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Bickiepegs Doidy Cup

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21 Reviews

Brand: Bickiepegs / Type: Training Cups

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    21 Reviews
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      06.04.2013 05:12
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      Doidy cup.

      Malakai hasn't been the biggest fan of his sippy beaker just lately, and he was finding it difficult to drink certain beverages out of it such as thick smoothies or thick fresh juice, as the opening hole wasn't too big and was best suited to water, or diluted juice.

      Because of this I ended up buying him a doidy cup, which was recommended to me by a wonderful friend of mine from parenting classes. I hadn't heard of doidy cups before, so I took to google and had a little read about what it was, and then looked on amazon to see how much they cost.

      I had a feeling that they would be expensive - and at the full retail price they are, as they're around £10 at the full price but I got mine for less than half of the price from amazon. I paid just £3.38 for Kai's doidy cup, which was no doubt one of the biggest bargains I've bagged so far this year, haha.

      There was four different colours to choose from including pink, red, blue and yellow - I chose blue, though I will be buying a couple of other colours too as Kai has really taken a liking to this cup! At first, Kai didn't understand that this was a cup. I think he thought that it was a water toy (we have little plastic tubs that we use for water play).

      After showing him how to use it (eg drinking from it, lifting it up, putting it down, using the handles and keeping it upright) though he used it perfectly at first and sipped away happily but then when he had sipped all of the juice closest to the top of the cup he seemed to lose focus and he still has not got the hang of it. I filled it with juice rather than water because he's not too keen on the taste of water and I knew juice would be a tasty way of getting him motivated to drink from the cup. He used it really well and drank from it impressively well, but then as soon as he couldn't get the rest of the juice out it all went wrong and he tipped it all over himself!

      This of course turned into a bit of a game and in the end I gave him his sippy again as he knows how to drink from it, despite not really liking it much anymore. We are still in the process of teaching him how to drink from the doidy cup and he seems to be getting the hang of it and is learning how to hold it properly without spilling it but just as I think we're getting somewhere he will tip it too far (sometimes deliberately) and it will spill everywhere! Patience is key with this product.

      It's messy, and i am not able to control him that much with this which I know will freak some parents out, but personally I think it's fun to make a little mess and I make sure we use it in the kitchen as we have tiled flooring, or outside. The cup is very robust and well made and the handles are easy for Kai to grip. I wouldn't have paid full price for it, but I am happy with it considering that I got it for such a bargain price and Kai is a fan, too!

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      01.04.2013 12:57
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      not for us

      When I felt my son was ready to progress from bottles and cups with drinking teats or straws, I set about a bit of research on how to introduce them to drinking from a cup. Time and time again, this 'doidy cup' from bickiepegs was mentioned and, as it was priced at a reasonable £2.50 at the time, I decided it was worth purchasing.

      The doidy cup is meant to be a good way for toddlers to learn and develop the skills required to drink from an open cup. It is basically a plastic cup with two handles (one on each side) but the top is slanted so that the lip of the cup that is drunk from is longer than that on the other side of the cup. The idea of this is that it allows wobbly handed toddlers to lift and tilt the cup towards them easier than a conventional cup - and makes it easier for the drink to remain contained in the cup rather than spilt over the side.

      The cup is made from a thin (but durable - we have dropped it a few times!) plastic and is available in several colours - red, blue and pink. We have the blue version, which is a dark shade of blue. I first used this with my son with a little water in at lunch time and just let him investigate it really - he promptly tipped it up and spilt the water over the table. Non-deterred, I gave him this again and again he had little interest in drinking from it - even after I had demonstrated how to do it. He did grab the handles in the correct way, which was promising, but failed to lift it to his lips. We persevered every mealtime for about a week but my son just didn't seem to recognise this as a cup - when I offered him a regular child cup he was much more keen to drink from this. This probably led to more spillages than we would have had with the doidy cup, but he was much more accepting of this.

      Perhaps if the doidy could have been made more appealing to my son - for example with a pattern/character on it, it would have been more successful. This is impossible to say though and it may be that it just didn't work for us. It was not too expensive so I do not regret giving it a try and I could not say it was completely useless - it just wasn't for us!

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      10.02.2013 00:00
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      A very useful cup for young children

      The Doidy cup manufactured by Bickiepegs is specially designed to make it easy for babies to learn to drink from a rim, rather than a bottle or cup with a spout.

      The two-handled cup is slanted. The theory is that it does not have to be tilted as far as a regular cup in order for the drink to reach the child's mouth. The drink can be seen clearly by the child enabling them to better judge their drinking.

      According to the Bickiepegs website: "The Doidy cup is an ideal aid to weaning as the natural mouth action used is the same as in breast feeding. Health professionals are advising use of the Doidy cup to prevent long term health problems caused by delayed weaning and prolonged use of feeding bottles and spouted cups."

      I am not sure that this means that drinking from a Doidy cup is any better than drinking from a regular cup, I think they are just claiming that it is easier for young children to drink from the Doidy.

