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Essexgirl2006

Essexgirl2006
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Member since: 14.11.2006

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      30.09.2014 10:35
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      Milder, more pleasant mouthwash

      I actually bought this by accident instead of 'regular' adult Listerine mouthwash. It is aimed at kids, but I figured it would be OK for a few weeks use.

      Instead of pouring like normal, my bottle had a squeezy feature - You removed the cap and squeeze the bottle and the exact amount (10ml) was dispensed into the neck ready for you to pour into your tooth mug. It's a bit of a novelty but my measure-by-eye method isn't always effective when I use conventional mouthwash. It advises swigging around your mouth for a minute and with a modest amount like 10 ml, this isn't a problem.

      I use this after brushing most mornings and evenings (don't tell my dentist I don't use this or floss every time!)

      Firstly, the mild mint flavour is much more pleasant than the adult fresh-mint. Having gone back to the adult version I think I will buy this one again, as the adult one has a stronger taste of antiseptic and artificial mint, then the milder children's version, so this version is more pleasant tasting in the mouth.

      When I spit into the sink, it tints any left over food it has dislodged a darker shade of green - Bran Flakes crumbs are a regular offender. It seems that I get more crumbs with this than I noticed with the usual Listerine mouthwash.

      The main disadvantage is that when it gets low in the bottle the tube cannot suck up the last parts of the mouthwash to extract into the neck dispenser and I couldn't figure out how to get into it any other way, so 2-3 days worth of mouthwash is wasted.

      Obviously this is a kids product and I am an adult, but I imagine kids of a certain age could easily use this unsupervised and would see the results in the sink, which is a good lesson in oral hygiene. If you struggle with adult mouthwashes and the sharp taste, then you may find this is better.

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      25.09.2014 11:58
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      Advantages

      • "Well decorated"
      • "Great Location for South Terminal"

      Disadvantages

      • "Expensive food "
      • "Cleanliness issues"
      • "Noisy due to room design"

      Best Located Hotel for Gatwick South Terminal

      Prior to last summer's holiday I spotted the Hilton at Gatwick, for £85. It walking distance from the South Terminal, when most hotels required a shuttle bus. The deal was room only and available at short notice.

      I arrived at Gatwick by train, the station is next to the South terminal. It took six minutes to walk to the hotel. There was no queue at check-in which was efficient.

      My double room had an en suite with bath and quality toiletries. I had a camp bed as well as a double, but otherwise everything was pretty standard – TV, tea/coffee facilities etc. The window was tiny but the lights were good with convenient switches by the bed. I spotted one spare plug socket. Wi-fi is available for a charge, but is free in the communal lobby areas.

      There are various food options in the hotel but on the pricey side. There is a Costa Coffee by the entrance (1st floor), I went to Amy’s bar where I had an open sandwich with chips for £12. I also ordered a vodka and diet coke (large measures seem to be standard), bringing the price up to £22 including service. Other food options include the Sports bar, Amy's Restaurant and Garden restaurant.

      There is a small shop containing a limited selection of paperback books, newspapers and magazines, cigarettes, sweets, basic toiletries and gifts.

      My room had an adjoining door to the next room (not accessible), but this meant sound proofing was very poor and at 4am I could listen to my neighbours’ conversation. The 5 foot bed was not hugely comfy, it was soft and I seemed to find a dip.

      One thing I was disappointed with was cleanliness. As I was getting into bed with bare feet, I could feel gritty bits on the floor, and found a few small stones. The grout around the shower was looking tired and there were rust marks around the plughole. When I checked out, I reported the issues and the receptionist seemed shocked and apologetic and said she would speak to housekeeping.

      Overall I was disappointed with a number of aspects, most notably the cleaning. Other issues include the noise caused by the door to the adjoining room. The food is expensive, but cannot fault the quality. The communal areas are comfortable and not intimidating if dining alone. On the positives, my room was pleasantly decorated, well-lit and mostly comfy. Location wise, this would also be at the top of the list, particularly if flying from the South terminal. I am hesitant to recommend the hotel, as I am unsure I would stay here again. However, it is worth considering if you get a good deal as airport hotels are generally pricey due to a captive market, and it is one of the best located hotels at Gatwick South.

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      24.09.2014 11:08
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      Advantages

      • "Original location"
      • "Interesting lead character"

      Disadvantages

      • "Confusing plot"

      Could Bee Better

      The Honey Guide is a crime novel by Richard Crompton. Crompton is a British journalist who lives in Kenya and this is the first in a series featuring his detective Mollel. Mollel is a former Maasai warrior who now works for the Nairobi police force.

      I enjoy novels set in other countries, and why should we not get some good crime stories from Africa? This is no 'No.1 Ladies Detective Agency', it is much grittier, and whilst crimes are solved through deduction and legwork, that is pretty much where the similarities end. The novel is set during election time and Mollel is not popular with his bosses and has been moved into the traffic division; however as a national hero following the bombing of the American embassy a few years before, they cannot be seen to let him go.

      A few days before the election the body of a prostitute is washed up in a storm drain. She is also a Maasai, so Mollel is called on to lead the investigation. With everything else going on, no one really cares about an unnamed Maasai hooker. Mollel and his colleague Kiunga set about finding out who she is, and what happened to her and track down a friend called Honey. It seems that Honey and Lucy (the dead girl) have had some influential clients and may know something about some of the key figures in the election campaign and Nairobi society, that these people are keen to keep quiet.

      I initially liked the character of Mollel, he is tenacious and hard-working but a poor father to a young boy he struggles to relate to. I think there is more to Mollel’s back story than we are given. The character development seemed a bit of an inconvenience to the story and was inconsistent, and I found myself quite frustrated with the lack of revelations in that aspect. We know little about the supporting characters other than what they tell us.

