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Carnation Corn Caps

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4 Reviews

Brand: Carnation / Type: Foot Care Accessory

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    4 Reviews
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      21.07.2011 14:38
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      I was a bit worried when my toe looked like it was going to drop off! But it did the job in the end.

      I recently had a corn on each of my little toes, and while shopping came across two different removal methods, Carnation Footcare Corn Caps and Scholl Corn Removal Medicated Plasters. So I decided to try a little experiment: I bought one pack of each, and used one on each corn.

      The Carnation Corn Caps were made of more natural ingredients. The active ingredient in both was the same (40% salicylic acid), but the Carnation Corn Caps also included peanut oil, yellow beeswax, partially hydrogenated wood rosin, vegetable triglyceride, E124 Ponceau 4R, and E110 Sunset Yellow. They don't all sound great, but at least I do recognise some of them. The packet is also manufactured from sustainable forests, so this one appealed to the socially responsible side of me.

      The packet contains five plasters, and you are warned not to use more than five plasters per corn, so one packet will do for one corn, which is nice, and not something that can be said for the Scholl version. The plaster is shaped like a standard rectangular plaster, but the sticky side has a felt ring in the middle, and inside that is some pink paste. To apply you just stick the plaster so that the felt ring is around the corn, which is easier said than done, as the plaster is so bulky that you can't really see what you're doing. The plaster was also too big to stick around toes, so I found that it started to come off and irritate my skin. Each plaster is to be left on for two days, so this wasn't great. My main problem, though, was that the pink gel would leak out of the felt ring and kill the healthy skin around the corn. No matter how I positioned the plaster this still happened, so my whole little toe looked like a dead prawn. (Sorry.)

      I started to get a bit worried about my zombie toe, so I only used four of the plasters. After a few days, while riding my bike I felt my corn come off. It wasn't particularly pleasant, I felt a little sting, but then it was off. Unfortunately I was wearing tights at the time so I had this corn hanging around in there for hours. It felt like a hard contact lens. (Not really Carnation's fault, but if I'm being honest, it was gross.) Just over two weeks after the corn dropping off I now have a shiny patch of pink skin where the corn was, with a ring of broken skin around it, and some other irritated bits of skin further away. See my review on Scholl Corn Removal Medicated Plasters to compare Carnation Footcare Corn Caps with the leading brand. Short version: the Carnation Corn Caps were cheaper, it only took one packet to remove my corn, but the plasters weren't shaped as well and the corn-removing paste leaked out, killing healthy skin.

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        10.05.2010 11:30
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        Instant relief, simple to use, does the job

        Yeah, I just got rid of my corn and I thought I would recommend the product that removed it for me. I know you all really want to know about my corn? Probably not but you might want to know how I managed to removed it painlessly for future reference if you get one or already have one.

        I had been feeling some discomfort on the outside of my little toe for a few weeks and noticed that it was a little red but nothing more so just left it and thought it would go away. Wrong! On Tuesday I had a lot of shopping to do in my local town centre and after about half an hour my little toe started throbbing really hard and was so painful I couldn't walk properly. I hobbled into the pavilion where I know there is a Lloyds Pharmacy and asked the lady behind the counter for advice. They were very helpful and she took me to a little cubicle where a guy came in and asked to see it. I removed my shoe, oh yes he said it is a corn. A corn! Is that not what old people get, but no he explained to me that a corn is a thickening of the skin which appears like a piece of cone shaped hard skin pointing down into the toe, and left untreated can cause considerable pain. He told me that the main cause of a corn is through wearing ill fitting shoes and in particular if they are too tight.

        He gave me a pack of 10 Carnation Corn Caps at a cost of £3.68 and told me read the instructions carefully before applying and wished me luck.

        At home I read the instructions which were extremely easy to follow:-

        Clean and dry the affected foot, Remove a corn cap from the backing paper and position the felt ring over the corn, firmly fix in position with adhesive strap, which when properly applied should not slip or move. Change the corn cap every two days until the corn is easily removed.

        The corn cap looks like a normal sticking plaster except it has a thick red medicated felt disc in the middle which fits over the actual corn, the sticky straps either side of it fit firmly round the toe and indeed they do not move.

        On applying the corn cap there was an immediate relief from the pain when I put on my shoe as the red medicated disc cushions the pressure and prevents the shoe pushing into the corn, and I didn't feel much pain again from the corn throughout the treatment.

        Two days later I changed the corn plaster as instructed, when I removed the first one I noticed that the skin where the corn had gone a pale white colour and looked a little squishy, I didn't want to look at it too much and covered it swiftly with cap No.2. The 3rd change two days after that showed that the toe had much the same appearance.

        This morning I was due to change to corn cap No.4 but no need as when I pulled off the corn cap the hard skin came away leaving a little hole in my toe but the corn is out! The skin around where the corn was is a little but tender due to the medicated plaster but nothing major, I will just be careful for the next few days.

        There are a few precautions to observe they must not be used if you are diabetic and this is in big bold capital letters so I would say that it is a definite no if you are, and they also contain peanut oil so must not be used by people for who have a nut or soya allergy. There are some other minor precautions so always read the label before use.

        Stockist:- Lloyd's Pharmacy £3.68 for a pack of 10

        I would imagine you can get them from other chemists and supermarkets however I have not looked into that yet.

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          19.06.2009 14:31
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          have noticed an increased reduction in my corn after just two days

          Carnation Corn Caps.


          Having experienced recently a corn, which i havnt had for years and wanted a cheaper way to remove it, without the expense, recently was recommended this product by my boyfriend, he incidently purchased a packet for me in our local poundland store for £1.00.



