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      21.12.2009 04:02
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      An excellent read.

      The Times is one of Britain's foremost quality newspapers, and is a good one at that. In this review I will be mainly concentrating on the online edition as that is what I use most frequently although it will be applicable to the printed version as it is the same content.

      Firstly the website is extremely user friendly and has a huge amount of content. This is in comparison to many newspaper websites which are not quite so well laid out or don't have quite the same amount of content. The quality of the journalism is also generally of a high standard and the comment section having some stand out performers. I also take a guilty pleasure in reading Jeremy Clarkson's columns which tend to be quite amusing.

      If the Times is the paper for you very much depends on your political views, It is for those of a centre or centre right viewpoint and those who are particularly interested in global warming and have slightly more liberal leanings the Guardian, another excellent paper would be better for you.

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        27.06.2008 14:04
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        A riveting read.

        Now then, I want to be honest with you. I am not that intelligent. I am not the brightest star in the intellectual galaxy. I am not an all knowing beaming beacon of all intelligence; in fact my mathematical skills are so rudimentary I could sit there and just break down in tears when faced with any sort of number orientated problem or equation. If this is so then why on earth do I read The Times?


        Contrary to popular belief, The Times isn't the most taxing and difficult papers to grasp. Granted, it is exceptionally well written, and you do often find yourself in awe at the extent of the vocabulary of certain commentators within the paper. Some analysis does read like stereo instructions but not unlike reading basic French, you will start to get the point of a certain article - and it fills you with a sense of achievement when you finally do start to decipher, what can only be described as Shakespearean tongue, in some circumstances into a perfectly reasonable argument.


        Value for money is paramount with this publication, and it has to be. At 70p per print, it is over twice the price of certain tabloids - so in effect you do expect more for your money. I am pleased to report that you get it. Extensive political analysis is the benchmark for the paper; scathing, damning, praising and even evangelising are common place amongst such highly qualified journalists. The paper boasts numerous award winning writers such as Martin Samuel, the irreverent Sports Writer of the Year, who will not only describe last night's Euro 2008 semi-final in exceptionally fine detail, but will also give you an articulate break down of the impact of the score line upon the global economy for the next seven years. Ben Schott's political summaries should be making or breaking governments for years to come - on Tuesday he vilified Gordon Brown to such an extent, you have to wonder how the Prime Minister can keep going...


        So what else is there in the paper? Well, the Daily Register is always interesting, it offers you wonderfully useless snippets of information for you to digest over a coffee - Wednesday's edition featured Top ten Most Expensive Rare Book Sales, Happy Birthday to George Michael, Professor Sir Arnold Wolfendale and Lord Ravensdale nestled into a paragraph right next to a suggestion on eating Courgette Flowers, brilliant.


        Incorporated into the paper is Times2 focusing on Life, Style and the Arts. It's not as pompous or as pretentious as it sounds. Fashions, Reader Offers and a few cultured reports are thrown into the mix. It is a nice break from the heavy and rich political tradition of the newspaper to offer such features as idyllic holiday retreats, good food, and music reviews. It compliments the paper well, with the heavier information at the front, and relaxing features at the back; much like a gradual unwinding after a hard day at work.


        A lot of comment available within the paper is then opened for debate on the website: www.timesonline.co.uk which also has duplicated articles appearing within the paper, together with a healthy mix of open forums from the general public. This bodes well as it creates a online forum for the readers to get under the skin of a topic, offering the virtues of a good old fashioned debate.


        But who is the paper targeted to? Once upon a time the paper was firmly aligned to the political right, with a dominant level of support for the conservatives. However over recent years it has become a little more liberal, particularly since the launch of the compact version in 2004. Expect to find more features on "Green Issues" and a similar level of criticism for both the Labour Government and Tory opposition. Personally, I am of the opinion that both parties are become more cohesive and streamlined in their current view - perhaps a sign that The Times and the Guardian are keen to reflect to attract a higher readership?


        In Summary, The Times is an excellent read. Steeped in History, but with a new and modern eclectic mix of modern life and interests it features thorough and thought provoking journalism and comment for a very reasonable price. I cannot guarantee that reading it will catapult you into the Stephen Hawking realms of intellect, but it will definitely give you something to think about.

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          04.05.2008 14:41
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          Still funtions well online, give access to past, present and future articles.

          I'm a big fan of The Times - well, I have to say this as this is what we had been brainwashed with during my student days, it was either this or The Independent as these two were considered The 'Serious' newspapers.

          Back then, we had a fresh copy of this everyday waiting for us in the library so it was quite accessible. It was also an excuse to put off that 'essay' for a little longer.