      Baby CrazyEgg is able to drink from regular cups and the Doidy cup. However, at 20 months (17 corrected) she wishes to do things for herself. The Doidy cup has offered no miracle of developmental progression. Left to hold the Doidy cup herself she responds exactly as if holding a regular cup herself: takes a couple of sips, then pours the drink over herself. She is much better suited to the lidded and spouted Tommy Tippee First Cup- it, unfortunately is not suited to smoothie, which is too thick to get through the spout. The last outing of the Doidy cup was when Baby CrazyEgg was served mango smoothie, which she promptly poured over her head, making her look like a Slime Monster emerging from a swamp.

      You would think, from the above that I am not that impressed with the Doidy cup. Actually, I have a soft spot for it, because it was useful in some of the decisions made over Baby CrazyEgg's feeding last year, when she was fed by nasogastric tube.

      The Speech Therapist working with Baby CrazyEgg asked me to observe what Baby was doing with her top lip whilst drinking, and also to note whether there was a visible or audible swallow. With a regular cup I simply could not see baby's top lip, because the cup got in the way. The slanted design of the Doidy means that you can see a little more of Baby's mouth as they are drinking. At this time I held the cup for Baby so it was not poured everywhere. Because of the cup's design I was able to explain to the therapist what was going on, and it was whilst drinking from the Doidy that I heard the most audible swallows, though that was coincidental.

      The Bickiepegs website states in further marketing blurb that with the Doidy cup children "learn how to put the cup down properly." This sounds meaningless to me, as surely children learn how to put any cup down properly. The Doidy cup is no easier to put down than any other type of cup. Indeed, I would argue it is harder, but that's because the slant throws me every time: I try to put the cup down so that its sides go straight up, and then it falls, because when its sides are straight up its base is slanted. Sometimes, my brain is really very slow.

      The Doidy cup is readily available from Amazon sellers and the Bickiepegs website direct, priced at around £3.50. It is dishwasher and microwave safe.

      An extremely useful cup!

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        22.09.2012 16:24
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        Can be quite a successful little cup, if your child takes to it

        The Doidy cup seems like a pretty innovative product and there is a lot of hype and scientific studies surrounding it. Apparently, it can prevent tooth decay, speech problems and is suitable from birth as it is similar to breastfeeding and prevents nipple confusion from using bottle. I am always a little wary of these sorts of claims which often seem like little more than scaremongering to convince parents to spend more than they need to on baby products. However, I did end up giving into the hype and buying two of these for my youngest sons when they were making the transition from bottle to cup. I had originally invested in several different types of fancy sippy cup which were supposedly more like breastfeeding, more natural, less likely to cause problems etc. etc. but my sons, without fail, found it too hard to suck from every single one of them. On the other hand, they weren't quite ready to drink from a beaker, as they always tipped it up too much and spilled water everywhere. I thought the Doidy cup would solve our problems.

        It seems like a fool proof idea - the cup is slanted so as the child doesn't have to tip their head back as much to drink from it. In practice though, it seemed to make very little difference. My sons had limited success with these cups as long as I portioned out their milk or water, only putting little amounts in the cup at a time. But, to be honest, I think doing that with a normal beaker would have been just as successful. The strange design of the cup seemed to confuse them more than anything, and the handles are far too small to be fit for purpose, in my opinion. They don't seem very comfortable in the hand either. On the plus side, the cups are very durable, and have been dropped and banged relentlessly on the table without so much as a crack appearing. Equally, they've been through the dishwasher and microwave numerous times without any wear (the manufacturer does state that they are dishwasher and microwave safe.)

        I bought these cups on Amazon for around £3.00 each, so I didn't feel as though I wasted a huge amount of money - they are still in my cupboard 3 years on, and I fish them out from time to time if I've been lax with the washing up and we need an extra beaker. I'd recommend that you try and get them as cheaply as possible if you're going to try them, as there's no guarantee your child will take to them. Then again, it could be just the thing that helps your child along to the next stage. The success of the product seems to depend more on the child than the cup, which means that despite grand claims and the best of intentions, it's of limited use.

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        16.08.2012 14:43
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        An unusual open baby cup which is great if your baby isn't as naughty as mine!

        - Why I Bought -
        I recently purchased a Bickiepegs Doidy Cup for my 15 month old son. I actually first heard about these cups in a review that rather slated them. However, on reading a few more reviews it seemed that for every person who hated them there was another who loved them. I was intrigued so decided to give the Doidy a go.

        - The Doidy Cup -
        This is a cup for babies and toddlers that is rather unlike any other cup I have seen before. It is essentially an open cup so there is no teat or spout for baby to drink from; instead the baby drinks from the rim of the cup. The cup has a slanted design so that the baby only has to tip the cup slightly towards them to be able to drink what's inside. There are two handles to make holding the cup easier. The cup is made from one solid piece of BPA free plastic and comes in a range of colours such as blue, yellow, orange, pink, purple, turquoise, white or red like ours. The cup is suitable from six months of age or from birth if the cup is held by the parent. This cup is ideal for weaning from breast to cup as it avoids the need for a bottle or beaker. As there are dental and speech problems associated with using bottles and beakers for a long time the Doidy seems like an ideal solution. Drinking from an open cup is what they will be learning to do eventually anyway so why not go straight to this? I like the design of the cup. It is sturdy, light and functional but also looks unique and colourful.

