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      16.02.2011 00:36

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      More hit that miss on balance

      Since buying New Scientist from the age of 16 on and off I have come to enjoy the eclectic mix of up to date science stories and more speculative articles. This mix is both its main strength and its main weakness; the variation in every article content keeps each issue fresh, while this variation can extend to the quality of some of the articles.
      Indeed it is important to have an open mind in science, some of the articles have borderlined on the ridiculous a times (see very speculative string theory articles) and this can take away from the rigour you would expect from science. In the same light though, the magazine has not shied away from controversy, the ongoing debate between religious groups and rational groups and rightly backing the scientists.
      Consistency is the let down with New Scientist, it may go weeks without a poor article and be a perfect primer for a non scirentist and great resource for a practising scientist. In the same breath it can be a poor issue and you wondered why you bought it.
      It is definately worth a read if you haven't read it before, however I cannot bring myself to commit to a subscription.

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      21.06.2010 18:04
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      It is easily accessible to everyone

      I have been subscribing to the New Scientist magazine on and off for the last eight years and before then I'm sure I must have bought the odd copy here and there. I would recommend this magazine to everyone and I often do...

      --What makes it so great?--

      There is something in this magazine for everyone no matter what level of scientific knowledge they have. The magazine gives you a mix of many areas of science but without a lot of the hard to understand science jargon; I personally think that this magazine is accessible to pretty much everyone that has an interest in anything science related. Even if you don't think that a science magazine is for you I suggest that you should give this a read, it really is crammed full of interesting and exciting articles.

      In particular I have an interest in the astronomy and psychology articles, but I have learned many things about genetics, physics, technology and a huge and varied range of other scientific topics. In general, there are some longer articles going into more depth of information on the headline topics of the front cover. However, my personal favourites are the smaller titbits of information and recent news stories that are scattered throughout the magazine. These vary in size from one sentence nuggets to bite size five minute pieces. Also of some interest, for those of you that do work in the science industry there is always at least a couple if not more pages dedicated to jobs and careers.
      On the very last page of the magazine is - The last word section. This is the first thing that I read whenever I get a new magazine through the post. It is the section that the series of books brought out by the New Scientist team are based on, i.e., the most latest one is 'Do polar bears get lonely?'. The questions are sent in by readers and if selected are placed in the magazine to be answered by other readers in the following weeks.

      --Value for money?--

      For your money you get about 65 pages of science heaven!
      The weekly edition is priced at £3.40 but if you subscribe there is usually always a discount, I have seen these range anywhere from twenty percent off to fifty percent off. It's just a matter of keeping an eye out and subscribing when it's even more of a bargain.

      In my opinion I believe you get a lot of up to date and fascinating information for your money. I can on occasion finish a whole magazine in one reading but more likely than not I read bits of it over my lunches. Therefore, it does often take me a while to get through all of it.

      --Overall--

      If you do decide to subscribe rather than just pick up the odd copy here and there you are given free access to their online site and archives. Even if you don't subscribe their website contains quite a lot of interesting articles and information which can be accessed free of charge.

      In my household the magazine not only gets read by me but then sometimes by my husband and if there is anything particularly interesting I usually try and pass it onto a friend, so that I have someone else to discuss it with.

      I love this magazine and although I can only give it a maximum of five stars I would gladly give it more. I look forward to it arriving in my mailbox each week.

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        05.01.2010 11:53
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        If you love science or are a scientist, this is essential. Even if you don't, it's worth a flick.

        For anyone truly interested in science, this is an absolute must read.

        New Scientist is a magazine that covers science in depth and the issues surrounding it.
        It is at the forefront of bringing the latest news about climate change to the public at large. If you are a sceptic, then please investigate this magazine. They have made their minds up about it, but with good reason.

        Also New Scientist deals with some of the politics regarding science. As such they weren't exactly fond of George W Bush.

        Whereas Focus is designed to be an easy read, and no less respectable for it, New Scientist is for the informed reader, and as such can be quite high brow sometimes.
        Don't let that put you off, though, because it will still be worth it, for the majority of the content.