      Plot wise I thought the story quite interesting with a lot of potential, but there seemed to be a lot of strands and a lot of lies, so it started to get a bit complicated. I think Crompton tried to be a bit too clever, as there where many red herrings for you to keep on top of, which ultimately got confusing for the reader. However, I liked how he described the city and was able to build up a picture of it in my mind, although I suspect it was not entirely accurate. The parts about the election and its aftermath, were very interesting and brought the story more to life.

      Overall I enjoyed the book, but not so much at the end as at the beginning, which is why I am awarding the book just three stars. If you like your crime fiction set in different locations then by all means give this a try, as I suspect the best is yet to come from Mollel.

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      • More +
        18.09.2014 11:08
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        Advantages

        • "Fresh air and quality time with family/friends"
        • "Lots of activities to do"

        Disadvantages

        • "School holiday also expensive"
        • "Can work out expensive to do everything"

        Fresh Air and Quality Time

        I have visited Center Parcs a number of times now – more recently Sherwood near Nottingham, and also Longleat. I have always stayed in a Woodland Lodge which is a three bedroom lodge sleeping up to 6 (a double room and two twins) and I think this is a mid-range accommodation with good facilities such as bedlinen, towels, cutlery, crockery, pans and utensils. The beds are comfy and although bedrooms are small the communal space is good. The lodges are self-catering so you have a barbecue, oven, dishwasher, toaster etc. There was one bathroom and one separate toilet. I would have preferred two bathrooms as it was quite tricky to get five adults in an out the shower in the mornings – a bit of flexibility was needed.

        You can stay mid-week (Monday Night to Friday morning) or at weekends (Friday night to Monday morning). You can hire bikes or go around on foot. Free activities include the indoor pool area which is well equipped with rapids, flumes, hot tubs and other activities. Or else you can just sit in the warmth in a deckchair. There is a small beach and playground area too. Most other activities you have to pay for and they are not always cheap. We always try and have a game of crazy golf (£7 adults – 18 holes) and it is a very well thought out course. We also did Laser Combat (£28 for just over an hour) which was heaps of fun. You can also do Ten Pin Bowling or hire a segway, and there are plenty of kids activities. It can all mount up though.

        Each 'village; has a Village Square with a few shops and eateries. There is a supermarket for the things you forgot (not the cheapest shop), a place that does take-aways, a sports bar with food for all the family and a couple of restaurants and gift shops. It does vary between villages, but we traditionally visit the Pancake House for breakfast on the last morning.

        I've always enjoyed my weekends here but prices vary with the seasons (school holidays also) and type of lodge you stay in, and how many in your party. I recommend checking out their website to see if it is within your budget, but it is lots of fun for all ages.

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        10.07.2014 15:23
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        Advantages

        • "Clever links and themes"
        • "Quick read"
        • "Subtle plot developments"

        Disadvantages

        • "Hard to relate to characters"
        • "Weak plot/story initially"

        An easy read with more depth than initially appears

        The Trouble with Alice is the debut novel of Olivia Glazebrook. The book has two main protagonists, Kit and Alice, an expectant couple on holiday in Jordan for a last minute break before Alice is too pregnant to fly. The book dives straight in with their car falling off a mountain road. After the crash, Alice suffers a miscarriage and her way of handling this is different from Kit. I thought it was very interesting in how their actions and inactions at this time mirrored how there relationship unfolded over the rest of the book. This is a character led novel looking at their relationship from the outside, seeing only what they choose to reveal. The couple seem to be very different in both age, outlook and background and I did wonder why they got together. At times, I didn''t like either character very much. I struggled with the fact neither of them had a proper job and both seemed quite flaky. As far as supporting characters are concerned I saw some clever links as to the behaviour of the parents, which gave answers to some of the questions regarding the attitudes of their grown-up children. I think the signposts were subtle and something that came to me, after subsequently dwelling on the completed book. This could be an insight into a failing relationship of the ?perfect couple'', but I didn''t see the characters or their relationship as perfect. They seemed to do nothing to save their relationship, or care about that aspect. They certainly didn''t communicate. We hear each side and it is told in the third person. Whilst I was frustrated and initially thought the story a bit weak, I did notice a clever analogy regarding Alice''s relationship with Kit''s dog and her grieving process, but I don''t want to spoil anything for you. As mentioned, I had plenty of frustrations with the book and initially thought it quite a weak book. There was no plot or story to speak of, other than what we read in the opening chapter. The book is about people rather than events or actions, and as such is not going to appeal to everybody. At a teeny bit over 300 pages, I did find this book a quick read, which was merciful at the time. However, as I thought about the book and the themes in it, it occurred to me that there was more to it than I first thought, and it was actually a bit deeper. For this reason I think it would make a good Book Club choice as there is a lot to discuss about it and I have upgraded it from a 3 to a 4 star read. Glazebrook is a talented author, and I found the book easy to read and get into. Language is simple and (on the surface) quite shallow, but the book was more multi-dimensional than I first thought.

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          14.06.2014 11:55
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          Advantages

          • "Excelent acoustics"
          • "World class performances"
          • "Great architecture"

          Disadvantages

          • "Excelent acoustics"
          • "World class performances"

          A special night out in London

          The Royal Opera House is one of London''s best venues for the opera and ballet. Situated in Covent Garden, the front doors open to Bow Street. Covent Garden tube is just a few minutes walk away. It is the home of the Royal Opera and Royal Ballet companies. Originally just a drama theatre, built in 1732, the venue has had a massive refurbishment in the 1990s through money from the National Lottery and is truly a fantastic venue.

