Welcome! Log in or Register

geodougal

geodougal
  • 0
  • 78
  • 0
  • 172
  • 1510
  • 2225
  • Crowns
  • Premium reviews
  • Express reviews
  • Comments
  • Reviews rated
  • Ratings received

Member since: 27.06.2012

People I trust

User that trust you
  • Sort by:
    • More +
      01.03.2014 10:16
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      One of the easiest ways to save yourself some pennies without anybody noticing!

      Me and my family are big fans of cereal, not just for breakfast but as a light snack too, so we do go through a lot! One of our favourites is Kellogg's 'frosties', however I had to stop buying these for a while because I just couldn't fathom the price - cereal is so expensive! But on searching for cheaper alternatives I found these, Tesco's own version of 'frosties', called 'frosted flakes' and they are now a regular occurrence in our house as a replacement of the branded version.

      ~ Price & Availability ~

      Tesco's frosted flakes are only available to buy in Tesco's - hence the name, however other supermarkets also do their own versions of frosties too, but I can't comment on how they compare as I'm yet to try them. Tesco's frosted flakes are available to buy in two sizes, a 500g box for £1.55 and a 750g box for £2.09, a 'free from' wheat and gluten box is also available for £2.00 (as of 21/02/14 on Tesco's website). In comparison to Kellogg's, buying Tesco's frosted flakes will save you around 74p for a 500g box and 60p for a 750g box, which is quite a considerable saving, particularly if you are buying more than one box or buying them on a regular basis as it all soon adds up.

      ~ Frosted flakes? ~

      For those of you who don't know what I'm talking about and keep wondering what on earth these Kellogg's frosties are that I keep comparing Tesco's frosted flakes too, they are described as 'sugar frosted flakes of corn, fortified with vitamins and iron'.

      ~ Packaging ~

      Tesco's frosted flakes come in a blue box, with a large surfing penguin on the front holding a box of the frosted flakes. It's a very fun looking design and its aim is to clearly attract their target audience, children. The penguin is part of the Tesco's cereal 'gang', as each of the different cereals have a different member of the gang to represent them. Also on the front of the box there is a simpler version of the nutritional information breakdown, which is useful when you are just glancing and comparing to other cereals, rather than having to spend a long time reading the full table on the back.
      On one of the sides of the box is the allergy advice, ingredients list, dietary needs, a full nutritional contents breakdown, storage and disposal information and tesco's promise with contact details. On the other side there is images of all of the other members of the tescos cereal 'gang', displaying other cereals available in the range.

      On the back of the box there are some puzzles and games ideal for keeping the kids entertained and a recipe that you can use the frosted flakes in, the box I have to hand has a recipe for 'frosted snowballs'.
      The cereal inside of the box is contained in the usual thick plastic bag, in order to keep the cereal fresh I would recommend folding down this bag after use and securing it with a food clip and then re-closing the box using the slots provided or alternatively putting the cereal into an airtight container.

      ~ Appearance, smell, taste & texture ~

      On opening the box I really don't think you can tell the difference between these and frosties, they are little golden flakes with a sugar frosting. As far as I can tell they are the same size and shape as frosties, the only thing that may be slightly different is that these may be slightly thicker, but that really is on close examination.

      They smell slightly sweet, but not overpoweringly artificial. As far as taste goes, nobody in my family even questioned if these were frosties or not, the difference, if any is very minor. They are sweet, but not so sweet that it's sickly and this is balanced with the corn flakes themselves.

      Their texture is nice and crunchy, with a nice feeling of substance rather than eating air, as it can seem with some cereals. They are of a fair thickness and stay fairly crunchy in milk for a reasonable amount of time and don't go immediately soggy. The sugar from the flakes gives the milk a slightly sweet flavour too, which is great if you're not a huge fan of milk anyway, like me.

      I enjoy this cereal without milk sometimes when I just want a handful to snack on, however they are obviously quite dry without liquid but most cereals are.

      ~ Other information ~

      Suitable for vegetarians

      each 30g serving without milk contains:
      120 calories
      11.1g sugar
      0.2g fat
      0.2g salt

      The sugar content is quite alarming, but they are 'frosted' flakes, so you can't really expect anything less.

      The ingredients list is simple and short which is always good to see, its nice to know what's actually in what you're eating:

      Maize, sugar, barley and vitamins

      It actually contains nine different vitamins and minerals! excellent! Including vitamin D, B and iron.

      ~ Overall opinion ~
      For a cheaper alternative to Kellogg's frosties these are ideal, you really can't tell the difference unless you deliberately examine them looking for differences, there's definitely nothing obvious. Once taken out of the box nobody in my family can tell these aren't a branded cereal - they taste more or less exactly the same. The only downfall I can find is the sugar content, but it seems that its difficult these days to find a cereal that actually tastes of anything that has a low sugar content.

      Overall I would highly recommend Tesco's frosted flakes, I don't see any reason to buy the branded version, especially if you're trying to save some pennies!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      20.02.2014 22:24
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A great book to start with or stretch your abilities even further!

      If you have read any of my previous reviews you may have come to know that my main hobby is cake baking and decorating/sugarcraft. I have more recently entered into the depths of sugarcraft as I have been asked to make and decorate cakes for friends and family and needed to improve on my skills if they were going to look half decent! So, I have recently ventured into purchasing a few different sugarcraft and cake decorating books to help me out, and some have been given to me as gifts. This particular one, 'fun and original character cakes' by Maisie Parrish, was given to me for Christmas. I had seen a few of Maisie's cake decorating books around so was familiar with the books contents and was assured this would have been worth purchasing.

      ~ About the author ~

      Maisie Parrish, is known as 'The queen of characters' and is an internationally renowned sugar crafter. She is a self taught international sugar artist, who has created a unique style which is instantly recognisable and much copied and learned from.
      Her work is widely acclaimed, and her fans travel across the world to be taught by her in her studio in Stoke on Trent, where she runs a successful business, teaching, demonstrating, writing books, and making DVD'S and tutorials in order to satisfy the demand from her dedicated followers.
      Originally she taught herself how to make cute figures in salt dough, and eventually created the most successful dough craft company in the UK called Maisie Dough. A high point came when she completed two books on this subject, and was asked to create a range for the animation giant Walt Disney in Florida, nothing she did or does ever starts out as a hobby. After, she was invited to try her hand at creating three dimensional figures in sugar.

      People find it difficult to believe that she has never actually baked cakes for anyone, this was never in the scheme of things, because all the work she creates is published. Now, she has 10 successful book titles, and an amazing catalogue of work and continues to travel the world sharing her unique modelling skills.

      ~ Price & availability ~

      'Fun & original character cakes' is available to buy on numerous websites online, such as amazon and Maisie's own website. It's RRP is £14.99, however it's on Amazon for £10.34 which is a bargain in my eyes for the amazing quality of the book, definitely worth the price.

      ~ fun & original character cakes contents ~

      This book contains eight different cake designs, with over thirty individual characters, so that you can create each complete scene or the cake/characters separately to create your own unique design.
      The book contains a basic introduction to the book and a guide to buying, making, storing and using sugar paste (which is what the figures are made from), a guide to modelling, including a list and description of the equipment you will need and a step-by-step introduction of basic sugarpaste shapes that are used to create the characters in the book.

      The tutorials/guides begin with showing you how to make animal characters. These include a mouse, monkey, lion, rabbit elephant, crow and a dog. Followed by a series of essential cake and icing recipes. These recipes are for Madeira cake, rich fruit cake, mini cakes, cupcakes, sugar paste, butter cream, flower paste and pastillage - all including step by step instructions. Followed by step by step tutorials, with photos, on how to cover and dowel your cakes.

      All of the tutorials and recipes are clearly set out, paired with photographs to refer too with clear, concise instructions to ensure that people of all abilities can use the book successfully.

      ~ the 'projects' ~

      After the introductory tutorials comes the projects, which are whole cakes, split up into separate instructions which take you through how to make each of the cakes components, then it's up to you whether you make the whole cake or select sections of it to create your own design:

      - Easter bunnies (includes tutorials on a wooden fence, rabbits in different positions, carrots and Easter baskets)
      - In the spa (includes tutorials on a hippo and bathroom equipment)
      - Purrfect wedding (includes tutorials on buckles, cats, cats dressed in wedding attire and bouquets)
      - good luck (includes tutorials on horses and horse shoes)
      - Baby bears christening (includes tutorials on roses and leaves, babies carriage, balloons, teddy bears and fairy wings)
      - Best in show (includes tutorials on a brick wall, five breeds of dog and rosettes)
      - mother's day surprise (includes tutorials on ducks, bows, lily pads and bumble bees)
      - penguin Christmas (includes tutorials on snow covered trees and penguins)

      Each project is beautifully set out, with a main title page displaying the title of the project and an idea of one outcome you could create from the tutorials. Each component is explained step by step, paired with photographs to make it easier to see what you are aiming to achieve. The instructions are easy to understand and not too wordy or over complicated. Each page is presented in a sophisticated, bright and eye-catching way.

      ~ Overall opinion ~

      I can't get enough of this book, at first glance it may look limited but because each tiny little component is explained individually if means that the limit is only yourself! The different outcomes are endless and it's so useful if you just want to pick a certain part of the cake and use that to incorporate it into another design. I also love the way its laid out, it makes it so easy to read and it's paired with stunning photography which makes the book very visually exciting and is great for people who learn better through pictures rather than words.

