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In-depth articles, top reviews and guest writers have helped secure Four Four Two's position as a firm favourite amongst adult football fans.

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    28 Reviews
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      09.02.2012 17:51

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      I love the magazine and hope that it continues being able to entertain me to it's high standard.

      I have always been an avid football fan. For about four years now I have read the monthly Four Four Two. It has consistently been the best of the bunch in my opinion. I have occasionally purchased competitors but have always regretted it.
      Four Four Two contains excellent journalism. The magazine does not focus solely on the English game (although this is the main agenda) and contains many features from around the world. The regular features (letters, Q&As etc) maintain a high level of standard and interest. The best part of the magazine, in my opinion, are the features on certain problems facing the game, for example racism. These sometimes extend to reviews of special circumstances in football (my mind jogs to a large and informative article on an Albino football team in Africa). These stories are often emotional (mainly in a good sense, giving a feel-good factor).
      FFT is by far the most professionally written football (if not any) magazine that I have read. The last few years it has developed and constantly been able to reinvent it's style to avoid becoming wearisome. I have often gone to pick it up to read only to find my father, who has no interest in football, reading parts of it.
      One downside is it's price but although FFT is relatively highly priced (£4.30) there are some good offers available to subscribers such as free gifts, sometimes in the region of ~£35 worth and I once had a year's subscription for £12 with one of their offers. Most readers will have an interest in subscribing due to the reasons above and the price is not too bad considering that it is a monthly magazine that can be read page-to-page by football fans and selective articles within it by those who don't follow the beautiful game.

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      28.09.2010 17:46
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      A great football magazine for adults!

      There was a day when I really fancied reading a magazine. What more then a football magazine as I love football! So off to Tescos I went to get myself one. There was a choice of Shoot, Match of The Day, Match and FourFourTwo magazines. I had a quick look at all of them. Most of the magazines cost around £1.40-1.80 but FouFourTwo cost something like £4.50. The other magazines looked like they were made more for kids, so I purchased the FourFourTwo magazine for the first time ever.

      The FourFourTwo magazine is packed with interesting football stories, facts, and small chunks of football humour. It took me around 10-15 hours to complete the magazine from front to back. I really did enjoy it so I decided I would have it delivered to my house every month. So after having the magazine a year, I slowly started to read less and less of it, until recently I decided to cancel it because I just didnt have the time or drive to actually sit there and read it.

      The magazine is probably the best football magazine available for an adult. However it takes so long to read it, its probably not work having unless you have the time. That doesnt take away the fact this is still a great magazine!

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      20.06.2010 15:20
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      very impressive magazine

      Four four two is a monthly football magazine , full of intresting articles, up to date news and interviews to do with everything football. For the purpose of this review im using my June 2010 issue.

      ===Look===
      The magazine has a glossy feel, the front page features a big image of some of the England players, FF2 above it and a short comment or slogan beneath the picture.
      The back has a advert for a Davidoff fragrance.
      The pages are mostly designed with one page as an advert or big image , and the article on the other. The article also has many images making it easy to read and look at , whilst still getting a lot of information.
      Adverts generally are football based or computer games , so they really are structured towards the reader.
      Being a sucessful magazine the images are all high qaulity and generally feature a well respected footballer or legend.

      ===Contents===
      FF2 has a host of writers as well as regular sections. The magazine starts with a Snap shot , capturing a big footballing moment or character, In this issue its Stevenage borough celebrating their promotion.
      The magazine has a couple of pages of letters from readers which the magazine replies to, followed by a one to one interview with a football star. For example schevchenko.
      Then theirs a couple of pages covering the month gone by, a big debate e.g. world cup or champions league, Footballers answers, silly questions etc. There is also a couple of competitions for tv's or a beer fridge to which are always worth a go, also featured is a regular column from gordon strachan, graham taylor and simon kuper. You can also find a few reviews of football products.
      The second half of the mag is the features, these change from mag to mag and so really varies, this issue includes a talk with Andre pirlo and Iniesta , a discussion about previous world cups and a guide to world cup betting.

      ===Writing===
      The qaulity of the writing is extremely good. Interviews and articles flow, yet are short enough to be able to put down and come back to. The variety in the mag also means their is always something new to come back to and have a read.
      Obviously it comes down to personal prefference as some may like certain writers more than others, but in total its a nice read and I always feel as though its been an engaging experience.

