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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

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      31.08.2013 11:15
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      Still cursing after all these years!

      **Viz**

      A day rarely passes in my life without me uttering a line, reference or novel swearing combination that I have learnt off of Viz. Neighbours, colleagues, friends and acquaintances are nick-named after many of its characters: most have been given this honour in secret, although there are some who have embraced the name and wear it with pride. It has been essential bathroom literature for over 25 years, and I have managed to keep on to almost every copy I ever bought.

      Viz has been around since 1979, when creator Chris Donald produced it from his bedroom in his parents' North East home along with brother Simon and friend Jim Brownlow. It was very much a product of the post-punk alternative press, and went on sale at 20p (30p to students). It quickly grew from a few photocopies sold to mates, and in 1985 a deal was signed with Virgin Books to publish the comic nationally. In 1987 Virgin's John Brown set up John Brown Publishing to produce and distribute Viz.

      That was the year I got my first Viz.

      **Beano**

      The comic's style is a parody of traditional children's publications such as Beano or Dandy. However Viz is not suitable for (nor is sold to) children. With comic strip stories, readers' contributions, features and advertisements, it is a cover to cover mix of toilet humour, foul language, black comedy and innuendo with plenty of sex and violence thrown in. If any of the latter are offensive or distasteful to you, please, read no further, discard this review and under no circumstances ever, ever buy a copy.

      However if your sense of humour is puerile, subversive, wicked and warped you might quite like it.

      To be on the safe side, I've only used very minor swearies in my review, and I've starred the spelling just in case!

      So whether this s to introduce a new batch of delinquents to its delights or take seasoned Viz readers on a trip down memory lane, its perhaps best to break the review down into the main components that make up Viz: the comic strips, the features, the readers' contributions and the "advertising".

      **Outing**

      Viz is probably best known for its comic strip stories and characters, many which have evolved into national institutions and treasures. Forgive me if I have omitted anyone's favourites, but here are some of mine:

      The Fat Sl*gs -San and Tray, in a fog of fags and ale embark on erotic adventures and experiments with friend Baz, and perform sexual favours in lieu of taxi fares and pizza delivery charges.

      Sid the Sexist - Tyneside's silver-tongued cavalier, who continues to fail in his amorous pursuits and usually winds up in casualty thanks to his offensive and pathetic chat up techniques. Actually, as Viz is very intellectual - "Sid" was once in Latin (albeit in the Monty Python "Romanes eunt domus" school of translation, but a classical education did come in handy).

      Roger Mellie - the man on the telly, who drinks, smokes, womanises and swears his way through the presenter jobs no other D-list celeb would touch.

      8 Ace - Elvis hairstyle, shell suit bottoms, lives in a shed aside a broken washing machine and a urine-soaked mattress, whose sole aim is to procure £1.49 and purchase eight tins of cheap lager.

      Fru T Bunn - The Master Baker and his Gingerbread Sex Dolls - a sexual deviant with a weakness for freshly baked, meringue-breasted confection ladies. Personally I find Fru repulsive and disturbing, but I've been told from a reliable source that the Gingerbread Dolls are actually quite attractive.

      There are other comic strips that only appear as a one off, frequently with guest celebrities, like "Elton John's Dole Fiddle" or "Kenny Ball and his Jazz Mags". Other stories include such titles as "The Vibrating Bum-faced Goats" or "Ar*e Farm" which although they feature only once are instantly unforgettable.

      **Inning**

      Next to take up the column inches are the features - mainly in the style of tabloid stories, but far better written and more believable. The title usually has some kind of sex secret in it while sub-headings bear absolutely no relation to the story. The first one is usually relevant enough - then the remainder go off on an abstract tangent of word association.

      They often feature a professional, like a toilet attendant or clairvoyant who has come into contact with the stars and is willing to spill the beans on them and their behaviour. You can tell they are genuine because the feature will have a photo of said spiller, either highly photo-shopped or quite obviously someone from the Viz office dressed up.

      The most recent exclusive is by a dentist who treats the stars and shares their secrets whilst they are under sedation. We learn for example that TV boffin Brian Cox confessed how he cheated in woodwork at school, and copied all the answers of Stephen Hawking when he sat his Professor's exam.

      Other features include useful quizzes to determine your personality or type: I found "Are you a Pimp or a Scientist" intriguing but very confusing - my OH (Baron Spanielmeister) is an Ecologist specialising in Invasive Species, but no matter how many times he took the quiz he still came out clearly as a Pimp.