        The quality of the writing shines through, and they are not afraid to go against the grain of popular opinion if they believe that something needs to be said.

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        16.06.2009 13:15
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        A definite must for anyone interested in cutting edge science

        Far from being texts for the scientific elite, New Scientist offers the latest in cutting edge science in a concise and fully readable format, regardless of your scientific status. As a student I have been a subscriber to New Scientist for some time, yet the beauty of this unique periodical arises from the fact that you don't need a degree in Supervolcanics to understand this weeks article on Mount St Helens (for example). Indeed the only prerequisite to an enjoyable read is a keen interest in science in general.

        The magazine opens with a short editorial giving a brief introduction to some of the principle articles followed by the more succint columns "Upfront," "This week" and "In Brief." Perhaps my favourite part of the magazine is the "Technology" section which can cover anything from robotic-octopuses to radio controlled bullets. What follows are the main cover stories of the week which present cutting edge science in a user friendly, and more importantly, understandable format. At the end of the magazine there is the "Last word" section, where users can pose questions for feeback from other readers (and which has spawned numerous compilaton books of the best and most interesting questions - see Do Polar Bears Get Lonely?).

        Throughout the magazine, the articles are adorned with truly stunning photography and artwork - one only has to look at New Scientist on the shelf next to the other magazines to realise how visually brilliant these are. As well as this, other gems are scattered throughout the magazine which makes New Scientist truly unique - check out the sounbites, histories, and books and arts sections. As well as this, NS often offers extra commodities such as posters and the much revered graduate recruitment articles and, once a year, booklet.

        Around a third to a half of New Scientist is taken up by job advertisements, some academic and some industrial, which can somewhat detract from the apparant value of the magazine for non subscribers (currently priced at £3.25 in the UK).

        Subscription (definitely reccomended) to New Scientist also allows access to the vast online archive, spanning back over 15 years, and in considering cost is definitely the best option for prolific readers. Students can bag NS for a mere 50% of the cost (studentsubscriptionservice.co.uk) and non-students can also subscribe for a reduced cost.

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          27.05.2009 15:08
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          good for everyone to enjoy

          I read this magazine backwards, always starting with Feedback the excellent column that charts all the amusing stories that have been sent in that week; also the results form all the competition that they run. Next questions and answers, the public send in any questions that they might have about random scientific topics and other readers try to answer the questions I always learn something new here!

          Each week the have a few articles covering interesting topics on a huge range of topics, the news section gives short readable insights to what going on in science. Book reviews and interviews are great short break reading. Frequent specials on recruitment or grad special lead into the essential jobs section. This is an excellent magazine for people with a passing interest in science or scientist who want to keep up to date in other fields.

          The subscription is quite a lot at £165 but they frequently do discounts for new customers, this also means you can access all the content on-line.

          http://www.newscientist.com/ is an excellent website, all the latest news stories are right there on the front page , explaining the hot topics from all the fields of science. They also have in depth guides to things like space and evolution. To get to the content of the magazine can be a bit of an effort, (click on 'this weeks magazine" no the picture) as they try to send you to subscription pages all the time.

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          30.04.2009 11:58
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          My favourite magazine!

          I don't know what this says about me... but I've been subscribing to New Scientist for well over a decade now! I'm not a scientist, nor a student, nor even all that bright, technically speaking! I do rather suffer from a little thing called curiosity, however, and New Scientist is brilliant for people who are cursed with this terrible affliction!

          I've been interested in science since I was a child, probably stemming from my interest in science fiction. I used to love Omni magazine (if there is anyone else out there as old and wrinkled as me, you might remember what a wonderful mix of science fact and science fiction Omni was). New Scientist magazine is perhaps not quite as much fun as Omni was, although to be fair, it does have its lighter moments.

