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Corkscrews in general

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3 Reviews

Brand: Others / Product Type: Corkscrew

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    3 Reviews
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      07.11.2008 22:36
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      Anything which makes it easier to get at your wine has to be a winner

      This review is on the Culinare Suregrip Corkscrew.

      I don't want to come across as a total lush but I really believe nothing beats a good glass of red wine on a cold winters night with the fire roaring and a couple of candles flickering nearby unless of course it's a lovely crisp clear glass of white wine which accompanies a family barbecue on a sunny afternoon, or possibly a glass of rose as you sit outside watching the sun go down on a summer evening. Yes I love my wine.

      I have always struggled with normal corkscrews either the ones who's legs go out further and further the harder you screw (ahhhem) or the silly short ones which require to be pushed all the way in but still don't give you any satisfaction because they don't have enough length left to pull them out again.

      When I was younger and we would have had a bottle of wine together as we were getting ready to go out I have lost count of the number of times we tried every corkscrew in my friends house and being weak girlies still couldn't get into the bottle. We often ended up doing silly things like hitting and pushing the cork until we got it into the bottle or cutting as much of if out as possible and then poking holes in the remainder, both of which required such inventive ideas as then straining it through kitchen paper or a sieve, or pretty much whatever we could find to get the nasty little bits of cork out. In our defense we were only about 17 or 18 and were not connoisseurs by any stretch of the imagination.

      Then my dad got a culinare corkscrew for Christmas, it had a white body with a rubber end which encased the top of the bottle, a grooved top with grooves into which your finger and thumb fit beautifully and a built in foil cutter. I watched in amazement as he placed the rubber end over the top of the bottle, twisted the top round a few times to put the screwey bit through the cork and then kept turning gently in the same direction to remove it. It took seconds, no effort, no bottle between the knees while two people pulled at the corkscrew just a nice easy bit of twisting.

      Next bottle of wine to be opened I immediately volunteered, it was indeed as easy as it looked, I popped the rubber end over the bottle twisted the top around a few times and out popped the cork. No yanking or pulling required and the cork came out in one piece (and always has since, no yucky bits of cork floating about with this little beauty). One of my few bottle opening successes at that stage.

      I think after I got married the thing I missed most about home apart from my mum and dad was that corkscrew. I looked in all the kitchen shops and department stores but couldn't find one and as I was married 15 years ago it wasn't the done thing to just nip onto the internet and check out Amazon, Kelcoo, etc for it. Then one day after about 5 years of asking hubby to open my bottle or even once or twice after a hard week at work when hubby was away out fishing, going to a neighbor whose name I didn't even know handing him a bottle of red and a silver corkscrew with the wings and asking him if he could open it please I found my dad's corkscrew in T K Maxx for £9.99. Expensive enough for a corkscrew but to be my own boss when it came to when I could open a bottle of wine it was worth it.

      The corkscrew worked every bit as easily as I remembered, a few twists and no pulling required. It worked equally well on old fashioned corks and the new plastic ones. I've had it about 10 years now and it still works although it is getting a little harder to twist and the rubber end keeps falling off but ten years isn't too bad and I will definitely get another one even though I tend to buy srewtops now as on the odd occasion when there is some left in the bottle of a Friday or Saturday night its easy to stick the lid back on.

      I would really recommend it for anyone who struggles to open a wine bottle.

      Pros
      Comfortable to hold
      Removes the whole cork every time, no bits left in the bottle
      Twists with minimal effort
      No need for facial contortions or putting bottle between knees
      You look much cooler using a simple twisting motion
      Cons
      None at all

