Welcome! Log in or Register

Antony Worrall Thompson Autograph Digital Scales

  • image
8 Reviews

Kitchen Scales

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    8 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      09.09.2013 18:50
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      They suit me ok

      I was giving these scales by my dad as he found the digital scales over complicated and decided to buy a traditional set of scales instead, he gave me these as he had only had them about 6 months, I've had them about a year.

      The Scales
      As scales go these are quite nice they are round with a glass top and a grey body with "antony worral Thompson's" signature across. It has 3 buttons, and a small digital screen. These weigh items up to 5kg. The buttons are to switch it on or off, to change the weight to ounces, pounds or grams and to set the scales to zero if you are using a bowl or whatever. They are quite compact scales being only about 20 cm in diameter. The glass section unscrews to make it easy to clean. They take two lithium batteries, which I've never had to replace, but then I'm no delia smith :) I probably only use them once a month.

      Using Them
      I'm not much of a baker, so my main use for these is weighing things I'm listing on ebay, they do this well, the weight matches the weight at the post office, and I find them easy to use. I just switch them on, make sure it's zeroed, and then put my item on and weigh it :) The only problem I sometimes have is, if it's a large item it can be hard to read the screen as it is tucked in under the glass, I could imagine if you were using a bowl to weigh flour or something this would make it awkward.

      Would I recommend them?
      Yes I think they are good for light use, as they work well and are compact enough to fit in a cupboard or drawer when not in use. If you are a keen cook though I think the screen being beneath the glass weighing section could become annoying.

      These no longer seem to be available in shops, but are available on ebay for £14.99

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        01.09.2013 12:33
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        2 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        These scales work but they're far from perfect

        INTRODUCTION

        A few years ago I went self-employed, and as I was now working from home and money was tight, home baking seemed to be a good way of keeping our food bill down a bit. Over the last few years I've got quite adept at making bread and other baked goods.

        As anyone who bakes knows, being able to measure quantities of ingredients with some degree of accuracy is important. Until last year I was making do with some super-cheapy plastic scales that I think I picked up at a market. Then, when perusing the shelves in Wilkinson's, I saw these Antony Worrall-Thompson digital scales on special offer for about £10.


        PRODUCT DESCRIPTION

        These digital scales are formed of two sections: a circular base encased in silver plastic and a circular glass weighing plate. The weighing plate is secured to the base by means of a screwing mechanism.

        The scales are quite light - I'd estimate they weigh around 200g-300g. On the front of the base unit is a small digital panel with three black press buttons: on/off, mode and Z/T.

        I've long ago lost the instruction leaflet for these scales, but from what I've worked out, Z/T zeroes the scales, mode allows you to toggle between weighing in pounds, ounces or grams and the on/off button...I'll let you figure it out :-)

        The digital screen is of the old liquid crystal style and is around 4cm x 1cm in size.

        The scales are powered by two large silver lithium batteries, similar to those found in watches. Poundland sell large packs of a variety of these types of batteries, a far cheaper option than buying them separately.


        USER EXPERIENCE


        I wouldn't know Antony Worrall-Thompson if he leaped out in front of me, but I gather he's a 'celebrity chef' of some repute. In any case, these scales he's lent his name to are a good budget product but they have several design flaws.

        *The Ugly*

        First of all, my major bugbear with these scales is that they switch themselves off after around 5 seconds. This is *so* annoying, especially when I'm adding ingredients to a bowl. For example, if I'm making bread I like to use half the quantity of white flour, and make up the rest with wholemeal. Once I've weighed out my white flour I find the scales have switched themselves off before I've added the wholemeal flour to make up the total weight I need. Once I switch them back on they automatically zero themselves, so I have to take a note of the weight of the first load of flour I've measured out and then do a quick sum in my head so I weigh out the second lot of flour correctly. If I was adding a third ingredient to the bowl, or even a fourth, this gets very tricky.