        - The Reality of Using the Doidy Cup -
        So this all sounds great but I didn't have very high expectations as I knew reviews were mixed and we have already tried around ten different types of cups. My son will quite happily drink from his Tommee Tippee free flow cup but I thought it would be good to progress onto this so that eventually he will drink from a normal cup. On our first attempt I put a small amount of water in the Doidy cup and held it to my son's mouth. He knew what do to and started sipping the water. Then I gave him the cup and he quite successfully held it up to his mouth and continued to sip his water. Great! I was very pleased with this and was already thinking about ordering the yellow version. Then my son put the cup down and decided to put his fist into the water. Well let's face it this is much more fun than drinking it. He did this a few times before tipping the water into his lap and completely soaking his trousers. So not as successful as I first thought then. I realised that this cup was going to take a lot of patience and persistence. We are continuing to use this cup at lunch time but with mixed results. Sometimes my son will drink the water and sometimes he will play with it.

        There are several things I like about this cup. Firstly I think it is a great way to get my son used to a normal cup. He likes being able to see the water and it is great that he is sipping water from the rim rather than sucking it from a teat or spout. The design of the cup is simple and makes it easy for my son to use. He finds it quite easy to tip the cup up enough to drink from it and the handles are easy to hold onto.

        However, there are also a few things I dislike. As my son can see the water he can also touch it. He really enjoys putting his hand in the cup and splashing about with the water. As with his other cups, he also enjoys throwing the cup around and tipping it upside down. This is bad enough with a free flow spout cup but with the Doidy it only takes him a second to empty the cup of water over himself. It is also worth mentioning that the cup is not practical for taking out and about as it has no lid so you would need to take a separate container for the water. Due to my son's behaviour with the cup I think I would be too embarrassed to let my son use it anywhere other than at home anyway!

        - Cleaning -
        This cup is dishwasher and microwave steriliser safe. Due to its open design it is very easy to clean.

        - Price and Availability -
        I bought our Doidy cup from Amazon for £3.40. It is also available from John Lewis and Kiddicare.com for similar prices. I think this is a reasonable price for a baby cup and at least you know you haven't lost much if you don't get on with it.

        - Would I Recommend? -
        Even though we have had a mixed experience with using this cup I still think it is worth a try. If your child will happily drink from it and avoid the temptation to drench themselves then there are many benefits to using this cup.

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          04.08.2012 15:12
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          I wouldn't recommend, end up with more water on you baby and floor

          When Lauren was around the age of 5 months, I attended a weaning session at my local Sure Start Centre where they talked us through what to feed and drink, how often to etc. One product which the health visitor recommended was a Doidy cup so as soon as I got home, I purchased one from Amazon.

          Unlike most cups, the Doidy cup is slanted so that your little one can see the fluid coming towards them as you or they tip the cup towards their mouth. It comes with two handle which are quite thin and ideal for little hands to hold.

          Bickiepegs state that the cup can be used from birth (with help) apparently the mouth action needed is the same as used when breastfeeding but it is also recommended using from 6 months when you start the weaning process, the health visitor recommend this cup rather than cups with spouts as it is mean to deter problems associated by using these (tooth decay, speech problems etc)

          As I said, I purchased mine from Amazon for just under £3, it is also available from places like Kiddicare, Mothercare and the price is around £3 - £4. I brought the cup in a pastel pink colour, but there is a wide variety of colours available.

          I found that using the cup was a bit of a nightmare, regardless of the fact that Lauren could see the fluid in the cup; she always tended to tip too much and ended up with water all down her top and sometimes even too much in her mouth so she ended up coughing. Being so young, it was hard for her to understand what it was for and tended to just shake the cup. I also dislike the fact that the cup doesn't come with any type of lid so it could only really be used in the house.

          The cup is both dishwasher and microwave safe, I never used in the microwave but did run through the dishwasher a few times and I didn't experience any problems.

          Overall, I would not recommend the cup, I know it is a learning process but after a month or so of the cup being constantly knocked over and spilt all down Lauren, I gave up and opted for a Tommee Tippee Cup. Having said that, Lauren did spend ages just banging to the cup on her highchair and loved making a noise with it so we did get some use out of it!

          Thanks for reading.

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            19.02.2012 14:39
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            The answer to your prayers if you have a cup/bottle dodging baby

            The Doidy cup is the prefect receptacle to get babies used to drinking out of a beaker.

            It was the first cup that my daughter showed any inclination to start drinking her milk out of after refusing a couple of cups with spouts and out-right always refusing to be bottle-fed.

            It therefore gave me the confidence that I was not going to have to be showing up at break times at school to personally give her her milk - a fear that I'm sure all mothers who breastfeed and are unable to substitute any feeds with a bottle, share.

            However, my joy at using this cup was actually quite short-lived, and that is because of the mess.

