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11 Reviews

Current affairs digest.

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    11 Reviews
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      03.04.2011 21:28
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      A great compendium of the best written news articles of the week to keep you briefed and up to date.

      ---Overview--- THE WEEK is a weekly magazine which provides you with a useful overview of the important current affairs stories of the preceding seven days through the best bits of various national and international publications. I find it a great way of keeping up-to-date with the current goings on in the world and particularly like to buy it in order to brief myself on events when I have been out of touch with the news for a while. Since contributions from a wide variety of sources are included, the result to me seems to provide a very intelligent and well rounded summary of the major news stories, yet is all bundled together in one handy source without any of the unnecessary padding to the articles. ---Normal Sections--- The main stories: The front pages immediately provide the reader with the key details of the main news events of the week and how different papers reacted to them. Politics: Other important political stories of the week / poll results / boring but important policy nitty gritty Europe and the world at a glance: Several pages of maps pointing out snippets of important news from around the world and where they come from. Many of these stories are the sort of things that I find are either not covered on mainstream news programs / in papers or are easily missed. It has helped me improve my geography considerably too! People: Articles discussing what various important and celebrity figures are currently involved in. Briefing: A page devoted to one single issue in an FAQ style, particularly useful in providing background details to some stories which run over several days or longer if you have missed the initial build-up of the events. Best articles, Britain, America and Foreign: A sample of some of the best written articles from around the world. There are additionally more humorous snippets from the tabloids. Health & Science: Information concerning recent scientific breakthroughs and discoveries. Talking Points: Various opinion pieces presenting the different views of people on some of the week's news. Sport: Articles discussing recent sporting events Letters: A pick of the most interesting letters to different newspapers in the week. Arts: Several pages reviewing books, television, theatre and art as well as recommendations for what to see and visit in the coming week. Best Properties on the market: A selection of properties on the market with a particular theme Leisure: Information concerning food and drink and travel including restaurant recommendations a recipe of the week and consumer product suggestions. Obituaries: Tributes to famous people who have recently passed away. City: Articles discussing the events surrounding companies, economic issues and the like including good and bad share prospects. The last word: A final double page article on a given topic. Puzzles: A cryptic crossword and Sudoku! ---Summary--- As you can see from the above, there is a load packed into this cracking little magazine across the whole spectrum. THE WEEK is priced £2.75 and is available from most magazine vending establishments. There is also frequently an offer available on their website to get 6 free issues if you try subscribing to the magazine. A brilliant way to keep informed if you ask me. Thank you for reading. Review may also appear on Ciao.

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        09.10.2010 16:36
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        The Week will keep you in the loop about all the goings on around the world!

        The Week is a great magazine for those people, who like a bit of everything and to catch up on the news and goings on of the past week in a short and snappy format. Having tried out a few issues, we signed up to a regular subscription because we enjoyed the magazine so much. There are a number of distinct and constant sections within the magazine, all of which appeal to us and are interesting to read or glance over. There is everything from the most newsworthy affairs, random snippets of news from around the world, finance news to a selection of jaw-dropping houses on the market, reviews of plays & films, tech news and holiday ideas. The magazine is down-to-earth and unpretentious. Most of its articles are combinations of various newspapers and magazines and the breadth of subjects and views makes for intersting reading. Most interesting perhaps is the fact that the magazine accentuates opposing views of the same information from different newspapers. Even if you're not the kind of person who typically reads magazines and newspapers, the Week is great for always being up-to-date on anything and everything happening in the world over a few interesting & informative pages. Plus every week you get a great caricature on the cover!