          I have only switched to trying to read off the online version the last couple of years with very poor results. I have the website as my homepage to encourage myself to read more and even just to have a glance at what the headlines are when I think I'm too busy (another excuse) - but shamefully I haven't really been past that homepage that much these days unless something really reaches out to catch my eye.

          Personally I find it a bit more of an effort to have to flick through and check for the most up-to-date news. It isn't a case of flicking over to the next page anymore when you had just the whole day's worth of news in your hands. With the website you could have several days worth of articles, if not, even more. The website has its own organised sections, UK News, Global, Education, Health & Lifestyle, Business, Arts & Entertainment and the list goes on.

          When you're only after today's news it's very pretty easy to get distracted (and lost) by so many headlines on the screen and they are not all necessarily today's headlines. Once you have clicked on a particular interesting article that happens to be an old one, you would have to rummage through the website trying to follow it up, though they do provide a search box to make it easier to find articles.


          I suppose what makes the online version seem more of an effort is that I am no longer reading on the comfy college sofa (with such high tuition fees these days it would be unspeakable for them to provide us with anything less than comfy sofas!). With the actual paper all of the day's news is in your hands and there is a sense of complacency to know that you will soon finish. Online, it feels as if you're reading forever.

          The layout on screen will inevitably be more condensed, after all, would they ever be considering 40" PC screens? Because of this restriction, there will also be fewer pictures alongside the article - whether this is an issue for you is down to personal preference but it certainly matters to me.


          They've had a new design during the past year with also new motif colours. It used be prim black to give a sense of 'serious', traditional, but nevertheless, independent journalism - nowadays the front page is full of pastel greens and blues, and it just reminds me of some health magazine - it just doesn't quite feel right for this kind of newspaper but it will do. There are a lot of silly little things that I could mention about the online version and I'm sure many will agree, although much of it is pretty tolerable.


          To be fair all the news is still there and even the next day's headlines appear before the hardcopies hit the shops. Another thing is, if you miss anything you can still backtrack from a few days before, and if you're really keen they also have a library of archive articles going back years (I think this is a charged service though).

          And hey, all this is provided FREE (with the exception of the archives). A hardcopy would be a daily 70p unless of course you're still a student who probably (like me back then) doesn't really appreciate the discounted 25p concession. And then there is still the free brainwashing copy that lies fresh on the library coffee table waiting for you in the mornings.


          What I would turn into without it...



          © Leighsady 2008

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            14.10.2006 18:16
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            Overview of The Times

            If it’s one thing I love to do at the weekend, it’s to sit down and read a newspaper at my leisure. I find it so difficult during the week, what with working and stuff. Of course, the national newspaper market is a crowded one with both tabloids and broadsheets clambering for the public’s attention and money. Over the years I’ve tried various newspapers including The Telegraph, The Daily Mail and even The Sun (Lord help us) but my newspaper of choice is the stiff-collared Times. I will explain why but for anyone that’s not heard of the world famous publication:

            The Times has been published daily in the UK since 1785 adopting its present name way back in 1788! For years, The Times has been regarded as an objective archive of news and events and it is preserved in the British Library's newspaper library in that capacity. Published by Times Newspapers Limited, a subsidiary of News International (itself wholly owned by the News Corporation group headed by the Australian business mogul – Rupert Murdoch) it is considered to be right wing in terms of its politics, influencing and shaping public opinion over the years. Outside the UK, The Times is sometimes referred to as "The London Times" in order to distinguish it from the many other "Times" papers such as The New York Times. It is the originator of the ubiquitous Times New Roman typeface, originally developed by Stanley Morison of The Times in collaboration with the Monotype Corporation. In May 2006, it announced plans to launch a United States edition.

            For years, I was happy to spread The Times out in its broadsheet format in which it had been printed for 200 years until the paper decided to switch to compact size in 2004, in an attempt to appeal to younger readers. Granted, it was a bit of a pain trying to open a broadsheet out on the train with someone sitting next to you or The Tube being packed to the rafters but where there was a will, there was a way. Still, the compact version is so much easier to read even if you don't make as many unintentional friends by fumbling into others as you turned the pages of the broadsheet.

            Today, the newspaper still publishes daily with a very comparable website at www.thetimesonline.co.uk and an authoritative Sunday edition that now retails at £2. I do buy The Times during the week which costs 65p but for the purposes of this review I will concentrate on the larger Saturday edition for the most part, which I read in more detail. It costs £1.30 and has a wide cross-section of pull-outs and articles to appeal to the whole age spectrum of readership.