            This cup is a unique, and I would go as far as to say, inspired design. For all intents and purposes it looks like a regular plastic cup but it has two handles to allow the baby to get used to holding it and guiding it to its own mouth and most importantly the whole cup is on a slant, as though it has been melted at an extraordinary heat or made by an inexperienced potter on a potter's wheel.

            But this slant is no mishap. It is this slant that allows a parent to be able to feed their baby out of an open cup well before they are actually capable. The slant means that less milk pours down the
            sides of the cup rim when you tilt it to the baby's mouth, the cup also does not have to be tilted as far to allow the milk to touch the baby's lips and because the baby can see clearer the contents of the cup it is much more efficient at getting them to start self-feeding earlier

            Most importantly it is the ideal cup for a breast-feeding baby as they are able to lap up the milk and so mimic the unique sucking action they are used to. This either allows parents to completely avoid the introduction of teats and spouts to their baby or, in my case, overcome their babies aversion to said teats and spouts.

            The maker, Bickiepeg, also claim it is much better on a child's teeth than sucking on a teat and spout and also does not impede the development of speech - both problems in babies bottle fed for too long.

            My daughter seemed to really enjoy drinking out of this cup and would keep pulling it to her to get more and more milk. But unfortunately this only exasperated its one big downfall - the mess factor.

            While it is much tidier than a normal open topped cup it is still significantly more messy than any cup with a lid.

            I found that after feeding my daughter from this cup she would need a change of clothes and a good clean off which made it completely impractical to take out and about which had been one of my hopes for it.

            I persevered for a few weeks and my daughter and me both got much better at using it but still it wasn't a dry experience. Added to this was the fact I could not be sure just how much milk she was drinking as so much was being spilt and what she had did not appear to be sustaining her for very long which made me suspect more was being spilt than it should be.

            After much thought I decided to try a cup with a free-flow spout. For a time I interchanged the use of both these cups until my daughter started to get the hang of the spouted cup and I'm afraid this meant the Doidy cup had had its day.

            But its use isn't over. Its still sat in the cupboard and will return when my daughter is a bit older and is learning to drink from a normal beaker or cup as for that stage it will be ideal.

            And I cannot play down the fact that it was the Doidy cup which broke the ice when it came to starting to get my daughter off breast-feeding, making it in this sense, invaluable.

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            28.06.2011 21:22
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            A great alternative to a traditional spout beaker

            My daughter is breastfed and I have since she was born been struggling to get her to take expressed milk. I have in four months only successfully given her a bottle once! I have tried various makes and teats to no avail. In the end I decided to give up on the bottle and move straight to a cup. I was recomended this cup by my health visitor.

            I got it from Amazon for £3.99. The cup comes in various bright colours as well as a sparkly variety. I chose cerise sparkles. The cup has a unique slanted shape. It has two handles each side for your baby to hold.

            The doidy cups unique slanted design makes it easier for your baby to drink from the rim of the cup as they can see the contents without tilting their head too much. It is also said to be an aid to weaning as the same natural mouth action is used as when breastfeeding. It also states on the packaging that dental professionals suggest that training children to drink from a cup as soon as possible can cut down on the long term dental problems associated with prolonged use of bottles.

            The cup is recommended for use by baby's 6 months and over. Or from birth with mum's help.

            I have in the past tried normal cups with no success so I was a little sceptical about this cup.

            To start with I used water as I find expressing milk time consuming. My daughter suprisingly took really well to it. She was able to take small sips without ending up with liquid all down the front of her. I have been using the cup for a few weeks now and she seems to like it. It has made my life so much easier as it means I can leave my daughter for a short while with family something I couldn't previously do as she would get really distressed without me. My daughter is too young to hold the cup herself although she does try to grasp at it. The cup is light enough for a young baby to hold so hopefully by the time she is 6 months she will be able to use it herself.

            I would recommend this to all breastfeeding mums as an alternative to bottles, or to mums introducing water and juice to their baby's. It is I think much easier to use than a traditional spout beaker and it saves a lot of mess! I have now ordered another 3 in different colours.

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              13.09.2010 23:43
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              Try the child with a mug least they can see the fuild moving towards their lips worked for my girls

              I had tried bickiepegs with my girls when they were teething but had not heard of the doidy cup when my health visitor told me in a condescending manner to buy them and try it with the girls.
              The cup is aimed at toddlers to get them off sippy cups to drinking from a cup with no lids or spouts.
              We have two pink doidy cups but there is a huge choice of colours available.
              The cup is plastic and angled slightly there are two small think awkward handles at the sides of the cup. The idea of the cup being angled is to stop a child putting their head forward into the cup and tipping back, child is meant to just tip the cup slightly and drink from the angled side. The cup is also supposed to not to cause spills but does in fact both girls when using the cup has juice down their tops and this happened on a few occasions.
              The cups were tough for the girls to master , they could drink out a normal mug better than they could with the doidy cups. The cups are easy to clean dishwasher safe.
              Both Hannah and Jess drink from normal cups now but this is not thanks to the doidy cup , oh i also told the health visitor how i felt towards the doidy cup!

              I would not recommend the doidy cup, try a mug at first.