          There is a large cloakroom area. It is free to keep coats and brollies here and I do recommend it, especially if you are in the cheap seats as there is not a lot of legroom. After a quick trip to the spacious and posh lavatories, we went up the stairs to the Paul Hamlyn bar. The glass fronted part of the opera is now a superb sleek and modern restaurant and champagne bar.

          We were seated in the Amphitheatre aka the Gods with reasonably priced tickets, and this can be accessed by escalator from the Hamlyn Hall level. There is another bar and a smaller restaurant up here as well as several sets of toilets. In the amphitheatre the rows are quite narrow and you don''t have armrests, so although you have individual seats, your arms and elbows may be in contact with your neighbour. There is also limited legroom, less than a on a budget airline, so if you are in the middle of the row you are pretty much stuck there until everyone else has moved. The seats were well padded and comfortable, but I felt a tad achy at the end, because of my subconscious effort to hold myself upright, with my arms close to my sides, so I didn''t touch my neighbour, and I am only petite. It is worth remembering that the seats are well tiered here, so you won''t have your view down obstructed by other people''s heads. It is a long way down and opera glasses maybe a good idea. Tickets vary in this section and can start as little as GBP 5 for standing room. Mine were GBP 30, including booking fee through an independent organisation but you could probably get them cheaper direct. If you want to sit in the stalls or the front of the grand circle you are looking at about GBP 95 to 185 depending on the production. I would certainly like to try a nicer or closer seat another time, if I was feeling flush.

          The building is very ornate within the auditorium, and looks amazing. The contrast with this baroque style theatre and the super, modern bar and restaurant area makes this a really interesting building to visit and my friends and I spent half our time cooing at the decor. You can also do backstage tours for GBP 12 which I fully intend to do one day.

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            10.06.2014 19:20
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            Advantages

            • "A few valid points"

            Disadvantages

            • "Author out of touch"
            • "Weak concept"

            A poor attempt at being helpful

            I had never read a self-help guide before this book, in fact I only read this one by accident. It serves me right for not reading the Amazon blurb properly before I ordered it.

            The author is called Elizabeth Kantor, an American writer who has published a number of articles previously. This is her second book.

            In the beginning Ms Kantor wishes to establish that us women are indeed looking for our Happy Ever After. Our aim is the be an Elizabeth Bennett, rather than a Lydia (characters from Pride and Prejudice for those that have not had the pleasure of meeting them before).

            Kantor does discuss (from an Austen point of view) the difference between the sexes and why it is us women who are worrying about our love lives, not the men. I think she makes some valid points here (although I am sure there are those that would disagree), as I found some things did resonate with me. One chapter is dedicated to a number of Fear of Commitment case studies based on characters from Austen''s novels, that were written two hundred years ago. This was kind of what I was expecting from the tongue-in-cheek book I thought I had bought, but for the fact the author thought it relevant to today.

            Towards the end of the book, Kantor makes suggestions as to where we may find these modern day Darcys, Knightleys et al. She is at pains to point out that she is happily married, so doesn''t actually need these methods herself. This includes what she calls a ''new-fangled'' method called computer matchmaking, I seriously hope she was being facetious here, and the book had just made me lose my sense of humour. The book was published in 2012, not 1812. However, Kantor knows some people, who know some people who met online, so that must be OK then.

            I love Austen''s books, but they are works of fiction. They are probably a very good social commentary of the Regency period, but I really don''t think that they are particularly helpful to single women today. I can''t recommend this book, and I can''t make any comparisons to other books of this genre, but I would imagine it is quite poor.

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              18.03.2014 11:07
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              A nice hotel in the heart of Kensington

              Based just a few minutes from Kensington High Street, this four star hotel is excellently located for a short break in London. There is parking outside, but I gather it is expensive. However, the hotel is just a few minutes from High Street Kensington tube station (Circle and District lines), so making it easy to access much of London. It is also ideal for events at Olympia or Earls Court, or a concert at the Royal Albert Hall.
              The hotel has a number of restaurants, including a brassiere, a lobby bar, Asian food at the Bugis Street restaurant and a coffee shop. There was a menu for the Bugis St restaurant in the room. Prices for main courses were between £9-13, and vegetarian choices were poor. There is also room service with sandwiches starting from £9. The coffee shop doubled as an internet cafe as £1 for 20 minutes. There is wi-fi in the hotel but there is a charge for it.

              The hotel has a currency exchange service in the lobby, an ATM (I think it charged you) and a gift shop.
              My friend arrived before me and checked us both in at 2pm which is the earliest check in time. She said there was no queue, but there was quite a queue when I arrived at 5pm. I gather there was a little wait whilst they found an available room, but otherwise was straightforward.

              Our room was on the seventh floor, and one of the five spacious and efficient lifts came quickly. We were a little walk from the lifts but the floor was well carpeted, with nice, soft carpet for when you are walking back from a night out with your heels in your hands.

              Our twin room was a good size with light wood finish, and white bedding. There was a small wardrobe with those fiddly hangers that can't be removed, an iron and ironing board, and extra blankets. There were also drawers, tea and coffee facilities, a desk/ dressing table with mirror and a flat screen TV with freeview channels. Over the bed were individual lamps but the switches were together next to one if the beds, which was not convenient for the person in the other bed, who would have to get out of bed and walk around to use them. There was a hairdryer built in, and we spotted two free plug sockets but the one under the desk appeared to be unsafe (we didn't use it and reported it to reception upon checking out).