      **Cricket**

      Readers' contributions to the comic are made up mostly of letters and advice. "Letterbocks", which I believe coined the phrase, "Do I win £5?" includes the familiar mix of public opinion, politics, social comment and bile spewing that you would find in any newspaper or magazine letters page. The content is as outrageous, politically-incorrect, sweary, offensive and hysterical as the rest of the comic. I've had so many things I wanted to send to the letters page, but was always afraid my mum would see it.

      I suppose I could always send it under a pseudonym like so many readers do, but then would any of my friends believe it was me. Such dilemmas have kept me awake at night.

      The letters page also previously included pictures of suggestive signage or foreign products with an unfortunate English translation, but such is the level of contributions, they now have a section of their own now in "Hog's 'I' Spy".

      "Top Tips" offers such handy hints as "Keep an empty bottle of milk in the fridge in case someone wants black coffee or even tea" or "Brasso makes an ideal moisturiser for robots". In 1996 McDonald's were famously caught on plagiarising "Top Tips" in an ad campaign. The case was settled out of court, with the sum awarded donated to Comic Relief. At the same time Viz published their own offering in TT: "McDonald's advertising executives. Why not steal someone else's idea and then claim you overheard it in a bar, you ******** *****."

      In "Roger's (Mellie) Profanisaurus" readers can also send contributions to the swearing dictionary. Euphemisms, localisms and novel words or phrases for all sorts of sexual or toilet functions, plus their meanings and examples of usage are included each issue in "Britain's' Favourite Lexicon of Filth and Profanity". You don't win £5 for entries published - but you do win a swear word crossword mug.

      **Grasshopper**

      Finally, the Viz ads. It's often hard to tell a real ad from a joke one especially when you see some of the stuff allegedly on sale. The best way to tell whether an ad is genuine or a joke is to look at the top of the page - if it says "Cheapskates' Parade" the ads are probably real.

      Viz ads often feature cigarettes, extolling the benefits of smoking: "She gets the blokes because she smokes", or "You could get hit by a bus tomorrow, go on, have a fag". Such ads did encourage me to start smoking, but after one puff I was sick all over the bathroom floor, so instead I took on-board the public information advice and had "A pint and a fight - a great British night out!"

      If you're lucky your issue might include a full page colour ad of some worthless heirloom tat that you can buy for a lifetime of outrageous instalments. The "Elvis Tutankhamen Dam Busters Clock plate" was a classic, but my favourite was the delightful "My Friend Billy had a Ten Foot W*lly Charm Bracelet" bearing the timeless words of this exquisite playground poetry and engraved with images of a touching but cautionary tale. The Clock Plate was eventually manufactured and sold, but I heard it didn't work very well. The charm bracelet never made it to production.

      **Kung Fu**

      As Viz is not suitable for children, when any come to visit we do hide our copies (along with the other child un-friendly stuff we have at Spaniel Hall) like good citizens. I suspect that older children and teens would be too sophisticated for its humour anyway and would just find it childish and embarrassing that adults think Viz is funny.

      While some people will get some of the humour some of the time, I do think the comic is aimed at a specific generation. Much of the allusion and references are to 70s/80s popular culture with the like of Wee Jimmy Krankie, Shakin' Stevens and Fred Dineage regularly popping up in stories and features; however the latest issue was a bit more up to date with "Mumford and Sons & Their Hover-Wain - Touring the English Countryside in their Jet-Powered Hay-wain".

      **Fighting**

      There are those who say that "Viz isn't as funny as it used to be" but though it's in colour, has some shiny pages, is published monthly and has increased in price by £3 since it was first published, I disagree. I think rather that these readers have just grown up themselves, and have lost that magical mentality from the age of innocence when swearing was big and was clever, and that the ensuing guffaws produced by drawing a crude genital doodle was enough to get you thrown out of Double Maths.

      **Ninga-ninga-ning-ning-ning-ning-ning**

      Since Spaniel Hall is in the back of beyond and as our Postman is neither a "Plod" or a "Miserable *******" we are safe to have ours delivered. Of course as everyone knows although the comic costs £3.20 in the shops when you buy a subscription you don't pay real money, so I'd say it was excellent value.

      If you are a lapsed reader or just Viz-curious you could pick up one of the Viz annuals - there'll be a new one out by Christmas, but with all annuals you can buy the 2013 offering (The Billposter's Bucket) on Amazon for 1p.

      Please people - keep this stalwart of swearing alive - when I morph into "Mrs Brady Old Lady" I'm still going to need my fix of Viz.

      Thanks for *******.

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        14.07.2010 04:44
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        A British Institution !!