            Today’s edition is number 68831 and has sections on sport > business > money (personal finance) > books > Travel > health > a glossy magazine with general interest stories and The Knowledge which covers entertainment and the Arts. Needless to say, there is also a round up of the latest news broken down into “Home” news focusing on the UK and Ireland and "World" news for issues further a field. I enjoy reading the news items because they are often covered in more detail than you would get in papers like The Sun and The Mirror and The Times doesn’t hunt out the gimmicky stories like the tabloids do, which often go for the ultra dull snippets about celebritydom that bores me to tears. The kind of features today include a lead story about women in their fifties and sixties not being barred from having fertility treatment, a piece about one of Samuel Pepys’s lovers and a major story about General Sir Richard Dannatt’s suggestion that British troops should be withdrawn from Iraq. The language used in the articles is more demanding than that used in the tabloids with the odd word needing a dictionary reference if you feel so inclined although within the context of the article, it’s usually easy enough to work out the word’s meaning.

            The sport’s coverage is good in The Times with Matt Hughes and Oliver Kay being the staple writers whilst Giles Smith provides the quirky, topical observations. Smith is not as good as Danny Baker in his pomp who wrote a terrifically rye column each week until Smith took over. Most sports are covered although, predictably, it’s football that gets the lion’s share of word count crowned by the Monday pullout “The Game” which reflects on the events of the weekend. The major British sports such as rugby, cricket, tennis and so on are reported on whilst more exotic inclusions like triathlon and US baseball will be featured from time to time.

            The stock features you would expect to read are all there during the Monday to Friday period including: TV and radio/Times crossword/Weather/Obituaries/Editorial and so on. I can honestly say that I’ve never attempted the famous Times crossword (preferring the much easier one in The Sun *grin*) but I know that many do and good luck to you if you are one of those cranial participants. Sudoku is a popular challenge in The Times although it doesn’t rock my particular boat. There are 38 separate sudouku puzzles in today’s paper under the banner “Sumo Sudoku” for those wanting to gorge themselves on the Japanese inspired numbers game.

            As mentioned above, there is a good deal more in the Saturday edition with a personal finance pullout called “Money”. I particularly like the letters page which always has people writing in and complaining about bad service. For someone in the industry already, like me, these are often a source of interest and amusement. “Body and Soul” is a good pullout with plenty of features about personal health. I particularly like the “breakthroughs, tips and trends” page which covers the latest developments in medical science. “Books” is a good read being a pullout homing in on what’s what in the world of books. The top 50 bestseller league table is always interesting to see who is hot and who is not whilst the latest hardbacks and novels to be published may be reviewed. “The Inheritance of Loss” by Kiran Desai, the Man Booker Winner 2006, has an extract printed today and looks like a possible candidate for my personal reading list for this year. The travel pullout includes reviews from writers who report on trips abroad and closer to home. Today, there are a couple of features on Lapland and Finland with a very Christmassy feel to them that I enjoyed reading.

            The Times regularly features competitions and I did gloriously win one once where I got free tickets to a weekend horse racing meeting at Goodwood. I was soooooooo excited when the envelope arrived and I opened it to discover that I was a winner. Can you imagine how I'll be if I win the triple rollover, Lotto tonight? Increasingly, the reader needs the code included in the paper to enter online, stopping folks from simply entering the competitions via the (free) online edition.

            A tip for getting a deal for The Times is to answer surveys that talk about which newspapers you read. I’ve been offered a cheap subscription to The Times and Sunday Times twice now where you pay for the next 13 or 26 weeks in one lump sum but get the paper for, in my case, an average of £1.50 a week for all seven issues, weekly! Bearing in mind that up until recently, The Sunday Times cost £1.50 on its own, then it’s not difficult to see that this is a great deal! The only drawbacks is that you tend to be tied to one newspaper and I do like to vary my reading from time to time and you get issued with a book full of daily coupons to exchange at the newsagents for the relevant copy of The Times. Not everywhere accepts the vouchers, notably Marks & Spencer’s (boo, hiss).

            By now, you will have worked out that I really enjoy The Times. I’ve only scratched the surface with this review and suggest that if you like to read news in a more in-depth format, prefer more serious and comprehensive news reporting or want a wide cross-section of reading entertainment then I can’t recommend The Times highly enough. It may take you longer to read than the tabloids but you will learn more and you may be surprised at the amazing things that you can pick up by trying something more discerning like this newspaper (without patronising anyone that reads other papers, of course). Do look for a deal per the above as The Times is more expensive than its tabloid counterparts but, failing that, try the Saturday edition to start off with as there’s something for everyone.

            Good reading and thanks for the read.

            Mara.

            Times Newspapers Limited 2006 is published and licensed for distribution by Times Newspapers Ltd., 1 Virginia St., London E98 1XY. Tel: 020 7782 5000.