              The bathroom was also a good size, with a shower over the bath that was straightforward and worked effectively. All was spotless, with clean white towels and hotel branded toiletries (supposedly ones that used green tea). I can confirm that the shower cap worked effectively, the soap lathered and the shower gel did its stuff. No complaints here.

              We were staying here to attend a black tie function in the Liffey Suite on the Mezzanine level between ground and first floors. It can be accessed by the lifts (level M) or by stairs from the ground floor. The suite had a small private bar area, and plenty of space for 100 plus diners and a dance floor. There was a cloakroom just outside, and large toilets which were clean and spacious.

              The staff behind the bar seemed disorganised and inexperienced, at first I thought it was just because everyone was arriving at the same time, but it happened throughout the evening. The range of drinks were limited (you could go to the main bar downstairs if you wished but who wanted to do that all the time?) so there were no beers on tap, nor dark rum. A spirit and mixer was about £6 for a single.

              We were served warm bread rolls and butter, followed by a starter of Melon Fan with fruit coulis. This was beautifully presented, but a lot of melon, and many people didn't finish it as the melon was just "too much". I did enjoy the other berry fruits though.

              Mains were chicken thighs, which I though a strange cut, but as a veggie what do I know? This was served with potato and a selection if vegetables, and seemed well received. I had an aubergine parcel stuffed with rice on a bed of ratatouille style vegetables. I thought this OK but the aubergine a bit tough, and not quite as the menu described it when I booked. Dessert was chocolate fudge cake with fresh cream, and was a good sized portion that was hard to finish, but was very tasty. Mostly people enjoyed the meal and service was very good.

              After the meal there was dancing, although this aspect had not been organised by the hotel. The bar remained inefficient. At the end of the evening (1am) some if us retired to the hotel bar which stays open until 2am for residents. When we approached the bar we were told they were shut. I gave them my room number, but contrary to the guest services info in the room, they insisted they were shut. We returned to our friends and a staff member came over a few minutes later and offered to fetch our drinks as long as we paid cash. We were a bit confused but went with it!

              We slept well in our room, only disturbed by someone in the corridor once. We were woken by the cleaners as we hadn't put the Do Not Disturb on (there is a button on the control panel by the other bed, where light switches are also controlled).

              Breakfast was served in the brassiere on the ground floor, where you are greeted and seated. A waiter serves you tea or coffee. I requested hot chocolate but this was extra. If you don't have breakfast included it is £17 for full English (hot) breakfast, and £12 for Continental. The breakfast is buffet style, and I thought it quite small for a hotel of this size, many dishes needed re-filling, and it was small and cramped. Cold food included orange or apple juice, four varieties if cereal (adult cereals, no kids ones), fresh fruit (orange segments and a mixed fruit salad), ham and cheese (one variety). There was also yoghurt, pastries and bread for toasting. The hot food selection included bacon, sausages, various eggs (scrambled, fried), baked beans, tomatoes and congee. The latter is not something I see often in my breakfast options. As a vegetarian, I was disappointed not to see any hash browns, which would have made my cooked selection more interesting. Overall, I thought the breakfast buffet experience here, to be pretty poor.

              After breakfast, we returned to our room to packs and check out. The checkout queue was short and swift and we used the opportunity to report the dodgy plug socket in our room. Hopefully this was dealt with promptly. We stored our overnight bags with the concierge service whilst we had a mini-shopping trip around Kensington High Street.

              Despite my mini disappointment with the breakfast, I enjoyed my stay here more than a similar event I attended at the Holiday Inn Kensington Forum. Therefore if the price is similar, I would choose this place over that as I thought the rooms, function facilities and location to be slightly better here.

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                11.03.2014 10:47
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                A gentle, warming read

                Maeve Binchy is an established Irish author who sadly passed away in 2012. She has written quite a few novels and I have read quite a few of them with mixed results. The important thing to remember with Ms Binchy is that she will provide you with a gentle read. There will be no complicated plot twists in her novels, which are very much character driven, and you will not find any rumpy-pumpy here. There are some romantic strands, but sex is something that happens and is not indulged. What you will get is a gentle read with some varied characters in a pretty setting.

                The format of this novel will be familiar to those that have read Binchy's books before - each chapter takes a different character and builds up the story (such as it is) over a week. In this instance the setting is a newly opened country hotel on the west coast of Ireland, where a variety of people have come to enjoy a week in winter...

                Stone House was the family home of the Sheedy sisters. Now on her own Queenie Sheedy persuades Chicky, a local woman who moved to America, to take it on and turn it into a hotel. Amongst the characters that we meet are Chicky, her old school friend Nuala and her son Rigger and Chicky's niece Orla. On top of this we meet the guests of this first week, which include competition prize-winners, a Swedish accountant and a fading American movie star.

                Binchy certainly has the skill to create a well-drawn character, as we really only get a chapter to learn about each person. We get background information to their story, which leads to why they are at the hotel, and in some respects the book is a selection of short stories in which each person ends up at Stone House. There is definitely a knack to this type of story-telling and there is no doubt that Binchy has it. I had read some of her books previously and was disappointed that a few peripheral characters seemed to pop up again across novels. Regular readers may enjoy this, but I found it a tad self-indulgent and felt I was an outsider in a clique, wondering if I was missing some in-joke. Thankfully I didn't get that feeling in this book, and there seemed to be only a few references to past characters that I recognised (die hard fans may spot more).