        *The Bad*

        Secondly the digital readout screen is placed half under the glass plate, so if I'm weighing ingredients out in anything bigger than a cup I have to bend over and look under the glass weighing plate to see the digital readout! I have dodgy joints and bending down to read the scales is not always easy, especially as I have to do it within five seconds (see above!).


        *The Good*

        The good points about these scales are that they are accurate (they measure in 1g increments) and allow me to measure using different systems. I grew up with metric but some ye olde recipes I've unearthed are written in ye olde imperial measurements, so being able to switch between the two is handy.

        Also, these scales are easy to clean. I just wipe the base unit over with an antibacterial wipe, and pop the weighing plate in with the washing up. The battery life is very good too - probably because the dratted thing switches itself off so quickly - I haven't had to replace the batteries since I bought the unit.


        CONCLUSION

        In conclusion, these scales do the job I bought them for but they can be a pain in the neck. I'll use them until they die on me but I wouldn't buy them again.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          30.08.2012 00:50
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          2 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          These are not very good scales

          WHAY ARE THEY?

          Digital scales from celebrity chef Anthony Worrall Thompson.

          HOW DO YOU USE THEM?

          Turn the scales on and set if you are weighing in ounces or grammes. You can weigh directly onto the glass top of the scales or put a bowl on top and weigh into that. There is a zeroing function so that you can weigh out different amounts of ingredients into the same bowl while you are making a recipe.

          ARE THEY ANY GOOD?

          No, they are not. They do not weigh accurately and display very different weights in different places in my kitchen, there can be up to a 10g difference and this can be disastrous when cooking cakes and airy biscuits. The scales switch themselves off very quickly as well so if you are weighing lots of different items you should have them all to hand because just a walk to the cupboard for more sugar can be long enough for the scales to shut down. If you need to walk away from the scales try to memorise the number in case you lose your data.

          The scales are very cheap feeling and the plastic base is too light, it is also slippy on the bottom so slides if you knock it. The display is hard to read because it's underneath the glass plate and in shadow. You cannot weigh anything on a big plate because then you can't see the display at all.

          The glass scratched very easily on mine and I don't know what scratched it because I only use plastic bowls with the scales. They only need to be wiped to keep them clean but use batteries quickly even though they switch off so quickly to save power.

          1 Dooyoo Star.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            04.07.2012 10:23
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            1 Comment

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            See Review

            I wanted some new scales for the kitchen as the old ones we had were so bad you would weigh something and then weigh it again and it would be a completely different weight. I wanted some digital scales and wanted some that would give me the results in either oz or grams whichever I needed. We had a look in Wilkinson and found these scales by Anthony Worral Thompson. They looked nice on the box so bought them.

            I can only say that I don't think he could ever have actually used them himself as they are really badly designed. The plate that you stand things on is clear so you can see through it to the bit where it has the numbers but if you put something on the plate that is a fair size, like may be a plate with food on then you can't see the numbers as they are covered up. This is quite annoying as I wanted them to weigh food for my diet so I am finding that a lot of the things I am weighing cover over the numbers. I have to get everything to fit into a small bowl to be able to see properly.


            There is another fault with the scales. You have three buttons on the front, one turns them on, one switches the mode over from oz to grams etc and the other one will reset to zero. This option is for if you want to put a bowl on and then you can reset to zero and it takes off the weight of the bowl so you will just be weighing the contents inside the bowl. Only trouble is that the numbers that show up disappear pretty quickly so you do not have enough time to keep adding ingredients to the bowl. This is a right pain especially if you are doing something like grating cheese and weighing it as you go, the numbers vanish where it switches itself off and then when you turn the scales back on again it just goes back to zero again. If you take the bowl off and reweigh it then you get the weight of the bowl added in and there is no way to take the weight off again. Hence you would need two bowls the same all the time so you can get a good reading or other wise you would need to empty the contents and start again. I havent used them for cooking for a recipe yet but can see this not working for this either if you are trying to add different ingredients to a bowl and weigh them as you go instead of having them all separate.