          Corns are a hard lump of skin usually between the toes, (painful) as they can be, and are usually caused by ill fitting shoes, the only change in shoes i have had recently have been to wear trainers which i dont usually wear, but are part of a uniform i have to wear when working at my local sports shop, so have no choice.



          The plasters which come in a packet White and Pink, with corn caps written on the front of them apparently clinically proven to remove corns, are very easy to apply, they are basically a plaster which have a felt pad in the middle, and where grately received as my feet were killing me , so ive applied one and i must admit the pressure and pain was releived, and i just have to apply a new one each day until the corn has gone. So ill let you know what the outcome is.



          I must admit i have noticed a big difference today when walking and have not felt any pain, great. The medicated plasters have a felt padding, in a circle inside the plaster, which my boyfriend tells me has a active medicated centre, so dont touch this, and wash your hands when you have applied this plaster to your toe.



          They contain a Salicylic Acid paste, that penetrates and removes the hard corn while the red felt ring relieves the pressure that builds up with the next toe, rubbing on the corn.


          The directions say that you must**********


          Clean and dry the feet to ensure that the plaster sticks.

          Position the plaster over the corn so that the felt ring covers the corn.

          Firmly stick the plaster once on should stay there if your toes are dry and mine did, just reminds me need to apply another today after my bath.

          Change the plaster every two days until the corn is removed, sounds simple and i have noticed a reduction already after two days.

          It does tell you that you should not treat anymore than three corns at any one time, i only have one of the annoying things so thats ok.

          Apparently they state that these plasters are manufactured from sustainable forests, so thats a good selling feature in my book.

          Warning ********* Not to be used if diabetic.

          Also contain peanut oil, so dont use if allergic to peanuts or soya.

          And obviously keep out of reach from children.


          Thanks for reading and rating my reviews. will keep you all posted if these actually work, although i have noticed a reduction in just two days have a feeling they do all they claim to do.

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          24.10.2006 12:14
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          They work, but take time

          I have quite nice feet if I do say so myself; and it is mainly down to the fact that I have always worn fairly sensible shoes. I have had the odd lapse though and when I do I tend to suffer from corns. I bought an expensive pair of boots in the New Year sales this year. They look great, but they are quite narrow and as one of my feet is wider than the other, I’ve ended up with corns on two toes of one foot. There are a number of ways of getting rid of corns; the most successful is probably getting a chiropodist to dig them out. However, this is obviously an expensive option. Special files can be bought, but these tend to work best on corns that aren’t between the toes like mine are. I have therefore always used medicated plasters to remove mine.

          What are corns?
          Corns are little pads of hard skin that build up on and between toes. They are caused by ill-fitting shoes, so obviously the solution would be to not wear ill-fitting shoes. As fashion victims though, many of us fall foul of this rule. Corns can be extremely painful if not dealt with. In my job, I do spend a lot of time rushing to meetings in places I’m not always familiar with and sore feet really do not help the situation.

          What are medicated corn plasters?
          The Carnation brand of plasters basically consists of a common or garden plaster with a ring of felt on the pad, the centre of which is filled with a red gooey, waxy looking substance. The aim is to make sure that the waxy stuff covers the eye of the corn. There are other brands; I quite often use Boots own, which consists of a small plaster dot which is infused with the corn removing substance and is then held in place with a plaster.

          What is the red gooey stuff?
          This is primarily salicylic acid (40%), mixed up with beeswax and peanut oil. Because of the latter ingredient, anyone with allergies towards peanuts or soya should stay well clear.

          Warnings
          Apart from the peanut oil problem, there are other issues that should be considered. Perhaps obviously, the plasters should not be used on inflamed skin. They should not be used for any other purpose than corn removal. Use should be discontinued if there is any sensitivity. And no more than three corns should be treated at any one time.

          What happens?
          Once the felt ring has been anchored in place, it should be left for two days, before removing. Sometimes, I check to see if any of the skin is loose at this point, but generally, I put a new plaster on and leave it for two more days. After four days, the skin is usually soft enough to peel off and it brings the pad of hard skin with it. On occasions, four days is not long enough to remove the root of the corn, in which case another two days is needed. No more than five plasters should be used per corn. I’ve no idea what would happen if more were used, but anyway, I’ve never needed more than three.

          Advantages of this product
          Well, it does remove corns. It does take time and can make a bit of a mess, but it certainly does what it says on the packaging. In addition, the felt pad is thick enough to lessen pressure on the corn, which, when the skin is softening, can often become quite painful.

          Disadvantages of this product
          I think the main disadvantage is that the salicylic acid solution is so gooey that it tends to leak under the felt pad and can therefore soften quite a large area of skin. This can be a real problem in that when healthy, thin skin is peeled off, it can quite often become sore, which almost cancels out the relief from the removal of the corn. On the whole, I do prefer the Boots version – the medicated plaster disc can be aimed directly onto the corn and does not leak into other areas.

          Another disadvantage is simply the length of time that it takes to work. There is nothing worse than sore feet and having to put up with the pain, however much lessened by the felt pad, can be frustrating. Comfortable shoes during the skin softening period are really a must.

          Finally, the corn is rarely fully removed the first time around. If the root is left, the corn quickly builds up again and so it is best, in my experience anyway, to continue to use the plasters until the corn finally gives up the ghost and can be fully removed.

          Conclusion
          I hope I haven’t put anyone off their food! I am lucky and am not afflicted by corns too often. Ultimately, the best cure for corns is to change footwear to something more sensible. However, as a corn removing solution, these plasters are not bad. There are better options, such as going to a chiropodist, but at £1.99 for a pack of five, this is definitely the cheapest. I would definitely prefer the medicated solution not to be quite so messy, but it’s not like anyone sees it, so this isn’t a major issue. Recommended, but expect to have to be patient.

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