                I had been reading quite a bleak book and once it got to Christmas Eve I found I wanted something a bit lighter, so picked this off my kindle as a friend had recommended it to me very highly. For that time of year, when I had some quiet periods relaxing at my parents' home, I was able to take some time out to read and this book really ticked the boxes of what I was looking for at the time. As much as I enjoyed it, I won't say it is the best read I have had recently, just that it was perhaps the 'right' read. If you are not familiar with Binchy's style you may find the book a bit slow and old-fashioned (it makes modern day west coast Ireland sound like it is stuck in a time-warp), and some happenings a bit odd. At 480 pages I was surprised I got through it in two days, but it was such an easy read which sometimes suits the mood we are in. Overall, I think this gentle, unassuming last novel may be a comfort blanket during the melancholic winter months.

                RRP - £7.99
                Kindle - £2.99
                Paperback - £3.80 - check for offers on the web

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                  04.03.2014 10:27
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                  A lovely pub in Chelmsford.

                  Some friends of mine are regular pub quiz goers, and their favourite quiz is the weekly Wednesday quiz at the Riverside Inn, Chelmsford, so one week I went along to check it out. The inn is an old seventeenth century coaching inn and mill based on the banks of the river Chelmer (you can sometimes spot canoeists nearby) and they also have a few bedrooms for those staying in the area. It is located just 5 minutes from the town centre and can be accessed in about 6 minutes from the local rail station, and bus services come by this way too.

                  The Riverside area is easily signposted as there is a leisure and shopping centre nearby with further parking. The pub does not have its own car park; I parked in the public pay and display opposite. Charges were £1 per hour, and £3.50 for four hours or more. I understand that this is the most reasonably priced of the nearby car parks but I have not tried any of the others to be sure. Parking in the streets would be pretty much impossible in the immediate locality due to proximity to the town centre and the station means a lot of places are permit/residents parking or double yellow lines.

                  The pub is large with wooden beams on the ceiling and lots of wooden tables and padded chairs around, plus a few leather sofas and armchairs. All the furnishings seem well maintained and not torn or scratched, it looks like the owners and their team take pride in their pub. There seemed to be an upstairs area but I didn't investigate. The bar area is big, uncluttered and clean (no damp bits just where you were about to lean) and there seemed to be enough staff on, all who seemed friendly and helpful. There is a neat and well maintained garden area and a blanket box where you may borrow a blanket if it is chilly outside later - I thought this a nice touch as I often feel the cold, but like to enjoy the outside areas in the summer. As it was we sat inside. The loos were off to one corner and there is a disabled lavatory. Although the building is quite old they have endeavoured to make it accessible with ramps at the entrance. Unfortunately when I visited, they were looking a bit untidy (loo paper all over the floor, wet around the sinks) but otherwise were well stocked, with everything in working order). There are just three cubicles in the ladies, so there could be a queue at peak times.

                  The pub was quite busy when I arrived at 7.15pm (quiz starts at 8pm-ish) and we had one of the last free tables. I got myself a drink (a diet coke was £2.35) and perused the food menu. Like many pubs they had a good range of wines and spirits. It is a Young's pub, so many of the cask beers are from that family.

                  I went for the veggie burger (£8.25); a few others had the classic burgers, a soup and a pie. The burger was nothing special, although perfectly edible if sauces added (it came with wholegrain mustard on the side), it was served with lettuce, tomato and a pickle on a small wooden tray. The bun was nice, and the burger was easy to pick up and eat, which is just as well as on the tiny tray it would not be easy to cut with a knife and fork. The burger was accompanied by delicious skin on chips in a little metal bucket. I am SO over chips in a bucket. The classic burger was similarly served. The pie (chicken, ham and leek) was a good size and was described as 'nice', and was served on a plate with seasonal veggies and mash. The soup ordered was carrot and coriander (£5.50) and she thought it very nice, but thought the accompanying bread (which looked like regular sliced white bread) was pretty tasteless. Expect to see the usual suspects like fish & chips, scampi and sausage and mash on the menu also. Overall, everyone enjoyed their food but no one was especially impressed. They do roast dinners here on Sundays which are apparently very popular (booking recommended), as well as barbecues at weekends (weather permitting of course!). I wouldn't rule out eating here again. They do 'meal deals' on various days of the weeks, but not on a Wednesday, which is popular anyway with the quiz.

                  The quiz was lots of fun! It is £1 per person and there is a cash price for the two top teams (we came second and got £15, but that may depend on the number of people who show up). I understand that there are also roll-over weeks, but this didn't happen the week I was there, so I am not sure what that is about. They also do token prizes for the lowest scoring team and a bottle of wine as a random prize (picked out of the hat). Teams were generally six people or less. As well as conventional quiz questions (I knew remembering who wrote the Mr Men books would come in useful one day) and the obligatory music round (of which I knew all the embarrassing, cheesy stuff, but none of the cool stuff) there were supplementary rounds such as pictures, anagrams, guess the lyrics and cryptic clues. The quiz lasted about two and a half hours from start to final prize awarded, with the scoring and prize-giving being a slightly long-winded process where people were getting fidgety (it was about 10.30/10.45pm).

                  Overall I enjoyed my time here. The pub is well-looked after, the food is nice enough and the atmosphere pleasant. I recommend the quiz night if that is your 'thing', as it was a fun evening.

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                    25.02.2014 10:45
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                    Therapy for the skin?

                    I received a 15ml tube of this night cream in an Anti-Ageing beauty box from a company called Latest in Beauty. The product was included as it was considered to be one of the best products by testers for the book, The Anti-Ageing Beauty Bible. I was unfamiliar with LP Skin Therapy who make the cream and it would appear that LP stands for the initials of Dr. Linda Papadopoulos, a 'renowned' psychologist. No, I didn't mean dermatologist. She is a psychologist who has appeared discussing the mental state of the housemates in some of the earlier series of Big Brother so I was surprised to see she had a skin care range. On her website:
                    'Dr. Linda has said "After having worked with hundreds of patients it became clear to me that what was lacking in the field of dermatological cosmetics was a range that addressed the skin's health holistically, taking into account a person's emotional state as well as their physical state".'

