Welcome! Log in or Register
£6.68 Best Offer by: bookdepository.co.uk See more offers
9 Reviews

News of the week condensed to a magazine.

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    9 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      08.02.2011 23:01
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A great read, especially for the commute!

      Do you ever find it frustrating that you have so many sources of news and information open to you that you don't know where to start!? Now that news is beamed to us through multiple channels (tv, internet, text message, radio etc), and done so throughout the day and night, I often find that it seems only a few hours between one story ends and another begins. I also tend to distrust a lot of what is being reported, as I either don't feel the source is reliable (i.e. if its told to me in a blog or twitter) or because the source may be biased and wants to promote a particular agenda. The Week solves all these problems. I first bought it after being offered 6 free issues on a trial and have now been subscribing to them for just over £20 every 13 weeks (which apparently saves me over 30% on the cover price of £2.75 for each issue). With the subscription, the magazine comes straight to my door and has never been late. On opening its pages, you'll soon see the difference between The Week and other magazines - it basically consists of all the leading stories that have broken around the world in the past seven days, and reports these stories by selecting articles from different publications and different areas of the world, so as to ensure its coverage is both impartial and from the most relevant source. The Week's format also allows for many different news stories to be covered while ensuring there is enough detail on each to tell you the key facts and opinions of those that matter (for example, its 'main stories' have two paragraphs stating 'what happened', two paragraphs stating 'what the editorials said', two paragraphs stating 'what the commentators said' and a quick paragraph telling you 'whats next'). And this, in a world where we're often overburdened with information, is both refreshing and, to be honest, all you really need to know in many cases (The Economist or the Times for example has inevitably more information and analysis on a story than this magazine can offer, but while I am a devotee of both I often find because of the level of detail, I've forgotten much of what I've read about a story ten minutes after I've read their article! Thematically, The Week covers the main stories first, then looks to events around the world, then selects its 5 or 6 'best articles' from the world's media (a section I really like) before covering issues from the worlds of sport, science, the arts, people, property and business, and basically everything else you could possibly think of, while doing this in less than 40 pages. If this seems as if it can't be done, I agree it seems implausible as I shared the same scepticism at first, but I promise once you've read your first issue, you'll see that not only can it be done, but it can be done without sacrificing the quality of its coverage.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      24.04.2010 18:57

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Subscribe to it - you'll never look back!

      A couple of years ago we decided to stop watching the news on a regular basis, as it was becoming pretty depressing. That's when we discovered the magazine 'The Week' - the best bits of the week's news (both national and international) condensed into one fantastic magazine. We've never looked back. As parents of very young children, we never have time to read long articles any more, so The Week's articles are ideal as they are concise, but still very informative. It gives every side of the argument, so you don't get the feeling you're being swung in any one direction. There are serious and funny bits, a scientific page, a sports page, the best properties on the market, the best (and worst!) films, plays, books etc. There are interesting and amusing articles on celebrities and loads more. Anyone who's tired of reading whole newspapers (or simply doesn't have time), or doesn't like watching the news - I really recommend The Week. If you subscribe to it it's definitely worth the money - you suddenly sound very informed when having conversations with people! Also, now I know what they're talking about when I watch 'Have I Got News for You'!! In fact, my husband and I fight over who's going to be the first to read it!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      30.07.2009 12:53
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      FIRST ON THE LIST ON FRIDAYS!

      The Week very neatly condenses all the News from at home, Europe and The United States, over the last seven days. The magazine has been in circulation since 1955 in this country, and there is now an American version in print, which is harder to find here. Items also covered are: The Arts, People,science and health, obituries, The city and property. sport, A Crossword which is just about right. Not too hard! NEWS: The weeks news covers the majority of it's approx 50 pages which they present in a stylish fashion by, presenting a short introduction to the headline, then what the commentators say from various newpapers and they also say what are the future thoughts and ideas from these people regarding the relevant news items. The news items from the States is quite in depth and less so from other European countries. THE ARTS: This section covers new releases at The Cinema, theatre and opera. They give ratings for these and I've found they're always pretty spot on for theatre and cinema. We always trust their opinions! They have a similar section for books, usually fiction, and also a well known author will tell us their favourite books of all time! PEOPLE: Brief stories of three celebrities who have usually been in the news. Usually an interesting fact about them, which you would be hard pressed to read anywhere else. SCIENCE AND HEALTH: Groundbreaking stuff from the world of science and also topics which are relevant in living a healthy lifestyle- I found out about the wonderful health properties of Gogi berries- from here. OBITUARIES Two or three celebrities or not so well known people, who have passed away over the last week. Gives a good account of their lives. THE CITY AND PROPERTY: An account of news and headlines from The Financial Times and recent properties that are for sale. SPORT: Gives a short account of sporting headlines from around the world. I enjoy this magazine very much, and find I'm up to speed with current events in next to no time. The only draw back it has from my view is, the sports section is a bit brief, but apart from that, it's well worth the price of £2.50. It's available every Friday