        Having just read an issue of Viz magazine for the first time in a couple of years I felt compelled to write a short review here on Dooyoo.

        Viz is a british institution, it is a Comic Book magazine first released in 1979 by geordie brothers Chris and Simon Donald and their friend Jim Brownlow, it started out simply enough, a few photocopied pages distributed around pubs locally and very soon became an overnight success, after a few years of sales and huge popularity mainly in the northeast of England they signed a deal with Virgin Books to distribute it nationally and would release one issue every 2 months ( Which stayed that way until Viz was bought out by another publishing group, which increased the frequency to 10 issues a year ), at one point Viz was one of the most popular magazines in Britain, although its sales have declined a little over the last few years.

        Viz is renowned for its humourous Comic Strip's, including such legendary characters as Roger Mellie, The Fat Slags, Billie the Fish and Johnny Fartpants, but other strengths within Viz's humour lie in the numerous regular features contained within, they will feature spoof newspaper style articles in the vein of the News of the World and the Daily Mirror, also two of the most popular features are.....

        Rogers Profanisaurus:
        An Encylopedia / Thesaurus of the rude, including such gems as....
        "B.o.b.F.o.c" Body off Baywatch, face off Crimewatch !!, and other reader submitted rudeness

        Viz Top Tips:
        A Collection of Viz created and reader submitted top tips, one such example is,
        "Save money on sex-lines by phoning up the Samaritans and threatening to kill yourself unless they talk dirty"
        Top Tips gained a measure of infamy in the 90's when McDonalds ran an ad campaign in england that was a direct rip-off of Viz's Top Tips, they later settled out of court.

        Letterbocks:
        This is by far my favourite section of Viz, the creativity of some of the "Letter's" is incredible sometimes, whenever I look at the Letterbocks section of Viz i'm normally laughing out loud by the end of it, such an example would be....
        "TO THE zookeeper in 1978 who replied "I'll tell you when you're older" when I asked him why one of the monkeys stuck its tongue up another one's a*se: I'm 36 now and still waiting for that explanation.

        There are other funny parts of Viz that I could go on about in more detail, but I find the above to be the most vital and the core reason's why Viz was and still is as successful as it is, I remember reading it when I was younger and I know alot of people are saying that its not as funny as it used to be, however I think those people may have just been reading it for too long and still might be hankering for the days of Johnny Fartpants and aren't interested in newer characters, or newer segments.

        Another gripe is the sticker price, yes the Magazine started life at 20p...but that was in the 70's !! and quite frankly I think its larger now than it used to be, plus most magazines out now are in the 2 to 3 quid range and I think its money well spent for the Comic Genius of Viz.

        I'll read it for as long as they'll publish it, being here in the states I don't have access to it every month as some in England may, so maybe I get to appreciate it more, either way I strongly recommend it, provided you enjoy crude, irreverant humour !!

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          29.11.2009 20:15
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          A great british humour mag when all said and done, but pretty pricy nowadays

          Newcastle-based adult humour publication Viz is a monthly comic with a wide range of characters and accordingly varied styles of humour, all of them decidedly risque and completely unsuitable for children. Better characters include Jack Black, a more cynical and unwholesome (but on the face of it innocent) version of TinTin, and Gilbert Ratchett, a boy-inventor who always comes up with ludicrous and amusing mechanical creations, such as a machine to harness the energy of a well known literary figure spinning furiously in his grave.

          The comic can at times be suprisingly intelligent and insightful and is always willing to push the boat out as far as it can, but whilst it can be very rewarding it can also be pretty mindless, with characters like The Fat Slags offering nothing but endlessly repetitive, lowest-common-denominator purile humour.

          The best sections of the mag are normally the hilarious and frequently surreal fake adverts, witty/ridiculous letters page and of course Top Tips, where viewers are invited to write in with their own 'helpful' suggestions as seen in womens weekly mags, with entries like " Fun-sized Mars Bars make ideal normal sized Mars Bars for midgets", "Minor skin grafts can be performed on pigs by covering any cuts and grazes with thin strips of bacon. " and "Don't invite drug addicts round for a meal on boxing day as they may find the offer of cold turkey embarrassing or offensive. "

          Whilst the content is of mixed quality, Viz is a publication that never fails to provoke at least a few laughing fits each edition, and though it is increasinlgly extortionately priced given its size (its now starting to edge towards the £4 mark) its still a frequently hilarious comic thats well worth reading, ideally after somebody else has bought it.

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          20.11.2009 16:01
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          offensive comic suitable for the broad minded only, must have a sense of humour.