                    Quite frankly, I think most of us are aware that our skin suffers when we are stressed, and that is without the doctorate, what I didn't know was that this was a recognised 'ology' - Psychodermatology and it has been discovered that it is the hormone cortisol, which we release when stressed or anxious, results in blocked pores, spots and contributes to premature ageing. So, whilst the problem has been identified, how are we going to solve it?

                    Well, I guess the manufacturers are hoping we will use their cream, and I was certainly happy to give it a go. It includes vitamins F, A, C and E (clever eh?), peptides, gold and platinum. It all sounds a bit fancy (and it appears that Vitamin F is technically nowadays classified as a fatty acid, if you were wondering why you hadn't heard of it before), so I was keen to try it.

                    I really liked the scent, I can't really describe it exactly as it was a blend, but it seemed to be vaguely citrusy but softer - less tangy than other citrus scents I have used. On application I found it to be quite sheer, more so than I expected, most night creams tend to be a bit thicker and heavier than other skin creams, but I didn't find that with this one. Maybe this was influenced by the fact that I had a small tube, rather than a tub. However it squeezed out swiftly and was easy to apply and smooth in, soaking in almost immediately. It didn't leave my skin feeling greasy at all, just soft.

                    At the time of application I was in the midst of a busy period at work with deadlines looming and helping my elderly parents prepare for an imminent move, and I certainly think I was run down. My skin was looking as tired as I was, but I didn't have any obvious problems with blocked pores or spots. I found no real difference to my skin the next day, but it didn't feel dry and I had no reactions so I was happy to continue to use.

                    My little tube lasted me a good few weeks and during that time I didn't suffer any breakouts or problems, but at the same time I still looked tired and didn't feel like my skin had brightened. Overall, I did not feel my skin was as moisturised as I would have liked. It didn't feel dry the next morning, but it didn't feel especially moisturised or soft so I was always keen to get my day cream on, which seemed to have a better effect on my skin. For that reason, I will not be purchasing a larger tub.

                    RRP £45. Stockists include QVC, Amazon or E-bay.

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                      21.02.2014 10:40
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                      Pleasant Italian restaurant in Croydon

                      When my friend Juliet invited me to her birthday lunch I automatically said yes, even though I didn't know the restaurant, and it was completely on the wrong side on London to where I live. Juliet already knew where she wanted to go, having been here several years ago for her birthday. She is a popular girl, so needed somewhere that could cater for large parties thus picked this restaurant in South Croydon which is local to her. So one hot, sunny Saturday, last year fifty of us rocked up here for lunch.

                      The invite said 12.30 for 1pm, but my sat-nav sent me in the wrong direction once I was within the vicinity. I wasn't the only one, so be warned if coming here with a sat-nav and print off directions from the Croham Arms pub/Croham Road area. Fortunately my friend Amy was kind enough to run around the streets of South Croydon to rescue me. It is also worth noting that parking (which is available on the street outside the restaurant and nearby) is £4.50 for a maximum of two hours. A lengthy lunch is always going to take longer than that, so under Amy's local knowledge we parked about 5-7 minutes walk away on a residential street at the other end of Selsdon Road where I could park for £2 for three hours. The reason that parking is difficult is that the station is nearby - the restaurant is just a five minute walk from South Croydon over-ground station, and a longer walk or a bus ride from East Croydon station. The restaurant is located on Ruskin Parade on Selsdon Road, but the end where there are lots of shops and restaurants.

                      The restaurant in double-fronted and there were tables outside if you fancied it. It is L shaped with the base of the 'L' going across the front of the restaurant, which has tiled floor and a sort of medieval inspired theme going on with wooden doors on the walls, iron 'gates' and bright red or yellow napkins accompanying the plain ivory tablecloths that cover the red checked under-cloths. It was very bright and gave the restaurant a light, airy feel (although lack of natural light at the back, may mean you don't get this feeling there. Walls are bright or mirrored, so it all looks very modern and cheerful. They have a number of blackboards dotted about the walls with specials on, or special mid-week lunch offers. If I was to criticise the interior is that the seats could be a bit more comfy. I definitely had a numb bum by the end of the meal. Everything is at ground level, including the lavatories, so this is an option for less-abled diners. Loos were clean and in good decorative order.

                      We had a massive table down one side, split into three to allow access to the people against the wall and to help divide the bill up. Juliet has said they were experienced with groups, and they certainly seemed to cope with fifty disorganised people (that may just have been my end of the table). The waiting staff were always helpful and friendly and not above a little flirt with the ladies. All in all, we were here just over two and a half hours, which is not bad going considering the size of the group, as the first half hour was just arriving and scanning the menu, and much of the latter half hour was sorting out the bill and saying our goodbyes.

                      Considering there was various levels of faffing and we didn't order until 1.30pm, starters were swift to come out. To start with I plumped for grilled goat's cheese which was served on ciabatta type bread with a small garnish and drizzles of balsamic (£3.65). I really enjoyed it, it was a good size for a starter, just enough to take the edge of my raving hunger, but not enough to fill me up that I didn't feel able to cope with my main course. The whitebait was a popular starter (I think it was a special) and was a generous portion.