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      16.10.2008 08:32
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      The Week

      The Week-magazine This is a 'weekly magazine' and it covers news events which occurred in the week.It is presented in a way that the layout is appealing and easy to read. The magazine is a wonderful way of keeping up to date with the news and other popular topics such as Arts,Science,Health Issues. It has thirtyfive pages in total and it is packed from cover to cover with every news item and current affairs that anyone would wish . A wonderful magazine to keep up a breast with what is happening in the world and so much easier to read than a newspaper. This is ideal for anyone who has a busy life style and it short of time. The layout of the magazine I like and colourful and the other best thing is that it gets posted through the door but I am sure that you may be able arrange for delivery through an newsagents but I prefer to get it through the door. There is amazing offer as it offers you first of all the first six issues free and then if you do not want to have them anymore you can cancel the order and you do not need to send the copies back which have been sent free to you. The cost of the magazine is for 13 copies for £19.99 plus the six issues which they will send you free. This is done by Direct Debit which I know a lot of people are not happy with but I am not sure if you would qualify for the six free copies if one arranged for copies of the magazine through a newsagent. I find this a vital magazine to have as I can spare one hour max a week catching up on things that have happened in the week concerning 'Financial,Science Arts topics and many more interesting topics to read.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      29.08.2006 17:01
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Great weekly coverage of all the main news stories from around the world

