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Bristol Evening Post

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    3 Reviews
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      12.07.2008 00:42
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      Despite some problems, still worth reading.

      The Bristol Evening Post as the name would suggest is a paper based in Bristol England which traditionally would be released in the eveing. The paper is published six days a week, Monday to Saturday. However there are now several different versions, which are released at different times of the day and in different areas.

      On different days of the week there are different central supplements. On a Monday this is the Green 'Un which are sports pages which predominately cover local teams and events, but also cover the larger national stories as well. On Saturday there is the otehr major supplemeng which I always read, and this gives TV pages for the week ahead as well as editorials. On the other days of the week the paper has supplements devoted to houses for sale, houses for rent, jobs and one which is for local entertainment (known as Crackerjack).

      The news is mostly local stories, or national stories with a local slant. It is good at getting good reports on local stories and has been known to reveal major stories which originate in the west country before the big national and international media organisations.

      The paper costs 37p, but nowadays the vast majority of articles now appear on the official website for free.

      However, the sports section of the paper has often been accused of using rumours which appear on local football forums and claiming that they are exclusives. The paper also makes publishing errors, whether spelling mistakes and punctuation or more major ones.

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        14.10.2006 03:51
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        moron provincial staff

        wow, if you want lokel yokel attitude then this is the place... if you want to fall asleep standing then this is the place... admittedly brass player did help me outside with my whereabouts (&his band are prob great) - however i would say the patrons are of a post-war english mentality which is far from desirable company in this fresh modern communicative world we live in ...
        the bar staff are comprised of unwashed unemployables - indeed it smells like their digs:
        if you like standing in queues inexplicably; if you dont like to question anything, then indeed this is your place - an uncool bar that smells like sick... take along your ration tickets (if you're still holding!!)
        I would say the best thing about this joint (as everyone probably knows) is the black geezer with the copper wire sculptures...!!