          Having just celebrated its 30th anniversary I felt it fitting to do a review on the comic that I enjoyed reading as a teenager and still read to this day. Launched back in 1979 the first run of the comic amassed to only 150 copies which its creator - Chris Donald - sold in small Newcastle record shop, and local pubs the 12 page issue sold for just 20 pence and was widely photocopied and resold to other people. Steadily growing in popularity the comic's readership topped 5000 and had to be professionally produced from a printing press to meet demands.

          By the time I was first introduced to the comic by school friends in around 1988 / 1989 its readership had risen to its highest peak of around a million copies sold per edition and I was attracted to its humour from the start. If you have never seen Viz or heard anything about it then its qualities may be hard to understand, it is unashamedly rude, crude and scrapes the bottom of the barrel in terms of toilet humour. It is, however, hilarious and doesn't take itself too seriously what so ever. There are a multitude of characters and comic strips that have become more publicly wide known such as:

          Sid the Sexist - a Geordie charmer who fails to get the girl despite coming out with some of the crudest one-liners you can think of.

          and

          Roger Mellie the man on the Telly - An unscrupulous television presenter who will appear in anything his manager puts him forward for, famed for appearing in barrel scraping reality television shows where he is always seen "pulling the birds" He has released his own "profanisaurus" which provides thousands of variations on mostly sexual and sexist phrases and sayings listed in a dictionary and thesaurus type way. They are submitted by readers of the comic and are included in each edition and are updated in print form in a separate book which can be bought from book shops. I have looked for a clean example to provide, but cant for fear of offending somebody, so better to look for yourself if easily offended.

          There are dozens of other examples I could list, but could potentially offend someone with their titles or names, the language used is very strong and crude and sexual situations are often portrayed. "Clean" examples of characters included are "Mrs Brady, Old Lady" "Major Misunderstanding", "The Modern Parents" "The Critics" "Victorian Dad" plus dozens of other recurring characters.

          The comic is released every 5 weeks or so and is usually found on the higher-up shelves in newsagents, it used to be next to the "adult" magazines, which when you were 17 and buying a copy was very embarrassing. I subscribe to it now and have mine delivered through my slot (sorry, couldn't resist) every month.

          You do need a sense of humour to appreciate the comic, it ranges from the bizarre and surreal through to the mildly offensive with some of the articles and comic strips, it has caused controversy in the past but on the whole it is pretty mainstream really (just a lot more sweary)

          Particular highlights for me are the "Letterbocks" pages featuring letters from the public about random topics, these are often hilarious and although not all genuinely submitted and similarly the "Top Tips" section; a Mickey-taking dig at the tips pages found in magazines; a clean example of a top tip from Viz from the last edition is: "Save some money on Tap Shoes by simply pushing drawing pins into the toes and heels of your feet". See, not funny when typed out on a review, but raises a smile when read with everything else in the magazine.

          It's not going to appeal to everyone, and I don't expect it to, but for me I look forward to receiving my latest edition. As your mother used to tell you, "it isn't big and it isn't clever" but it passes an hour or so and brings a bit of light hearted entertainment with it.

          For me Viz will remain a firm favourite and gets 5/5 Dooyoo stars. Like Roger Irrelevant (a comic strip character) it's completely hatstand and for me that's what makes it a must read. Prices have risen over the years, and now an edition will cost £3.20 which is on the high side but there is nothing else like it out there.

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            09.09.2009 12:58
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            Great to read if you're feeling down

            I get the impression I'm in a minority, because I am a female who enjoys reading Viz. Every time I read it I laugh so hard I find it hard to breathe and I have to dry my eyes.

            Viz is like The Beano except it's strictly for adults only. It's full of comic strips, and each one of them is profane and offensive. You'll find one called "Modern Parents" which completely takes the mickey out of hippies who only use modern parenting methods and fail miserably, and there was once a comic strip called "Harold and Fred - they make ladies dead" about the serial killers living on either side of an old woman and trying to ruin the other's plans and murder her.

            It may sound quite silly and pointless, but behind the rude humour, you'll find quite astute observations of modern society. It's like a social commentary.

            The format is usually the same. The first section is comic strips, in the middle you have the "letters page", which is not all it seems. If you read them closely you'll find that the letters are not real letters, or from real people. The contributors usually have names like "Mike Hunt" and are writing about random nonsense. These letters mirror the articles found near the beginning and end of the comic, which are equally random. One article was about trying to solve the mystery of Roy Hudd's death.