                      For my main there were two veggie options on the a la carte (none on the specials board) and I fancied the spinach and ricotta crepe. I queried its vegetarian status with the waiter as it stated it had a parmesan glaze ('real' parmesan is an EU Protected Designation of Origin product and has to be made using calf rennet, so it's definitely not suitable for vegetarians). The waiter promised to check. He didn't come back to me and someone else brought the food out. I queried it again and was assured that my dish did not have the Parmesan glaze - I can only trust them on this. I would like to see a better selection of vegetarian mains hare, as their menu was quiet extensive otherwise. The crepe cost £6.95 which was very reasonable and was two rolled parcels of spinach and ricotta in a tomato based sauce and was very enjoyable. I didn't quite manage to finish it though. The sea bass and salmon were popular choices (£9.95 and £7.95 respectively) and were beautifully served. Someone else had the char-grilled rib-eye steak (£8.95) and they thought it well cooked as was the chicken with bacon and mozzarella (£6.95). I can't comment on the meals of everyone there, but the general consensus of those seated near me was that the food was well cooked and good value for money.

                      I didn't have a dessert, finding my first two courses satisfactory. All desserts were £3.25 and the selection included tiramisu, vanilla cheesecake and apple and blackberry crumble (the latter scoring very highly with those that sampled it down my end of the table).

                      Overall my two course meal and two soft drinks came to about £17 with service. Staff members were on hand with card machines for those who wished to pay that way and dished out menus so people could work out their share of the bill without checking the receipt. I thought the standard of food and the value were excellent, I would just prefer to see more vegetarian options on the menu.

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                        18.02.2014 15:29
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                        An OK Crime fiction book

                        Jar City by Arnaldur Indridason is the first novel in his Reykjavik Murder Mystery series. I had read the fourth (The Draining Lake ) previously so I don't think it necessary to read them in order.

                        Our protagonist is a chap called Erlendur (all names are Christian names as the Icelandics don't use surnames like most of us do) who is a detective with the Reykjavik Police. Like in a lot characters in of detective fiction these days, he is divorced with a difficult relationship with his children. In this case, Erlendur and his colleagues are investigating the death of a man killed in his home. Looking into the victim's past, it would seem that he was far from an innocent victim, so was someone from his murky past responsible? For a while Erlendur seemed to be going in strange directions, pursuing relatives of a long-dead child, whilst supposedly investigating the murder of one of the city's less upstanding citizens in what is seemingly a break-in gone wrong with perhaps one or two clues to the contrary. . Thankfully, eventually the story picked up pace and we discovered an interesting, dark side to Reykjavik,where crime is solved slowly through investigation and lots of questioning.

                        I enjoyed the book in the end but it isn't one of the punchiest, fast paced thrillers some crime fiction can be. It is just about a crime and a mystery, there is no tearing about the city waving guns, and saving the world. Whilst I liked the detection and crime solving aspect, I would have liked some more red herrings to make it harder to guess the outcome and make the book more exciting that way, as whilst the plot was interesting and original, it was not exciting or particularly gripping..

                        I would still recommend this book for crime fiction fans and would also read other books the same author.

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                          12.02.2014 10:37
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                          A mixed bag, and probably not worth it

                          As a fan of history, especially the Tudor period, the choice of this book as a gift for me was an easy one for my friend. I knew nothing of the author, Philippa Jones, but this seems to be her first non-fiction book, published in 2009. I can find no information about her on the internet, so am not aware of her experience or qualifications as a historian. In the book, she introduces us to King Henry VIII and his wives, mistresses and children. With a gripping sub-title like "Henry VIII's Mistresses and Bastards" I was expecting some juicy stuff. The cover photo, of a regal looking lady, looked like it should be better suited to a historical novel rather than a historical reference book.

                          Whilst I learnt some new information from the book, I also had some frustrations with it. Firstly, the introduction, which tells us what the author is going to tell us in the main body of the book. This all seems a bit pointless and repetitive, because when I get to the main part of the text I think "Hang on! You've already told me this". If you are going to introduce us to some new mistresses, don't tell us all we need to know in the first eleven pages, otherwise you may as well just write an article on it, not a whole book. This is then followed by a chapter on Henry's early years (also partly summarised in the introduction).

                          The first 'real' chapter comes some 49 pages into a 306 page book (excluding notes and index). This, relatively brief section covers the rumours of a lady-in-waiting to Henry's mother, who may have been his first sexual partner. Equally she may not have. Whilst Jones provides us with a variety of evidence, I found little of it to be more than circumstantial. Gifts to loyal servants, court members and their families were not uncommon, and there is nothing to say that the lady concerned, one Elizabeth Denton, didn't receive these generous gifts for services rendered to the Queen.

                          Once Henry was married (to Catherine of Aragon at first) he continued to have affairs. This was typical, and often expected, of men of such high rank. There was no scandal in being the mistress of a King or Prince, and the lady and her family could expect to benefit in the form of lands and titles. Henry seemed to choose from his wife's ladies-in-waiting, going for attractive women, but not necessarily beautiful ones. There were exceptions when he travelled abroad, for example, but not all alleged mistresses are easily tracked down and identified due to name similarities and inconsistency of spelling during this period. Of course, not all alleged mistresses would actually have been a mistress, and equally we cannot be sure how many may have slipped through the net, lost over 500 years of history. In some cases, I feel that Ms Jones is clutching at straws, she spends more time discussing the potential mistress's family background and connections, and life after Henry than she does the affair. Again evidence is often circumstantial, if barely existent. I sometimes wondered if I was reading a book made up of (not very exciting) random Tudor court members, as Ms Jones spends two pages discussing said lady's brothers relationship to the king, to explain how the king may have met the lady. Evidence that said lady and the king ever made the 'beast with two backs' (to paraphrase the, as yet unborn, bard) is usually in the form of letters and documents. However when faced with a mistress and a child with little supporting evidence, phrases like "Thomas was commonly believed to be the bastard son of Henry VIII and....looked a great deal like him" don't cut the mustard for me, especially if the physical descrptions of the mother and her husband are not available.