          I would say the magazine is primarily aimed at university students and graduates already working in science (the magazine does regular jobs features with entire sections devoted to job adverts and special features for graduates). Sometimes I do feel the editorial attitude is a little elitist, which I never felt with Omni. Perhaps it's not fair to compare New Scientist with Omni, as they are clearly aimed at different audiences. Nevertheless, there is much to interest the intelligent layperson, and judging from the letters page, I am not the only non-scientist to read the magazine.

          New Scientist is filled with news features with a scientific slant, and articles on whatever is new in science and technology, and much more. Despite what I said about the sometimes elitist attitude, the articles are actually very readable and quite easy for the interested non-scientist to understand. It's always my first port of call when I am looking for truly authoritative and reliable information.

          I suppose, in simple terms, I have always viewed New Scientist was a sort of paper version of Tomorrow's World (again, you'll only know what I'm talking about if you are old enough to remember the programme!). Nowadays, I suppose I'd say it's like a printed version of the Discovery Channel! It's so much more interesting than reading about the latest celebrity break-up. The magazine includes lots of short, half page articles, on new developments and news stories. There are also some fascinating articles which run to four or five pages, which give more detail on, say, a scientific study about (again just as an example), the formation of memories, or ageing. There is also a really interesting section called Histories, which tells a story of a historical scientific mystery or discovery. This is one of my favourite sections.

          For me, however, the very best sections in New Scientist are the Feedback and Last Word pages - these are right at the very back of the magazine, so I'm afraid I tend to start there and only go to the front after I've read those bits! Feedback is a page of humorous snippets, often sent in by readers, and deals with (for example) advertising blurbs which try to sound authoritative but trip themselves up by using dodgy scientific terms, or ambiguous (and therefore humorous) signs and notices. The Last Word is a brilliant feature where readers send in questions, and other readers try to answer them. I remember a wonderful one about Brocken spectres and my personal favourite, was where people discussed the old wives tale about warm water freezing faster than cold (yes, in some cases, it's true!) The contents of The Last Word columns have been collected together to create a number of books, including Do Polar Bears Get Lonely? and Does Anything Eat Wasps?

          The magazine has an online website, which is invaluable for searching the archives of old issues of the magazine. There are so many times I suddenly remember a snippet of information from an article I read a few months ago, but just can't remember the details, so I want to read it again. The search facility is really good, providing I can remember the correct words to use. Most of the time I do find the article I was looking for, although it sometimes takes a while. For example, my daughter was concerned one of her school friends had told her that clicking her knuckles would lead to arthritis. I remembered and article from New Scientist a few months earlier, which disputed this. So I logged on and began to search. Now, this is where I hit problems. I searched for 'knuckles' and 'click' or 'clicking', or 'fingers' and 'clicking' and so on. It took ages, but I eventually found the article and discovered I should have used the word 'cracking' instead of 'clicking'! So, it does work, you just have to have a pretty good idea of what you are looking for. I also tend to get distracted along the way by other, equally interesting, articles brought up by the search.

          The entire magazine is now available online and it's the best place to go if you want absolute up to the minute information, since the paper version is only published once a week. They also send out regular emails with lots more interesting articles. Personally I prefer to read New Scientist in its printed form, I find it more comfortable that way (it's not easy to snuggle up in bed with a computer screen!).

          This is a weekly magazine, costing £3.15 per issue at present (Spring 2009). However, if you subscribe you can often find a good discount advertised inside the magazine, so you will end up paying just over £20 per quarter.

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            01.03.2009 10:07
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            New Scientist can make any one a science expert!

            New Scientist is an award winning weekly magazine that aims to present the latest advancements and discoveries in science. It was launched as long ago as 1956 for "all those men and women who are interested in scientific discovery and in its industrial, commercial and social consequences" (quote from New Scientist).

            I'm an industrial chemist by profession and I've been reading New Scientist for over 20 years now and find it an incredible resource for learning about developments in my own field, but more importantly, news about what's happening in other areas.

            The first thing to say about New Scientist is that it is not cheap. I don't pay for it, as we get it circulated in work, however. The cover price is £3.15 which seems reasonable, but it is a weekly publication. This gives an annual price, if bought from a newsagent, of £165. Thankfully, there are subscription offers that reduce this considerably.