            Interspersed within Viz are suitably ridiculous "adverts" which look a lot like the sort you find in newspapers but are of course completely fictional.

            And then you have Roger's Profanisaurus, the jewel in the Viz crown. It's a "dictionary" that can be found right at the end of Viz, except it's not a dictionary; not a normal one anyway. It's actually a list of rude slang terms and their explanations. Expect to see items such as "chocolate chimney sweep", and cockney rhyming slang such as "Ballroom Blitz", the explanations of which are described with excellent English and include examples to illustrate how they might be used.

            Viz has been running since 1979 and it has spawned the publication of a variety of books, including a concise book of Roger's Profanisaurus.

            It seems to me that not many people know about this comic, and I think that's partly what makes it so good. It's like a hidden gem.

            I always enjoy reading this and I'd recommend it to anyone except for children, the faint-hearted and easily offended.

            I don't know the exact price offhand but I believe it's about £3.

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              15.07.2008 03:16
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              Shadow of former comic greatness

              Viz (Comicus Vulgaris) could once be found in the bog of every male shared occupancy house in the land. Badly drawn comic strips, crude humour and ridiculously unlikely stories on public figures such as the Archbishop of Canturbury, gave it a special place in the a(n)nals of blokedom. Letterbocks and Top Tips parodied the kind of letters sent to magazines such as "Chat" and made for interesting and often hilarious reading.

              Under the vulgar top layer was some very well written stuff, cutting edge and ironic. Viz always set out to offend in an intelligent, tongue in cheek type of way and consequently had many imitators who just didn't "get it".

              Recently though, Viz has suffered in terms of its quality and ideas. It even advertises itself as "not funny anymore" so the creators must be laughing all the way to the bank with every issue sold. The characters are weary, the jokes recycled and the price outrageous.

              Even the once funny "Profanasaurus" continually cross references itself in such a way that it disappears up its own nipsy (see rusty sheriff's badge), that the original train of thought is well and truly derailed.

              Perhaps even blokes grow out of certain things and the exposure to true vulgarity in the form of violent computer games and bad language on TV and films, leaves a mildly entertaining product that will not appeal to the new members of the traditional Viz demographic. When it first appeared, much of society was not ready for the Viz style, taking the comic medium and twisting it into a car wreck that you shouldn't look at but couldn't resist. Now you'd be hard pressed to find someone who cares.

              So please Viz, die quietly so that we may feel nostalgic for your passing in years to come...

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                14.03.2008 09:20
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                A humorous and successful northern comedy institution

                Back when theediscerning was still at secondary school, and by chance someone was passing their copy of the latest Viz round, he wasn't really that interested. For one, it all seemed to concentrate on the boy with the unfeasibly large testicles, and let's face it - at that impressionable age, reading about other large reproductive organs can be a little close to the bone.

                So it was donkeys' years (whatever they are) before theed actually read - and paid for (sort of) - a copy of Viz. And lo and behold he actually quite liked it.

                With the sample of a three month's dirt cheap taster subscription arranged online he didn't see hide nor hair of any elephantine scrotal sacs, either. There were the characters he had heard about, that had passed from the original Viz offices in some coal bunker oop north into comedy history - the Two Fat Slags, always on the game, the man in their life so often with his bum plaster. There was Billy the Fish, learning that the team's new manager, Jesus Christ, wanted him in goal - a shock as he was working in the Match of the Day studios at the time. Billy, not JC.

                But each issue provides a goodly variety of characters, some returning, some seemingly a one-joke creation. From provincial lushes and their special brews, to snooty pretentious art critics, to canny children getting walloped by their working class parents, all life is here. The graphic style is at times rather rough and ready, but you shouldn't read this expecting the Beano anyway.

                There is comedy to be had not just from the 'toons though. Several times each issue there are successful rip-offs of the red-top press, with tabloidese rubbish getting the regular mickey taken out of it. Fake adverts (witness the 52-disc (and rising) DVD collection of Pete Doherty's courthouse step appearances) are there as well, and go some way to break the 2-colour monotony of the budget printing processes.

                And, of course, there is the Profannisaurus, which is very good indeed. A lot of it is toilet humour, or sexual reference gone bluntly wrong, but all the same it is well worth a look - even if you have no hope of really getting it into conversation, or finding common ground with someone else who has the time and patience to learn the lingo. (One dreads to think what lingo means in the Profannisaurus...) Apparently you can offer an entry into the word guide, which is often made into a stand-alone book, and you get a pencil (yes, a whole one).