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              28.03.2005 23:41
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              The Times has recently changed its format - it is now tabloid size, but still very much broadsheet in quality. It calls itself a compact to distinguish itself from other tabloid papers such as the Daily Mail, and there is a clear distinction. Stories are reported in an in-depth, non-sensationalist and balanced way and The Times does not try to disguise opinion as news. It is this quality of journalism which has earned The Times the reputation of being Britain's "paper of record".

              Its rivals are the newly-compact Independent and the broadsheets Daily Telegraph and The Guardian. It is my paper of choice because of its compact size and balanced reporting, The Grauniad and Torygraph showing left/right wing bias respectively. It is 50p which is cheaper than the afformentioned papers.

              In the paper I enjoy reading the main news and usually there will be a double-page spread on the big story of the day, with useful facts, figures and comment. There is a parliamentary sketch by Ann Treneman taking the rise out of our politicians and is usually a good laugh. The letters page is full of well-written letters by Ordinary Members of the Public, politicians from the main parties and other leading public figures, as well as the usual "Disgusted of Tunbridge Wells" letters from retired Colonels. The funny letters are usually in the bottom-right corner!

              Their comment pages have the Leading Articles (or Leaders) giving the paper's official stance on major issues as well as articles from other journalists such as ITN's Nick Robinson. Overall, a Labour bias is clear - most of the comment articles about Iraq, for example, talk about democracy in the Middle-East rather than missing WMD or the 100,000 killed in Iraq. But I think that they generally get a good balance of opinion, for example on Friday they published an article by Michael Howard despite being a pro-Labour paper. You certainly do not get the reactionary "Brussels is destroying Britain/We're Being Overrun with Immigrants" mentality common to the Daily Mail (spit!) and the like. Like all papers there are cartoons which add a bit of humour, especially to the political stories.

              There is a section devoted to world news, which is handy because I like to skim the world stories, preferring to read about the domestic agenda (with Mr Blair it seems like the other way round!). There is also the Business/Register/Sport section which was separate when the paper was a broadsheet but is now integrated with the rest of the paper. This is slightly annoying because it means I can't give the sports pages to my Dad while I read the paper and then swap over. Can't have it all, I suppose? The Register is full of various formal items such as obituaries (today on Lord Callaghan of Cardiff), legal notices and the official Royal Court Circular which details the engagements of the royal family which do not interest me much, but I highly recommend the Q&A column. This is where you can send in questions on almost any matter to be answered by readers. They also have a daily debate for readers to write in their opinions on an issue which is very interesting.

              I couldn't review the paper without briefly mentioning the sport but the problem is I don't usually read the sports pages, preferring to watch sport than read about it. My dad does tell me that their sports reporting is poor in that they often don't print the results of football matches that kicked off at 7.45pm or later. They print all the usual racing form you would expect and give a lot of coverage to cricket, my favourite sport, so that goes in their favour.

              The Times crossword is full of fiendish clues, very much for the intellectual brain. I cannot get to grips with it - can *you*? One thing the Daily Mail has going for it is that at least I can do the crossword!

              Every day they have the T2 mini magazine with fashion and more celebrity news than the main paper, as well as in-depth articles on more social or human interest stories. On Saturday there are also 4 supplements (weekend Review, body&soul, money and travel) a media guide and magazine (Recipes by Gordon Ramsay, restaurant reviews by Giles Coren, fashion and much more) and for this reason it is 85p on Saturdays. These are full of good articles but unfortunately I just don't have time to read as many as I want! My favourite is Julie Burchill's article in Review - she is an outspoken feminist and her views, whilst often questionable, are great to read as they are so independent and away from "the norm".

              I highly recommend The Times for deep coverage of *real* news, not celebrity rubbish, and intelligent, balanced comment with minimal bias. Now if only I could do that crossword....