      I would definitely recommend this book, its suited to everyone right from very beginners to people with experience who want to stretch their abilities even further in sugar craft and its great even if you're just looking for ideas and it definitely lives up to its name of being fun and original!
      The only very slight downfall is the fact that some of the text is very small because there is so many different parts to a cake, it seems like maybe a little too much has been crammed into one page meaning smaller font, so if you struggle with your eyesight you may need to get your glasses out for this one!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        30.01.2014 17:57
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        1 Comment

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        I don't know why you'd want to use another recipe book!

        Cake/sweet baking and decorating is one of my main hobbies and I have hundreds of recipe books sitting on my shelves dedicated to this hobby, or as my family would call it - obsession! However I don't see them complaining when they get cakes baked for them on a regular basis! But, like most people I have a few select recipe books that I always go to when in need of a reliable, stable and tasty recipe, which is when I use this recipe book - "the best ever book of cakes".

        ~ Price & availability ~

        'The best ever book of cakes' can be bought from several online retail sites, such as amazon, ebay, the book people and in store in shops such as the works and I'm sure if you look around in bookstores it will be easily found. It's retail price is around £10.00, which in my opinion is a very reasonable price for the size, quality and content of the book.

        ~ Appearance & content ~

        'The best ever book of cakes' is a large hardback book. The front cover is beautifully presented, and definitely draws the audience in, with a large heading in bold pink writing and a huge picture of a stunningly presented 'meringue mountain'. However, the front cover can be quite misleading as, as far as I know meringues are not cakes, but it does show that the book clearly contains a wide variety of recipes.
        Inside the book you will find '165 deliciously irresistible and foolproof cakes to bake for everyday eating and special celebrations, shown in 800 delectable photographs.' As with most books, there is a contents page, listing every single recipe inside of the book, organised into specific categories to make a specific recipe easier to find .

        The recipes included in this book are; classic cakes (Victoria sponge, lemon drizzle etc.), spice, nut and seed cakes (lavender cake, walnut cake etc.), chocolate cakes (chocolate sandwich cake chocolate fudge cake etc.), individual cakes (cupcakes, fondant fancies etc.), tray bakes (flapjacks, lamingtons etc.), loaf cakes (fruit malt loaf, almond slices etc.), fruit cakes (boiled fruit cake, Scottish black bun etc.), dessert cakes (gateau saint honour, raspberry and hazelnut meringue cake etc.) and special occasion cakes (lemon daisy christening cake, white Christmas cake etc). There are at least 20 different recipes per category and each category contains both the simple recipes and the more elaborate, but still completely achievable for both beginner and advanced bakers. Also, the book doesn't just contain cake recipes, as would be expected of the title. It also contains recipes for pastries such as apple strudel and Eccles cakes. The variety of recipes is exceptional, there is a cake recipe to suit every single occasion, whether it be something you're just looking to do as a quick and easy bake for the family (or yourself), as a dessert or something more 'out there' for a special occasion like a birthday, wedding or even mother's/father's day.

        Each recipe is paired with beautiful photography showing you how to complete each step and what the final product should look like. Each page is sophisticatedly set out, in a simple but effective arrangement to make each recipe easy to follow, nothing too complicated or worrying ,with each recipe heading in larger font.
        The book is very informative, beginning with an introduction of what to expect from the book and a chapter dedicated to 'cake making basics', outling 'essential ingredients', 'basic equipment', 'successful cake making', 'methods of making cakes', 'fillings and toppings', 'adapting recipes for special diets', and 'how to solve baking problems'. This chapter also tells you how to line your cake pans, how to store cakes, how to release and cool your cakes and how to tell if a cake is cooked. This chapter is particularly good if you are new to baking as it tells you EVERYTHING you will ever need to know about cakes, their ingredients and how to bake them.

        The recipes themselves are laid out appropriately with a description of the cake, an ingredients list, amount of servings and easy to follow, simple, step by step instructions. The instructions are worded simply to ensure that all abilities can understand them (children would need assistance).

        The only problem I have found is that the font is rather small and people with eyesight problems may struggle to read them.

        ~ Overall opinion ~

        I don't see any reason to choose any other cake baking cook book. In my opinion it has everything a cake baker, beginner or advanced in ability would ever need to bake successful cakes every single time. I have never ever come across a problem with any of these recipes, they have all turned out as the picture shows (or as near to) and I have never had any complications or confusions with the instructions.
        I wouldn't hesitate to recommend this recipe book to anybody who is wishing to start baking or has been baking for years and wants some new recipes to try. It is both informative and fun! However, I would suggest anybody under the age of 13 would need assistance to follow some of the instructions and possibly to do some of the tasks the cakes require.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • Tesco Fig Rolls / Snacks / 41 Readings / 40 Ratings
          More +
          04.01.2014 19:00
          Very helpful
          (Rating)

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Give these little figgy pastries...I mean biscuits a try and save yourself some pennies!

          In my household there always has to be biscuits of some form to have with a nice cuppa, however sometimes for me the plain old digestive just doesn't hack it and I fancy a bit of change - which is when I turn to fig rolls as an alternative. We always have a pack (or two) in the cupboard for when the fig roll craving strikes hiding away somewhere, but I always opt for supermarkets own brand of fig roll instead of say, jacobs unless they are on offer because I'm always out to save money.

          ~ Fig rolls? ~
          Some of you may be thinking, what is a fig roll? A few years ago I was asking myself the same question. Basically, they are described as a baked pastry with a fig paste filling. However, I don't see how they are a pastry at all, as they don't taste or look like pastry and are found down the biscuit isle of a supermarket...not the pastry isle? But apparently, that's what they are.

          ~ Price & availability ~
          These particular fig rolls are only available in Tesco's because they are Tesco's own brand, however other supermarkets own branded fig rolls are also available as a cheaper alternative to the well-known brands. Tesco's fig rolls are priced at a mere 49p for 200g, for roughly 14 biscuits. This is excellent value compared with other brands, for example jacobs are priced at £1.25, bolands at 85p and lyons at 69p for the same weight as Tesco's fig rolls! So choosing Tesco's own brand could save you up to 76p, which is a considerable amount, especially if you're like me and buy multiple packs as you can buy two pack of Tesco's fig rolls for less than the amount as one packet of Jacob's would cost you.

          ~ Packaging ~
          The packaging of Tesco's fig rolls is not dissimilar to the one Dooyoo is displaying, it has just been updated and altered slightly. The fig rolls come wrapped in a thin, bright red wrapping with an image of the fig rolls going around one side. The name of the product is printed in fairly large lettering and above this a smaller tesco logo. On the front of the packet there is a useful 'at a glance' nutritional information table so you can quickly check this and compare to others if you wish.

          The back of the packaging gives you a product description, a full nutritional break down, allergy advice, ingredients, storage advice, product weight and Tesco's contact details.

          Inside of the packet, the fig rolls are contained in a cardboard tray to keep them in place and to avoid them being squashed or damaged.

          ~ Appearance, smell, taste & texture etc. ~
          Each fig roll is around the size of an average thumb in length and the width of two thumbs (thought this was the best comparison!). They are a pale golden colour, like the colour of baked pastry and have ridges on the tops of them. On appearance, the fig filling is plentiful, explaining the thickness of the biscuit and looks just about right compared with the amount of biscuit around it. The fig filling is very dark in colour.
          They don't really smell of anything strongly enough to be detectable instantly, but there is a faint smell of sweet, fruity figs if you sniff hard enough!

          Now the important bit, what do they actually taste like? Admittingly I was skeptical at first as I've had mixed experiences with Tesco's own brand. Taking a bite, the first thing noticeable to me is the fact that fig rolls are described as a pastry, and yet to me, they do not resemble a pastry at all. They are more like a soft biscuit, but this isn't a fault of Tesco's as every kind of fig roll I have ever had never seems to be a pastry, but maybe that's just me? However, I am going to describe these fig rolls as biscuits for the purpose of this review as I feel this is what they are. The biscuit part of Tesco's fig rolls is relatively soft, with a slight bite to it, which to me is the only difference between these and a more well known brand because from experiencing other brands such as Jacob's they are usually slightly more crisp and have more bite. However, the biscuit is still, to me, of high quality. It tastes quite short, and melts in the mouth - quite like a soft, thinner shortbread. The ratio of the biscuit and filling is spot on in my opinion, the biscuit is just thick enough to give the biscuit some substance without taking away the focus that these are 'fig' filled rolls. The fig filling in Tesco's fig rolls, is rather sweet and is mildly flavoured with fig, however figs aren't a very strong tasting fruit anyway so this can't really be avoided. The filling is nice and thick, smooth and holds together well, even though it is sweet, the biscuit outer breaks this up so it doesn't become overpowering or too sickly.

          Tesco's fig rolls are pleasingly not dry at all as the filling seems to keep them moist and fresh tasting, therefore they are easily swallowed and don't need a huge gulp of tea after them like some biscuits.
          They aren't particularly filling, however I can't imagine many people managing more than around four without finding them too sweet, but that doesn't put me off at all as I have a VERY sweet tooth so can easily polish off a packet in one sitting....whoops!

          ~ Nutritional information ~
          Each Tesco fig roll contains:
          70 calories
          7.2g of sugars
          1.9g of fat
          0.9g of which is saturates
          trace of salt

          At a glance this information doesn't seem bad, but not many people just stick to one which makes both the sugar and fat content quite alarming, although the high sugar content is to be expected as they are very sweet tasting. It is a positive that the salt content is so low though as most of us have enough of that in our diets already.