      ===Price===
      FF2 is £4.50 as a montly magazine, this is a fair amount of money for a magazine but if you enjoy football there isn't really a competitor.

      ===Availability===
      This can be found in many newsagents as its pretty well stocked.

      ===Overall===
      Very good magaine for big football fans.

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        03.01.2010 19:19
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        worth a read for any football fan

        A a subscriber to fourrforutwo magazine for the past 2 years I feel that I can give a fairly rounded opinion of the magazine (I hope!)
        fourfourtwo is a monthly football magazine that costs £4.90 (last time I checked). It has followed a fairly rigid stucture over the last couple of years with a regular readers letter section, a 'ask the legend' interview where readers send in their messages for a past former player (desailley, peter reid, kevin keegan but to name a few). Apart from the main cover story it incorporates footballing stories from around the globe for example a recent article looked at the rivalry between Argentina and Uruguay and the apparent demise of the footballing power of Serie A. There is also focus on each of the domestic leagues and a summary of what is going on in the main leagues from around europe and the world often sighting humerous tails of the comings and goings in world football.
        The writers of the magazine often give a witty and informative insight into footballing stories although it should be noted that whilst the contents are topical and often very interesting it ccertainly doesn't come anywhere near the comprehensive and intellectual commentary of rival magazine "World Soccer". Call it 'The Dail Mail' to World Soccer's 'The Times' (without the bigatory of course!)

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          12.09.2009 20:12
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          Best football magazine in a bad bunch.

          Four Four Two is probably the best magazine out at the moment that caters for adult football fans. As a kid, I was a huge fan of Match and must have spent over a grand on the five hundred and something issues that are now gathering dust in the attic. But as I grew older I wanted something more in-depth and not just about the Premiership. This is how I started subscribing to Four Four Two, for its quirky articles, interviews and pieces about fotball from all around the world.

          My favourite thing about Four Four Two is the interesting articles that you don't really get in any other magazine like articles about rivalries in Vietnam, Alternative Awards among other more serious articles. The magazine is monthly, so unfortunately it is always out of date when you get it.

          Constant features are:

          Letters: Readers letters about football

          "More than just a game": Feature about various footballing rivalries around the world. Good Feature but gets bogged down in talking about the history of the occasion.

          "One on One" A good feature in the magazine where readers send in questions to interview a past or present footballer.

          "Up Front" The best part of the magazine and what sets Four Four Two apart from the rest. An entertaining look at the more light-hearted sides of football, including funny quotes and guest columnists like Gordan Strachan.

          "Reviews" Reviews of the latest books, games and movies. Okay but a bit short.

          Various football interviews, articles and stories make up the rest of the magazine and it is finished by Planet Football, which has information about all the British Leagues and little snippets about other footballing stories around the world.

          The one gripe I have about Four Four Two is the amount of advertising in it. I know they probably need the money to survive but in an average issue roughly two-thirds is advertising, which I personally find disgraceful.

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          29.07.2009 08:01
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          Perfect for those who like their football with a bit of depth.

          ~~~~~~~~~~
          INTRODUCTION
          ~~~~~~~~~~

          There have been a number of magazines that have plopped through my letterbox over the years - National Geographic, The Economist and What HiFi amongst them - but none of them have had the enduring appeal of Haymarket Publications' cerebral football magazine - FourFourTwo (Drat. There go half of you already!)

          I have been an Arsenal season ticket holder for over ten years now and am a regular contributor to one of the fanzines (Oh well, that's another batch of you alienated). However, despite proudly wearing the club colours, I am first and foremost a football fan and enjoy reading football literature (Stop sniggering, that is NOT an oxymoron).

          FourFourTwo (FFT) is without doubt the closest thing to a "thinking man's" football magazine. For those not of a football-minded disposition (well done for staying with me!) the name refers to a well-known football formation - four at the back, four in midfield and two strikers up front (the poor goalkeeper is ignored as he is the one constant).