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                11.09.2001 20:39
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                Well - what can you buy for thirty pence these days? A third of a lottery ticket. A packet of wine gums. Two potatoes and a carrot. Or... boost up your weekend experience by investing that hard earned six bob in the Saturday Times. Now I don't know about you, but during the week I wouldn't touch the Times with a stick. I'm strictly a Guardian/ Scotsman/ Express if there's nothing else kind of girl - mainly cos I love *features*. You know - lifestyle/ human interest articles with lots of pictures, graphs, quotes etc. As opposed to 'hard news' which I do read, but only in the way that you eat up all your mince at your grannys house before you get your cake. You know? And it is here that the Saturday Times excels. Other papers are doing it too - giving away glossy mags (the right wing Express's effort is great - I say this grudgingly) and sports supplements, free seeds, half price trips to Paris etc etc as a way of foisting their rainforest-guzzling mounds of print on us at the weekend. Am I right in saying that most of us are adamantly loyal to a Sunday newspaper, but act like the easily-bought tarts that we really are when Saturday comes? It seems that way to me - I've been hopping into bed with the Guardian, the Express and once (by mistake) the Mirror! But I have found my true home now, and here is why. The Saturday Times, like its' Sunday sister, comes in many bits. I love this! It makes sharing so much more fun - 'darling, are you finished with the travel section? Oh, and have a look at the magazine - Bob Dylan's in it!' - etc. What could be cosier? The main news section is a sturdy workhorse - all the home and international stories are covered intelligently, but without too much in the way of in-depth features. There's no one 'screaming headline', a la The Sun - the front page is reassuringly non - 'in your face', with many stories
                covered equally. This week featured a laugh-out-loud shot of Tony Blair playing rock guitar. Nice! All the horrible, depressing stuff was saved for inside. The letters page is always good for a quick peruse, so you can find out what 'irate of Uxminster' and his pals have to say this week. (Usually it's 'legalise foxhunting! And let Charles marry Camilla!' etc) The usual hand wringing stuff - with the occasional letter from I. M. Famous too. On to the more interesting sections... The tv and culture guide is (rather wittily, I thought) called 'Play'. This is similar to many other listings supplements in its' layout. It's magazine sized - and always has somebody cooool on the cover. This week - the lovely Fay Ripley. The tv listings themselves are excellent - clearly laid out, and covering the whole week. Every day there are five or six tv 'choices' that get a more in depth preview - and intelligent film choices too. The rest of 'Play' covers film, video, music, theatre, books, art and the internet. Not in a chin stroking, high brow kind of way - more like a cross between the Late Show and Heat magazine. There are some decent features to get your teeth into - this week, with articles about Jim Broadbent, the Mercury Music Prize and a staggering twenty book reviews. All laid out in bright, colourful graphic style - very readable. The internet page is always well researched - that's where I first heard of dooyoo! This week, make up sites were reviewed - and I agreed with all the findings. A great resource for all kind of net user - whatever your age or interests. Play ends with a page on 're-issued classics' - heaven for us dooyoo types, who love to live in the cultural past! And now onto the glossy magazine! The jewel in the crown of any Saturday paper - and for many, its' major selling point. The Saturday Times mag is just fantastic - it
                has enough in it to keep you engrossed on the sofa for an entire football match. There are the usual opening pages, full of regular wee features, such as the 'hanging on the telephone' interview. This is fun - each week a 'personality' gives a short chat over the phone. This week, Jonathan Pearce, the enthusiastic commentator, gets a light grilling. And then there's the 'almost famous' bit, where an emerging talent is profiled. I'd never heard of this weeks choice - Arthur Bradford, a young author - but that's probably the point. Moving on - the mag always has at least three in depth features - often on controversial topics. This week there was a hard hitting piece about police brutality in Jamaica - real eye-opening stuff. This feature, like others in the mag, ran to four pages of dense text, illustrated by superb photography. It is this 'deep reading' that keeps the Times ahead of its' competitors. There was also an interview with Bob Dylan - but I always get itchy at this stage to whizz ahead to my favourite bit - the lifestyle section! This section is called 'R and R' and covers, 'interiors, gardens, food, fashion, beauty, and self' - wooooooooo!! What can I say - all of this stuff is photographed so beautifully, and written about so artfully (with a slight tongue-in-cheek flavour), it's just irrestistible. The homes, gardens, clothes etc that are featured are not nearly as 'way out' as those in the Sunday Times. In fact, they're almost accessible! The make-up features are always great fun, light, reading and the food section will of course make your mouth water. And this week there was a great feature on that grand dame of style - Vivienne Westwood. A treat! The 'Self' element deals with health issues. This bit is excellent - there was a feature on 'one womans battle with agoraphobia' and the weekly 'regimen' inte
                rview was with a famous rugby type I've never heard of (but who looked pretty healthy!), spilling the secrets of his diet and fitness programme. Last week this bit featured Shane Warne. I learned that he likes nothing better than a curry and a few lagers the night before a crucial match! Great stuff - I impressed my boyfriend no end. All in all - a great magazine. Now on to the weekend section! This is my other favourite section - as it is just so comforting to read. It isn't a mag, it's part of the big paper, and it deals with all your weekend 'passions'. These are: The outdoors, cookery, gardens, pets, shopping, and 'real life' stuff too. Wow. All of these topics are given a page or two each - with loads of 'expert' advice on hand. I love these query bits - 'how do I make a jellied Bloody Mary?' etc. I always wonder what kind of people have the time to write in - and why?! Great reading, all the same. Lots of practical advice too - and with well written, step by step instructions for all the recipes, garden projects, dog worming techniques etc too! The weekend section is also bursting with consumer comparison reviews, taste tests etc - all lovely stuff for us dooyoo types. But the best column of the lot is 'modern times', an etiquette and manners query section by Phillip Howard. This is the part of the paper I save until last, I love it so much. Each week old Phillip deals with six or seven reader dilemmas - of varying ridiculousness. You can just picture the well meaning, middle class ladies and gents who write in - terrified of making a social gaffe. This week, Phillip laid to rest that old problem - is it or is it not acceptable to put your elbows on the table????? You'll be glad to hear that unless you are dining with royalty - elbows are fair game. Phew! There are loads of wedding related issues, as well as frankly bizarre stuff, like 'If I bump into a lad
                y aquaintance in town, is it correct that I should speak first' - ??!! Good old Phillip can be relied upon to give fairly common sense advice - gawd bless him. And there is one of those sections for readers to comment too - great fun reading. OK, so those are all my favourite sections dealt with. There are also the following sections to choose from: Sport. Ummmm... can't really comment on this, as I've never read it. I'm sure it's good though - if heavily English biased. Money - ditto. Travel - a great section, with loads of faraway places reviewed. Bear in mind that this kind of travel usually falls into the 'fantasy' category - after all - it *is* The Times! And last but not least... For the last two weeks the Saturday Times has been giving away serialised extracts from 'Happy Days' - the latest Jamie Oliver book. And all I can say is... AAAAAARGHHHHH!!!!! Somebody please take this smug mockney git and stick his shiny scooter where the sun don't shine!!! The recipes are as complicated and obscure as ever (most have at least twelve ingredients, most only available in Soho) and the 'diamond geezer' patter has now been cranked up to the kind of level that would have Frank Butcher cringing in shame. The 'we love us' shots of Jamie and his 'missus' are even more tedious third time around - and the accompanying interviews make 'Hello' look like Jeremy Paxman. But! The piccies of the food are undeniably tummy-porn, and it's a nice little glossy. You may know somebody who'd be delighted to receive these. And you are saved form further swelling this man's ego and bank balance by having to buy his book. PUKKA! Right then - summary. It's got loads of sections. And loads of features - many of them beautiful to look at, and many of them amusing or informative. You won't need to buy a separate TV mag. You won't even need to buy a Sunday paper - I challenge you to read this lot in one afternoon! And the Jamie thing is a cool idea - it's not their fault he's a tw*t. The Saturday Times? It's better than Chewits!