          Allergy & dietary advice:

          Contains milk, wheat and gluten
          Cannot guarantee no nuts
          suitable for vegetarians

          The ingredients list isn't too long which is positive, the first few ingredients on the list are figs, whole wheat flour, vegetable oil and glucose syrup along with others.

          ~ Over all opinion ~
          For the price, I don't believe you can go wrong with these fig rolls (as long as you actually like fig rolls of course!). I don't think you can tell the difference between these and specific branded ones apart from the fact that the biscuit seems to be slightly softer. Another positive for these biscuits is that they keep well, because they are soft anyway you don't need to worry about them going soft and they don't dry out because the fig filling keeps them moist.

          I wouldn't hesitate to recommend Tesco's fig rolls, just be wary if you are watching your nutritional intake though, because having a few of these won't really do you any favours (I try and tell myself this every time!) but if you enjoy a sweet, fruity snack and fancy an alternative from your usual biscuit then give these ago! For the price, you've got nothing to lose!

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
        • Kellogg's Coco Pops / Breakfast / 30 Readings / 28 Ratings
          More +
          30.12.2013 23:38
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          1 Comment

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Go coco loco for this chocolatey cereal!

          Me and my family are cereal lovers, so it's a staple trolley item when I go shopping. However, we're not ones for bland, boring cereals, we prefer sweeter, preferably chocolatey cereals which is where Kellogg's coco pops come in. There is nearly always a box of these in our cupboard as they are definitely a family favourite.

          ~ Coco pops and Kellogg's ~

          Coco pops are a chocolate toasted rice cereal, made by Kellogg's. Kellogg's products first arrived on the UK's grocery store shelves in 1922 with their first product being the famous Kellogg's cornflakes.
          Other products produced by Kelloggs include all bran, crunchy nut, froot loops, krave, start, frosties, mini max, optivita, rice krispies, special K, honey loops, fruit 'n' fibre, just right and frosted wheats. In recent years they have expanded their range from just cereals to breakfast biscuits from all bran, nutri-grain and special K, cereal bars from brands such as coco pops and frosties, special k crisps and fruit winders. As well as the coco pops cereal, the Kellogg's coco pop range also includes other cereals ; choc 'n' roll, coco rocks and moon and stars as well as coco pop snack bars.

          Kellogg's claim to have a passion for nutrition in their products, which is why they use grains, wheat, corn and rice in their products, which helps to supply our bodies with the fuel we all need to take on the morning.

          ~ Price & availability ~

          Kellogg's coco pops are available to buy at all supermarkets down the cereal aisle and many independent stores. They can be bought in three different quantities, 295g for around £2.00, 550g for around £2.69 and 800g for around £3.85. Expectedly, they are more expensive than supermarkets own versions of this cereal, however they are around average price for a branded cereal and the larger boxes do provide a large number of servings, making them value for money and ideal for bigger families (or people like me that eat A LOT of coco pops!)

          ~ Packaging ~

          Kellogg's coco pops come in a bright yellow cardboard box, the design of the box is not dissimilar to the one Dooyoo is displaying, it has just been updated and altered slightly. On the front of the box is the Kellogg's logo towards the top, and beneath this the words 'coco pops' in large, bold, brown lettering. The coco pops 'mascot' is displayed on the front, which is a monkey - often displayed on television adverts for coco pops and is easily identifiable as the coco pops monkey. Next to him is bowl of the cereal to give you an idea of what to expect. There is also a basic, but useful for a quick glance whilst on the shelves nutritional information chart on the front of the box. The boxes design is clearly targeted at children with its memorable character and bright, fun colouring.

          The back of the box gives the usual information such as a full nutritional information table, allergy, advice, ingredients list and Kellogg's contact details.

          The box has flaps at the top that can be easily slotted back into place to ensure the cereal inside stays fresh after opening. Inside the box the cereal is packaged in a non-resealable plastic bag, similar to most other cereals, so you have to rely on the box for freshness unless you transfer the coco pops into an air tight container.

          ~ Appearance, smell, taste & texture ~

          Kellogg's coco pops are tiny little grains of chocolate flavoured rice, similar to their cousin - the rice krispie, apart from these are chocolate flavoured and brown in colour. They have a mild smell of chocolate, but nothing that really hits you when you open the packet, which could lead you to believe that the chocolate flavour isn't very strong - but these prove that smell isn't everything.

          They are best paired with cold milk, the amount depends on your own preference, a little can leave them dry and difficult to swallow but too much can make them very soggy - which some people prefer. I have quite a lot of milk on mine, which gives the opportunity for chocolate milk as the milk absorbs the chocolate flavouring from them. The more coco pops you have, the more chocolatey the milk will be. This is ideal for people who aren't keen on plain milk because it may make it more palatable.

          The chocolate flavour isn't too overpowering, which is good otherwise the cereal would be too sickly for most - especially in the morning. It's strong enough to know what it is and flavour the milk and thankfully isn't overly sweet, which suggests good quality as the flavour isn't being masked with an artificial sugary taste. Some people may feel the chocolate flavour isn't strong enough, but in my opinion it's just enough to provide a subtle chocolate fix.

          The amount you will need really depends on your appetite, I don't find coco pops very filling so I have a fairly large amount. When milk is added you will hear the occasional pop, but not as intense as rice krispies.

          ~ nutritional information ~

          One serving of Kellogg's coco pops (30g) without milk contains :
          116 calories
          0.8g of fat
          17.0g of sugar
          0.2g of salt
          The calories and fat content are pleasing, being relatively low for a chocolate breakfast cereal. However, they do contain a lot of sugar (it's listed second in the ingredients list after rice and before chocolate, so is clearly a main ingredient), which is a slight let down but I suppose is to be expected for a chocolate cereal.
          Allergy advice: contains barley

          ~ Overall opinion ~

          For the taste, I can't fault Kellogg's coco pops. They are chocolatey enough to taste, without being too sickly or overpowering, which is just right for in the morning. They go down well with all the family, adults and children alike. The only downfalls is the high sugar content, which isn't ideal for young children as they hardly need a sugar rush in the morning and the fact that they aren't that filling. Perhaps they are for children, but most adults would need a rather large bowl full.

          I would recommend Kellogg's coco pops to anyone who is looking for a chocolate breakfast cereal that isn't overly sweet or sickly and/or is watching their calorie and fat intake as they are relatively low in both compared to other cereals on the market. However, if you are looking for a very intense chocolate hit, or are looking for a particularly filling cereal then this isn't for you.

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            26.12.2013 23:07
            Very helpful
            (Rating)

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            One of the only cereals on the market I can hand on heart say keeps me going until lunch!

            Due to horrendously busy circumstances, I have sadly had to neglect my fellow dooyoo'ers for a fair few months as I have had to prioritise my time for my family and work ect. however, I feel now is the time to steadily get back into my usual review reading and writing routine that I have missed, and what a better way to kick it off other than reviewing the product that I more often than not start my day with - weetabix!

            ~Weetabix?~

            Some of you that have never entered into the world of weetabix may ask what are they? Weetabix are a whole grain wheat cereal, usually eaten around breakfast time. They are produced by weetabix limited in the united kingdom as palm sized wheat biscuits. Also made by weetabix limited are other well-known brands such as alpen, crunchy bran, ready brek, weetos and oatibix. Weetabix limited claim their weetabix recipe is "the favourite breakfast cereal recipe" and is made from nutritious wholegrains, making it a great way to start the day because wholegrains are proven to keep you fuller for longer as well as containing many of the good things your body needs to stay fit and healthy, including fibre and one third of your recommended daily intake of Thiamin (B1), Riboflavin (B2), Niacin, Folic Acid and Iron.

            ~ Price and availability ~

            Weetabix can be found in all supermarkets down the cereal aisle, as well as in many independent stores as it is such a popular product. The products price varies depending on where you shop and are available in a range of quantities for you to choose from depending on the amount of people who will be eating them. They can be bought in boxes of 72 biscuits (36 servings based on 2 biscuits per serving) for around £5.69, 48 biscuits (24 servings) for around £4.18, 24 biscuits (12 servings) for around £2.39 and 12 biscuits (6 servings) for around £1.48. However, it is worth looking around for offers as because of their popularity it's rare to not be able to find them on offer somewhere, otherwise the price can seem a bit steep. I do think that it is great that they are sold in different quantities because that way you can buy the right amount to suit your needs without having to buy loads of boxes or having to buy a big box that you may not need.

            ~ Packaging ~
            Weetabix come in a rectangular cardboard box with the base design being a sunny wheat field. In the centre of the front of the box is the word 'weetabix' in huge lettering, displaying the recognisable logo and underneath this, the words 'fuel for your day'. The design is very noticeable in the shops and distinctive to the weetabix brand.

            The back of the box gives you the usual information; an ingredients list, allergy advice nutritional information and contact details, including their twitter and facebook page.
            The box has a handy flap to lift so that the flaps can be put back into place once the box has been opened to ensure the cereal stays as fresh as possible.

            Inside, the weetabix come in paper packets of 12 biscuits per packet to keep them fresh, however once they have been opened it is very difficult to re-seal the paper packets so you have to rely on the box to keep the weetabix fresh, however this doesn't always work so it's a good idea to transfer them into an air tight container.