            I paid about £12 for these scales and must say I am disappointed with them so far. They are ok for just weighing out something easy like a couple of potatoes or something that you can pour in quick but if its something you need to keep adding too to get the weight right then you need to be so quick that its just about impossible to do. I certainly would not recommend them to anyone looking for scales. I am sure there are better options out there that work better and have a better design.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              14.09.2010 15:34
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              13 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              I advise you not to purchase these scales - unless you have X-Ray vision and can work very quickly!

              I bought these Antony Worrall Thompson digital scales some time ago after they were recommended to me by a friend, I can only assume she doesn't like me as much as I like her due to the fact that the scales definitely have more 'cons' than 'pros'!

              If I remember correctly I paid around £18 for them in Woolworths, nowadays I would imagine they would cost significantly less due to the influx of digital scales on the market.

              These scales will measure in both metric and imperial units, it's very easy to switch between the two by pressing the easily accessed 'Mode' button on the front of the scales. The other two buttons you will see on the front of the scales are a responsive On/Off button and a zeroing button for use when you want to weigh two or more items in the same bowl, for cooking and the like. The buttons have a slightly rubbery feel and are well encased within the body of the scales, I mention this as a previous set of digital scales I owned had a fairly wide gap between the button and the base unit which was obviously full of crumbs and flour within a couple of uses - and an absolute nightmare to clean!

              Aesthetically these scales are a delight; the silvered body looks clean and modern and they look as fresh as the day I bought them. There has been no scuffing to the body of the scales and the tempered glass weighing plate is remarkably scratch resistant, considering I am a heavy user of any scales I own I must admit these have kept their looks extremely well.

              There is, however, a fatal flaw - one which has led me to purchase another set of scales to replace these. This is the fact that the display is located underneath the weighing plate; of course this isn't a problem if I'm simply weighing, say, a small piece of cheese or an apple as I can simply lay that on the glass itself and read the display through the glass. The problem occurs when I am using a bowl to measure ingredients for baking, or perhaps cooked noodles and other such foodstuffs. In this instance the bowl will either partially or completely cover the display, meaning I have to stoop and contort my body just to read the numbers beneath. This is not ideal, in fact it's not even acceptable considering the rather high price of the scales and the 'celebrity endorsement'.

              If this weren't bad enough, I have another irritating issue with the scales. Gosh, they are turning into as big an irritant as the gurning man himself! This is the fact that the automatic shut off is far too quick. When I first bought them I thought this was a very good feature, the idea being that the scales will switch themselves off after use to preserve the batteries. The problem is the fact that these switch off almost immediately after you have added your items to be weighed onto the plate, making the 'Zero' function somewhat redundant as there simply is not the time to press the button and add another item.

              I'm certainly not an ill-prepared cook; I ensure all my ingredients are to hand before beginning a recipe and don't dally in the kitchen, yet after measuring my 400g of flour I am hard pushed to put my hand on the caster sugar and add that to the bowl before the scales decide I've had time enough and switch themselves off. Many a time this has caused me to either need to swap bowls or simply throw away perfectly good ingredients as I have not been able to keep track of the weights used.

              As far as accuracy is concerned, these scales are fine. They're more than fine actually, they're perfect. As well as measuring ingredients for cooking I also use them to weigh the occasional parcel so I can accurately calculate postage costs for Ebay. Using these scales I have never been caught out and had to 'top up' the postage upon taking the parcels to the post office, the weight results being spot on when weighed both here and at the point of posting.

              The scales work through two Lithium Cell batteries, fortunately I have not had to change these since owning the scales as I believe this type of battery is rather more expensive than your standard AA battery. This probably means the automatic shut off function is doing its job as until now I hadn't realised the scales were working off the same batteries as was provided when they were new. It's still extremely irritating though.

              I don't recommend them, I simply can't. Yes, they may be very accurate but so are the majority of digital scales available these days so this isn't particularly a plus point relating to this specific model. The strange situation of the display panel coupled with the fact that I cannot trust the scales to stay on when I need them to means they merit no more than one solitary Dooyoo star - as even the plus points pale into insignificance when compared with the two very irritating problems.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
                More Comments
              • More +
                02.08.2010 09:25
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                4 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                A complete waste of time and money.