          ~~~~~~
          FORMAT
          ~~~~~~

          FFT, which is printed on glossy, high quality paper, comes out once a month and has a news-stand price of £4.10. As a subscriber, I pay £19 every six months by direct debit - a saving of 20% off the cover price. The magazine, which celebrates its 15th birthday this month, has a healthy balance of regular features, exclusive interviews, advertising, and competitions, and boasts a very high quality of journalism and photography.

          It covers the whole range of the football universe - from Non-league to Premier League in the UK - as well as coverage of foreign leagues, from the more obvious such as Serie A (Italy), Primera Liga (Spain) and Bundesliga (Germany) to the esoteric (Japan, Turkey, Mexico and Ukraine amongst other).

          There are three or four eagerly awaited special supplements a year, including the Top 100 Football Rich List, 100 Best League Players from the Championship and down the leagues, and the annual season preview. You also get a World Cup and European Championship supplement when these tournaments come around with a nice wall chart to keep tabs on proceedings. They also produced an Ashes supplement this year which was a welcome - if rather unexpected - bonus.

          The adverts are not intrusive. They are scattered throughout, with a more extensive section, including shoe, glove and kit catalogues, concentrated at the back. Every now and again, the issue will be packaged with a freebie. These usually consist of seventy to a hundred page excerpted chapters of football-related biographies. Recent examples include books on Brian Clough, George Best, Terry Venables and Maradona.

          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~
          REGULAR FEATURES
          ~~~~~~~~~~~~~

          Here's a quick run down of the features that appear each month:

          One on One: A leading football personality (this month it was Patrick Kluivert) answers questions put to him by the public - via letter or e-mail. Some of the Q&A can be surprisingly frank, although the honesty of the response depends on the character of the interviewee.

          The Boy's A Bit Special: An interview with one or two bright young starlets ostensibly destined for great things, but FFT's success in predicting them is pretty hit and miss (they picked striker Graeme Tomlinson (who?!) from Man United's class of '94, ignoring Beckham, Scholes and the Neville brothers).

          Up Front: This section features small bite sized articles, excellent book and game reviews, anecdotes of strange fan behaviour, and various other weird and wacky titbits.

          My Secret Vice: A one-page in depth interview about a particular player or manager's hobby or interest out of football (some have surpisingly atypical intellectual pursuits - the current month features David Artell, a Morecambe defender studying as a forensic biologist)

          More than a Game: Throwing the spotlight on the most competitive, historically important or emotional football derbies across the world. Subjects have ranged from the predictable (Cardiff v Swansea and Atletico v Real Madrid) to the bizarre (Persepolis v Esteghlal in Iran, and Honduras v El Salvador in the Caribbean).

          Action Replay: Usually a detailed and very well researched overview of key people and moments in the history of the game. Recent highlights have included such diverse subjects as the tragic "Superga" air crash that killed the Torino football team in 1949, Dixie Dean and Claude Anelka's stewardship of Raith Rovers.

          Planet Football: A section dedicated to lower league football, non-league football, Scottish football and a round-up of leagues across the rest of the world.

          First XI: A leading football personality is asked to provide a list of the eleven best players he has ever played with or against - one in each position, as well as a manager and three subs.

          Competitions: there is a star letter award for the best letter to the Editor, and a unique and devilishly difficult "spine line" competition. The spine of the magazine is printed with some random looking words, and you, as the reader, have to figure out how it relates to one of the articles in the issue.

          ~~~~~~
          VERDICT
          ~~~~~~

          All in all, a very satisfying read that contains some very good writing, exceptional sports photography and intelligent discussion of the relevant and topical football issues of the day. I usually manage to get through an issue, dipping in and out, over the course of a couple of weeks, so the frequency of publication is about right. With the immediacy and accessibility of news on the internet, this magazine needs to provide something different from the usual gossip and speculation, and it does so very well. The cover price of £4 is a bit steep, but not exorbitant given similar publications and you certainly get your money's worth. Highly recommended.

          © Hishyeness 2009

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            27.05.2009 17:46
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            A top notch football read

            As a subscirber of FourFourTwo magazine for a number of years, I belive that without doubt, it is the best football magazine aimed at serious football fans that is available on the market. The other main magazines focused on domestic football are Match and Shoot. Match is very good in its own right, but is focussed much more on a younger audience. I find the writing in Shoot to be quite boring and often feel that there aren't enough interesting articles in there. This leaves us with FourFourTwo, which doesn't fail to deliver.