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        30.08.2010 11:43
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        A condensed weekly magazine

        **What is it?** A weekly magazine which sums up all the important events of the past week. Basically it is all the newspapers from the past week condensed into one magazine. **What's in it?** It has a similar format each week containing a variety of sections including; Top news stories from the UK, Europe, USA and the rest of the world, News from the sporting world Celebrity news Business and economy news Top properties on the market Consumer news including product suggestions Best letters of the week sent to newspapers Feature stories Reviews on arts/books and cinema The wonderfully funny "it must be true, I read it in the tabloids" Crossword and Sudoku **Is it any good?** I really like this magazine, although I feel that it is not a replacement for sitting down on a Sunday and reading the newspapers but it is a fun magazine and highlights the biggest and sometimes the smallest stories of the week. It also stops the need to sift through the entire stack of weekly newspapers to extract the important and intresting information-someone else has done it for you! My favourite section is "it must be true I read it in the tabloids" it's hilariously funny as it picks out the most ridiculous news stories of the week so strange it's hard to believe that they are true. This is a perfect magazine for people who don't find the time to read the paper every day or fit in the time to watch the news but still want to keep in the know with regards to current affairs. **Where can I get it?** Available in most newsagets/supermarkets, basically anywhere that you can buy newspapers, it only costs £2.50.Which is an excellent price for what you are getting. There is also the option to subscribe which provides great saving opportunities including free issues and a reduced price of 30% and it is posted straight to your door! What could be better?

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        05.07.2010 19:50
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        The Week is your value for money answer to not being able to read a paper every day!

        I am a subscriber to the week, and it is most probably the most useful magazine I have ever subscribed to. I, like many others, don't always find the time during the week to read a newspaper every day. This means that I would be somewhat 'out of the loop' as far as current affairs are concerned. But this little nugget called The week, keeps me nicely up to date. The Week condenses the week's news from around the world into a nice, bite-sized chunk. But it doesn't skimp on detail, nor treat you like a simpleton. It actually tells you what was said in various newspapers from around the world. The first to pages look at two major issues in the news during the week. It has a subtitled layout: 'What Happened', 'What the Editorials Said', What the Commentators Said' and 'What Next?'. This neat layout tells you all you need to know.... and can be read in about 10 minutes. It continues on the next page with 'Controversy of the Week'. It breaks down a major controversy, such as a political scandal (eg, MP's expenses), and analyses it using what the papers have said. It goes on to give nice, bite-sized chunks of world news, pointing out the important bits you need to know about. Then comes the 'Best Articles: Britain' and 'Best Articles: Foreign' section. As you may have guessed, this summarises the best published article from Britain and the world. Very useful, as they are not always the big issues you may immediately be aware of. It also has it's quirky bits. Such as 'It Must Be True.... I Read it in the Tabloids'. This gives four highly amusing and quirky stories reeported in the worlds tabloids (like signs in Romania warning drivers of drunk pedestrians!). And it has the pick of the weeks letters written to the news papers. Although edited somewhat, it's and intriguing and entertaining read. Next comes the reviews. The Week reviews the latest book releases, what's on at the theatre and the latest movie relseases. Again, it draws on what the critics have said in the various papers of the world. That's where I stop reading though. I have no interest in the extensive business section. Although, I do have the occasional peek at their sports page. For me, this is a cracking magazine to read. It keeps you up to speed with what's hapened, without patronising you or insulting your intelligence. It doesn't tell you what to think, it gives a balanced and unbiased picture of the week's news. So, if you don't have time to read the paper, or you think a summary of the news would be nice at the end of the week, The Week is the magazine for you! Plus, at £2.50 an issue (or less if you subscribe), it's terrific value for money!