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                01.09.2010 08:12
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                see review

                One day when taking my son to the health centre to be weighed as a baby the health visitor began talking to me about a new kind of cup which was highly recommended by health professionals for your baby. The product she was talking about was the doidy cup which is made by the same people who make bickiepegs.

                On first glance at the doidy cup I have to say I thought it was a little bit mental! Here was this cup, intended for babies from around six months, which had no lid to stop spillages! The doidy cup is basically a plastic cup which has a more slanted edge at one side and two handles to hold it with. It does feel like a very solid cup and is well made. You can buy the doidy cup in many colours and it is both dishwasher and microwave safe.

                The doidy cup is recommended by health professionals as they feel that it is not damaging to a child's teeth which is something that can occur with prolonged use of bottles or even the cups that you can buy which are non spill and involve a child having to bite at the spout just to get any liquid to come out. With the doidy cup a child can learn how to use a real cup and also learns how to be careful with a cup so to avoid spillages.

                The doidy cup can also be used from birth apparently, with help from the parent of course. The action required to drink from the doidy cup is apparently the same as that used to breast feed so it is an alternative for those who are breast feeding when they need to express and let someone else feed baby, rather than opting for a bottle.

                I was talked into buying a doidy cup to use with my son, and it cost me £3.50 from my health visitor. When I got my son home I decided to give it a go immediately and we filled the cup with a little diluted juice and I helped my son use the cup. He really wasn't keen on the cup though unfortunately. Despite my helping him he still seemed to take too much of the juice at once and then would cough and splutter which I think put him off. He also would end up spilling juice down himself quite regularly.

                We tried with the doidy cup for a couple of weeks but it really didn't go down well at all in our house and so I reverted back to a free flowing cup with a spout. My son was bottle fed from birth, and then moved on to free flowing cups with spouts or straws and he has perfect teeth so I am presuming that the claims of the cups damaging teeth are just for those who continue to use bottles and such like long after it is actually required.

                Whilst the doidy cup is quite a novel idea I do feel it is a bit of a gimmick too. Here is this trendy and rather strange looking cup that is apparently so wonderful for your child that really I felt I had to buy it, even though I was quite happy with the cup we were already using. I can't say it is something I would recommend to parents to be honest as we just didn't get along with it and my son liked to play with it more than anything, but perhaps some people out there could use it!

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                  27.08.2010 02:08
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                  An odd shaped cup that works rather well

                  The Bickiepegs Doidy Cup is one of the oddities of the baby and toddler feeding cup world. Its something that we saw and thought was quirky and interesting but didn't actually think it would work for us. However as it came highly recommended, we thought it was worth a try.

                  The cup is something we bought to try to help our child become accustomed to drinking straight from a cup that didn't have a covered spout, mouthpiece, or teat like fitting on it. It worked well and is something that proved useful.

                  **********************************************************
                  The name of the cup has always been an irritation, its odd just like the cup itself, yet although the name is not a winner, the cup does work well enough. The range of colours you can choose to buy your Bickiepegs Doidy Cup in is rather good too and you are almost spoilt for choice.

                  You can go for anything from vivid red, orange or yellow, to blue, turquoise and jade. As if thats not enough the girly girls can choose from pink, cerise, purple or lilac. There is also a plain white and a sparkly purple which is very disco babyish. So many colours to pick, yet all shaped in that odd slightly off centre way that is part of the Bickiepegs Doidy Cups err... charming usefulness.

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                  The cup has a simple set of handles on each side that have been made as part of the cup, not as an addition. The whole thing has a sleek appearance that is styled in rather an Ikea cheap crossed with 1970's retro chic manor.

                  Its made from a durable polyetheylene material or plasticy stuff to you and I. We have been able to bung it in the dishwasher and its come out fine and its also capable of entering the mighty microwave and coming out alive-ish. Microwaving is frowned upon though as it can lead to certain parts of the drink being too hot for a child and may result in burning. The cups simple all in one design makes it easy to rinse out by hand after use too.

                  **********************************************************
                  Thinking about how our child found the cup as something to drink from, its best to say the first few drinks needed a helping hand. We found that our child didn't have to lean so far into the cup that they were about to spill it on the floor, although that did happen, but mostly through choice not by accident.

                  The oddly shaped slightly tilted and off side shape of the cup is something that can be very helpful for a younger child learning to use their first lidless cup. Even though it looks tilted the Bickiepegs Doidy Cup can be stood on a flat surface as there is a nice flat base to the cup. Once placed on a flat surface it still stands well.

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                  We bought the Bickiepegs Doidy Cup as we were very conscious that its not great for a young childs developing teeth to be using cups with teats, spouts etc for every drink. We found the cup to be very good as a cup to be used with supervision as it teaches a child to drink freely from an open topped cup.

                  We did find that spills from the cup were no less than from other cups we had tried out and at times the tilt of the cup still meant that almost the whole cupful went all over our childs top. In a way I feel this is as much down to the learning process that younger children go through to be able to use a cup without adult help, so it wasn't the cups fault or a fault with the cup.