            ~Appearance, smell, taste & texture ~

            Each weetabix biscuit is oblong in shape and is flecked with different shades of shredded brown wheat.
            They don't really smell of anything at all apart from perhaps a very subtle wheaty malty smell, but nothing immediately noticeable.

            Now, the taste and texture of weetabix really depends on how you eat them, I choose to eat them usually with cold milk which complements the biscuits very well, softening them as the milk soaks in, however they do turn mushy quite quickly so if you'd rather have some bite to them then using only a little amount of milk is recommended.

            The taste of the biscuits is rather plain without any accompaniment, which is for some is preferred, however I like to liven them up a bit - sometimes with a sprinkling of sugar (obviously isn't the most nutritious choice) or with pieces of fruit. Without some form of liquid on them, the texture of the biscuits is very dry and scratchy, making them difficult to swallow. Admittedly, alone weetabix are definitely not the most flavoursome or exciting cereal on the market, but you cannot expect them to be when they hold health benefits and are basically just biscuits of wheat. But, do not let this phase you as there are copious amounts of different ways you can jazz them up to suit your taste buds, for example; add a sprinkling of sugar like I do or a spoonful of honey or golden syrup, and for the more health conscious fruit, nuts and/or pouring yogurt instead of milk. They also go well with hot milk on cold winters mornings.

            ~nutritional information ~

            Each serving of two weetabix (without milk) contains:
            134 calories
            1.7g of fat
            0.24g of salt

            The amount of sugar contained in this cereal is not listed, it just says they are low in both sugar and fat, which is very strange because if its low in sugars you'd think they'd want to list it as something to be commended.

            The nutritional content of weetabix is very pleasing, they are low in everything, made with 100% wholegrain, are high in fibre and contain added vitamins and iron.
            Allergy advice: Contains wheat and barley

            ~Overall verdict~

            Weetabix have remained a staple product in my household for years and both the adults and children enjoy them. I buy them mainly because they are much better for me and my family than the other sugar laden cereals on the market and give the opportunity for variety so you don't get bored of the same thing every morning. They also are excellent for giving energy and it is the only cereal I can honestly say keeps me going until lunchtime without feeling hungry, which saves me from snacking on unhealthy foods for a quick energy fix.

            I would definitely recommend weetabix to anybody because you can customise it to suit you, whether you have a sweet tooth or are after a filling, healthy start to your day and are especially good for busy family life as they provide a substantial amount of energy and come in a variety of family friendly quantities so that you are not constantly having to buy more cereal and equally come in small quantities for smaller families, so they are made available to suit everyone's needs. I don't really have a bad word to say about weetabix - alone, admittedly they are bland and boring but paired with your favourite toppings, they're nutritious, filling and open to variety and customisation to suit everybody! They would also be an excellent choice for dieters or people just looking to eat healthier as they are a low calorie, fat, sugar and salt option (baring in mind you don't add sugar etc. like me).

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • Tesco Potato Waffles / Ready Meals / 45 Readings / 44 Ratings
            More +
            29.06.2013 22:12
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            4 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Get off your high horse and down-brand! You will thank me for it! :)

            Potato waffles remind me very much of my childhood and give me that very homey nostalgic feeling. I always remember going to my grandmas and she'd always treat me to a meal with my favourite side - potato waffles, whilst the adults had their more sophisticated (and to me at the time boring) new potatoes or something along those lines. Similarly they have the same effect on my children as they always ask for them and leave me with nice clean plates! But with the economy being how it is, and the amount of potato waffles we go through I didn't fancy paying through the nose for something which is essentially just another form of potato so I thought I'd swap my usual branded version for Tesco's as there was a considerable price difference.

            ~ Price & Availability ~
            Tesco's potato waffles are sold at Tesco's (state the obvious) and come in one size of 12 waffles (680g), for a mere 95p! Which works out at less than 8p a waffle! Compared to the competitive brand birds eye which would set you back £1.20 for just 4 or £1.48 for 10, so opting for Tesco's version gives you a fair saving!

            ~Packaging~
            Tesco's potato waffles come in a very eye catching, bright red, rectangular box. On the front of the box you will find the tesco logo in white writing and beneath this the words '12 potato waffles', with the word waffles in yellow to stand out against the red background. Below this in paler red writing it says 'delicious crispy lattice mashed potato'. Next to this there a picture of the waffles themselves topped with a fried egg as a serving suggestion and below this a very useful at a glance nutritional values table and cooking time from frozen.

            The longer sides of the box have this same design repeated and the shorter sides just have the name of the product.

            The back of the box gives you a full list of ingredients, Tesco's promise, cooking instructions, a full nutritional information breakdown, allergy advice and frozen guidelines.

            ~Cooking~
            To cook these waffles, you have two choices. You can either cook them in the oven from frozen for 15-20 minutes at 220 degrees (reduce e if you have a fan oven) or on the grill from frozen for 8-10 minutes.
            I usually cook mine in the oven and find that 20 minutes cooks them perfectly, I guess it's down do your cooking preference to which method you choose. I imagine cooking them on the grill would make them crispier and it's clearly quicker than using the oven but I daren't take that chance with my grill as it's a bit a temperamental and I do still want the waffles to be edible once cooked!

            ~ Appearance, smell, taste & texture ~
            When frozen the waffles are a very pale yellow. Each waffle is about 6x6 cm roughly and within them they have little square holes which is where they get the name 'waffle' from.

            During cooking you will begin to smell the potato being baked/grilled and a slight hint of sunflower oil.
            Once cooked the waffles smell to me, very much like chips which is really what they are but just bigger, squarer ones. The waffles turn a nice golden colour without them looking under or over done (baring in mind you stick to the cooking guidelines). They do not look at all greasy or smell particularly fatty or unhealthy. Cutting into one, the outside of the waffle is nice and crisp and gives a nice bite, which then reveals the light, fluffy , mashed potato inside. They are not at all dry but aren't swimming with that horrible oily taste either. The textures complement each other perfectly; having the nice crisp outer coating and the smooth velvety potato inside.

            The only down side I find is that they are slightly bland and could do with slightly more seasoning, but that's not really a problem for me as I just add my own salt and sauce depending on what I'm serving them with.

            ~ Other information ~
            Each Tesco potato waffle oven baked contains; a mere 85 calories, 0.2g of sugar, 4.4g of fat, 0.5g of saturates and 0.1g of salt. So on the calorie front these are very low and the other values really aren't that bad either!

            Tesco potato waffles are cooked in sunflower oil

            The potatoes they are made with are 'specially selected'

            There is no information given about artificial colours or flavours which could be slightly alarming

            Tesco potato waffles are suitable for vegetarians

            Allergy advice: Contains wheat and gluten

            Ingredients (not full list) include; potato (84%), sunflower oil, dried potato, potato starch, salt, dextrose etc.

            ~ Overall opinion ~
            I undoubtedly would buy these again without hesitation, they leave my dinner plates clean all round, aren't too unhealthy even though they are fried (definitely a healthier alternative to chips) so I don't feel too guilty giving these to my children and don't cost the earth!

            I would certainly recommend these to anybody who isn't brand loyal and wants to save some pennies without sacrificing any of the taste as me and my family can't tell the difference at all!

            Tesco waffles nutritional content is actually better than Birdseye's with their waffles coming in at 105 calories instead of 85, have 1 more gram of fat compared with Tesco's (which is a considerable amount) and have a larger amount of salt coming in at 7% of your daily allowance instead of Tesco's 2%! This doesn't sound much but it's still a fair difference to those who find nutritional content important like me!

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • Bassett's Jelly Babies Bag / Sweets / 61 Readings / 58 Ratings
              More +
              01.06.2013 22:45
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              5 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              Just because they look innocent doesn't mean they are!

              I don't often buy sweets as snacks as I'd much prefer a chocolate bar or bag of crisps as they're much more satisfying, but whenever I'm going on a family outing in the car or taking a trip to the cinema or theatre I feel that sweets are a must and so do my children! Usually we end up with something like a mint assortment or toffees, but not this time! We decided we all wanted Bassett's jelly babies!

              ~ Bassett's~
              Bassett's was a former British confectionery company and is now used as a brand of Cadbury's. It was founded in Sheffield in 1842. Bassett's is probably most well known for it's liquorice allsorts which were created by accident in 1899 and in 1926 the mascot of Bassett's, Bertie Basset was created and is still used to represent the brand today.

              As well as liquorice allsorts Bassett's also produce jelly babies (which I'm reviewing) which were introduced after world war 1 as 'peace babies', Sherbet lemons, bonbons, pear drops, dolly mixture, toffees, Murray mints, mint creams, mint imperials, Everton mints and sour squirms.

              ~ Price & Availability ~
              Bassett's jelly babies are widely available at supermarkets, independent stores and bargain/pound stores. They are available to buy in 190g bags for around £1.48 from supermarkets (Sainsbury's and Tesco's currently have them on offer at £1 until 11/06/13), although I managed to grab my bag for £1 from B & M. The 540g boxes (ideal for gifts) are priced at around £4.00 each and Asda sell little 21g bags of mini jelly babies for 20p each. I personally wouldn't pay any more than £1 for a bag of these because you don't get very many in a bag and I like to feel like I'm getting good value for money.

              ~ Packaging ~
              Bassett's jelly babies come in an eye catching, bright yellow plastic bag, which needs to be opened carefully because it's made of that flimsy plastic that just rips further than you want it to and then you get jelly babies all over the floor! On the front of the bag there are three very cute looking cartoon jelly babies bursting out of the bag and above this are the words 'jelly babies' in multicoloured, fun lettering and the Bassett's logo. In the left hand corner there is a little section of the nutritional information chart telling you how many calories are in ¼ of the bag.