            Currently, if you subscribe online, you can get 52 issues for only £99. Still a lot of money but worth it (and a saving of 40% on the cover price).

            New Scientist is not exclusively aimed at scientists. The articles covered do go into great depth, sometimes on really complex topics (the cosmology articles make my head hurt!), but they are written by experts and expert writers. The magazine excels in publishing articles that are comprehensive, yet readable by people who don't necessarily know anything about the subject being discussed. This is an excellent achievement and is, I'm sure, one of the reasons New Scientist has been going so long.

            The heading 'science' covers a huge range of topics. Astronomy (one of my hobbies) is covered extremely well, but almost all other science areas that you can think about are also covered. Many of the subjects examined are relevant to everyone. The environment is, of course, a hot issue at the moment. Fossil fuel replacements, electric cars, the accuracy of global warming predictions, and the progress in fusion reactors have all been discussed recently.

            Medical problems (such as avian flu) and developments are covered in detail. You can be sure, in reading New Scientist, that you're kept up to date in the progress in the fight against disease and other health issues, without the sensationalism found in tabloid (and, indeed some broad sheet) newspapers.

            New Scientist online was launched in 1996 and provides an internet resource for much of the material in the magazine. Despite reading the paper copy every week, I log on to New Scientist online on a daily basis for completely up to date news, as well as items that don't make it into the magazine.

            The website carries two types of articles. The first are readable by anyone, the second only to subscribers (if you subscribe to the magazine, you get the online access for free). The subscription only articles are shown by an "NS" symbol next to the text. The introduction section of these is usually accessible, but you can't see the full article (a nice little draw to get you to subscribe!).

            Overall, New Scientist magazine and website are fantastic resources for anyone who wants to know what's happening in the world of science. If you're looking to learn more, try the free articles on New Scientist online (www.newscientist.com). It may tempt you into taking out a subscription.

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              21.10.2008 21:11
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              Buy an issue to see whether you like it or not.

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              What is it?
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              New Scientist is a weekly magazine with all of the latest scientific developments, theory's and issues from a variety of subjects and there are dozens of articles on a variety of subjects, for example this week's issue was largely about the current economic crisis. Each issue will cost £3.15, at the time of writing this review.

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              What's it about?
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              New Scientist is all about the latest scientific developments and theories as well as the various opinions and ethical issues that surround them. There is a huge range of subjects ranging from biology to quantum physics. There will be at least one article as week that caters to everyone's tastes although it is very interesting (and educational) to read the magazine through. Each week there are 2 or 3 feature length articles at around 3-4 pages each which cover cutting edge scientific debates in lots of detail which are always a great read.

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              The Looks
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              The magazine is well set out and well written, there are articles that are short for people that just want something to read on the way to work or at lunch times as well as longer feature length articles that cover subjects in a lot of detail. The articles are always set out neatly and clearly with relevant pictures which provide extra insight into the subjects at hand. What I really like about the magazine is that it's layout in a very similar way every week, which means after a few copies you will get used of where to go in the magazine to find the bits you want and which bits you don't.

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              Should I buy it?
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              If you're into science then it's a definite must buy as there are huge range of subjects which are thought provoking and well written, and often New Scientist is the first to hear about the latest developments. The magazine does require some prior scientific knowledge and there are some words that some readers may have to look up, and if you're looking for some celebrity gossip and crosswords this certainly isn't the magazine for you.

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              Conclusion
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              This magazine is great read and you will never find that you have nothing you're interested in inside. The magazine is also great for students as it covers a great range of subjects which are often relevant to their exams and courses and it provides the necessary background information to get the higher grades especially at college and university. My advice would to be it every week if you are interested in science, maybe even get a subscription. If you aren't as keen a scientist then maybe check the contents every week and if there's something you like the look of then buy it. This also provides an invaluable tool for finding a job in science.