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                  To rate the Bickiepegs Doidy Cup, I feel it can be a very useful item to use in the transition stage between using a bottle or lidded cup. A child can learn to drink from an open topped cup unaided with this cup, but lots of spills can and do still happen.

                  The cup can be bought for £3 to £4 and so doesn't cost the earth. Its recommended by health professionals as a good cup that can help to wean a child away from bottles and lidded drinking cups and as such it does have its place.

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                  The Bickiepegs Doidy Cup may have a jolly silly name, but it does the job once a child gets the hang of it and can soon lead to a child being able to hold an open topped drinking cup without spilling the contents. With all this in mind the cup gets a 4 star rating.

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                  15.07.2010 21:25
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                  A good investment

                  It is recommended that babies are weaned off bottles by around one year of age as prolonged use can affect their oral health, so with this in mind I bought my baby a doidy cup when she was around nine-months old.

                  These cups can be used from birth with obvious parental support, but most people I know purchased one when their child was between six and 12-months old.

                  As my little girl was breastfed until she was 16-months, she only had water or the occasional expressed feed in a bottle, but I was keen to get her to use a proper cup, as she had not been keen on the sippy cup I tried her on first.

                  The Doidy is different as it is not covered and encourages babies to drink directly from the rim, instead of via a sprout or teat. It mimics a real cup and develops good habits from the outset, meaning babies are more likely to drink properly from a younger age. Or so I was told...

                  When I first got this cup I was unsure of exactly what to do with it so I held it for my daughter the first few times, and she was keen to try it out. The idea is that because the cup is slanted, the contents are visable so both parent and baby can see what they are doing, reducing the risk of large spillages. The slanted top also means there is more room available for the babies mouth so they dont end up with their nose enclosed which can be uncomfortable and put them off.

                  My daughter had no problem grasping this concept and drank properly, leading me into a false sense of security whereby I thought she may be able to manage all by herself. Big mistake. I did persevere by leaving the cup on her highchair but every time she either knocked it over by mistake with her elbow, or tipped the liquid all over herself spectacularly while trying to have a drink.

                  The two handles on the side are great for even young babies to hold, the cup is sturdy yet lighweight, but some babies manage the drinking bit better than others, and it does take plenty of practice.

                  At almost eighteen-months old, my daughter still tips the contents of this everywhere and I still hold it for her if it is full so for me it would not be ideal as her only cup.

                  During the day she will have water from her Amadeus cup, which is outstanding, but for milk in the morning and evening I use her Doidy cup and she seems to like it, reaching for it when she wants milk.

                  I picked mine up at a little baby shop for around £5 but they retail at anything from £2 - £6 so shopping around is advisable.

                  As they are both microwave and dishwasher safe they are a good investment, even for occasional use, since they do help babies to drink properly from a 'grown-up' cup. I have not put mine in either the dishwasher or microwave and I just clean it in a bowl of hot soapy water which seems effective enough. There is no discolouration to the beaker, which comes in a range of fantastic bright colours, including the hot pink one my daughter owns.

                  Going back to the breastfeeding point, this cup is especially recommended by health professionals for breastfed babies since sipping from it is similar to the mouth action used to suckle, aiding the transition off the breast.

                  All in all, it has been a handy cup for us, and is definately worth buying once you don't expect miracles from it. After all it is only a cup and not the miracle solution it is often marketed as! But it is also a neat design, sturdy, good quality and attractive. It just depends on whether your baby likes it or not!

                  Like I said I bought ours from a local retailer but it is widely available via Surestart, dentists, and through online retailers including John Lewis and Amazon.

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                  08.07.2010 23:02
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                  A fun and funky idea for tots.

                  Dooyoo is all about personal experience with products, so I would like to tell you a bit about why I bought this product and how much success I have had with it so far.


                  If you have read some of my other reviews, you may know that I have a 5 year old son with mild learning difficulties. One of the problems that he has is with his fine motor skills, or co-ordination. Things like eating and drinking are huge obstacles for him, as when he tries to drink from a regular cup, he always over compensates and gets the juice all over himself. The occupational therapist suggested buying specialist products to help him manage better, and my research led me to the Doidy Cup, which is a special cup designed for babies and infants to help them to learn to drink from a cup with a rim.


                  You can see from the picture above that the cup is just like a regular plastic cup that has been slanted to the side. The idea of the slanting cup is so that the child/baby does not have to lean over the cup to see the liquid inside, and that it does not requite much tipping to reach the liquid. The cup also has sturdy handles on either side that the child can hold on to.


                  The official website says that this cup can be used from birth with the mother holding the cup, and this can be better than a bottle for breastfed babies to drink expressed milk from, as the mouth action that they use to drink from the cup is more similar to breastfeeding than sucking on a bottle. A six month old baby can hold the cup themselves, with supervision. Using the cup minimises the dental problems associated with bottles and spouted cups.