              On the back of the bag there are six little different coloured jelly baby faces telling you what each different colours names are, but not the flavours which is a bit annoying as I'd of thought that was more important than the babies names? Below this is a full nutritional information table alongside an ingredients list.

              ~ Appearance, smell, taste & Texture ~
              On opening the bag, the first thing I noticed was the lack of sweets actually in the bag - at least ¼ of the bag was empty! The smell is a mild waft of mixed fruits which gives you a hint of what's to come. Each jelly baby is roughly around 2cm in height and a bit less than 1cm wide and each one is shaped just like a baby with a little face and belly button! The colours are fairly pale, but still noticeable which makes them look less artificial and more natural and appealing. They are all coated in a sort of floury icing sugary powder which doesn't really taste of anything and just goes everywhere, but I think its purpose is to stop the jellies from sticking to each other.

              There are six different flavours in the bag; strawberry (red), lemon (yellow), lime (green) , blackcurrant (black/dark purple), orange and raspberry (pink). So there are all the normal fruity flavours that you usually get in a bag of sweets and I found them all to be in equal quantities so none of the babies felt left out!
              Each flavour was distinctly detectable and different which makes a change from them all tasting the same and gives the bag of sweets a nice variety. They all tasted very naturally flavoured too and very similar to the fruit of their flavour. The first ones to go are always the raspberry, strawberry and blackcurrant ones as they are the sweetest, but the strongest in flavour are definitely the lemon and lime because they are very citrusy but not too much so that they are bitter.

              The jelly babies texture is very much like a thick jelly without its wobble. If you hold them between your fingers you can squash them and they are easy to bite into and don't really take that much effort to chew but they don't immediately disintegrate into your mouth either. Each bite into the little jelly babies fills your mouth with fruity juices and makes your mouth water for more!

              ~ Other information ~
              ¼ of a bag of Bassett's jelly babies contain: 160 calories, 35.8g of sugar, a trace of fat, a trace of saturates and a trace of salt. The fact that these contain virtually no fat, saturates or salt is great, however the sugar content is incredibly high but I suppose this can't be coughed at considering these are sweets and most sweets are pure sugar. But for sweets the calorie count is also high, especially when most of us don't just stick to ¼ of a bag when the bag isn't full anyway!

              The ingredients list mainly consists of sugar, gelatine and natural flavourings.

              Bassett's jelly babies are made with natural colours and flavourings and real fruit juice - you can tell!

              Bassett's jelly babies are not suitable for vegetarians

              Allergy advice; may contain traces of gluten and does contain sulphur - WHAT?!

              ~ Overall opinion ~
              Bassett's jelly babies are very addictive and I will definitely be buying them again but I will try and limit how often I buy them because of how bad they are for me, they may be virtually fat free which nearly did fool me but the calories and sugar content are high! But I suppose that the fact they're made with natural flavours and colours does make them slightly better for you than other sweets on the market. They also aren't really very satisfying so it is VERY easy to finish off the bag without really realising it, other than perhaps feeling a big sickly or hyper from the sugar overload. I would recommend these as a treat now and again, especially for children as they seem a firm favourite with mine but I certainly won't be paying anymore than £1.00 for them because of the amount you actually get in the bag!

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                25.05.2013 13:06
                Very helpful
                (Rating)

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                Oh Mr.Quaker, where have you hidden the blueberries?

                When the weathers like it is - cold, wet and windy (yes, apparently we are in may?) I like to enjoy a warming, filling breakfast and that usually happens to be porridge! However I don't have the time (or the energy) to stand around the kitchen all morning over the hob, so that's when I turn to my good old friend Mr Quaker, who always manages to provide me and my family with a quick, filling and wholesome breakfast! I do usually opt for the golden syrup flavour to satisfy my sweet tooth, however I have recently branched out and tried various other flavours including the apple and blueberry.

                ~ Quaker Oats ~
                Quaker has been milling oats since 1899,in different countries around the world, but their main factory is in Cupar, Scotland. They provide these countries with over 47 million gallons of Quaker oats porridge each winter!

                Quakers oats go through a very strict, vigorous milling process to ensure only the finest oats reach out breakfast table; any oats that are discoloured, or have low moisture levels are rejected and then once the oats have passed their quality test they enter the milling process. This uses special machinery that separates the oats from other grain matter (wheat, barley etc) and any weeds that have been picked up during the harvesting process. The oats are then shelled to ensure all that's left is the oat grain and then they are steamed and cooled to bring maximum flavour before being rolled for a smoother texture. It is also good to know that Quaker oats support LEAF and their work to improve sustainable farming practices.

                Quaker oats has a range to suit everybody, literally! For the people that want a quick, convenient breakfast (like me) they have 'oat so simple' in various flavours including original, golden syrup (previously reviewed), cinnamon, honey and almond and several fruity flavours. They also produce a range specifically for children that includes flavours such as original, chocolate and strawberry. They even have a range for the naughty, in need of indulgence side of us which has flavours such as chocolate brownie and creamy caramel! And more recently they now cater for the ones with a bigger appetite with their 'oat so simple big bowl' range. Furthermore they of course cater for the more traditional families with their traditional rolled and jumbo rolled oats.

                But if porridge isn't for you, they don't stop there! Quaker oats has very recently introduced breakfast biscuits into their range to go with their 'morning bars' and other 'just add milk'cereals.

                Price & Availability ~
                Quaker oats so simple apple and blueberry is available to buy from all major supermarkets and most independent stores for around £2.44 a box, which contains 10 sachets (330g), which works out at just over 24p a serving which isn't bad at all. However if you need to buy multiple boxes and feel that £2.44 is a bit you can nearly always find them on offer, usually at 2 boxes for £4.00 which gives you a saving of 88p. You can also buy it in little 'express pots' for around 99p, which clearly works out a lot more expensive than buying the boxes even when the pots are on a multibuy offer, so when you can opt for the boxes!

                ~ Packaging ~
                Quaker oats so simple apple and blueberry (10 sachet variety) comes in a cardboard box with its base design being an oat field scene. The front of the box has the oats so simple logo at the top with a picture of Mr Quaker himself and below this are the words 'apple and blueberry flavour, 10 sachets' in green. Below this is a large green sign stuck in the field saying '2 mins to perfect porridge' and some juicy apples and blueberries to entice you.

                The two shorter sides follow the same design, but the longer ones contain an ingredients list nutritional information, cooking instructions, Quaker's customer service information and allergy advice. One of the longer sides also has a useful slit in it so you can easily close the box back up after use.

                The back of the box gives you a bit of background information about Quaker's and the nutritional benefits of their products as well as advertisements about other products in their range.

                Each individual sachet of porridge comes in a lined paper packet with the flavour of the porridge on the front with cooking instructions on the back. There is also a useful line on the packet that you are told to use to get the correct measurement of milk/water.

                ~ Cooking, appearance, taste & texture ~
                There are two options on how to cook the oats, you can either tear open the packet along the tear line marked, pour them into a microwaveable bowl, use the sachet to measure your milk/water by filling it to the line, pouring the sachet of water/milk onto the oats, give it a quick mix and pop it into the microwave for around 2 mins on full power (cat E microwave, 800 watts). Or, you can boil 180ml of milk/water, stir in the contents of the sachet and simmer until milk/water is absorbed, stirring occasionally.

                I always opt for the microwave option, because in my opinion this is why they are called 'oats so SIMPLE', because they are quick, easy and simple to cook without having to get all your pans out and get the hob on etc.

                You may have noticed I keep saying water/milk, this is because I prefer my porridge to be made with water and I know other people do too, however I know equally that many people prefer to have it with milk and both options work just fine.
                Uncooked the oats look like well...oats? You will also find a good handful of apple pieces....but wait, where are the blueberries?

                Once the porridge is cooked and you've given it a final stir you will have a bowl filled with lots of pale cooked, creamy oats. You should have your acquired consistency; however I usually end up adding a bit more water to it because I don't like it thick. The dried apple pieces will have been revived whilst cooking and become nice and juicy with a good bite to them...and the blueberries and still pretty nonexistent. You really are lucky if you get any more than five tiny blueberries, which is a real shame because when you do get one they are juicy and full of flavour and add some colour to your otherwise dull looking porridge! I can't say it looks particularly appetising because it doesn't, and it's not supposed to but you can make it look nicer by dressing it up a bit with a drizzle of this and a dollop of that. I usually just leave it as it is, but my children like to sometimes have fruit on there's or extra golden syrup, jam or honey as a treat.

                The porridge it's self tastes pretty plain with a very mild sweetness. Its texture is just right; it still has some bite to it without it being just mush in a bowl, especially with the added pieces of apple which add something a bit extra to it, but more blueberries would give it that extra oomph it needs! I always find one bowl is plenty, even made with water it is still adequately filling and sets me up for the day nicely without having to snack before lunch.

                ~ Other information ~
                Each sachet of Quaker oats so apple and blueberry porridge (made with 180ml of semi-skimmed milk) contains; 215 calories, 15.7g of sugar, 5.3g of fat, 2.3g of saturates and 0.3g of salt. Yes it is high in sugar, but some of it will be from the fruit so it's not all bad sugar. Obviously without the milk the nutrition just comes from the oats so the calories drop down to 130.

