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Lancashire Evening Telegraph

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Widely read in East Lancashire - Blackburn, Burnley etc.

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      15.02.2001 01:36
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      Most towns and cities have their local means of publishing and broadcasting news to the citizens in their area and North East Lancashire is no exception with Radio Lancashire, originally called Radio Blackburn and The Lancashire Evening Telegraph. Published six days a week in tabloid format, the LET is centred on Blackburn and covers the east Lancashire area at 27p a copy. Established in 1886 the paper was printed in Blackburn until a few years ago, when Newsquest the current publisher took over and transferred the printing to Bolton, yet still manage to put each edition on the streets by around noon each day. If there is a breaking news story the 4.00pm edition will reflect this, not as a stop press bulletin but as headline news on the front page. Although business adverts appear on every page, the bulk of the white space is taken up with local news where most reports are accompanied by the reporter’s name and in some cases his or her e-mail address. And yes the reporters do reply to e-mails even if it is only to acknowledge receipt of the e-mail that a citizen has sent. On Thursdays and Fridays the LET has a special “pull out” section dedicated to Homes and Cars respectively. Thursday is also the best day for jobs. Each day some ten pages are set aside for classified ads where the local community can advertise their wares for quite reasonable fees. A basic classified ad of one column inch (5 lines) will cost around £6 per day or £12 for two days with the third day free. A novel feature to help keep the cost of personal advertising down is that should the article for sale be sold, a phone call to the office before 8.45pm the same next day will have the ad pulled and subsequent days not charged for. And as a little extra all ads placed in the Telegraph are also published in the local free paper, The Citizen, at no extra charge. Placing an ad is as easy as phoning Blackburn 54321, an easier number to remember I ca
      nnot imagine. Like all newspapers the Telegraph has horoscopes, a crossword, the day’s and tomorrow’s weather and the day’s TV and radio schedules as the pull out centre page. The Helping Hand column provides a list of chemists that are open after normal hours, hospital visiting hours in the region’s hospitals and a series of emergency phone numbers. Even though the town is land locked you can find out the time of low and high tides at the nearest coastline, that being the Preston estuary. Sport from around the region and national sport is comprehensively featured and even very minor and very local sporting events are catered for if the organisers send in the results. A few years ago, from our local community centre, we ran a five a side football league for 3 age groups where the matches were played on a Saturday morning at the local sports centre. I would present the results of the day’s play together with league tables and a 200 words report that would be published on the Wednesday. It gave the kids a big kick out of seeing their teams and individual names in print. In fact on one occasion the Telegraph sent up a real reporter to see what it was all about from the professional’s viewpoint. The voice of the people can be found on “Your Letters” page where the citizens of the area can vent their spleen of any subject under the sun and the best letter of the week is awarded a nice crisp tenner. It’s a cheque actually. Letters are accepted by e-mail, snail mail and telephone and there is no real restriction on length although a 300 words letter will have a greater chance of being printed than a 1,000 plus word tome. Of course I do, so don’t ask. In years gone by when the Telegraph was still printed in Blackburn it would be rushed out on a Saturday evening as a “pink” to arrive, with the ink barely dry, at the news stands on the Boulevard, just in time to greet t
      he bulk of the supporters getting off the dozens of buses coming from Ewood Park after the match. The “pink” had all the day’s national football results, league tables and full reports of the local team’s matches. No mean feat that as the matches had only finished some twenty minutes before the paper hit the streets. Sadly this service is no longer. To complement the LET there is an excellent web site at: http//www.thisislancashire.co.uk where you can not only read the daily news on-line but also use the first rate search engine to read news from days gone by. To sum up this local rag has everything that a newspaper reader requires of a local paper, except national news, although on the odd occasion a major national news item will be featured.

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      • More +
        10.02.2001 14:23
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        These days there is more choice than ever for news, with multi-channel television and a wealth of information at our fingertips online. So is there still a place for the newspaper, and in particular the humble local newspaper. I lived the whole of my childhood in East Lancashire, and after a brief hiatus, I moved back to the area about a year ago. Despite the many changes that have taken place on the media map, some things don't change, and the local evening 'rag', The Lancashire Evening Telegraph (LET) appears to be as popular as ever. For anyone wishing to keep up with goings on in the East of the County, the LET is still the first place to look, except perhaps to tune in to Radio Lancashire, which is also an important source for all the latest news and sport for the region. As a young schoolboy (ah - those were the days, not a care in the world), I used to deliver the LET to a number of homes in the local town. It wasn't a big paper round - only about 20 or so houses, although they were spread out over a large enough area to mean that it took me half an hour or so, even at a brisk walking pace. These people relied on the local paper to tell them of the recent goings on in their corner of Lancashire, and from my observations this still appears to be the case. Daily newspapers have been fighting tirelessly to maintain their dwindling circulations for the past decade, with mixed success, so why should the local rags be any different? In many ways they both suffer the same problems - newspapers are seen as 'old hat', and with many more opportunities to discover news and other information, their importance has gradually been eroded. However, the fact that such titles as the LET are local and relevant to the local people gives them a distinct advantage in maintaining the loyalty of a wavering readership. I am not a regular buyer of the LET, although I will sometimes make a specific e
        ffort to buy it to catch up with any big local football news. I can be sure that they will always be the first to pick up on any stories that are breaking with the local football teams. If I take a look at any of the Sunday newspapers, my team may occasionally get a few column inches, but even this is a rarity for a first division side. Breaking news relating to my place of work is also featured in the LET, and it has been known for them to pick up on issues, and print them, before it has become common knowledge in the office. However this probably speaks volumes about the lack of internal communication rather than anything else. Aside from news and sport, the LET is able to bring details of forthcoming events and local job vacancies. It is true to say that many websites are now in the market to disseminate similar information, but few do it as well with a local focus. In fact, I lie. There is one website that is able to bring all this information, and with the same level of local focus. It just so happens that it is the Lancashire Evening Telegraph's own web site. The parent company, Newsquest, which is a subsidiary of a US based company called Gannett Inc., is the largest regional publisher in England, and hosts equivalent websites under the 'thisis' brand eg: www.thisislancashire.co.uk I am now able to obtain much of the information that is carried in the LET, on this website, including lots of archived news and sports information. I can also see what is going on in a number of other regions as well. This does not detract from the paper, as many people still prefer to read their daily dose of news and sport in an 'inky', however, it does provide a handy alternative to people like myself, who can now catch up with the news online from time to time. A few other details about the Lancashire Evening Telegraph: Publication Days: Mon - Sat Issues per annum: 312 Circulation:
        42,535 Price: 27p {Source: JIGREG & ABC} Although it covers the whole of East Lancashire (effectively the 'BB' postcode area), it enjoys the greatest penetration in Blackburn, Darwen, Great Harwood and Accrington. Other areas such as Burnley, Nelson and Colne have penetrations that are significantly (up to two thirds) lower. Full details can be found at the following link: http://www.adweb.co.uk/nsnewspaperDetail2.CFM?paperid=582 So if you need to know what's happening in East Lancashire, you could do a lot worse than to go out and buy a copy of the Lancashire Evening Telegraph. Even if you now live away from the area, you can still keep up to date with events on their comprehensive website. {An original Dooyoo opinion © Blackjane 2001}

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