                  So essentialy this is a baby cup, and I wish I had known about it when my son was younger and got him started sooner. I bought the cup from Amazon, for just over £3. The cups come in a variety of colours. I bought turquoise, as I though it would be appealing for him. Usually, he drinks from a spouted cup, so when he got home from school and saw this, he looked puzzled. I told him that it was a special big boy cup for him, and put his juice in it. I told him to hold both of the handles when drinking. He managed to tilt it back OK, but did overcompensate a little and spilled a tiny bit on the table, but nowhere near as much mess as he would usually make.


                  He loved the cup and kept asking for more drinks. I made sure he kept the cup at the table and didn't walk around with it, as the cup has a sturdy base which makes it unlikely to tip over. He did splutter a bit at one point when he took in too much juice, but I think that he will get used to it with practice, and it is a vast improvement on previous attempts.


                  I am really glad I bought the Doidy cup, although this is early days yet. At least he feels he is a bit more like his big brother and sister who drink from normal cups. The cup is made in the UK and is dishwasher safe and microwave safe. It is made from food safe HD polyethylene and is Bisphenol free, according to the website. I think this is an excellent idea for moms who are thinking of moving their kids on from bottles and sippy cups, and a great aid for parents of disabled kids and kids with co-ordination problems.

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                    16.06.2010 13:51
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                    A good cup to use when weaning a little one I wish I had tried it a little longer than I did

                    As part of a recent kitchen cupboard clear out of things we no longer use with my son I came across the doidy cup. I have to say as I held this cup again memories of my son trying to use it came flooding back to me. So I thought it would be good to share our experiences of this cup with you.

                    Why this cup
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                    I have to admit as a first time mum I was probably very easily swayed. If I was told a product was good by a health professional in this case both the health visitor and the dentist it would in all likelihood involve an inter-net search and purchase of the item recommended. I had been told that this cup was an ideal way to wean baby off the breast and straight on to a cup with out using bottles or a one-way value beaker. The reason for this is that drinking from the cup uses a similar mouth action to that of breast-feeding and that dental problems associated with longer-term usage of weaning one-way value cups and bottles wouldn't happen.

                    What is it?
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                    The doidy cup is unlike most cups that you can buy for a baby, as it is open topped in the first instance. The cup is designed on a slope so that children can see what is inside the cup without putting their heads forwards and downwards. The cup has two handles to make it easier for little one to hold on to. They recommend that this cup can be used from 6 months on wards but it can be used from birth if mum holds the cup. The cup is dishwasher safe and microwave safe. It comes in a variety of colours ours was a lovely bright yellow.

                    Our experience
                    ****************
                    I have to admit I had high hopes for this cup and thought it would be great for our son, as he had used a small cup in SCBU when he was born to drink some milk along side breast-feeding. I rather naively thought he would remember this action 6 months later no such luck.

                    Initially one of the reasons I wanted him to use this cup was for when I went back to work and he would need to have some expressed breast milk at nursery, I hoped by drinking from this cup we wouldn't need to use a bottle. The drinking choices for my six-month-old son were either breast milk or water. Now as breast milk was hard to express and was treated like gold dust by myself I decided I would try him with water with the cup as a first measure.

                    The first attempt was I think a totally disaster. This I think was due to my lack of knowledge and skills as I just filled it up with water put it on his highchair table for him and some how expected him to pick it up lap at the water and drink it. Now in hindsight (which occurred fairly quickly) this was a bad idea he just knocked it over with out even seeing what was in the cup. So a baby change and a floor clean later I decided to try with him sat on my knee and me holding the cup to his mouth. This worked better and he seemed to lap and sip at the water. Not much went in really and he still with me holding it had a few spills down his top. We tried this for a few days and he got a bit better on each try. However he still wasn't drinking huge amounts from the cup and would appear to get bored as it were with drinking the water. I then tried with some breast milk in the cup but as this drinking matter was more to his taste he tried to guzzle it down too quickly and lifted the cup too high covering himself in the milk so again he didn't drink huge amounts. As we wanted him to use this instead of a bottle I was concerned that if the breast milk at nursery ended up over him rather than in him then he would get hungry. For this reason we switched to a closed cup without a value for him to use. In hindsight I actually think if I had been a bit braver and given this a longer try for him I think it would have been more successful. But as I worried too much about him not getting the milk or water into him I gave up very quickly. I think if I have any other children in the future I will return to trying to use this cup and just be prepared to take a little longer with it.

                    We kept this cup clean by washing it and sterilizing it in our cold water sterilizer. This worked very well and the cup never changed colour or altered any way from being used in a cold-water sterlizer. As it is microwave safe I think if use a microwave sterilizer it would also remain in good condition.


                    Overall and recommendation
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                    Despite my lack of success with this cup I would still recommend it but from my experience it needs a little more patience and time to get a little one to accept this cup than a closed beaker. We are now moving our son from a closed cup to an open one and if I had tried this cup a little longer he would never had to have a closed cup.

                    Where from
                    ****************
                    These are available from Amazon and John Lewis from around £3.50 a cup

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                      28.04.2010 12:53
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                      A fantastic cup that is a great learning tool to wean a baby from bottle to cup

                      The transition from bottle to cup can sometimes be a bit of a challenge. With there being so many different cups available, it can be a difficult task to choose a cup that we think will be best suited. This can result in many purchases in order to find one which a child will be happy to drink from. The Doidy cup is an ideal first cup, as its brilliant and innovative design gives a child the opportunity to learn how to drink from a rim. Health professionals recommend getting a child drinking from a cup as early on as possible.