                A letters page that bears too much resemblance to the Mail and Sun and Mirror's own efforts might or might not have some source from the general public. And even on down to the small print about who publishes it for subscribers in the USA there is an attempt at putting a fresh gag in each time.

                And to borrow some words from that sentence and run with them... time, for one - the mag is out ten times a year. No idea why. Gag - there are definitely enough of them to go round - if the more subtle humour of the farmer with his sheep binbag, or the investigations of the young Jack Black (no, not that one - this one looks human) are not to your taste then there are always broader ones - simple folk getting their sheds blown up, their knickers slung away, and pubic lice being introduced to prissy girls' schools and coming out heroes.

                And fresh - after a lifetime's effort it's surprising to see how current and fresh the whole magazine is. They use some elements of topicality - one recent strip has the Labour party's trouble with registering donations, and Tory nepotism, and puts that into the machine marked reductio ad absurdum - but mostly just make their own merry way through the laughter field. And while they hit a cowpat sometimes, they can strike a four leaf clover too - the step-ladder family had theed tickling for days.

                To reiterate, it is not all toilet and willy humour, either. In fact, the age range is at times a lot higher than the stupid 'download this mobile game', 'buy this naff T-shirt' adverts that are in there for real suggest. How many school children would really have got off on the 'what it's like to be waiting in for a parcel' cut-out-'n'-keep board game? And while not a lot could offend (well, we'll see how Jesus gets on in his technical area, shall we?) the smut level is not too low.

                Given four stars only because theed has not been a fan long enough to consider the issues worthy of keeping for a collection, the rag is certainly worth recommending to those who have the time and money for a dose of good humour (nearly) every month. There are quite often freebies, to boost the sales figures - we await our fold-out naked women with all the obvious visible signs (see the first paragraph). It has gone a long way from its humble beginnings in Newcastle, and now has enough years under its belt to claim to have seen off many other comic ideas and ventures (Spitting Image, Ben Elton, theediscerning's dooyoo career).

                Not brilliant, not hugely great value for money, but a worthy addition to the nation's collective journalism purchases. And quite worthy of joining your own singular journalism purchases.

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                  19.12.2001 00:01
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                  • "Im too old for it!"

                  Viz magazine ten years ago when it first came out was a revelation to adults that really should no better. If ever there was a comic made for students and immature parents, let alone kids then this was surely it. But this years Christmas edition is a shadow of it self at three times the price. In those days it was a hybrid of the American Mad magazine that bought toilet humor on to the top shelf to replace drab political satire. Many publications of the type have tried to copy the original Chris Donald gem in its early days but to no avail. There really were some poor imitations that sold about three copies to the Newcastle boys that peaked at a million. But now with the original writers and friends long gone the mag has evolved into one of those tacky unfunny hybrids that litter Tombolas around Britain. Some of the old unfunny favorites are still knocking around from Johnny Fartpants and The Modern Parents, to Buster Gonads and Tinribs just for Christmas. Some of the much more significant creations like Roger Melly, the man on the telly and the Fat Slag’s have been indignantly reduced to half page strips from their original impressive three pages. Roger is the fowl mouthed TV presenter who will turn his hand to any job and any swear word with the C word being his very favourite. But Christmas 2001 The man on the telly has come along way as he has Prince Edward as his tea boy!. The big earners like Sid the Sexist that made the boys a lot of money through separate merchandising are still treated with the respect they deserve with a double spread. These characters are at the heart of the mag and the writers as they take a big one at Geordie culture the lads grew up in. One of the new characters is an example of how the new writers are looking for the same laughs by pure retred. Tasha Slappas mum is clearly the slag’s aunt or friends of the brilliant Biffa Bacon looking for the same gags. Mrs Brad
                  y old Lady hasn’t been included and only the funnier Spoilt Brat makes the cut from the good old days. The Kewl Chicks are grafted in to take over from the gobby pretentious Student Grant strip as most college kids clothes are louder than they are these days. 8 Ace is a newer entry about a Scotsman that’s homeless and always gets drunk. That’s not funny, that’s reality. Harry Rotter is a seasonal short to take the p**s out of the film phenomenon is deathbed chortle of Bob Hope who really should be dead by now. The rest of the magazine between the comic strips is put over to old favs and predictable advertising from sex lines to those mobile phone tones and fascias. You can obviously by seasonal merchandise based on the Viz name or novelty student stuff like naught T-shirt’s and hash seeds. Letterbocks which is a series of spoof letters from people with silly names is always mirthful with obtuse musings like these.”Dear Sir, who says doing Christmas shopping early avoids the crush?.Lasy year I did mine a full 12 months in advance, and the shops were just as bust as ever”. This one is particularly naughty and certainly bought a chuckle.”How do lesbian couples put up with each other if every two weeks one of them is a rag hag. What about the one in four couples that this statistic demands who are synchronized”. Yuck!. Or from Mike Woodandtrees from London.”How do we know that Steven Hawking is clever?,someone could have just programmed him”. Then theres the war column with the latest from the war on terrorism, TWAT for short. A letter from Les Thackery reads “I don’t know why the Americans are trying to achieve by carpet bombing Afghanistan.After all, the Afghans already have the finest rugs in the world”. Top Tips, which used to have a whole page to its self, has been reduced to a mere sad paragraph. They actually ran some adverts on TV fr
                  om this idea about five years back. Do you remember the carpet slippers with carpet on the soles to a wooden floor!. The mag has its usual dig at celebrity although they used to be much crueler in the old days. This weeks offering are the 2001 “nearly boilers” referring to female celebs that are almost dogs. Helen from Big Brother is rightfully number one just a head of that hound Lisa Tarbuck (helps to have a famous dad when your ugly). I’m shocked that they have put the stunning Nigella Lawson in at three. The vacuous socialite and pain Lady Victoria Harvey makes seven of the hundred listed with Anne Robinson at eight. The hole 100 are listed next to crude comments like at 13,cock riddled it Girl for Tara Tompkinson to her friend Tamara Beckwith one above her as the “pointless slapper” and Maccas runmpy stumpy for free loader Heather Mills (Mcarteny one legged girl). And the list goes on…..Ok one more, Mel and Sue at 57,”don’t fancy yours much”. Theres a funny TV listing for Christmas predominately having a pop at Robson Green and Ross Kemp who do seem to make endless crap on the endless crap station. Readers an send in photos of rude and silly road and shop signs that read rather rude in plain English.Most of these are of course foreign and very amusing. The center spread has one of those cut outs you used to have on the back of the Cornflakes all those years back when life were easy lass. It’s a very glossy edition because its funny although the pages are thicker and you pay a quid more for very little extra content. But its lots its rebellion and cutting humor that its no longer funny or worth the read if you are over fourteen. Or maybe it’s just as naughty as ever and I’m an old bastard. If you have never read it then don’t as it’s one of those annoying magazines you feel you have to read every little bit in case you miss the
                  funniest bit. Try it and see what you think.