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                  14.08.2001 12:00
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                  I got to regularly read The Times when I was studying political science at University. My Professor recommended regular reading of it,along with magazines such as The Economist. I find the "Old Thunderer" is a good broadsheet. It covers the likes of political,business,financial,technology matters in considerable depth.Then there is the interesting section on Obituaries-I hope I dont sound morbid. Still it is interesting to read about famous people and their achievements during their lifetime. When I was an inpecunious student,the price of The Times was a big bonus. On Mondays it only cost 10 pence and even at weekends,when there was a splendid magazine to boot,the price was only 60 pence. I found the Weekend Magazine a really good read. There were columns by journalists such as John Diamond, Nigella Lawson and Kate Muir. The Times has good coverage of the arts and its sports coverage also seems to above par. Overall, I think The Times,although previously thought of as "The Establishment" newspaper gives a fairly "balanced" coverage. It is not blatantly right wing and is technically well produced. There seem to be very few typographical or printing errors. All in all a good newspaper !

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                    07.08.2001 06:46
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                    The Times has to be the best current newspaper available nationally. Each day it provides me with a good quality well balanced read. Each section provides me with either entertaiment or good solid news reporting. In addition it has two crosswords although I will freely admit it is the easier of the two that I normally try and attempt. Overall I have to say that it is well worth the money I spend on it each day as I read it from cover to cover. The online version of the newspaper is also excellant and I often find that reading things on-line brings a fresh perpective to the item I may have scan read in the flesh.

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                      05.07.2001 05:23
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                      This is more of a rant that an article. When I was younger I used to just read the Daily Mirror. But then teachers started to say that we should start reading the Times and other broadsheets. Now I was never too keen on the Times, since it was so big.. and I never was really interested in politics..etc. The one incentive that made me read the Times, was the Interface pullout that came once a week. This small magazine was very interesting to me (I like computers) since it reviewed games, talked about upcoming technologies and also I picked up a few tips and hints on the advice page. However, the size of Interface has dwindled through the years..... Now its just one page full of advice.... Now don't get me wrong, but now that I'm an experience user, the Times has no longer included anything that could be of interest to me in their Interface page... Just one page. No reviews, just common sense knowledge. I no longer buy the Times on weekdays. I only purchase it on Saturdays and Sundays, where there are an excellent variety of supplements.. Including the fantastic DOORS.. please dont tell me that DOORS is a replacement for Interface... It lacks the technical edge that Interface possessed - I have come to see the Times as the best serious newspaper, but without Interface, I'll have to award the Guardian with the best technology pullout..."Online"