                          Chapters on better known mistresses, and his acknowledged bastard son Henry Fitzroy, are sharper and more to the point as some cases are better documented than others. I particularly enjoyed the chapter on Mary Boleyn and Jones' take on both Mary's reputation and the parentage of her first born child (it is it not officially known whether it was her son Henry, or daughter Katherine, was born first, let alone if Henry was actually the father). Here Jones presents us with a variety of evidence and acknowledges the flaws in the availability of sources, giving us the opportunity to form our own opinions. This was more engaging for me than when the author fails to convince that a lady and/or her offspring are even justified in being included.

                          At the beginning is a chronology of events and at the end, notes and citations, followed by an index. I found the writing style inconsistent: sometimes engaging, sometimes dull, but always way too much emphasis on family connections - each chapter was accompanied by a family tree, which was then described in the text. There are some inaccuracies which I spotted, and I am not alone, a number of Amazon reviewers spotted the same, as well as a few other errors. The book finishes with a pointless two-page conclusion.

                          I have been quite critical of this book, and I am not saying it is poorly researched, although a good editor/fact-checker wouldn't go amiss, I just find it too padded with barely related information, some of which is just plain boring I'm afraid. It felt like an essay extended to make a book. There were too many slow, tenuously linked parts which ultimately dragged the more interesting parts of the book down, so that it barely passes muster as average.

                          It is not like there are not any other biographies of Henry or his Queens (and even some on his mistresses), and I think you may be better reading one of those and leaving this book, which is comprehensive in all the wrong places.

                          RRP £9.99.

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                            07.02.2014 10:27
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                            A pleasant local little Italian restaurant

                            Bella Naples is a family owned and run restaurant in South Woodford, East London. Situated on the High Road, opposite the cinema, I parked in nearby Sainsbury's car park and walked over to the restaurant, when I dined there as a part of a group of seven one Friday evening. There are local buses that run nearby or you can walk up from the tube station (Central Line) which will take about 10 minutes up hill.

                            The restaurant is fairly small, but has a lay out that means it isn't too cramped. Upon arrival at 7pm, there was only one other table occupied, and only a few others got taken throughout the evening. The décor is simple and understated - wooden tables and chairs in a well-lit, glass fronted space. To be honest, a week on and I can barely remember what it was like, so it obviously didn't make much of an impression on me. At the end of the day we were here for the food, and if that is nice, does the décor really matter? The lavatory is at the back, up a few steps. It was clean, but running low on toilet paper.

                            The food menu doesn't mention all the drinks; they have a separate wine list that wasn't on our table when I arrived. I decided just to have a glass of house white (£5 for 250ml) whilst we waited for the rest of our party to arrive. The House white was perfectly chilled, crisp and refreshing, leaning towards the medium end of the scale. People mostly had wine, bottled beer (Peroni, Stella and Bud were available) or soft drinks. Prices are not on their online menu when I went to double check, so are based on my memory. It does, however, clearly highlight dishes that are home made.

                            To start, many of us had one of the different types of bruschetta that they offer. The Bruschetta con Funghi (mushrooms) was popular, as was the Bruschetta Melenzana (aubergine). I went for the Bruschetta Napoli, which was more like the classic bruscheeta with olive oil, garlic, tomatoes and olives. All were priced about £4. I was a bit disappointed with mine, as I found the toasted bread a bit overdone and hard to cut with my knife. Others didn't seem to have this problem, so I guess I was a little bit unlucky. One of our party had the Parmigiana (Tomato, Mozzarella, aubergine, Basil) starter as it was recommended by our server. He was a little bit disappointed with it. I am not sure of the exact problem, but he felt it didn't deliver what he expected. It was a good size though, and I am glad I didn't have it as it would have been too large for me as a starter. It would have been a good size to share though.

                            Most people had pasta or risotto for their main courses. The seafood spaghetti and risotto were both well received and made with fresh fish. I was the only one to have a pizza, the Pina Colada Hawaiiana (Tomato, Mozzarella and Pineapple) which was about £7. I was quite excited about having a vegetarian Hawaiian pizza. To be honest, it wasn't that exciting, although nice enough. I think if we visited again I would try a different one - they had a good choice. It was a good size and I couldn't finish it, but it was well cooked on a thin base.

                            All fairly full, we decided not to have a dessert except for one person who went for a chocolate mousse cake. He kindly asked for six extra spoons so we all had a taste. It was very nice, and a large portion, so again, ideal to share. Some of our party had coffees, and we decided to linger and chant for a bit longer in the restaurant than go across the road and fight for a spot in the pub. They seemed quite happy to oblige. The bill was itemised so you only need to pay for your share, but we split it for ease. I believe it came to £108 without service for the seven of us, which I think is very good value as we all had two courses, and perhaps one alcoholic drink apiece.

                            Service was friendly but I think our waitress was a little bit inexperienced, although polite and helpful. We did meet the chef-owner who came over to answer some questions and had a little chat. The restaurant has been open for two years now, and surrounded by pizza-pasta chains in all directions, so it is nice to have one that is a bit different.

                            I enjoyed my meal here but wasn't blown away by it. I don't think I was alone in that opinion amongst my companions, although some others did love all they had. I would certainly return, and perhaps try something different.

                            Bella Naples
                            83 High Road
                            South Woodford
                            London
                            E18 2QP
                            T.: 020 8616 4345

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