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                    19.11.2000 00:26
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                    VIZ, the finest choice for those looking for vulgar humour and a suprisingly witty take on life. There have been contenders, oh yes, but VIZ has does and always will reign supreme. VIZ feels like it is always on the verge of going bust at each issue. It is printed on cheap, bog roll papaer and feels very flimsy. The editorials and comments are always quite negative, relating to apparent poor sales - but I'm sure the magic of VIZ will live on for many many years. VIZ has some real classic characters, from the no-longer existent billy the fish, to sid the sexist, 8Ace and Student Grant. All feature the sometimes disgustingly graphic style of drawing. You are in for a laugh no matter what. SOmtimes the humour may scrape the barrel of appear quite schoolboy-esque but who cares - you'll need it. I have basically grown up with VIZ, something which I doubt many parents would allow, but my brothers always faithfully passed them on to me! VIZ is bursting with non-comic strip humour also, in the form of Letterbocks, VIZ Top Tips and Roger's Profanisaurus (Roget's Thesaurus?!) hilarity (though at your stomach's expense) is garunteed. VIZ has become somewhat more rude and sexually graphic now, good or bad? ill let you decide! Certainly not suitable for children! Harry

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                      13.09.2000 22:51
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                      My husband occasionally buys the vizz comic, and buys most of the annuals,He used to read them and start laughing often, i started to wonder why it was so funny. So i had a look i did not find it very funny, its just sexist comic stories designed for men. Some of the regular stories are The fat slags(probably the best stories) maybe because it reminds me of someone i know. Other stories are Sid sexist, and Roger Mellie the man on tele, the comic also features articles similar to what you would find in the sport paper. I personally think its a waste of money, as the comic is filled from cover to cover with sex related stories .