                I do a lot of baking, and loved the idea of digital scales as they give that little bit of extra precision when it comes to measuring out your ingredients. So, I popped digital scales on my Christmas wish list a few years ago, and was thrilled to discover these scales under the tree!

                Looks-wise they are perfect. They look sleek, and they match my kitchen well as most of my other applicances are stainless steel. I think the shape of the scales is quite funky, and they look really fun and modern. I also love being able to switch from pounds, to ounces, to grams just by pressing a button. With my old manual scales, I had to adjust the units by sliding the scale round, so this is much more convenient. However sadly this is where the compliments end, as in reality I have been extremely disappointed with these scales.

                Where to start with the criticism really?! By far the most irritating feature of these scales is that they turn off by themselves. Initially I thought this would be a fantastic feature. As they run on batteries, I thought it would be really handy for them to turn off by themselves, as it would stop the batteries from being wasted if I occasionally forgot to turn the scales off. Indeed, if they had researched this feature a little more thoroughly, then I'm sure it could have been very uselful. However the reality is that these scales will turn off after anywhere between 20-30 seconds of inactivity (I have timed how long it takes and there is no consistency to it!).
                What I have found ridiculously annoying is this: I am making a cake, and have weighed out the sugar, butter, spices, and start to weigh out the flour. I finish a bag of flour and there's not quite enough for this recipe, so I go to the cupboard to get a second bag of flour. I come back to the scales, and of course they have turned off, leaving me not knowing how much more flour I need to add, and not being able to easily check now that I have a bowl of mixed ingredients. If it turned off after 2 minutes then it would make using these scales much easier, and so much less frustrating. I have found I need to get all of my ingredients lined up on the kitchen table, and even make sure all the packets/ jars are opened, as having to open a packet or jar in the middle of weighing can easily cause the scales to turn off if you're too slow. In addition to this, if I am weighing something that is coming out very slowly, such as the end of a packet of sugar/ flour/ or the last bits of a tin of golden syrup, the scales will decide they can't be bothered weighing something that only increases by a gram a second and just switch off right in the middle of it. Last night I was weighing some shower gel to sell on the Lush forum, and again it just switched off in the middle of it as it deemed the gel was not coming out quickly enough- this is extremely irritating.

                One factor I completely under-estimated about these scales was the rate at which they would gobble up batteries. They take 2 x CR2032 3v batteries, and a pack of just the 2 of them costs £4.99 from my local Boots, which is the cheapest place I have found them. You would have thought that the one advantage of the scales turning off so quickly would be that at least the batteries would last a decent amount of time- sadly you would be wrong! I find even with just using the scales a couple of times a week, the batteries will die within 3 months. And of course they will always go when I'm right in the middle of weighing out some ingredients- you get no warning that they are on their way out. The first you know if it is when it flashes up with "UnSE" when you are trying to see how much more butter you need to add! Some kind of warning light when the batteries are running low would be so useful, particularly because the first time they went I was in the middle of making a cake, and I had no spare batteries in the house and had to finish the cake by guessing the quantities! Given that I got digital scales in the first place to make my measuring more accurate, I was extremely unimpressed with this.

                A further irritation with the batteries is that they don't always stay in place. On numerous occasions I have found they have wriggled free of their compartments, and this either brings up the "UnSE" message, so you think the batteries have died and need changing, or the display just goes blank altogether. Again this always happens when I am in the middle of weighing something out.

                Another design fault with these scales is the position of the display. This is fine if you are weighing things in a small bowl, but if you want to weigh things on a plate, or in a larger bowl, it is alsmost impossible to read the display. Anything that overhangs the glass platform means you won't be able to clearly read the display. I had to purchase a small mixing bowl after being given these scales, as my original one was too large to use with them! Perhaps it would have been useful to have included the right size bowl with the scales.