      have subscribed to The Week magazine for over a year now and thought I was long overdue writing a review of the magazine. The Week is a weekly (thus the name) news magazine that covers all the weeks' main news stories from the UK and around the world. The magazines tagline - "All you need to know about everything that matters" is a great way of summing up the content as this magazine really does cover all the weeks news with not only the headlines but also view and opinions from various press sources. General ~~~~~~~~~ The magazine looks and feels aesthetically a little like private eye and is printed in A4 size on what looks and feels like re-cycled paper. The Week has been published since 1955 and been growing in popularity ever since, mostly by word of mouth, and now an American version is available in the US for our American Cousins. The Week is 44 pages (with no more than 9 pages of Ads) and costs £2.15 per issue however you can get a yearly subscription for about £64.50, which works out at £1.24 per issue. For content the week examines articles from over 60 world newspapers and about 30 leading magazines including The Spectator, The Economist, The New Yorker, New Scientist, Far Eastern Economic review and even Heat. With subscriptions the magazine usually arrives either on a Friday or Saturday morning - just in time for your Saturday morning coffee. Content ~~~~~~~~~~~ The week is split into eight sections, News, Letters, Arts, Property, Leisure, Obituaries, City and classifieds/crossword. News The News section covers the first 20 pages including the cover. The first two pages of the news section cover the two or three main stories of the week and how they were covered. Firstly they describe what happened, then they cover what the editorials said, then what the commentators said and finally they have a what next column discussing the next steps/ramifications of the news story. The next page is politics and has four or five columns - The controversy of the week, boring but important, poll watch, good week bad week, and an editorial. The good week bad week looks at key figures in the media spotlight that have had either a good or bad week and poll watch is a different poll each week on topical issues e.g. this week it was on the terrorist threat. The next page is Europe at a glance which is a map with the main news stories from various countries around it. We then move on to the world at a glance a two-page spread on world news, which like the last page centres on a map this time of the world and relates the key news stories. The next part of the news section is people, which as the name suggests is a number of articles on people in the news, a little side bar on this page I like is the recap of this weeks Desert Island discs on Radio 4. We now move on to the next page titled Briefing. This page covers a scientific or natural issue in some detail, this week it was about the alarming increase in jellyfish around the world, and it covered a round up of the issue and everything you wanted to know about jellyfish. The next three pages cover the best articles of the week from the British papers, the best of the American columnists and the best foreign articles. These are excellent as they allow the reader different perspectives on key news issues and the different national spins that can be put on these issues by the media. Moving on from these we have the health & science pages, which as the title states is the main news items from the world of health and science. The penultimate part of the news section is two pages entitled talking points. These pages cover gossip and news issues that, while not making the headlines have created some debate. To provide an example this weeks issues in talking points were on the war pardons for the British soldiers executed for cowardice in WW1, the A-level results and John Prescott's slagging of president Bush. The final part of the news is sport - alas this is only one page and only focuses on one or two major stories with a side bar on the main headlines. Letters The letters section is only one page however the spin on this is it is not the letters sent to "The Week" but a round up of the best letters of the week sent to the letters sections of The Guardian, The Times, The Daily Telegraph and The Independent. Arts. The arts section covers five pages and has a page each dedicated to new Books, Drama and Theatre, Film releases and Art exhibitions with a list page at the end summarising the weeks guide to what's worth seeing and reading. The list page also provide a summary of the week to comes best TV and a summary of the last week in the Archers if you missed it and are interested in the long running Radio 4 series. Property. These two pages cover a selection of the best properties of a specific type on the market throughout the country at the minute. The type varies each week; this week it was rural idylls and period town houses. I must admit this is the section I rarely look at and just skip through not being in the market for a rural idyll or a period town house but hey you never know. Leisure. This section is the most important for use consumers as its three pages include a food and drink section a travel section and most importantly a consumer section. This week consumer section included; new cars - what the critics say, the best waterproof cameras, for those of you who have everything and the best places to get pampered when you're pregnant. Obituaries. This page speaks for itself really. City. This four-page section is split into four parts, Companies in the news, Commentators, City briefing and Shares - tips and best buys. I find this section difficult to rate as I am not involved or have much interest in the city or financial markets though the shares tips and best buys is well laid out and easily understood and even I can clearly understand it. The Last Word. This section is a two page editorial on a different topic each week. The topics are wide and varied and thus difficult to categorise the last two weeks have been an inside look at traffic wardens in London and the job they do and an article on the development of an English Country town in China called Thames Town an British themed development outside Shanghai complete with village green and red phone boxes. And finally - Classifieds and Crossword. Well this speaks for itself, however I feel compelled to point out the crossword is a match for the times and has a prize draw for completed entries. In addition there is also a Sudoku. In Summary ~~~~~~~~~~~~ I must admit I do look forward to reading The Week each Saturday morning and it has become something of a Saturday morning ritual. It is easy and enjoyable to read and gives you a lot of information in just 44 pages. While it does lack detail the range of stories more than makes up for it and it provides a wide overview of all the weeks news for those with a busy lifestyle and without the time to catch the news or read the papers everyday. I would really recommend the week to all regardless of age and I feel that it is one even the kids might read as the short concise articles don't require patience and the word power of a countdown panellist to understand. All in all a great read.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        15.08.2002 19:13
        4 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        If you come across a Week reader then I'll bet they will be a disciple for the publication. People stumble across this weekly digest of quality news and current affairs writing and become devoted fans. Even their weekly look at the weather in the UK and Europe is of more interest and meteorologically sound than any national newspaper weather section. If you are interested in how different countries portray national news events and like to get more than one slant at topical issues then trial the Week for one issue and you'll become hooked. If you want to be well informed in both your working and social life then reading the Week will make you a far more interesting person.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          12.09.2001 23:29
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          4 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          ‘All you need to know about everything that matters’ is what ‘The Week’ says it offers you – a bit sweeping perhaps? After all, it doesn’t tell you what your other half was really up to at that office party, or how to open a milk carton without creating a dairy fountain. It does, however, give you a pretty good briefing on what’s happening in the world and how people are dealing with it. I’ve had a subscription to The Week for about...umm…four years, as far as I can remember – it works out cheaper that way - just over £1 per copy, rather than £1.65. I took up the special offer that you can still find inside the magazine to get six free trial issues before subscribing. I hadn’t really intended to keep up the subscription after that but it was too late – I was hooked. Since that time I have recommended it to friends and family and I know for a fact that my sister has become similarly addicted. The basic idea of the magazine is that the week’s news stories from around the world are presented in a condensed format, with quotes or précis from relevant media sources. The great thing about this is that, not only do you get the important points of the issue, with the minimum of padding, you are also shown how different sides of the argument are presented by different journalists in different countries, giving a far more balanced picture. The layout of The Week is very well planned. Usually, the two main stories are covered on the first two inside pages, giving you four separate columns on each, covering: What happened What the editorials said What the commentators said What next? If there is a third major news story in a week, this format is sometimes upset. These pages also contain a section of weird or touching stories, headed ‘It wasn’t all bad’, and a brief message from the editor. The next page cove rs politics, with ‘Controversy of the week’ which is fairly self explanatory, a smaller column, sometimes headed ‘Boring but important’, although I notice that they sometimes leave off that heading when they’re covering something too sensitive to call boring. There’s also light relief at the bottom of the page with sections on the latest opinion polls, who or what has had a good or bad week and the latest examples of over-enthusiastic political correctness. Next page is ‘Europe at a glance’, followed by two pages of ‘The world at a glance’ – with brief reports of the most important stories. ‘People’ is next, covering the personalities in the news, then a page with a ‘Briefing’ on a topic of interest, giving the pros and cons. The next three pages are for the best newspaper articles. I’ve always found it interesting that these are headed: ‘Best articles: Britain’ ‘Best of the American columnists’ And ‘Best articles: Foreign’ – which covers the rest of the world, including Europe. Perhaps these titles were devised by someone who sees British and American interests as being far more closely linked than British and European – I pass no judgement on this. Next up are pages covering ‘Health & Science’, ‘Talking Points’ ‘Sports’ (The only page I never read) and then an arts section with reviews of books, drama, art, film etc. A letters page usually picks the best from the UK broadsheets. Then there a couple of pages of impossibly expensive houses that are currently on the market, followed by food & drink, consumer and travel pages and an obituaries page which I tend to find surprisingly interesting. The city pages give you the low down on the movers and shakers, what’s going up, coming down or crashing out and a page on t he shares being tipped for buying or selling – this also has a form guide, telling you who’s tips performed best and worst out of those listed three months ago. ‘The last word’ presents an essay, sometimes on the subject of a new television programme or book, or sometimes linked to a recent event or commemoration. It’s usually worth a read. Finally there’s a crossword, to keep you busy over the weekend and a round up of the week’s weather – just in case you missed it! Not having the time or the inclination to buy a daily paper, I’m a big fan of The Week. It gives me about the right level of information to keep me up to date with what’s going on in the world and a good, balanced selection of viewpoints. The one drawback that I can think of is the fact that there’s an element of Chinese Whispers in it - you are relying on someone to interpret someone else’s opinion and put it before you. Just once or twice, having read an article in the New Scientist and then seen it interpreted in The Week, my boyfriend has said he thought that the original article hadn’t been represented entirely accurately. I don’t know if this is the case for other sources as well. That said, it’s a good read each week, it’s entertaining and informative and I’ve certainly no plans to give up my subscription for a while.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            20.02.2001 17:20
            Very helpful
            (Rating)