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                        13.09.2000 21:33
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                        I bought the latest Viz out of boredom during a four hour delay at Gatwick,possibly tempted by the free and aptly titled"Crap joke book". For those yet to sample Viz's wares it's best described as an adult comic.Much of it consists of cartoon strips of characters who swear,fart or have big testicles or indeed all three! The letters page and Top tips sections are a welcome respite from the strips and these can be quite funny- sample tip:Avoid paying for expensive personalised number plates simply change your name to your existing plate,from Mr P145XVT. I used to be a great fan but slowly grew bored with the constant repitition, with Sid,Rodger,Johnny et al just going through the motions(mostly literally).The letters are clearly made up with so one letter often getting several replies on the same page.The style has'nt evolved at all and it now looks lazy and tired. Occassional nuggets like the Franklin mint spoofs only highlighted the general deterioration.When I agreed with the banner headline "not as funny as it used to be" I jumped ship. So what's new?Well not much, I also enjoyed the robot pimp story so gushingly recommended by our previous reviewer but appart from "buy the Queen mother's teeth"little stood out. One to avoid unless you have a "Fast Show"appetite for repetitive catchphrases and fart jokes.

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                          25.08.2000 00:48
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                          I don't buy Viz as I don't like it but I was given an annual last Xmas so I thought, out of been polite, I'd better read it. Immediately it reminded me of a dirty Beano magazine with stupid pointless things in it. Ok, the letters can be funny but most of them are just crap. I didn't laugh much throughout the "magazine." In short, as it really isn't worth writing about (it is that poor), it is a light hearted dirty worded comic book for teenagers and people who just don't won't to grow up. Needless to say my copy is in the loft somewhere.

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                          24.08.2000 23:04

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                          Ah, Viz - - how quintessentially British. Viz has been on the top shelf for years and everybody I know has been through that phase of buying it and/or the annuals. Even to this day, quites from Finbar Saunders and his Double Entendres can be abused in conversation. For example, when his uncle was talking about being in Dick Whittington, he remarked "my Dick was partially well received in the Lady Mayoress' box" - - much to Finbar's delight. With such gems as Roger Melly, the man on telly taking a dump in a bunker during celebrity golf, this mag deserves awards. As a final extremely useful application, there is no magazine finer for rolling a joint on than a faithful, battered old viz. Shame it went a bit pants and commercial (loads of full page ads and I tuned out). Shame. Those video versions were a mistake too - - the only funny thing about the Fat Slags video was that it boasted on the cover to be "filmed in panhandle vision" :-) Ooh, went on to do lucozade ads didn't they - - you know it's gone wrong when that sort of commercialism creeps in.

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                          24.08.2000 19:01
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                          Love it or hate it, and I love it, viz is a classy comic. The whole purpose of a comic is to make you laugh, it doesnt matter how it accomplishes this, you bought it to have a laugh while reading it. Thats exacly what Viz does. From page to page it is crammed with hilarious stories. Most of the characters are renowned and some have even featured in their own films (fat slags anyone?). How the people at Viz keep coming up with such funny and original material is unbelievable. The comic strips are funny, the tips section was so good Ronald McDonald thought to do a rip-off of it in his commercials (which didnt work as I switched to burger king immediatley!). The one that has me in stitches at present is the story about: Danny Davis & The Robot Pimp. The caption to it just sums it up nicely... it reads.... "Young Danny Davis was the envy of all his classmates, for his best friend was Mickey Murphy. A remarkable time-travelling robotic whoremaster from Mars." Good old clean cut family entertainment.....it certainly isnt. But a bloody good laugh.....it certainly is. Buy it and laugh, then sell it on to your friends who will want to know what your laughing at. Jobs a good un!

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                            24.08.2000 16:53
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                            I have pretty much grown up with Viz from the days when my Uncle used to give me his copy through my student days of standing and reading in it in WH Smiths to now just being a good read when you are having your morning movement. Although the comic strips themselves are good and some are very funny, Sid the Sexist, Postman Plodd (anyone remember him?) and spoilt bastard being my particualar favourits. It is the articles and Top tips that really make Viz special. The top tips are based on the "Womans own" style of helpful tips, intead of how to get Jam out of Cardigans though they are based on a comic format. Tips like "sausage rolls sewn together make an excellent emergency hat for judges" "a pair of fox terriers taped to your feet make ideal organic roller skates" "Grandmothers don't forget that the latest date for boiling Christmas lunch carrots and potatoes is the fith of December". The articles follow a Sunday Sport style approach and often totally take the piss out of the tabloids. Fictous stories about Prince Charles being King of the Tree people with obscure headlines above each paragraph like "Socks". Now, you do have to have a fairly obscure sense of humour to appreciate this stuff but it is the only way to keep this venerated magasine going. There are only so many ways that you can say "f** off" or "s****" and Viz has used 'em all, some of them several times. Viz far outstrips its competition like Zit and is a far better read than Prima and filled with far more useful information.

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