            FourFourTwo does not focus on providing a news round up of everything that has happened in the world of football in the last month, it leaves that to the newspapers. Instead, it gives a number of articles that give the reader a better insight into particular areas of football. Regular articles include a monthly look at a particular grudge match from around the world. There is also a monthly "The Boys A Bit Special" article, which highlights promising youngsters who you can then look out for and monitor as their career progresses.

            The magazine also looks back in time, to relive and educate the reader on historical football events. There are also regular countdowns of things such as the best footballers outside the Premiership, which adds interest.

            A particularly helpful section for those who enjoy reading more about football is the section which reviews the latest book and computer game releases. I have read a number of very good books as a result of reccommendations from this section.

            Overall, FourFourTwo is a very good magazine for those who want high quality opinion, debate and wish to increase their knowledge of football history at all levels. It is perhaps not as fun as other magazines such as Match but the content is certainly on a higher level and so I would certainly reccommend it as the best football magazine available.

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            24.05.2009 23:28
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            Great read for football fans

            Four Four Two magazine is a British football magazine dedicated to football, generally it covers the British game and interviews with the biggest stars in the World Game, it also has interesting articles about matches around the world, there are sections on Football in each league around the world, the magazine is well presented but is expensive at nearly £4 a month.

            I love reading the magazine, one month there could be a massive article on Lionel Messi or the outstanding young footballing talent coming out of Argentina, the next month you may have an article on the history of Scottish football, it is a varied magazine and is well written and informative, its far more intelligent than simply talking about football, it reviews dvds, books and computer games relating to the sport and is really good in this respect.

            I enjoty the magazine for the interviews, the in-depth coverage of young talent and world football and the interesting articles, it is around 200 pages long and means you can keep coming back to it. there are often supplements with the reviews of richest football owners and the best players outside the premier league.

            The photographs are great, the magazine looks excellent and is professionally written with style and substance, I like the range of articles and the breadth of writing, it makes this a thoroughly interesting read.

            If tyou subscribe you can also get a free football shirt or football computer game and it proves cheaper over the year.

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            17.04.2009 11:17
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            worth the price to be fair

            It was a newsagent in Manchester airport , I was preparing for a flight to the Costa Del Sol . This is the first time I had the joy of buying the excellent four four two magazine.
            I was in the costa del sol for two weeks, and the magazine gave me some top quality reading for the majority of them two weeks . My Mother thought I was mad paying that much for a magazine , and I can see it is pretty expensive indeed for a magazine but it is a fantastic read .
            It is a monthly edition and I belive this is where it shines above the rest of the football magazines , as the editors have approximately a month to put all their effort into a great chunky magazine packed with excellent articles.
            Every edition they tend to have some kind of feature or pull out , some of the ones I have experienced in the past 12 months include 100 best league players , best sunday league players and transfers that rocked the world .
            I have also purchased a paper back book called 'mad for it' which investigates 20 of the worlds most fierce derbies including Barcelona and Blackpool - this is also a top read .
            I would reccomend this magazine to any football fan .

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              07.02.2009 21:13
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              If you love football, you will love 'Four Four Two' magazine.

              It is becoming increasingly rare that buying a printed magazine is necessary or desired in this day and age where most of the articles contained within are either out of date or can be found on the internet at any opportunity, but for me and my husband, both being football mad, 'Four Four Two' has become a way of life that we just don't want to alter.

              The fact that most of the really cool information inside the magazine can be found online does not deter us as we look at the flip side of that and you can't exactly look at the web site when on a train or something like that for the £4.10 that it costs to buy the magazine, that is unless you are rolling in money and cart your lap top around with you everywhere.

              The magazine feels really well designed and chunky enough to warrant such an outlay and never seems to disappoint with plenty of exclusive interviews and statistics to keep you going for 4 weeks until the next one. There is a really interested 'football rich list' article in the latest edition that makes it worth buying without anything else in my opinion.

              If you love football, you will love 'Four Four Two' magazine.

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                04.01.2009 09:56

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                The Best All-Round Football Magazine on the Market

                Probably the best overall football magazine on the market at the moment, Fourfourtwo covers everything from non-league football through to leagues around the world.