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                16.06.2008 01:33

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                New Scientist is published each week and costs £2. This is a very low price for some of the best and clearest writing on contemporary issues concerning science on this planet. Many recent issues have particularly been covering the summit in The Hague about climate change. Articles on this subject have been balanced and are not written from either a green or a corporate perspective.

                The recent proliferation of BSE in those countries in Europe where the infection had not previously been seen was also covered in some detail. This article set out the extent of the new infections without excessive hyperbole or language likely to cause panic.
                Many of the articles do refer to health related matters including articles on smoking and the effects of patches and how fat is burned off by the body at different rates by different people. Many issues which have an ethical dimension such as genetic therapy for embryos are also covered. Again these articles are clearly written and do not use emotive phraseology. This subject was covered in a lot of depth and the many ethical angles were covered.

                The articles in New Scientist are not long-winded and do not take ages to wade through They tend to present the issue in a relatively short 3-4000 word main article sometimes with a second opinion published along side. Articles cover all branches of science including botany and biology.
                There is a lively letters page and whilst there are few product advertisements almost half the publications 96 pages was filled with job vacancies. Notwithstanding that there is a lot to read in New Scientist and if you want a factual unemotional view of the scientific issues of today it is ideal.

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                29.03.2007 19:13
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                Generally an interesting and insightful magazine that I would recommend everyone at least try.

                I'm sure everyone remembers their science lessons as a child - having to wear safety-glasses, learning the periodic table, using Bunsen burners to melt biros, (perhaps that was just my class?). For many, these are the first lessons that begin to answer many questions you have as a child about how the world around you works, (though, equally, for others they were about as much fun as watching paint dry).

                'New Scientist' is as much a magazine for anyone whose fondness of Bunsen burner's led them into a career in science, or simply enjoys keeping abreast with the current "goings-on" in the world. It is published weekly and at the time of writing costs £2.70, although you can subscribe to get twelve issues, (three months) for just £12 - though it should be noted that after these three months the subscription charge goes up to £23.33 per quarter, though this is still saving you money off the cover price.

                I first began reading 'New Scientist' when I first started working at an Analytical Laboratory. Admittedly, this was mainly because it was one of the few things besides 'Heat' that was regularly available in the smoker's hut and, I must admit, though I never really considered myself that much of a scientist - melting biros as case and point - I was surprised by how much of the magazine I was not only able to understand, but also found myself enjoying reading.

                'Science' as a term is rather non-specific and for that reason 'New Scientist' isn't dedicated to any one single area, but instead covers a wide range of subjects from physics, technology, chemistry, medical-science as well as various other things in between. As an example recent articles have included things regarding potential new treatments for cancer, articles about climate change and even new discoveries in the field of evolution.

                Generally speaking the writing style within the magazine is very readable and pitched at such a level that even if you're not familiar with the subject matter, you can still grasp the general meaning behind the theories or discoveries being discussed. I'll admit that occasionally I find myself a little out of my depth, but then again, that's the reason I became a computer programmer and not, for arguments sake, say a nuclear-physicist.

                As well as having current news articles, the magazine also has regular columns, most notably 'Feedback' and 'Last Word'.
                'Feedback' tends to deal with amusing and quirky things readers have stumbled across in their travels such as entertaining warning signs, (you know the sort of thing, "Caution - May Contain Nuts" on the back of a packet of peanuts, etc.). I personally find this section quite entertaining, though I suspect some people might not always appreciate the (sometimes) pedantic nature of some of the observations.
                'Feedback' is where a reader has an opportunity to pose a question about something they've been wondering about, thus inviting those who know something about the subject to provide an answer. This, again, I've found to be very interesting as the responses range from the in depth, scientific solutions through to more 'common sense' suggestions.

                Another regular feature is 'Letters', which, as the name might suggest, is where to readers can air their opinions about articles featured in previous issues. I've often found that the editorial staff try to represent as many differing opinions as they can possible, acting as a sort of forum for readers to have a healthy debate regarding contentious, (and often not-so-contentious) issues, giving you the opportunity to see several sides of the same argument as it were.