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            The Week is an excellent weekly, condensed news magazine. It selects the most important and well-written news from many sources, and provides it all in one, easy to handle, entertaining magazine. However, where it particularly excels over more traditional news sources is not in its all-you-need-in-one-place-ness, but in its world consciousness. Whereas many newspapers tend to include very little coverage of world events, choosing only to include news of issues which they currently deem fashionable (heard much about the troubles in East Timor recently?) The Week includes a page entitled “Europe at a glance” and a two page spread, “The world at a glance.” containing summaries of news stories from around the globe. In addition to this there are pages dedicated to finding and summarising the best articles from Britain, the US and the rest of the world. The Week, as well as being informative, is also very entertaining, and has some very tongue-in-cheek moments, including “PC Watch” which highlights some of the grossest excesses of political correctness fever and “IT MUST BE TRUE… I read it in the tabloids” which is a selection of some of the less believable articles that tabloids have featured through the week. Also included are selections from just about every other section you will find in a newspaper, including reviews, travel, money, obituaries… The list goes on. All in all, The Week is a very successful foray into the land of condensed news and definitely worth a look if you can’t spare the time, money or energy to buy and read a broadsheet every day, or just if you crave a bit more variety than your regular paper can offer.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            23.11.2000 03:13
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            2 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            The Week is an ideal publication for people like me who would love to read a broadsheet but don't have the time. It selects articles, comments, photos etc from national and international newspapers to give the reader an informed view of the week's news. The first page summarises the week's main stories and the second has a selection of comments from the papers on each story. There is a page of politics, followed by a page entitled 'Europe at a glance'. This has a map of Europe with arrows to the places where events took place - very useful if your geography is as dodgy as mine. World news is covered in the same way on the next two pages. There's a section on celebrities then a very helpful page dealing with a major issue and giving the historical background leading up to current events. There's also comments from British and foreign journalists, health and science news, sport, reviews of books, plays, films and art, a pick of the week's correspondence to the nation's broadsheets, food and drink, travel, finance and a good cryptic crossword. The magazine is 40 pages long and is A4 size so it's easy to handle. The items are all brief and presented in an easy-to-read style. It enables you to be up-to-date and informed however little time you have to catch up on the news.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments