles can be very annoying though. Women, on the other hand, want things to work and look pretty and so out it goes in the trash and another one in the supermarket trolley before the guys can blink. What I don't want in the house is one of those retro middle-class kettles that look like the one your old mum had that always whistled.

        It's not the kettles fault it breaks but the working conditions and environment it has to survive in, all manner of hazards awaiting it, and human's pretty rough on them too, very much sweat shop labour in the kitchen. We don't fill them up enough so we can lazily have a quick cuppa and slowly erode the filament away in the process and then bang them down on the stand to concuss the socket of poor Mr Kettle. Hard water is further ware on the filament and internal mechanism and then electricity is added to the mix, not exactly a friend of water and never the twain shall meet. They have to be designed not to electrocute people and so the mechanics of the thing are not that durable. The times I have scraped lime scale out I refuse to count.

        So, after one too many £ 9.99 models from the supermarkets I thought I would upgrade and pay a bit more in the hope it wouldn't conk out within six months. To buy one of those reliable metal kettles with filaments straight from Sizewell B you have to pay an arm and a leg and so the Russell Hobbs series it had to be. This particular model is on Amazon at £34.99 but I bagged it at £29.99 and so a good price for what is pitched as a mid table metal kettle although the metal somewhat sparse.

        It looks cool and well designed with the blue luminosity gimmick present. It has a right and left hand design pick up with a double measure display and so far no problems or steam burns. With a 1.7 liter capacity its standard there and the push button lid nice and snug. It tips well and doesn't flood your cup and the filter over the nozzle seems to catch the lime scale and bits and bobs but best to clean it out now and then. It says it has a rapid boil kilowatt engine but it takes as long as any other kettle for me. Boil speed is always down to under filling the kettle. Whether kettles last longer on how much water you put in and how many times you boil it up is up for debate but what is certain is nobody likes to wait for the kettle to boil if there is a method to do it first.


        Problems with it seem to be around the electrics in the base that again will be bombarded with water and erosion over time. Water slops everywhere from kettles and if it gets in the base area that means rust and then a short. I try to be delicate with it. In keeping with our health & safety culture instructions and warnings are including - like don't throw it in the bath when people are bathing. Ok, they don't include that but you get the gist of the warning symbols on it. Whether its worth thirty bucks and I wont be writing about another kettle review in six months time is the big question.

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          16.03.2012 12:16
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          A fine way to boil water, but how long will it last?????

          I've always had bad luck with certain kitchen items, fortunately it's not with sharp items such as knives, which is good. The kitchen items I am always having terrible trouble with, breaking them quicker than cricket ball going through a glass window, are mainly toasters and, my dreaded kitchen 'nemesis', the humble water boiling device that is called the kettle.
          So over the years I have owned, used and broke more kettles than Harrod's shop has sold, which has cost me a small fortune trying to keep my household happy with that fresh cup of tea and coffee, or even those dodgy cappuccino's that taste like powdered paint with a dash of sugar.
          I have tried out many brands, Bosch to Breville, Morphy Richards to Swan and even a certain shops own brand, which turned out to be as reliable as a politicians promise. I also tried out a certain sleek looking kettle with a very well known brand on it which I hoped would last longer than I was used to. That brand was the famous Russell Hobbs one with the actual Kettle being the 18267 Regency.


          What does it look like then..?

          As I said it is pretty sleek, for a kettle, with its lovely 'brushed' stainless steel look to it and a solid black plastic handle which can be easily grabbed and comfortably held, then there's a water indicator level behind a clear plastic window which runs down the side.
          As for the size it is 220mm deep, 166mm wide, 260mm high and weighs in at a mere 1.25kg, holding a maximum of 1.7litres of water.
          The lid, which slopes slightly forwards, pops open with the push of the button on the upper section of the handle.
          The handle is black moulded plastic and feels solid in the hand, with a well placed thumb support near the top to give that extra firm grip.
          Then there's the spout, which isn't the biggest, in fact it's pretty slim really, so the easiest way to actually fill the kettle is buy actually lifting the lid.

          And finally there's the base which the kettle sits on and lets it become a cordless kettle. This base is circular with a little 'nobble' sticking out of the middle which the kettle sits on and gets its power from.
          The kettle can then spin a full 360° which makes it capable of being lifted by either hand without any wires or snagging getting in the way.
          The mains cable is quite a good length and can be wound around the underside of the base so that you only need to release the right length you need.


          What about working it then..?
          Well, it has one sole purpose in life, that is to boil water, and to do this you just press the little clear plastic switch which lies just below the handle. This then sets the thing in motion and, due to the 3kw of power, the kettle comes to the boil faster than a rabbit being chased by a whippet.
          During the boiling process you can actually see the water as it bubbles away when you look through the good size clear water indicator.
          The element is what they call 'hidden', which basically means that it is hidden underneath a metal sheet in the bottom of the kettle so that you can't see it.

          NOTE:
          For safety it does have a 'boil dry cut off switch which means that it will cut out if there is no water inside the kettle or, in the way mine went, the water boils away as the steam escapes from every orifice so that the kettle doesn't switch off automatically.

          CAUTION...
          Do show caution as the casing gets very hot indeed and if you touch it you will get very sore fingers, which can be painful, believe me. But as the handle is well constructed and a great size there's no real problem with picking it up and scorching your knuckles.


          My Opinion...

          This was a fine kettle in its opening days and did do me a fair few months of water boiling, but once it started to go wrong it went downhill fast, almost as fast as when I physically threw it right down my garden in a fit of temper.

          When it worked it worked well, bringing a full kettle of water to the boil in a couple of minutes, then keeping the water slightly heated so as to continue in its speedy boiling technique.
          But, as with all new kettle, the initial metallic taste was as horrid as ever, lasting for quite a few full 'boils' indeed.

          I do have to say that when it begins to boil you'll know about it because of the noise it makes, which does get a bit load, although not that excessive but I did have to raise my voice if I'm talking to someone in the kitchen.


          Sadly though, when it started to fail on me, as I said, it failed fast.
          Firstly I found was that the filter itself just began to not sit right at all, seeming to be too much of a gap near the bottom of it. This would allow limescale passed the filter which, in some areas of the country could make your brew a bit 'nasty' tasting.
          Then, after a while, it seemed to be taking a bit too long to actually stop boiling, but with a bit of fiddling with the filter, basically pushing it further into the kettle so the gap corrected itself, the kettle cut off kicked in. Although after to many filter pushes the kettle decided to actually continues boiling for what seemed like forever, in fact, if I hadn't turned it off, it would have boiled forever, which, for a kettle like this, is not too good at all. That's why I ended up getting shut of this one and grabbing myself another.
          Then I noticed that the steam was actually coming out of the lid area itself a lot more than it used to, and not just the spout, which I thought wasn't right at all, and was more than likely the reason for the kettle not automatically switching off when it was boiling. But when the actual lid began to push out of its housing when the kettle boiled I realised that it was time to call it a day and buy myself another kettle, but this I was quite used to by know as, in my life, even the most sturdiest of kettle just doesn't seem to last in my house.

          As for the price, well, I think I paid about £30.00 for this when I bought it a while ago which, for the quality and speed of the way it worked wasn't too bad at all. But for the time it lasted me I can't honestly say that I'm that impressed at all.
          But as I said, for some reason I have always had this uncanny ability to break kettles by just looking at it whilst it is still on the shelf in the shops.


          © Blissman70 2012

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      • Product Details

        Short name: Russell Hobbs 18267