                'New Scientist' also has various adverts and job vacancies, (obviously useful if you do work in a scientific area). The adverts are one of the slightly disappointing aspects to the magazine as they make up about a third of the entire magazine, which to my mind seems rather excessive; however it has to be said that this doesn't really detract from the overall content that makes up the vast majority of material.

                Adverts aside, overall I find 'New Scientist' to be both informative and entertaining and I think its appeal goes across various scientific disciplines, but can equally be enjoyed by people who never previously considered themselves scientifically-minded. I would recommend everyone at least read an issue to see what they themselves think.

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                  24.11.2004 17:59

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                  The science stories behind the tabloid headlines - Advantages: Doesn't treat you like an idiot, Covers all aspects of science, Not afraid to criticise the USA - Disadvantages: Can be a lot to read in a week!

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                  15.06.2002 00:26
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                  • "Makes you look stupid if you don't understand it"

                  There's nothing like a weekly magazine to suck up all your time, add in the fact that this is a very good, intelligent and in depth weekly magazine and you'll never keep up. Unless you have a lot of time and are a reasonably fast reader the only reason to subscribe to this is for reference or work reasons or so you can get access to the groovy online archive. Far better for the casual reader to pick and choose which issues to read, picking up 1-2 a month. There is something interesting in every issue, there is also something highly esoteric in every issue that will no doubt melt your brain if you try to hard to figure out what they're talking about (12 dimensional superstring theory anyone?). New Scientist covers everything from psychology to hard physics and engineering via molecular biology, quantum mathematics, ecology, medicine... every new theory or paper of any scientific importance will be summarised in here in almost laymans terms along with a letters page, book reviews and other tidbits. You will find yourself quoting articles to your friends in an irritating "Did you know..." fashion, just hope they don't ask you to elaborate on that unless you have the mag in your back pocket at the time.

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                    15.05.2002 18:46
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                    I know I can't be alone in being a passably intelligent lifeform with only a tiny amount of science knowledge but a desire to have some understanding of the developments that shape the world I live in. At Uni, I encountered 'journals' where all the modern science happens - these were actually psychology journals, I found them almost totally unreadable. Every area of scientific thinking seems to have them, and mostly they are written by experts, for experts. What little science you get on TV usually assumes that you know next to nothing (From what I remember) and while radio 4 has a bit of science programing, it isn't superb. I'd like to be one of those rennaisance type people who has some broad understanding of all the relevant issues. I was delighted when my wonderful other half introduced me to New Scientist and assured me I would be able to read it. It is a weekly magazine covering any scientific area you can think of, but written to be readable. The reality is that being a 'scientist' does not equip you to understand all 'science' - my husband is a metallurgist, he knows a good deal about alloys, and nothing at all about medicine. The magazine is written so that it can be read by those who are not working in the given field - for biologists who want to know about the latest geological findings, for chemists with an interest in sociology and cloning.... you get the idea. The result is a magazine that is accessable to any reasonably intelligent adult - if you can handle a broadsheet, this will be fine for you. Articles range in size and scope, from little soundbites about popular issues to many pages of more detailed thinking. Articles aim to give a broad overview and reasonable insight without bogging you down in the details. Not only do writers report on science news, but they also consider social and ethical dimensions, which again makes the magazine very readable to those outside the science field
                    - after all, what a lot of lay people want to know is 'and how is this going to affect me?'. The downsides - if the writing is in an area you know a good deal about, then its going to seem superficial. if you are the sort of person who likes to be presented with all the facts, this isn't going to work for you - you get findings, not details of how the findings were made - this is not a science journal and they aren't expecting you to want to try it for yourself. Some of the science is a bit 'poppy' - the sort of weird links through statistics stuff that always makes it into the media - you might find it amusing, you might find it irritating. Generally the content is interesting, informative and digestable, although unless you have a good deal of time for reading, there's probably more there than you could expect to get through in a week. The other thing to mention - if you are looking for a job in scientific work, this is the place to look, there are extensive adverts for that sort of thing. I heartily recomend this - it is surprisingly palatable and it does supply certain needs. it has a rboad range -a rticles on DNA in trees sit next to information about the effects of cloning and observations about the impact of Star wars films on the American workplace. You can pick it up and put it down, dip in as you want and find something of interest. it isn't going to tell you everything you ever needed to know, but it will give you an idea about the sorts of questions you might want to be asking.