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                        01.06.2001 21:13
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                        What a great motto! Indeed, THE TIMES it is a well-disguised conservative read for those who want to feel business like. The old stereotype of the business man stepping onto the train to London, briefcase and golfers umbrella in one hand, rolled up copy of the times tucked under his other arm, his rail card in hand. He takes a seat, puts down the briefcase and umbrella, slips the rail ticket back into his wallet and carefully opens the paper. He feels important. The paper which is hard enough to open without ripping, creasing or making too much noise is packed full of a wealth of up-to-date information which is enough to keep any human going for a week. However, due to the fact that one edition of The Times holds more information that any human mind could have 500 years ago the reader must selectively decide which articles he feels interest him most. The Internet web site is more concise than the paper edition and it holds an archive dating back decades. It is well written and is divided into useful sections, just as the paper edition is, such as WORLD NEWS, BRITISH NEWS, COMMENT SPORT, BUSINESS and FINANCE. It can be viewed at the following link www.thetimes.co.uk. Just remember, "FEED YOUR MIND."

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                          25.04.2001 04:26
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                          I must admit to never having read any single paper for many months in a row before, preferring to rotate around several of the better quality papers. But recently I’ve been taking The Times, and not just because it only costs 35p, but because I’ve found it quite entertaining and lively, yet also with enough food for thought to keep me interested. And its no longer a Tory house-newsletter. The Times has a reputation of being the establishment newspaper, very Tory and read by vicars and barristers. Above all boring and rather dull, full of law reports and business news. That was certainly my impression but I discovered when I began to read it that Rupert Murdoch the proprietor has modernised the paper and broadened its appeal. I’m not saying he’s transformed it into a high-brow Sun, but certainly its no longer stuffy and un-interesting. The paper comes in two sections every day, with Times 2 being tabloid size, and containing most of the features like health, women’s’ pages, television and so on. Also, each day, Times 2 focuses on a particular theme. For example, Monday its computers, Tuesday its law, Wednesday its books, Friday media etc. These daily themes vary in quality. The computer features on Monday are quite poor compared with say the Daily Telegraph’s, whereas the book features on Wednesday are very good. They also have a two page feature once a week for what you might call late-mid-life people which covers health, finance and leisure from the perspective of people of my age with the kids having left home and allegedly more time and money on our hands (joke), but not yet retired. The Times has many good writers and correspondents. Dr Thomas Stuttaford is excellent on health issues. Libby Purves, the broadcaster has a column on Tuesdays. Matthew Parris is the parliamentary sketch writer and is usually very funny. The political editor Peter Riddell is a very authoritative wri
                          ter and speaking of politics, one surprise about the Times is that it is no longer knee-jerk Tory. In fact, the bets are on that the paper will come out in support of Labour at the next election (I am writing in late April and the election is expected in June). The only writer I wish they would drop is their ex-editor Sir William Rees Mogg who is one of those totally committed Tories who can see no good in anything the current government does delights in issuing his pearls of wisdom to young William Hague, a fine chap in every way (no I didn’t say that myself!). The Times correspondence column is famous for attracting very high profile letter writers who generally know what they are writing about. It seems to be the place where people make major public statements about issues that concern them or their organisations. Quite honestly, I find many of the letters very dull, but of course the correspondence page is famous for the bottom-right section which is strong on humour. All newspapers have their biases, and things they choose to write (or not write) about. I have read that because of Murdoch’s business interests in China, that The Times is pro-Chinese in its reporting. Also, because Murdoch also owns Sky Television, the television listings feature quite a lot of Sky material as “film of the day” or whatever. I suppose so long as you understand the biases of a newspaper you can be on your guard not to be influenced by them. It is amusing to read the hints of the battle between the Telegraph and The Times. The Telegraph’s Charles Moore despairs of The Times, saying that it isn’t a Tory paper anymore. The Times on the other hand loves criticising the Telegraph’s proprietor Conrad Black and the aging readership of its rival. The Saturday Times is a good read with all the usual range of sections and magazines. I have to say, I prefer the Guardian on Saturdays. I also don
                          217;t like The Sunday Times, which means that I can’t really take advantage of The Times’ subscription scheme under which you can advance buy the paper seven days a week for about £90 per year. This works out at £1.75 a week which is a bargain if you want the same paper all week. No opinion on The Times would be complete without a mention of the famous crossword. Perhaps I've left it till last because its too difficult for me. I used to work with someone who completed it every day on the train to work, but for myself if I get one or two clues that's a good day. However, the quick crossword is very good and I usually manage to complete that instead. Heck, there are more important things in life than crosswords (DooYou perhaps?). On the whole, I am fairly happy with The Times, finding it an intelligent and informative read. It has its faults, but I find all papers have something about them I don’t like. I’ll carry on for now – unless they come out for the Tories next month!