                Traditionally the magazine is format based, allowing a month for the 50 best players in the world, another for the 50 best players in the UK, but around the main articles are a number of interesting and challenging features. From reviews of football related literature, computer games and DVD's through summaries of most football leagues in the world via Mailbags, footballers favourite players, articles on past footballing glories or ignomies, the magazine does offer something for most people.

                While it lacks journalistic views other than Henry Winter's monthly column, it is perhaps all the better for it coming across as neutral and football loving.

                The magazine is expensive at nearly £4 but much cheaper as a subscription where you can also obtain a free gift.

                This magazine is a lot of things to a lot of people and while its impossible to please every football fan with its content, it does a pretty good job.

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                06.08.2008 02:28

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                The issue for a football magazine is knowing who is likely to buy and read the magazine or as business studies people would say the 'addressable market'. If you ask people are they football fans a majority of the population might say yes. If this mass of people are then asked 'Do you ever buy a football related product or go to a game?' then many would probably reply in the negative. Of those remaining many are only interested in football in the context of their close affiliation or support for one club. The numbers who are fans of the sport but without allegiance are probably a small proportion of the numbers who expressed an interest in the game.

                How then can a magazine without a bias towards a club create a niche for itself. The majority of football coverage falls into 2 categories - the personality led sensationalism of the tabloid press and the intellectualism and pseudo-social focus of the broadsheets. I know this is perhaps a sweeping generalisation but the majority of written football coverage in my view is like this.
                FourFourTwo has been on the newsagents shelves for a couple of years now and has a coverage of the sport which tries to mix in-depth analysis of the game and its players balanced with some neat retrospective looks at the past game and a reasonable degree of humour.

                The magazine does get over the problem of allegiance by ensuring its main feature articles concern the players in the top clubs. The players of Arsenal, Liverpool and Manchester United get a large amount of coverage. Other clubs in the Premiership are also featured and there is usually at least one article from the lower divisions.
                The coverage does avoid sensationalism and also avoids being patronising. Football is a simple game played for the most part by relatively simple people best left having their boots doing the talking for them.

                FourFourTwo covers the English game mainly and there is little coverage of the Scottish leagues. In terms of coverage of the national teams again it is England that is featured rather than the other home nations. Consequently there are also articles on England manager Sven Goran Eriksson and the in May's issue the trials and tribulations of the new national Stadium to replace Wembley.
                One problem I did found with FourFourTwo is that there are few prominent writers contributing to the magazine. The only familiar name was Henry Winter from the daily Telegraph and his article was not particularly good at that. The other main articles I felt were not that good either. The writing style actually falls between the styles of tabloid and broadsheet but not in a compellingly interesting way. With more than one of the main articles I, quite frankly, got bored. The more interesting articles were those where the story was compelling enough to bear the weight of a longer article. From reading FourFourTwo it soon becomes clear that modern day footballers have done little other than train to reach where they are and having reach that pinnacle lead surprisingly similar lives. That being so there are only so many ways you can tell the story.

                So if you are interested in foreign clubs or leagues or interested in what has happened to the stars who have now retired then FourFourTwo offers something. If you areinterested only in contemporary players you may as well stick with your clubs own magazine, if they have one.
                The magazine does have shorter bite-sized articles which are interesting. These include snippets about grassroots football and news about football on TV. There is a robust letters column as well as a plethora of reviews on football books, videos, Playstation and PC games about football and explaining about football web sites. There is a section in the centre which has foreign league results and tables but this was quite out of date.

                I did find FourFourTwo disappointing. I do not know whether it has found a market niche big enough to continue. At £3.10 an issue it is not a lot of money compared to most programmes at matches these days which tend to be a booklet of self-gratification for £2 or so. However for £3.10 it is at the top end of prices for football related magazines and I do not think the quality of writing justifies it. There is better football writing every Saturday in The Times as part of a newspaper costing just 60p.
                I won't be a regular buyer of FourFourTwo.