                Each sachet contains 33% of the 3g of oat beta glucan suggested per day to help lower cholesterol.

                I am going to list the ingredients because there short and sweet which makes a change; wholegrain rolled oats, sugar, dried apple pieces, dried blueberry pieces, natural flavouring, sat and sunflower oil. Thankfully I can pronounce everything on the list and there's nothing too nasty on there either! Although I'd just like to point out that only 0.5 % of the porridge contains blueberries which is barely anything, so it puzzles me really how this can be called apple and blueberry?

                Allergy advice: May contain wheat, barley and soya.

                ~ Over all opinion ~
                I have to say, I didn't enjoy this flavour oat so simple as much as the golden syrup because for me it wasn't flavourful enough. The apples were plentiful and added a nice touch but the absence of the blueberries ruined it a bit for me as Mr. Quaker seems to like to tease you with just giving you one or two, which isn't enough considering how tasty they are when you do get one! I do still buy this flavour because it does make a nice change now and again but I wouldn't recommend it if you're looking for a very fruity blueberry porridge and this simply isn't. However if you're prepared to push that aside and are a fan of apples then you may enjoy this one and I would certainly recommend it for its fillingness (if that's even a word?), convinience and it's health benefits.

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
              • More +
                24.05.2013 16:11
                Very helpful
                (Rating)
                6 Comments

                Advantages

                Disadvantages

                Well Mr quaker, you've won me and my family over once again!

                When the weathers like it is - cold, wet and windy (yes, apparently we are in may?) I like to enjoy a warming, filling breakfast and that usually happens to be porridge! However I don't have the time (or the energy) to stand around the kitchen all morning over the hob, so that's when I turn to my good old friend Mr quaker, who always manages to provide me and my family with a quick, filling and wholesome breakfast!

                ~ Quaker Oats ~
                Quaker has been milling oats since 1899,in different countries around the world, but their main factory is in Cupar, Scotland. They provide these countries with over 47 million gallons of Quaker oats porridge each winter!

                Quakers oats go through a very strict, vigorous milling process to ensure only the finest oats reach out breakfast table; any oats that are discoloured, or have low moisture levels are rejected and then once the oats have passed their quality test they enter the milling process. This uses special machinery that separates the oats from other grain matter (wheat, barley etc) and any weeds that have been picked up during the harvesting process. The oats are then shelled to ensure all that's left is the oat grain and then they are steamed and cooled to bring maximum flavour before being rolled for a smoother texture. It is also good to know that Quaker oats support LEAF and their work to improve sustainable farming practices.

                Quaker oats has a range to suit everybody, literally! For the people that want a quick, convenient breakfast (like me) they have 'oat so simple' in various flavours including original, golden syrup (the one I'm reviewing), cinnamon, honey and almond and several fruity flavours. They also produce a range specifically for children that includes flavours such as original, chocolate and strawberry. They even have a range for the naughty, in need of indulgence side of us which has flavours such as chocolate brownie and creamy caramel! And more recently they now cater for the ones with a bigger appetite with their 'oat so simple big bowl' range. Furthermore they of course cater for the more traditional families with their traditional rolled and jumbo rolled oats.

                But if porridge isn't for you, they don't stop there! Quaker oats has very recently introduced breakfast biscuits into their range to go with their 'morning bars' and other 'just add milk'cereals.

                ~ Price & Availability ~
                Quaker oats so simple golden syrup is available to buy from all major supermarkets and most independant stores for around £2.44 a box, which contains 10 sachets (330g), which works out at just over 24p a serving which isn't bad at all. However if you need to buy multiple boxes and feel that £2.44 is a bit you can nearly always find them on offer, usually at 2 boxes for £4.00 which gives you a saving of 88p. You can also buy it in little 'express pots' for around 99p, which clearly works out a lot more expensive than buying the boxes even when the pots are on a multibuy offer, so when you can opt for the boxes!

                ~ Packaging ~
                Quaker oats so simple golden syrup (10 sachet variety) comes in a cardboard box with its base design being an oat field scene. The front of the box has the oats so simple logo at the top with a picture of Mr Quaker himself and below this are the words 'golden syrup flavour, 10 sachets' in a golden colour to represent the flavour. Below this is a large sign stuck in the field saying '2 mins to perfect porridge' and a jar and spoon overloaded with gooey golden syrup.

                The two shorter sides follow the same design, but the longer ones contain an ingredients list nutritional information, cooking instructions, Quaker's customer service information and allergy advice. One of the longer sides also has a useful slit in it so you can easily close the box back up after use.
                The back of the box gives you a bit of background information about Quaker's and the nutritional benefits of their products as well as advertisements about other products in their range.

                Each individual sachet of porridge comes in a lined paper packet with the flavour of the porridge on the front with cooking instructions on the back. There is also a useful line on the packet that you are told to use to get the correct measurement of milk/water.

                ~ Cooking, appearance, taste & texture ~
                There are two options on how to cook the oats, you can either tear open the packet along the tear line marked, pour them into a microwaveable bowl, use the sachet to measure your milk/water by filling it to the line, pouring the sachet of water/milk onto the oats, give it a quick mix and pop it into the microwave for around 2 mins on full power (cat E microwave, 800 watts). Or, you can boil 180ml of milk/water, stir in the contents of the sachet and simmer until milk/water is absorbed, stirring occasionally.

                I always opt for the microwave option, because in my opinion this is why they are called 'oats so SIMPLE', because they are quick, easy and simple to cook without having to get all your pans out and get the hob on etc.

                You may have noticed I keep saying water/milk, this is because I prefer my porridge to be made with water and I know other people do too, however I know equally that many people prefer to have it with milk and both options work just fine.

                Once the porridge is cooked and you've given it a final stir you will have a bowl filled with lots of pale cooked, creamy oats. You should have your acquired consistency; however I usually end up adding a bit more water to it because I don't like it thick. I can't say it looks particularly appetising because it doesn't, and it's not supposed to but you can make it look nicer by dressing it up a bit with a drizzle of this and a dollop of that. I usually just leave it as it is, but my children like to sometimes have fruit on there's or extra golden syrup, jam or honey as a treat.

                The porridge tastes nice and sweet, but definitely not overpoweringly so. It's just nice and mild with still being able to detect that its golden syrup flavoured. Its texture is just right; it still has some bite to it without it being just mush in a bowl. I always find one bowl is plenty, even made with water it is still adequately filling and sets me up for the day nicely without having to snack before lunch.

                ~ Other information ~
                Each sachet of Quaker oats so simple golden syrup porridge (made with 180ml of semi-skimmed milk) contains; 215 calories, 15.9g of sugar, 5.3g of fat, 2.3g of saturates and 0.4g of salt. Yes it is high in sugar, but it's bound to be, it is golden syrup flavour after all! Obviously without the milk the nutrition just comes from the oats so the calories drop down to 135.

                Each sachet contains 33% of the 3g of oat beta glucan suggested per day to help lower cholesterol.

                I am going to list the ingredients because there short and sweet which makes a change; wholegrain rolled oats, sugar, natural flavouring and salt. Thankfully I can pronounce everything on the list and there's nothing too nasty on there either!

                Allergy advice: May contain wheat, barley and soya.

                ~ Over all opinion ~
                Golden syrup flavour is definitely my favourite from the Quaker oats so simple range and my children also agree. It's mildly sweet without being sickly and isn't anywhere near as bad for you as some of the sugar loaded cereals on the market so I'm happy to give this to my children. I would certainly recommend Quaker oats so simple golden syrup, especially for its health benefits and convenience. If you don't think golden syrups your thing, give some of the others a try!

                Comments

                Login or register to add comments
                • Fox's Glacier Dark / Sweets / 39 Readings / 38 Ratings
                  More +
                  24.05.2013 12:46
                  Very helpful
                  (Rating)
                  2 Comments

                  Advantages

                  Disadvantages

                  The darker side of fox's is actually quite pleasurable!

                  I don't often buy hard boiled sweets for no reason other than the fact that they never seem to find themselves on my shopping list, which could be because there not a necessity in my household as they don't particularly solve the hunger pangs of myself or my children. However, I was taking a trip to the theatre the other day with my mum and we fancied something to take in with us like most people do and when browsing the selection of sweets on offer at a local shop I recognised these fox's glacier darks as something my mum used to offer me and I was fond of so we agreed these are what we would take with us!

                  ~ Fox's ~
                  The confectionary company was set up by Walter Richard Fox as a wholesale grocery and confectionery business in 1880. It started in a Victorian warehouse in Leicester. By 1897 Fox was manufacturing over 100 different confectionery lines.

                  In 1969 the company was acquired by Mackintosh's, a year prior to the creation of Rowntree Mackintosh when Mackintosh merged with Rowntree's of York. After purchasing Rowntree-Macintosh in 1997 Nestlé sold the Fox's Brand and its Leicester site to Northern Foods in 2001. The company was sold to Big Bear Ltd in 2003.

                  Peppy (from peppermint) the polar bear is the original trademark used for Fox's Glacier Mints and was created by Leicester-based artist C. Reginald Dalby, better known for his illustrations of Thomas the Tank Engine and the other characters from the Railway Series of children's books by the Rev. W. Awdry.
                  Confectionary items in the fox's range include glacier fruits, dark (the ones im reviewing), mints and citrus, just brazils, poppet's and xxx mints.