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                      08.03.2002 20:54
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                      Most people would think a science magasine was boring. But if they read this magasine I'm betting they would change their minds. New scientist aims to imform people about the general scientific advances being made using a clear and interesting writing style. Describing advances in quantum string theory and evolutionary biology in easy to understand language would seem to be a difficult task. The writers manage this no mean feat week in week out though. Using the clear to understand diagrams and basic explantions I have been able to understand everything I have read. The magasine itself has the same layout every week. The magasine starts off with an editorial as would be expected and then a "This week" section. This is where the current weeks scientific issues are discussed in short and to the point articles. These articles don't just discuss boring lab experiments, this is real world science. Articles on the winter olympics ( which are taking place as I write ) and other popular topics are common. This is followed by a "Frontiers" section which discusses early research into future technologies ranging from cancer drugs to disposable DVD's. The main section of the magasine however is dedicated to the specialist articles which often span several pages. These are in depth articles into any type of scientific topic. This weeks section is devoted to the moon and space itself for example. These are very informative and provide links to further information on the topics if you so desire. By far the most popular section of the magasine is "The last word". This is on the back page of the magasine and has answers to everyday questions sent in by readers. Questions ranging from "Why is snot green" to "How do insects walk upside down" have been answerd. These questions are answerd by the readers of the magasine and so are also written in easy to understand english which ne
                      ver fails to answer the question. My only complaint about this magasine is the advertising, often it is filled with leafets from 3rd party companies which just seem to be a waste of paper. A small price to pay for what you get though. For £2.20 you ask for much more in a weekly magasine and the 40% subscription discount is a welcome feature if you want to get them deliverd to your house. Overall a very well written magasine for a cheap price.

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                        01.03.2002 17:13
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                        I have subscribed to this magazine for over 15 years and I find it consistently interesting and informative. Of course, I don’t understand quite a few of the articles, and I don’t read them all, but there are always a number of things in each issue which I find worth reading. However, be aware that, if you are a scientist, specialising in the breeding habits of sub-atomic particles for example, this magazine is a bit lightweight. I know that, in the ‘groves of academe’ it is definitely ‘not on’ to quote New Scientist and there are no kudos (in the world of research) to be had from being published within its covers. But who cares? For its readability and variety there is nothing in the science field, in my opinion, to beat this magazine. There is an element of humour which runs through New Scientist which does a lot to make it an easier read. I have subscribed to other scientific magazines in the past (e.g. Scientific American) and I find them much heavier going. Even my elder daughter, who is an Arts graduate specialising in English Literature picks up the New Scientist and reads it when it comes through the door. I think that says a lot for its style and approach. Talking about humour - there is a regular feature on the last page called ‘Feedback’ in which fun is poked at all aspects of science as it affects scientists and us ordinary mortals. Feedback gets his/her material from the magazine’s readers and if you submit something quirky which is subsequently published they pay you 25 quid! I’ve done this several times and it almost pays for a yearly subscription. For the more technically-minded there is ‘The Last Word’ inside the back cover in which readers pose questions (sometimes really weird ones, like ‘Why is snot green?’) and other readers answer them. (Yes, the ‘snot question’ was answered. It is something to do
                        with the species of bacteria involved in the process). Again, if you provide an answer which is published you get paid. Then there is the news section in the front which covers everything from reducing the ‘stealability’ of mobile phones to the possibility of life on Jupiter. The range is vast, which is what I like about this magazine. The letters page, too, is always lively and controversial. And check out the weekly Patents Review in the news section. The stuff people patent is unbelievable. A highly recommended magazine - even if you are a non-scientist.

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