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        02.03.2010 11:54
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        Minimal information on a diverse range of topics

        The tag line of "all you need to know about everything that matters" seems rather at odds with a caricature of Gordon Brown as the Incredible Hulk on the cover. Is Gordon Browns temper really the most significant event of the week in the world at large? Call me cynical but I expect a current affairs magazine to feature on current affairs and not tabloid gossip. At 50 pages long its £2.50 a week price tag seems rather expensive, particularly considering that a whopping 17 pages are taken up with adverts with a further 3 advertising leaflets included. The Week features a broad spectrum of news snippets from around the globe although it appears to have a tendency to repeat itself. Not content with a rehash of what was in the papers you're also treated to a review of the editorials and then the opinions of some obscure commentator and a rather bizarre what next approach which attempts to predict the future but doesn't. The stories range from the decidedly high brow economical budget deficit debate to that of the worlds tallest dog which are adjacent to each other. It's a very strange way to present things. Some of the stories are more suited to the pages of Hello! than a magazine supposedly dedicated to current affairs. Several pages are given over to bullet point headlines from around the globe but with insufficient detail to actually tell you anything news worthy beyond the rock bottom basics. An example of this is the recent flooding in Funchal, Maderia which rated a mere 135 words despite the loss of 42 lives to date. The inclusion of a property section is rather strange, particularly as there is no logic behind either the pricing or the location of the seven featured properties which range in price from £365,000 to 2.35 million. Perhaps the most obscure part of the magazine is the arts section with its book reviews. Not one of the trio chosen is available for under £18.99 nor are they a particularly main stream selection although all three have previously been reviewed in considerably more detail by the Guardian. The single most bizarre inclusion is without a doubt the tiny column by relationship expert Tracey Cox cut and pasted, like many other articles, from the pages of The Sunday Telegraph. It lacks the drivel spouted by The Suns' Dear Deidre but equally fails to actually address any real issues, it merely fills a spot on the page. More suited to a quick flick in a dentists waiting room than to a regular informative read.

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        16.10.2009 15:09
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        Whilst compared to Digg this may seem out of date,The Week still provides the best, briefest content

        There is something remarkably bold about a magazine whose tagline promises to give you "All you need to know about everything that matters". As a man who likes to feel informed and updated about a vast spectrum of subjects this claim provoked a surge of scepticism in me when the first 55 page issue arrived in my post box. The Week have a perpetual offer of free magazines for new customers to sample, and out of nothing more than a healthy curiousity I decided to succumb to their promotion. Before any magazines had been deliver I was sent a complimentary book entitled "Short and to the point" which contained a pick of The Week's editorial over the past ten or so years. Conforming with the general brevity of the publication, these editorial were all shorter than 250 words, but contrary to the vacuous and unconsidered "tweets" and "texts" that 21st Century life seems to be saturated by, these articles had an appetising depth and intelligent wit to them. They have strong themes and even a considerable plot of idea, discussion, conclusion that is remarkably satifying to read. The magazines themselves follow a similar pattern, summerising the best and worst of the news media, directly quoting and deftly analysing. Within a few hundred words of each article readers feel informed by the facts of the story, more certain of the background, and equiped with a variety of views to consider and repeat in conversation. For a small magazine the range of articles and areas of the world that they manage to cover is quite staggering. It is not limited to the dryer news stories, but also ventures into People, Columnists, Briefings, Health and Science, Talking Points, Sport, Arts, Property, Leisure, The City and, my personal favourite, The Last Word - a two page article on some of the most fascinating and remote topics. It's style is intelligent without being overly technical, informative without being patronising and brief without ever being shallow. Althought this magazine might not cover every single thing that matters, and tell me all that I need to know about it, it still lives up to its ambitous tagline. I can read this magazine and gain a large amount of current and relavent knowledge, and if there is anything I may wish to know more about I have been given the best kind of starting place with these articles. And also, reading The Week rather than spending the vast majority of the week pouring over all the different newspapers leaves me time for all my other interests.