                      Having my son sit with us at meal times and study us eating, he was more than ready to wean when he reached the recommend 6 months of age, which is currently the guideline in the UK for when to wean your child onto solids. I mostly baby led weaned my son, as I knew he was ready to eat solid foods. I was eager to get him off the bottle as soon as possible and drinking from a cup as early as possible. It is best to wean your child off the bottle as early on as possible, as drinking from a teat or spout can lead to tooth decay and it is believed that it can slow down speech development. 'Sippy' cups (spouted beakers) are no better than drinking from a teat, so it is best to try and use an open cup as soon as possible.


                      As soon as my son started to wean he was more interested in eating and he became less interested in drinking, this was a bit of a worry as I know how important it is to keep hydrated. I started out with a 'sippy' cup which he drank from with some success; however his fluid intake had reduced as he was more focused on his food. Taking the lid off of his 'sippy' cup did encourage him to drink more, although this also resulted in him wearing most of it. I decided to have a look at what other cups were available; I thought the Doidy cup would be worth trying, as it is designed to teach a child to drink from a rim.


                      ~Doidy Cup~

                      The Doidy cup produced by Bickiepegs is a Unique training Cup, as the cup is slanted which enables a child to see the contents. This means that a child can sip their drink unlike other cups where the cup gets tipped up too far and the fluid comes out too quickly. It is said that the cup can be used from 3 months, however personally I decided that I would wait until the recommended 6 months before weaning my son onto a cup. The cup is made from polyethylene which is a safe material. It is a sturdy cup that will withstand an over enthusiastic toddler throwing it across the floor. It can be washed in a dishwasher and it can used in a microwave, although you should be careful of 'hot spots' (microwaving drinks is not advisable for children). The cup comes in various colours and the retail price is only £3.70, which is reasonable and comparable to most training cups.


                      ~Learning to drink from a cup~

                      Babies are generally much happier when they can hold their cup themselves and are able to have control of drinking.


                      The cup is an ideal size, it does look a bit unusual to begin with and I did wonder how well my son would get on with the cup. The cup has two handles, initially I worried that the handles were too small and close to the cup, my worries were soon put to rest as the handles were the perfect size for my son's hands. He reached for the cup immediately as soon as I put it onto his tray, he lifted it and the cup made it to his mouth with ease. This is quite an achievement, as my son could see his drink he was able to successfully lift the cup to his mouth instead of tilting forward to look into the cup.


                      My son instantly knew what to do with the cup, he did however get a bit giggly and excited and on the first few attempts at drinking from his new cup, so I did need to assist him. After the initial novelty moment and once the giggles had passed somewhat my son was keen to try and drink from the cup himself. Little intervention was needed from me; I did find it easy to hold the cup from the opposite side from the rim to keep it steady while my son drank from the cup. After a couple of days practice my son picked up the cup and had a good drink and he placed it back down on his tray looking rather pleased with himself. I was feeling very proud of my little boy.


                      The cup doesn't hold much liquid, although a sufficient amount for a little one, it is easy to top up if needs be, so it doesn't present a problem. This cup was used for a short time as it is designed to teach a child how to drink from a rim, so it is not a cup that is going to get a lot of use as once a child is confident and has mastered drinking from this cup then it is time to move onto a different toddler cup. This was a perfect learning tool for my son, as it gave him the confidence to drink from a cup alone and it gave him a great sense of achievement. Children are far happier if they can 'do it themselves' and they are more likely to eat and drink more if they are in control.


                      The cup is hard wearing and durable and it has suffered many bashes and it has been dropped and rolled across the floor countless times, mostly because this is a fun game. The cup has been gnawed and chewed on which doesn't present a problem, a few tiny indents have been made to the rim but that is inevitably going to happen with all feeding equipment. The cup was a success, as after a short amount of time my son had mastered how to drink from the cup independently and this gave him the confidence to move onto an open cup. His fluid intake greatly improved as drinking from the Doidy cup was a novelty so he was more than happy for me to refill his cup at meal times and drink from the cup.


                      ~Recommended~

                      This cup is a great learning tool, to teach a child an important skill. The Doidy cup is definitely worth trying if you are a bit nervous about weaning from bottle to cup, or if your little one is wearing more of their drink than they are drinking.


                      ~Availability~

                      Available from the following on-line retailers:

                      www.johnlewis.com
                      www.kiddicare.com
                      www.bickiepegs.co.uk
                      www.amazon.co.uk

                      RRP: £3.70
                      Product Dimensions: 25.4 x 15.2 x 7.6 cm.

                      Highly recommended.

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                    • Product Details

                      The Doidy Cup, designed and made in the U.K., to teach your child to drink from a rim. The unique slant of the cup enables children to drink easily as they can see the contents without thrusting their heads forward and downwards. They also learn to put th