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                22.01.2004 04:05
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                The gravy train these days may be a lot less rich than it was in the days before the collapse of ONDigital and the Big Money TV deal, but football still remains the leisure pursuit of choice for millions of beer swilling Brits, whether that be watching (usually) or playing (increasingly rarely). And a decent leisure industry needs a decent, high quality magazine to encourage its followers to satisfy their more highbrow urges and do some reading as well. And that is exactly where Four Four Two comes in... 442 (quicker to type than Four Four Two) is the major quality football magazine in the UK (if you discount all the a*** licking narcissism of the Man U mags, that is) and it's easy to see why. I'll offer as evidence an in depth analysis of the February 2004 edition if you'll permit, because it's always best to get some detail of such things. 442 is a glossy, full colour monthly football magazine retailing at £3.50 and available in most of the newsagents with anything like a reasonable choice. The cover contains the strapline "The Ultimate Football Magazine" and they're probably right. It's published by Haymarket Magazines and is edited by Mat Snow, a name I think I recognise from former contributions to the NME but I may be wrong. certainly the feel of the whole thing is very reminiscent of the irreverence of the good old music mag, so if Mr Snow has never been in that particular publication he should have been. 442 even has the obligatory website to accompany it, 442.rivals.net, but I have to say that when I tried to check it out I could only find adverts and the much vaunted article search facility did bugger all. Anyway, the Feb 2004 edition has 132 pages, out of which 32 are devoted to ads, a reasonable level I guess, because there are lots of pages that aren't (if you understand me). There are some great, high quality photographs and good, strong writing by people who seem to care
                about the game and 442 is very impressive all things considered. I'm not a regular reader, but was certainly pleased every time I've bought a copy. The Feb 2004 edition features Harry Kewell and Damien Duff on the cover and includes lengthy features on both men, which are well written and full of insight, although the arrogance of Kewell and his insensitive battering of former club Leeds certainly grated a bit. But as a dyed in the wool Elland Road man it would. The writing is certainly a good cut above the standard Fleet Street garbage and smacks of sincerity and feeling, with a decent combination of acid wit and cynicism, laced in with a genuine love of the game. There's a regular feature called One On One, where readers' questions are put to a star name, and this month the victim is Blackburn manager Graeme Souness. A ot of this feature is fairly bland and unconvincing, but there's a hint of tension in the sharp exchange: As a former team mate and then his manager at Liverpool what was your reaction when you heard Bruce Grobbelaar was accused of match fixing? No comment. You can feel the moustache-less top lip of Mr Souness fairly bristling at the thought. There's a page on Clough, Father and Son, and a Q&A session with Chris Waddle, along with a decent column by football writer Henry Winter, who is always enjoyable. You get special features on the search for a Football Chant Laureate, John Gidman, the North East and the African Nations Cup, and a five page article on manic football manager from the middle of the Twentieth century Major Frank Buckley, who bossed Wolves, Hull, Leeds and Walsall, discovered Stan Cullis, Billy Wright, John Charles and jack Charlton and pioneered the injection of monkey gland fluid into players and the use of ballet training! Buckley was a maverick, crazed character who was renowned for his eccentric behaviour and dress and certainly the feature makes excellent reading - &quo
                t;'He looked me up and down, as I imagine a bloodstock owner would look at a racehorse,' recalled Cullis of his interview in 1934. ' He said, "Stand up" and tapped me on the chest. He said "Are you frightened?" I said "Of what?" He said, "Of getting hurt." I said "No". That was all he said. He had some words with my father, which I couldn't hear, and I was a professional footballer'." GREAT STUFF. The whole magazine is like that, eminently readable and interesting with lots of insight and wit and a deep seated love of fun. You get the debunking of the aura of magic about the people being written about and a healthy dose of fans' perspective on the subject matter. This is a magazine by and for footie fans and is great value. There is nothing to touch it around at the moment and it really does offer tremendous value. It's offbeat and tries to avoid the mainstream, even featuring Port Vale fan and World Darts Champion, Phil The Power Taylor. You will, I can assure you, love this one, even if 2-3-5 and the WM formation are much more memorable and lovable than the rather defensive 4-4-2 formation on which it is christened - watch Mike Batt Football Manager and find out why 4-4-2 is not a thing to be loved - the Christmas Pudding rather than Christmas Tree... ENJOY