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        13.08.2009 19:20
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        Great for people on a busy schedule

        The Week's slogan is "All you need to know about everything that matters". And I am compelled to agree with them. If you- like me- don't want to be in the dark when it come to the news, and want to read good-quality articles (because lets face it- you really don't care what Jordan was up to last night) but can't give up time every day to read newspapers, then this magazine is for you. 'The Week is a current affairs magazine, which picks the best articles and the biggest stories from the best papers over the course of 7 days. It's great for those with hectic lifestyles, or people who don't want to spend a lot of time reading a newspaper everyday. Costing only £2.50, it's even cheaper to buy than a paper every day, without missing the world's biggest stories. It's also great because The Week summarises stories, then gives "what the editorials said" then "what the commentators said and finally "what next?" for 3 of the main stories. It also collaborates articles from many newspapers such as The Times and The Guardian. The magazine features news on politics, Europe, the world, people, health and science, sport, arts, drama, travel, shares and more as well as the pick of readers letters and newspaper articles from the UK and the USA. Even if you don't want to read it all, it won't really matter because they really do pack a lot in so it's well worth £2.50. And there's often deals when you suscribe eg. 6 free issues and subsequently only £1.54 each. However, the stories are heavily edited and sometimes too condensed for the liking. And it's not particularly witty, like Private Eye. But for the bulk of things, it does what is needed of it. You'll know by know whether it's for you, because it is or it isn't. Although I do think it deserves to be more popular than it actually is.

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          10.06.2009 23:12
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          The Week is ideal if you are politically minded and you don't have enough time to read a paper daily

          What is it? The Week is a magazine that purports to condense the big news stories of the previous week into one place. It is almost a one-stop-shop for catching up on what has been going on. It takes articles from all of the major UK newspapers (and some of the major international ones) and combines commentary around the same thing from different journalists. Why? The reason I find The Week useful is that I often find that I just do not have time to sit down and read a newspaper every day. It means that I am able to keep up with what is going on without having to make an effort to cram in a newspaper or two on a daily basis. I also like the fact that you get the views from across the whole of the political spectrum. I would not buy a newspaper like the Daily Mail or the Telegraph but sometimes it is nice to read how those newspapers view certain events - even if it serves only to enforce my own views to the contrary! I would make you aware that The Week is aimed very much at a middle class, middle-aged audience. Some of the content is stereotypical in its nature - for example, the previous week's choices on Desert Island Disks is always included and the classified adverts at the back are almost definitely aimed at houses with a LOT of spare income. This is not a magazine for those who like celebrity gossip or those who want to know the latest goings on in the Big Brother house. The stories are almost invariably politically motivated and there is a lot of foreign affairs commentary as well as the more traditional theatre reviews. While I grant you that The Week is not everyone's cup of tea, I am old before my time in many ways and I find that the articles cover a lot of the subjects that I am interested in. If you are not sure, pop into your local newsagent and just buy a copy of the most recent version and see what you think of the content. If it is something that you think you might be interested in, there are frequent deals for those who subscribe. The deals make the magazine cheaper per issue and you don't need to go to the newsagent every week - it comes straight to the door - bonus! It is most definitely a magazine for a target audience but if you, like me, are a geek at heart, you will love it as much as I do - stereotypes and all!

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          25.01.2009 20:07
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          Excellent to catch up on a lazy weekend

          My parents started to buy this when my brother was trying to join the army. I find it perfect if you've been away or out of the loop and want to catch up-just sort of distils the news and then anything I would like to know more about, I google and hey presto. It has some good bits, like the "It must be true, I read it in the tabloids" column and the "Quotes of the week" which i invariably forget before I have the chance to impress someone with!! Sometimes there are too many pictures to be honest, and if there is a big story, that can be covered to the detriment of other titbits of information which are more interesting. All in all, I would recomment it if you spend a lot of time out of the UK and need to catch up. Or if your job entails you being engrossed in something all week, you can read this on the weekend and stay up to date. Oh, it has a precis of the Archers as well which I think is great!!

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          02.01.2009 11:27
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          Worth taking out a trial sub.