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        06.08.2002 21:31
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        I lost my best friend this week. I am heartbroken. I don’t really know how I’m going to cope without him. Spending quality time with him on an evening was the highlight of my day. :O( You see, I took my brilliant corkscrew with me on holiday to Torquay, so that I could open all those lovely bottles of holiday wine I was also taking with me. But when we left the caravan at the end of our break, I forgot to take my corkscrew out of the kitchen drawer – I left him behind! Sob! Who do I get a screw from now? So, this week I have been lost. I haven’t known what to do with myself. I have had to remain sober. It’s been a tough week, I can tell you! I loved my corkscrew. It was so easy to use. I’ve had it for years. It was a housewarming gift from pals at work when I moved into my house 12 years or so ago. It was yellow to match my kitchen. It was one of the “lever” varieties. They always remind me of angels, the way they look. They have a rounded handle at the top (which also doubles as a bottle opener) and when you screw it down, two arms raise up at either side (like little angel wings). When you’ve screwed the corkscrew part right in, you push down on the two levers and the cork is removed simply and without fuss or excess pulling, grunting and sweating, and without the need to grasp the wine bottle unfemininely (is that a word?) between your knees. The normal kind of corkscrew, the kind that’s just a screw thread with a wooden handle in a T shape are very hard to use, I find. Lots of pulling and grunting involved with those, I can’t really be doing with it. And while my pal Charliechuckle is partial to a waiter’s friend, I never found them to my taste. I find them very fiddly to use and rather uncomfortable and pokey in the hand. I suppose there is a knack to them, but it’s one I’ve never learned. They h
        ave a little hinge thingy, which you sit atop the lip of the bottle and use to lever the cork out. A bit too scientific for me I’m afraid, when all I want to do is get to the grape juice as soon as! There are some expensive newfangled “cork removal systems” on the market, which use compressed air to remove corks, but I’ve never tried them. Apparently they have a little pin which you push into the cork and a pump device which you push a couple of times and the cork just slides out all on its own. I am a little sceptical myself. I am totally wedded to my absent “lever” pal. So, while I was mooching around the wine aisle at my local Spar, gazing sadly at the lovely shiny bottles my best pal and I would never open together again, I saw a little rack of gadgets hanging up. And there, like serendipity, hanging up amongst the teabag squeezers and potato peelers, was a shiny new lever corkscrew! It wasn’t yellow like my beloved pal; it was shiny chrome all over. And it cost just £2.49. We embraced one another like long-lost best friends and he jumped into my basket without delay. I took him home and we tucked into a bottle of Blossom Hill Red together! It was love at first screw! He was just as easy to use as my original corkscrew, and remarkably well put together for the price. In fact, he looks just like the picture at the top of the category. You just sit the little ring on the top of the bottle, screw the corkscrew down until fully seated in the cork, and push down gently on the two arms. It’s as simple as that. The cork slides out with ease, leaving no annoying broken bits floating in your Chateau Plonk. Brilliant! My new corkscrew is made by The Home Zone, whose products are often seen in convenience stores in those hang-up packages on racks of bits and bobs. I searched everywhere to see if they have a website but I wasn’t able to find one and there was no
        mention on the packaging. If you like bar-related items though, can I suggest http://www.gizmos-uk.com/BarStuff.htm. They have some cool corkscrews, drinking games, glasses, and pourers. Just the sort of thing to make your party go with a bang. But I’m a solitary drinker so I didn’t buy anything ;o) One final word, if you put the word “corkscrew” into a Google search, you get loads of sites offering corkscrew museums and collector’s clubs. Some antique corkscrews can fetch hundreds of pounds at auction. How strange is that? I know I loved my corkscrew, but that’s going a bit far, isn’t it? Cheers! Allie xx

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          13.05.2002 00:29
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          The Leaping Frog Corkscrew is a superb quality item which looks good, feels good, and makes a great present. It is a chrome plated, top heavy corkscrew, designed in the image of a frog. You simply screw the twisted tool into the cork, and then as you pull the cork out of the bottle, the legs of the frogs extend to make it appear as though the frog is leaping. Of course, this is not only for aesthetic purposes. The unique riveted springy frog-leg system means that the vertical pulling force required to remove the cork is greatly reduced. Cut and paste this link to see an image of it: http://www.frogstore.com/images/Pic81057.jpg In its resting position, the Leaping Frog Corkscrew sits at 15.7cm long. The maximal width is 11.7cm (the frog's arms), and depth 3.4cm (the rim which the cork sits inside). With the frog leaping in its fully extended position, the length increases to 20.3cm. The item weighs in at a whopping 421g. As I've mentioned, the item is designed to look like a frog, and no detail has been spared. It is beautifully crafted from the webbed feet up to the bow-tie and facial features of the frog. The words 'the Leaping Frog TM' are engraved across the legs on both sides of the item. The corkscrew may look the part, but it's performance is slightly disappointing. I find this item more difficult to use than a traditional lever-mechanism corkscrew. However, when popping traditional wooden corks, it is not too much of an effort, and it can be done without making yourself look like a wimp. The trouble arises when you try and remove a plastic cork (maybe it's my own fault for buying cheap wine!). The situation with these synthetic 'corks' borders on the ridiculous. You have to muster up all your might, and sometimes even hold the bottle between you feet, while attempting to remove the piece of plastic that is sitting between yourself and a drunken evening. So,
          to summarise, the Leaping Frog Corkscrew is: - Big, - Heavy, - Sometimes very difficult to use, but - Attractive and well-made. Would I recommend it? Well, yes and no. I don't recommend it as your no.1 corkscrew in the house. But this item is charming and appealing. Imagine how nice this shiny, chrome plated frog will look sitting on a clean tablecloth, in amongst a beautifully laid table, as your dinner guests are arriving for a meal (!!!) It also makes a great gift (which is how I came to have mine). It comes beautifully boxed and well presented. I have seen this item for sale in Boots and The Gadget Shop, during my infrequent shopping trips to town. A quick search doesn't reveal them on either of these retailer's web sites, though. You may well find it whilst browsing during some forthcoming retail therapy. I have, however, found it available for sale at: http://www.egertons.co.uk/shop.taf - rather than look through all the sections, just scroll to the bottom and type in the product code, which is: F2107 (you will get to see a photo of it 'in-action' with the legs extended!!). Price: £15.50 - expensive for a corkscrew, maybe, but I believe it to be a very good price for this quality item of giftware. Happy drinking.

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