                My Mum paid around £20 for these a few years ago, but I have seen them in Wilkinson and Robert Dyas since for £12. My bad experience has put me off digital scales altogether, and I have now decided to invest in a good, reliable manual set of scales so that when the current set of batteries die, I can throw out these scales. I got them in the first place to increase my accuracy with measurements, but have ended up having to use so much guesswork because they keep turning off in the middle of weighing something that they are an absolute joke. The batteries are expensive and need replacing very frequently, and it's just not worth the frustration and hassle. I really wouldn't recommend these scales at all, they have sadly been an absolute nightmare. I don't believe for one sceond that Antony Worrall Thompson could last a day with these scales- a shame he can't have tested them himself before putting his name to them!

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                • More +
                  05.03.2009 14:46
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  2 Comments

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  not worth the money or time

                  I follow a very specific eating plan and it's essential that my food is weighed and measured with accuracy. About 2 years ago when I first started this plan I bought these food scales from Wilkinson for £9.99, which at the time I thought was an absolute bargain and for some people this may be true, but they don't meet my needs effectively enough.

                  They look very slick, the sliver coloured base with a glass weighing plate which screws of for easy cleaning. They have 3 buttons, one to turn the scale on and off, one to change the measuring mode from imperial to metric and one to TARE the scale (which means set it to zero once you have added a bowl or plate to the weighing plate, or if you want to weigh one ingredient on top of another). The maximum weighing capacity is 5kg which is reasonable for kitchen scales. So far so good.

                  Using the scales is more of a hindrance than a help, they have an auto shut of feature which occurs about 2 or 3 minutes after switching them on. Although this is meant to be a battery/energy saving feature it actually makes this scales very user unfriendly. There were many times where I would be half way though weighing a meal and my scales would automatically shut down and I'd have to start again and be quicker! These scales take 2 lithium cell batteries which can be bought in Wilkinsons for around £2.50 per packet of 2, if you are thinking of buying these scales stock up because they don't last very long at all.

                  These scales no longer live on my work top and I spent a little more money investing in another couple of pairs which I find much more reliable. They are still in my cupboard because I have a habit of hording junk but I can't imagine that I'll ever use them again. Think about setting fire to a ten pound note before you buy these because that is effectively what you'd be doing!

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    23.02.2009 12:56
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)
                    1 Comment

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    Avoid at all costs!

                    I find Antony Worrall Thompson very annoying and his scales are just as bad. There's nothing wrong with them in the looks department: they're sleek and easy on the eye (unlike AWT) but they score very low on functionality.

                    The design of the scales is a round grey base, which has 3 buttons on the front underneath the digital display panel:
                    * On/Off
                    * Mode - change from metric to imperial
                    * Zero/Tare - allows the user to place an empty container on the scale and hit the tare button to zero the scale out.

                    The weighing platform is on top of the base and it is made of glass. This makes it perfectly fine to read the display panel if you are putting small items to weigh directly onto the glass. However, if you are using a bowl (not included) it makes it a lot harder to read the display, especially if the bowl is larger than the weighing platform.

                    I also hate the auto shut off function on these scales as they turn themselves off too quickly. You should be able to weigh out one ingredient, press the zero/tare button and then weigh out another ingredient. But these scales barely give you the chance to open the packet before they switch off, so if you're the kind of cook who doesn't have all their ingredients out before you start then you will find these scales infuriating.

                    This auto shut off function is supposed to conserve the batteries, which is my next complaint. They require 2 CR2032 lithium cell batteries (which are included) which I don't like as I think they're expensive and they're not the sort of batteries you normally have around the house. I found that these batteries don't last very long in these scales, despite it's annoying habit of automatically switching off!

                    The only positive feature is the scales are quite slim so they don't take up too much space in the cupboard (or the bin as that's where they're now going!).

                    The maximum weight these scales can take is 5kg, which is about average for kitchen scales. They are quite cheap at £12.00 from Wilkinsons, but you would be better off paying more for better scales (see my review for our new Salter Scales!).

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                  • Product Details

                    Easy read digital display / Metric and imperial scale / Auto zero / Auto shut off / 5kg max weight.