          The premise of this magazine is quite simple. It tries to condense the main stories of the week into one easy to read package. For those of us who have very little time this can be a lifesaver when trying to keep up with what is going on around the world. Its quite nicely laid out and very simple to flick through what you want to read and easily distinguish what you don't want to spend time looking at. They always have special offers on for subscriptions, normally its a month worth of issues for a £1. This is done because although everyone has probably seen the magazine sitting on the shelves of WHSmith very few people pick it up and actually take it home. This is a shame because the magazine itself is actually quite well done and useful is you are looking to keep yourself informed of what the press are talking about.

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          31.10.2008 13:33
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          A quick summary of the week's news in the form of a magazine

          ~Introduction~ About a year or so ago I subscribed to a special offer of 6 free issues of this magazine. It was through one of those cash back sites; Greasypalm or Rpoints I'm not sure which. I cancelled my subscription after about 4 issues to make sure that I didn't end up paying for a magazine that I didn't really want. I'd heard stories of others being ripped off when trying to cancel their subscription after the sixth issue. If you go to their website you can still take advantage of the free issue offer (I think it's only 4 free issues now), but be weary and make sure you cancel early if you want to avoid paying the subscription fee. In the shops a single copy of The Week will cost you £2.35 the last time I looked. If you subscribe to the magazine you are promised a 34% saving on the cover price. A subscription for 13 magazines by direct debit will set you back £19.99 whilst a 26 week subscription rate will cost you £38.97. It will cost you slightly more if you pay buy credit/debit card. These prices include delivery. ~Content and Structure~ On first impression The Week is a well designed publication. It comes in the common A4 format and although its pages lack an up-market glossy feel, the content is neatly laid out and well displayed. I would guess that 70% of the magazine consists of written articles with 30% made up of photographs and illustrations. There are very few adverts.The subject matter is well organized into different sections with each topic taking up one or two pages. The magazine starts with the 'Main Stories' where some analysis is given of some major news stories and how these were covered by the Worlds media. There are usually only two or three stories here and you get a rounded summary of the story alongside collected editorial commentaries from other publications. In the Politics section the magazine claims to give impartial and balanced views of various news stories extracted from a range of national and foreign publications. This section is somewhat tabloid in style and even has a rather light-hearted 'Good Week for... - Bad Week for...' section. Further reproduced articles can be found in Current Affairs, UK News and Europe at a Glance. One of my favourite sections is the 'World at a Glance' pages where there is an illustration of a world map spread across two pages and surrounded by boxed off summarised news stories. Each news story is linked to the map by an arrow pointing to the location where the news event took place. Further on in the magazine you will find other sections entitled People, Briefing, Best Articles, Best Foreign Articles, Best of the American Columnists and Talking Points. I found the 'Briefing' section to be one of the more informative parts of the magazine. Here you will find one page devoted to the dissection and explanation of an ongoing single news event. For example, a 'Briefing' topic might fill you in on the background of the recent collapse of the Icelandic banking system. Such an approach enables you to gain some basic knowledge of a major news event without trawling through countless broadsheet pages. However, there are few examples like this in the magazine. I found most of the articles and news items too short and lacking in depth. There are usually two pages devoted to Sport and a Health & Science section. There is quite an extensive arts section covering everything from theatre, movie reviews, book reviews and exhibitions. Oddly in my opinion there is a 'Best Properties on the Market' section - not really a news item as far as I'm concerned. Near the back of the magazine there are collected articles on Business, Stocks and Share movements, Travel and even the best of the obituary columns. To finish off there is usually a light-hearted topic under the heading The Last Word. The back cover has the expected crossword and Sudoku puzzle. Despite claims to the contrary, there is little wit in the magazine. There is certainly nothing in it that you might compare to Private Eye. On the 'Talking Points' page you will find a column entitled 'Wit and Wisdom' under which you will find a listed collection of quotes and proverbs reproduced from the various newspapers. Probably the most fun part of the magazine is the front cover which nearly always comes with a quirky cartoon - usually a caricature of a