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                  22.03.2002 03:55
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                  You may have noticed that I do like my football just a little bit. Ok, that is a bit of an understatement I love the game and I am obsessed. I love Exeter City through all the things they have put me through, when I am not playing or watching it then I can read about it. There are many sources of information and media things around these days. The newspapers have all the news, gossip and reports daily, television seems to be showing several games a day though ITV Sport has gone downhill and of course the Internet. The Internet has threatened to kill off all competition offering live news and all at the touch of the button. Still that has not totally happened and they all live on. Magazines still exist, and FourFourTwo has to be the best around for football nowadays. FourFourTwo has been around for some time, though a relative new addition of only a couple of years does not have the huge history of some publications. It is a more educated and older perspective on football than the younger Match or Shoot audience could offer. It joins Match of the Day, World Soccer and other major while bulkier and more words. FourFourTwo looks more in depth analysis, opinions, comments and long features. It all makes for great reading, good length and great quality. Each month in FourFourTwo there are a variety of features and lots of main articles along with a lot of regular sections. There are three or so long articles that study onto one area or player. This is usually done as an interview and then a background story behind the whole article. These are hardly sensationalist and not done to expose anything, but are usually interesting and always well done. The player has to have some sort of story or be something hot at present. It makes for good reading and a good sense of reading behind the game. The regulars are also as good. There are several regular columnists all writing about issues in the game today. These are not that good,
                  the writing is not top quality and they never get too controversial to start that hot a argument. Still pretty topical and worth a look. Readers get a chance to send in their letters to talk about just anything and these are good for a debate and an interesting viewpoint. Prizes are on offer for the best letter and FourFourTwo runs several competitions with prizes ranging from football boots to trips to see games in Europe. There is also a good part where people send in their own ways of being a manager for their favourite team, which is usually funny. There are reviews here for all sorts of football related things, from games, books, kit and others. Useful if you are considering parting with some cash. News both serious and the funnier side of football are written about in here, as well as a comprehensive result round up from all games across Europe. FourFourTwo is a good quality magazine, both in terms of writing and the overall quality. It is a glossy magazine, and the printing is very good. There are lots of pictures and these are really good. Full action shots and lots of general football pictures FourFourTwo does manage to capture some of the real emotions of the game in shots. Unfortunately there is a lot of advertising in FourFourTwo. It is all sorts of sports related goods and products so is at least good for the subject area. The number is not as bad as some magazines, though it is there. The one complaint I could make about FourFourTwo is the way they feature only the big clubs. Maybe in fairness this is what sells the magazines as people are not interested in Rotherham or Bury but the top side like Manchester United, Arsenal, Chelsea and Liverpool all get more press than smaller sides. The price is not great either. A bit on the pricey side at over £3 an issue monthly. There is a lot of reading, but also a lot of advertising. You can save for the yearly subscription for £29 and there is usually some special offer or free gift to acc
                  ompany this. Back orders for issues can also be done, though some of the classics have sold out. Good though for what you get. Put simply this is the best football magazine that I have seen and is the only one that I would consider buying regularly. Great read, lots of articles and content and overall excellent.

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                    13.10.2001 05:18
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                    From the very title, you know that Four Four Two is going to be a decent footy mag, sensible but interesting. I first bought the mag on recommendation by a friend, and quickly started buying it every month. About a year ago, I started a subscription, with which I got a free Umbro Training coat and the equivalent of 3 free issues in savings, and I have never had a complaint. Four Four Two has recently changed its styling, but the basic format is still the same. The articles are not all Premiership based, unlike some other footy mags, and often cover the lower leagues. For instance, in one of the recent issues there was a lengthy piece on the League of Wales. The articles are well written and objective, with great background info so that you feel you know exactly what the writer is on about, and the pictures are great. There is also a World football section, giving all the results in the major leagues, as well as news from the big name clubs such as Madrid and AC Milan. All this is in addition to the letters page (often entertaining!), the news pages and so forth. Although Four Four Two is not only Premier League based, there is almost always a big name star interview, with recent players being Juan Sebastian Veron and Alan Shearer. These interviews are often 4 pages or more long, and so you can really feel that you know a player inside out after reading. The one downside to Four Four Two is that it is monthly, so its a long wait from issue to issue! Four Four Two is definately the best footy mag I have read, and if you are willing to move away from the Premiership media circus, and learn about the League of Wales, as well as getting your Premiership fix, then this is definately the best alternative.

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