                  ~ Price & Availability ~
                  Fox's glacier darks on research surprisingly aren't very widely available, as most major supermarkets just stock the fruit and mint versions, but it's worth looking out for them. I managed to get hold of my 200g bag from an independent local shop and paid £1.00 for them, which seems that if they were sold in supermarkets they would also be sold around that price considering the fruits and mints variety are. I think that £1.00 represents good value for money considering most bags of branded sweets are usually well over a £1.00 these days.

                  ~ Packaging ~
                  Fox's glacier darks come in plastic bag of which the design has been updated from the Dooyoo picture as the bag is now a deep purple in colour with the fox's logo going down the right hand side of the front of the bag in large white lettering rather than the center. Next to this are the words 'glacier dark' and below this a product description; 'liquorice and aniseed flavour sweets.' There is also a picture of one of the sweets with a 'splash' effect, which I guess is to represent the juciness of the sweet. The back of the bag gives you a bit of fox's history, storage instructions, nutritional information and a full ingredients list.
                  Each individual sweet is wrapped in purple paper, similar to the colour of the bag with the words 'glacier dark' and the foxes logo on them, again in white bold lettering.

                  ~ Appearance, taste & texture ~
                  Each sweet is quite small; I guess around 2cm long and 1cm wide and is very deep purple in colour. They are also very shiny, which must be why they get the name 'glacier'. The sweets are very hard, which is pretty obvious with a boiled sweet and are smooth. The taste is probably very acquired, I am actually not a great fan of the flavours aniseed or liquorice however I adore these sweets! Both of the flavours come together very well, and neither are overpowering which is probably why I like them. I wouldn't necessarily say these are particularly sweet or sugary in taste, I suppose they actually have a slight bitterness but it's very mild. I find these great when you're thirsty as they just give you something to suck on and melt in your mouth (which takes quite a while - unless you crunch them!) and they do get your mouth watering.

                  ~ Other information ~
                  Fox's glacier darks contain 360 calories, 70.6g of sugar, a trace of fat and 0.3g of salt per 100g. Obviously they are going to be high in sugar because that's what they're made from, but it's good to know that they contain hardly any fat.

                  Fox's glacier darks are made from concentrated fruit juices and contain no artificial colours.
                  Allergy information: Contains sulphates and are produced in a factory where nut products are manufactured.
                  Fox's glacier darks are suitable for vegetarians.

                  ~ Over all opinion ~
                  I will definitely be keeping my eye out for these as they are probably my new favourite boiled sweet, but it's such a shame that they are so hard to get hold of! I would definitely recommend these to anybody who likes the flavours aniseed and liquorice, and even if you don't (like me) you might find you like them because the flavours blend so well together and are mild. I doubt many children would like these though as they aren't particularly sweet and make sure you watch your teeth with them as they will put your dentist in business if you crunch them!

                  Comments

                  Login or register to add comments
                  • More +
                    06.05.2013 11:17
                    Very helpful
                    (Rating)
                    2 Comments

                    Advantages

                    Disadvantages

                    I will definitely need water at hand when eating shepherd's pie from this mix!

                    When the weathers still cold and windy (yes it still happens to be like that in May!), I can't think anything more warming and homey feeling than a homemade shepherd's pie! But making up the sauce yourself with all of the stock and flavourings can take a lot of time and effort, which not many of us have these days so that's when I turn to the good old packet recipe mixes which I always have one or two of in my cupboard from various brands and this one happened to be a Colman's shepherd's pie recipe mix. After all using a packet mix is still classed as home made right?

                    ~ Colman's ~
                    Colman's began with making mustard back in 1814 and have earned their place on the great British dinner table and are still bringing us nifty new products made of great quality, flavoursome ingredients.
                    Their range includes table sauces, gravies, season and steam recipe mixes, season and shake recipe mixes, regular recipe mixes, pour over sauces, mustards and condiments.

                    ~ Price & Availability ~
                    Colman's recipe mixes are available to buy from all major supermarkets and some independent stores for around 74p per 50g sachet, although Asda have them on a constant reduction of 54p. They are cheaper than Schwartz's recipe mixes as they are sold at around 90p. I think that 74p represents good value however you have to remember that you need to buy the rest of the ingredients to make up the shepherd's pie so it can work out quite expensive and definitely more expensive than a ready made shepherds pie.

                    ~ Packaging ~
                    Colman's shepherd's pie recipe mix comes in a small sachet which is lined for freshness, with its base colour being dark red. The sachet has a little tear mark which rips off nice and easily to open the packet without the contents flying everywhere. On the front is a picture of the shepherd's pie and above this is the traditional yellow and red Colman's logo. In the bottom left hand corner you will find an at a glance nutritional information chart and in the top left it says 'great tasting family favourites'. On the back of the packet you will find a list of the ingredients you will need in order to make the shepherd's pie, the recipe itself, cooking instructions, the Colman's promise, a full nutritional information table, an ingredients list, storage instructions and a product description which reads; 'a traditional British dish, this blend of onions and sage quickly creates a great tasting shepherd's pie the whole family will enjoy!'

                    ~ Appearance, smell, cooking & taste ~
                    Tearing open the packet you will find a brown powder, similar in colour to gravy granules but finer. The smell is very herby with a nice subtle meaty smell which doesn't come across as being too artificial.
                    The ingredients you will need to make the sherpherd's pie following colman's recipe are as follows, however you don't really have to follow their recipe as everyone likes to put their own twist on things.

                    1 sachet of colman's shepherds pie recipe mix
                    450g (1lb) lean minced beef (I don't believe this is nearly enough!)
                    1 large onion, diced
                    300ml (1/2 pint) cold water
                    2 carrots, diced (optional)
                    175g (6oz) frozen peas (optional)
                    700g (1 ½ lb) cooked mashed potato (I usually use a bag of frozen mashed potato and microwave it before topping the pie with it and popping it in the oven for quickness and it works just as well)

                    The assembly of the pie is nice and simple, first you pre-heat your oven and brown your mince and onion (if using) and then drain off any excess fat from the meat. Next you blend the contents of the Colman's sachet in the water and stir it into the mince along with any vegetables (carrots, peas etc.) Once everything has been brought to the boil place the mince and vegetables into a baking dish and top with the cooked mash potato. Then all you have to do is pop it into the oven for around 30 minutes.

                    Once cooked the shepherd's pie smells nice and rich and the packet mix thickens up to form a gravy-like consistency. The taste is just as a Shepherd's pie should be, you can definitely taste the onions, garlic and sage and there are undertones of other herbs too. The only thing that I find is that the packet mix is extremely salty without adding extra salt in yourself, which really puts me off as it is overpowering and ruins the other tastes within the mix.

                    ~ Other information ~
                    Following the recipe given on the packet, 100g as sold contains 313 calories, 15.3g of sugar, 1.9g of fat, 0.6g of saturates and 11.15g of sodium (salt). As I suspected, the salt content is ridiculously high which explains the overpowering salty taste of the mix.

                    Allergy advice: Contains traces of egg & milk

                    Colman's shepherd's pie mix contains no artificial colours, preservatives or added MSG.

                    Colman's shepherd's pie mix is suitable for vegetarians, however obviously you would have to use something instead of real mince otherwise it isn't.

                    ~ Overall opinion ~
                    I can't fault Colman's shepherd's pie mix for ease of use and quickness however the saltiness really does let it down for me. It's such a shame because you can smell all the other herbs but don't really get to enjoy them because of this. Another upside to this packet mix though is that you can create lots of variations of a shepherd's pie, for example a vegetarian one using a meat substitute or lots of different vegetables, use swede and carrot mash instead of potato or swap the beef mince for something else. I think the price is reasonable, but like I mentioned earlier you have to take into account the cost of all the ingredients, so if you're looking for a cheap meal then this probably isn't the packet mix for you as mince alone these days can be quite expensive.

                    I'm not really sure whether I would recommend this packet mix or not, it's great for convenience and experimenting with different ingredients but does that matter when the whole dish gets overpowered with salt? I guess that's down to personal preference as I know a lot of people who do like salt although it's not good for you so if you were to use this mix, moderation would be key!

                    I personally wouldn't go out of my way to buy this again, I might try other brands and see if there more to my taste.

                    Comments

                    Login or register to add comments
                    • More +
                      04.04.2013 12:04
                      Very helpful
                      (Rating)
                      1 Comment

                      Advantages

                      Disadvantages

                      Spoon some on your dessert and your body may thank you for it!

                      I'm a huge fan of desserts but I am always conscious of how bad they can be for you, especially swimming in rich cream, so ever since I noticed Elmlea single cream alternative I have bought it religiously instead of normal cream in an effort to remove some of the guilt from my dessert (I wish!)

                      ~ Elmlea~
                      Elmlea was launched in the UK in 1984, it was the first cream alternative to meet the needs of time-pressed consumers who wanted convenience along with the great taste of real cream.
                      Elmlea is the real alternative to cream, and is a blend of buttermilk and vegetable oils and is classified as a dairy cream alternative (DCA). 100 ml of fresh single cream has 200kcal while the same serving of Elmlea Single Light has only 124kcal. Elmlea produce several different types of cream alternatives such as single (the particular one I'm reviewing here), single light, double, double light, whipping and whipping squirty.

                      ~ Price and availability ~
                      Elmlea single cream substitute is available to buy from all major supermarkets and some independent stores costing you around 65p for 284ml. I think 65p is a very reasonable and competitive price coming in cheaper than some supermarket own brand single cream per ml.