newsworthy public figure. Alongside is a column listing the main contents. I would say that the front cover is probably the most original aspect of the whole magazine. ~Purpose~ The Week magazine claims to provide you with the best of the British and foreign news stories that have been published over the previous week or so. According to the publishers "The Week is a unique digest which distils the best of the British and foreign press into just 35 succinct pages (there are actually 44 pages in total)." The publication is promoted as being "ideal for today's busy lifestyle" and is said to be a "joy to read, keeping you entertained as well as informed." The reason, according to the publishers, for the magazines launch in 1995 was in order to provide a single publication that could act as "an antidote to media clutter and information overload." However, one might reasonably argue that the magazine simply adds to the all the media clutter and information that bombards us everyday without actually providing anything new - as the bulk of the content of The Week has already been published somewhere else. ~Opinion and Critical Analysis~ One gripe I have with the magazine is that you are never sure where all the articles come from. Sometimes you will get quotation marks and the name of the editor, writer or the name of the newspaper mentioned after a certain commentary but at other times there will be no reference whatsoever. I can only assume that the bulk of the UK content is derived from the non-tabloid sources such as The Guardian, Times, Telegraph and Independent. You might also find the odd editorial quotation from the Mail or Express. The major problem with the magazine for me is that, apart from the news summaries copied from elsewhere, there is little extra on offer in this magazine. It's completely devoid of cutting edge information. Even the "Letters" page consists of reproduced letters taken from the other major newspapers. With this magazine what you're actually paying for is yesterdays news. Surely the whole point of the news is that it should be 'new'? Personally I don't want my news items digested any more than they already are. The world is awash with too much diluted, summarised, rounded off versions of news stories that lean towards sensationalism rather than being informative. In an ideal world the summarised content that you find in The Week is the sort of content that should be provided by tabloid newspapers such as The Sun and The Mirror. Instead these sad toilet rags act as mere portals for celebrity gossip, sport, soft porn and sensationalist often highly distorted news items that are often irrelevant. Nor do I go along with the claim that The Week magazine offers completely unbiased content. Regarding the foreign news content there is definitely a bias towards North American newspapers and in the magazine as a whole there is an insipid 'middle of the road' feeling about everything you find inside. One gets the impression that the stories are all carefully chosen and exquisitely dissected in order to present the 'safest' option. It's not exactly Orwellian 'Newspeak', but it's certainly a step in that direction. Anything a little controversial is excluded. Even the book reviews are on the dull side. The aim is to provide a comfortable anodyne reading experience. You're not going to get the 'bigger picture' of news events. What you'll get instead is some nicely framed information devoid of soul and lacking in bite, something that you won't have to think about too much. ~Recommendation~ No doubt The Week magazine will appeal to some people who simply can't get round to reading a broadsheet newspaper everyday. This is after all a publication designed for those with 'busy lifestyles'. It may also appeal to those who maybe feel they are not getting enough useful news out of their tabloid newspaper. I suppose in a way it does allow you to keep up-to-date with the latest UK and International news, current affairs and politics. To this extent I can see the magazine having some useful purpose. Personally however, I find most of the news items in this publication to be too concise and I have no wish to read "the weeks news in an hour" - maybe my lifestyle just isn't 'busy' enough to warrant such action. A much better option in my opinion would be to buy a weekly publication that covers all the news stories that are neglected or completely ignored by the news media in general (I'm not certain if one already exists). I'm sure I'm not the only one who gets tired of hearing the same narrow selection of news stories regurgitated hour after hour, day after day on every channel and radio station. When it comes to printed news, I would much prefer to purchase a single copy of a quality newspaper such as The Guardian, in order to obtain up to date news articles with some in depth analysis, some quality insight and perhaps some historical background. I think more can be gained by reading a couple of quality articles in the Guardian or Independent twice a week rather than reading a whole magazine full of brief highly edited summaries - it would also cost you less money. Furthermore, you don't have to buy a magazine in order to obtain a watered down version of news events, for this all you need to do is switch on ITV News at Ten every night.

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