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                            05.03.2001 22:24
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                            Panic stations! It's Saturday morning and I still have not finished last Sunday's copy of The Sunday Times. There's just so much to read. I've counted it this week. There are no less than thirteen separate sections. Yes, thirteen! How will I ever do it justice before the next tranche lands with a sickening thud on the hall floor next Sunday? I even have a strategy for dealing with this weekly trial of intellectual strength. But it does not seem to be working. First I dismiss those I have no interest in whatsoever. Out goes The Appointments section. Nobody is going to give me a job at 75K with benefits, whatever that means. The same goes for the one called - The Fifty Best Companies to Work for. Then there's The Funday Times? My children are too old for it now and we have no grandchildren, so it can be set aside too. The Sport Section goes to my son, the Travel section to my wife and the Style section to my daughter. Great. I feel better. Six down, seven to go - and I haven't even read a word yet. Now I can move on to Stage Two of the master plan. Choose the one I like best. That's the Culture section. Lots of good book reviews. A new crime novel by Michael Connelly. Sounds like he is back on form after the disaster of Void Moon. Another historiography on the studies of Hitler. Slated by the respected expert Robert Service, I decide not to buy it. What's worth watching on the telly this week? An adaption of Nancy Mitfords satire on upper class england sounds excellent. And Meet the Ancestors goes from strength to strength. Himmler is this week's Hitler's Henchmen. And a biography of the Thirties gangster, John Dillinger - Public Enemy Nunber One. (Can you tell I'm a History teacher?) But the real prize, and a good example of what makes The Sunday Times such an excellent newspaper, is the article by the regular columnist, A A Gill. My daughter has aspirations to be a journalist. Read Gill I tell her and
                            learn how to compose a first rate piece of writing. An hour has passed and I'm sweeping crumbs from the bed with an air of triumph. The Business and Money sections are next. How are my PEPs and my ISAs doing? And what about those Abbey National and Halifax shares we were given at demutualisation. Groan. Both down. And Irwin Stelzer, another fine columnist, is predicting a slow down in the economy. Oh dear. Perhaps it's time to sell. But at least the pound is still doing well against the euro so this year's holiday should be good value again. The sunday Times is a mine of useful information. The Doors section goes to the smallest room in the house. Some light reading about the internet and other modern technologies always whiles away the time. Now for the news. After all it is a newspaper. But no, it's time to get up. Work to be done even on the day of rest. During odd moments I will update myself on the leading news stories of the week as the week itself passes. Always authoritative and informative, I can only agree with the slogan. The Sunday Times is the Sunday newspapers. But wait! It's Saturday and I still havent read my very favourite columnist. Melanie Phillips in the News Review section. She seems to have her finger firmly on the pulse of what I feel is the collapse of society in Twenty First century England. She must be read. I ignore everything else and turn to her page. Phew, thank goodness. She's on holiday. I can safely cast the Sunday newspapers aside and gird my loins for another titanic struggle with The Sunday Times

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                              30.01.2001 02:25
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                              The Times, is a quality paper, full of the information that I need and want to see, from the city and business information to an excellent Sports coverage. The articles are written in descriptive English, without being overly drawn out as happens in other broadsheet newspapers. A quality read that won't bore and which has news and information rather than being an adult comic. The paper is set out in a manner which makes sense and as such it is easy to find what it is that you are looking for, and most days of the week there are additional sections which are ideal for the purpose as intended. The computer section on a Monday is invaluable in helping me get the most out of my PC

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                                16.12.2000 06:17

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                                I read The Times nearly everyday. It is a quality newspaper at a tabliod price. The General News and Sports coverage are quite extensive and reports on all the major events. My main reason for reading the paper however is because of the quality of the Business section. In my opinion it is one of the best and only surpassed by the Finanicial Times. The journalists working within this section are nearly always on the button and always give a clear balanced opinion in each article. The only thing of annoyance is that every story featuring BSkyB they insist on mentioning that News International, owner of The Times, is a part owner of BSkyB.

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                                15.11.2000 03:06

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                                The Times is my favourite newspaper. It is not trashy stuff like The Sun, The News Of The World e.t.c. The newspaper is very well written yet not too posh for some people to understand. My 12-year-old son loves this newspaper and he reads it every single day. Both he and I really enjoy the new mini-computer magazine that comes on Saturday. It is very informative and I have picked up some very good tips and tricks to do with computers. The price is very very cheap for a newspaper of that quality. 35p is a bargain. There are hundreds of interesting articles and the number of advertisements is very low. I really enjoy reading this newspaper and I would highly recommend you to buy it every morning.

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