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          21.03.2001 20:21
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          “Okay. Where’s the paper?” His face a picture of innocence, my youngest son opens his mouth to speak, thinks better of it, closes it again, and then decides that confession is probably the best course of action. “It’s upstairs in my bedroom, Mum.” This scene occurs almost nightly in our house, as Villainous Lad Mk II recklessly trashes the paper in his over-enthusiasm to see the football coverage on the back pages before his mother can read the local news. With a circulation of 216,000, the Evening Post covers Bristol and its surrounding districts, where it is the best selling regional newspaper. Every issue is printed in several slightly differing editions, corresponding to the areas they’re purchased in, thereby allowing each reader access to their own local news. After smoothing the crumpled paper, and rearranging its pages so that it more or less regains the form it took when it came through the letterbox, I eventually get the chance to catch up on what’s happening around the West Country. For many months now, the Evening Post has backed outraged families in their fight against the owner of one of Bristol’s cemeteries. Mr X (-cessively insensitive) had allowed Arnos Vale to fall into an appalling state of decay, suggested locals clear his land of their loved ones and have them buried elsewhere, and prompted relatives to stand guard in shifts at the gates following his threat to lock them. Today’s front page brings the news that the City Council is shortly expected to issue a compulsory purchase order. Mr X will hardly be laughing all the way to the bank, because the cemetery has a market value of just one pound, as it can never be re-developed, and he’s also likely to be billed close on £100,000 for essential work the council has carried out in the meantime. Inside, page four is devoted to a round up of national and international news. Children’s T.V. show Live & K
          icking has been pronounced Dead and Buried by the BBC, Robin Cook has promised Britain’s full support to Macedonia in its fight with Albanian separatists, and the Prince of Wales has urged businesses to consider recruiting from the ranks of the homeless, quoting several large organizations who’d now consider employing a homeless person. The Duchy of Cornwall wasn’t among them. Today’s double-page feature addresses the worrying issue of children and their vulnerability to paedophiles in internet chat rooms, with a report on what’s being done to combat the problem and some common-sense tips for parents on how to avoid it. This sits between ‘It Girl’ Victoria Elsbury-Legg and her ‘Sex in the City’ column, and the ‘Quotes of the Day’, in which Tony Blair says “You should stay as long as you’re useful, and go when you’re not” Hmmm… In ‘Open Lines’, readers write in protest on topics ranging from Bristol City Council’s unfortunate habit of displaying warnings of night time parking restrictions in almost complete darkness, to the ‘soft’ treatment of young offenders. No one has written in praise today. Surprisingly, a most pressing concern finds itself tucked deep within the paper in a few column inches on page fifteen. ‘Deprived Of A Choice Of Real Ales’ (a typically dramatic Evening Post headline) tells how the bosses of independent breweries will meet in Bristol to discuss the threat of their larger counterparts forcing them out of the city trade. I’m troubled briefly by a faint feeling of apprehension, picturing scenes of panic buying and rioting as the city runs out of beer. Get your weight behind this one, Evening Post – the People have spoken! Turning the page, I find Russell Grant pulling an almost comical face at me from the top of his syndicated astrology column. Apparently, travel
          is currently favoured for Leos. If Russell had taken the trouble to read the three-day weather forecast on page four, he’d have known that we’re actually in the thick of snow as I write, and conditions are so icy that the only travelling I’m likely to be doing is on my bum as I go sliding half-way down the garden path. I’m not a T.V. watcher at all, so I couldn’t comment on the accuracy of the Evening Post listings, but I can tell you that they exist – for terrestrial, satellite and cable channels – together with Tim Davey’s review of just how dire the evening’s ‘entertainment’ was the night before. Over the page are the local cinema and radio guides, and a cartoon, which I’ve never found particularly funny. A pullout in the middle of the ‘Post’ follows a different theme each night of the week. On Mondays ‘The Final Whistle’ brings reports and post-mortems on all the weekend’s sporting fixtures around the region, and on Tuesdays local historians and old-timers tell of our city in days gone by in one of my favourite bits of the paper, ‘Bristol Times’. Wednesday’s ‘Car’ supplement once had the honour of featuring the highly regarded (even if only by me!) South Gloucestershire Ford Capri Owners Club, and Thursdays bring ‘Full On’, with news of the Bristol clubbing scene, as well as a further pullout detailing the week’s job vacancies in our area. Friday nights belong to ‘Post Property’, usually fronted by snaps of impressive looking houses in districts where the sale of my own house would just about bring me the cash to buy sufficient land to park my wheelie bin. The week ends on Saturdays with ‘Seven’, a magazine pullout featuring a more comprehensive weekly T.V. guide, lifestyle articles, problem-page type pieces and a ‘net slot, amongst other things. For me, th
          e high spot of ‘Seven’ was always Jeremy Smith, now sadly departed to write for another paper somewhere in the direction of Weston-Super-Mare. Bespectacled, slightly overweight and thinning on top, he possessed a wicked sense of humour that never failed to leave me laughing like a drain (where *does* that expression come from? Has anyone ever heard a drain laughing?) I also found him faintly attractive in a ‘What the hell would my father have thought?’ kind of way. If I promise to have all your children and take up stencilling will you come back, Jeremy? No, I thought not! Scrutiny of tonight’s paper comes to a close as I reach the sports pages. Garry Thompson, caretaker boss of Bristol Rovers (yay!), after the board’s ill-advised decision to give the devoted Ian Holloway the Order of the Bristol Elbow, outlines his tactics for ensuring the team hangs on to a tenuous place in the Second Division. Meanwhile, Bristol City (nay!) chairman John Laycock tries to predict the outcome of the F.A. enquiry that follows the match against Millwall last Friday, when City ‘fans’ took large chunks of their stadium to bits in order to throw it at opposition supporters. The editor of the Evening Post is seen regularly in print countering accusations of bias from both City and Rovers fans, though from where I sit, coverage of the teams seems about equal. Much of the paper’s content, both current and archived, can be found at the Evening Post’s website ‘This is Bristol’ - http://www.thisisbristol.com/index.html - together with links to the sites of their sister papers. The Evening Post has changed its format several times over the years, and it’s been around for as long as I can remember. It’s pages are a mine of information for those who live in the areas covered by it’s circulation, as well as for those simply wishing to know more about the region. It has a tendency to be a li
          ttle overdramatic, and I often feel that, however unintentionally, the views of the editor and his team are being imposed on the readership, sometimes in ways that are less than subtle, and sometimes more furtively. The majority of us are more than capable of making up our own minds however, and having made up mine, I’d recommend the Evening Post without hesitation. If there are any football crazed eleven year-olds in your home I’d also suggest you make it a priority to reach the letter-box first, unless you’d enjoy the challenge of a jig-saw puzzle that was never intended to be a feature of the paper!

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