                      ~Packaging~
                      Elmlea's single cream comes in an eye catching red and white plastic tub/carton with a red foil lid. Printed around the carton is a strawberry with cream being poured over it, alongside the strawberry are the words 'elmlea single' written in white and below this in smaller print it says 'alternative to cream'. As well as this there are serving suggestions; 'spoon on your pud, drizzle in your coffee and splash it in your mash', contact information, nutritional information and an ingredients list.

                      ~Appearance, smell, taste & texture~
                      Peeling back the lid you will find a white/creamy coloured liquid that doesn't really smell of anything at all. I usually opt to use it to pour onto desserts or to use in sauces when cooking but one thing that's quite clear when pouring it is that it just doesn't seem as thick as actual pouring cream, it's almost as if it's lacking substance or something. Taste wise, I find it pleasant enough, you can tell it's not actual cream as it doesn't have that luxurious, indulgent feel to it. It tastes quite milky and not overly sweetened, which is good as often with interpretations of full fat/calorie foods you often just get overloaded with sugar as that's what they use to flavour it instead. It's texture is very smooth and silky and I have never come across any extra thick or lumpy bits.

                      ~Other information~
                      Per 100ml elmlea single cream contains; 150 calories, 4.0g of sugar, 14.0g fat, 9.0g of saturates and 0.1g of salt. Compared with regular single cream this set of nutritional values is very pleasing as the average 100ml of single cream contains as much as 193 calories and 19.1g of fat!
                      Elmlea single cream is suitable for vegetarians.

                      ~Overall opinion~
                      No, it's not the same as full fat and calorie single cream and you can quite clearly tell it's not - especially used on it's own, however if you're looking for a better for you alternative to your usual single cream like me, then this is the product for you. When used in cooking and baking it works just the same as any other single cream and blends in with the other flavours so you can't really tell it's not the real deal used this way and is a great way to reduce the fat and calories of a meal. When poured into coffee, tea or hot chocolate again disappointingly you don't get the same satisfaction of a proper creamy, luxurious drink but it suffices. I will continue to buy this product because it's one thing in my diet I can swap with that's not going to cause me huge impact on taste but may do towards positive health effects in the long run.

                      Comments

                      Login or register to add comments
                      • More +
                        01.04.2013 21:40
                        Very helpful
                        (Rating)
                        1 Comment

                        Advantages

                        Disadvantages

                        I want a visit from the malteaster bunny every year!

                        When it comes to choosing a chocolate treat that's light on your stomach I always opt for malteasers and when I was looking down the seasonal isle in my local supermarket I noticed these little malteaster bunnies as seen as malteasers are one my favourites I thought I'd give them a try as they would make a change from a crème egg or a hollow Easter egg and thought my children might prefer them too!

                        ~Malteasers & Mars = malteaster bunnies~
                        Maltesers are a confectionery product manufactured by Mars. They are most popular in Denmark, the UK, Australia, Switzerland, Spain, Ireland, Canada, Poland, France, Hong Kong, and Portugal and they were created 1936, and first sold in 1937. As well as the original malteasers mars also produce white malteasers and malteaster bunnies which have been around since Easter 2010 in their malteaser range.

                        ~ Price & Availability ~
                        Mars Malteaser bunnies are available to buy before and during the Easter period from all major supermarkets and are usually taken off the shelves around April. They are available to buy singularly (29g) for around 60p each, in packs of 5 (5x29g) for around £2.50 and in bags filled with mini bunnies (58g) for around £1.00.

                        ~Packaging~
                        Mars malteaster bunnies in a little rectangular red packet (similar to malteasers themselves). On the front of the packet there is a little chocolate bunny with it's ear bitten off to reveal a honeycomb center. Above this is the words malteaster written just the same as the mars malteasers are and below a product description; milk chocolate bunny with a crunchy & creamy malteasers centre'. In the left hand corner there is a little box giving you a quick view of how many calories are in each bunny and adjacent to this the actual malteasers logo itself.

                        On the back of the packet you will find the full nutritional information, an ingredients list and Mars contact details.

                        ~Appearance, smell, taste & Texture ~
                        Opening the packet you get a very cute little bunny shaped treat covered in glossy chocolate. Roughly I'd say it was about 4cm in height and 1.5cm across, so they are pretty small. As soon as I opened the packet I could smell all the elements of a malteaser - sweet chocolate and honeycomb! Giving it a bite you get lots of little crushed up malteasers in a blanket of sweet, malty tasting cream which is nice and thick and holds the whole treat together. The malteaser pieces are nice and aerated and crisp with that distinctive melt in the mouth feel that contrast with the creamy filling beautifully. The chocolate coating is very smooth, sweet, creamy and easy to sink your teeth into - just like the chocolate on normal malteasers and blends into the malty filling perfectly. The whole bunny with all its elements - chocolate, honeycomb and cream is extremely Moorish but also very, very sweet so I don't think I could handle more than one even though they are so small! But I'm sure I'll give it a try when temptation overtakes me...

                        ~Other information~
                        Each mars malteaster bunny (29g) contains 156 calories.

                        Mars malteaser bunnies are suitable for vegetarians.

                        No allergy advice is given on the packaging.

                        ~Overall opinion~
                        These little novelty bunny easter treats are delightful! For me they are the perfect size to give you a sweet chocolate hit, any bigger and they might become a bit too sickly sweet. I think they are the perfect easter-themed chocolate for children instead of a huge, boring hollow easter egg because of their novel bunny shape and will definitely bare this in mind when buying easter treats for the younger children in my family. However they are not just for children, I find them extremely enjoyable and taste just like mars malteasers, just with added chocolatey taste and creamy, silky filling! Although I wouldn't recommend mars malteaster bunnies if you don't have a sweet tooth as you certainly need one with these!

                        Comments

                        Login or register to add comments
                        • Cadbury Creme Egg / Chocolate / 33 Readings / 33 Ratings
                          More +
                          31.03.2013 13:57
                          Very helpful
                          (Rating)
                          2 Comments

                          Advantages

                          Disadvantages

                          I'm goooing mad for Cadbury's creme eggs!

                          Easter brings a certain level of excitement for me because it gives me an excuse to eat lots of chocolate and especially on Easter Sunday when it's apparently acceptable to eat it for breakfast, lunch and tea! My favourite Easter treat by far has to be the Cadbury's crème egg and I can never wait for them to become widely available to buy during the Easter period!

                          ~Cadbury's & their crème egg ~
                          Cadbury's was founded almost 200 years ago and their crème egg in its current form was introduced in 1963, initially sold as fry's. The Cadbury's crème egg is one of the best selling Easter confectionaries throughout the UK and the US with annual sales in excess of 200 million and a brand value of approximately 50 million. They are manufactured at a rate of 1.5 million per day during the Easter period!

                          ~ Price & Availability ~
                          Cadbury's crème eggs are widely available to buy between the months of January and April, however you may be lucky and find some shops still stocking them after the Easter period. They are available to buy singularly (39g) for around 60p, in a box of six (6x39g) for around £2.95, in a100g bag filled with miniature crème eggs for around £1.30 or a 56g bag for around 60p. Other products produced under the brand name 'Cadbury's crème egg' include Cadbury's crème egg ice cream tubs, cones and lollies.

                          ~Packaging~
                          Cadbury's crème eggs come in a thin foil wrapping which is coloured red and the traditional Cadbury's purple. Around it are 'splats' of yellow with the words Cadbury and crème egg in the same purple. If you unwrap the foil carefully enough you will find the ingredients list and allergy information also, but this is quite difficult to do so you may find it more useful to take a look on one of the multipack boxes which will be much more clear and informative.

                          ~Appearance, smell, taste & texture ~
                          Unwrapping the foil you will be left with a milk chocolate egg, which is about the size of an actual small chicken's egg. It doesn't smell very strongly but if you make the effort to actually sniff it (which I did for the purpose of this review even though I may have looked really strange) you notice a hint of cocoa, milk and sugar. The chocolate looks distinctly Cadbury-like with its pale, milky brown exterior and interior. The chocolate shell is actually of a very decent thickness to give you a good chocolate fix with a nice crack to it (baring in mind you've not let it melt) and tastes just like a bar of Cadbury dairy milk - smooth, creamy and sweet! Once you have bitten into the egg the interior looks very similar to a real egg with a white outer representing the egg 'white' and pale orange inner representing the 'yoke'. The filling is described as fondant and is very similar to cake or cookie icing just thicker. It's very sweet and sticky and is in just the right amount to not be overly sickly; the chocolate also helps with this because it breaks up the sweetness and gives you a different texture to the 'goo'.

                          ~Other information~
                          Each Cadbury's crème egg (39g) contains; 180 calories, 25.9g of sugar, 6.3g of fat, 3.9g of saturates and 0.05g of salt. Can't really expect anything less from a chocolatey Easter treat filled with sugary fondant now can we? Such a shame they don't have the same benefits as an actual egg...ah well we can pretend they do just for Easter, right?

                          Cadbury's crème eggs are suitable for vegetarians.

                          Allergy information: Contains; milk, egg & soya.

                          ~ Overall opinion ~
                          I am yet to find an Easter treat to better the Cadbury's crème egg, it's just full of nostalgia and gooey goodness! They usually go down very well as a treat for the children however if you don't have a strong sweet tooth then these may not be for you as I know a lot of people who can't handle the fondant filling. I definitely need to stock up on these before they leave supermarket shelves for another nine months!

                          Comments

                          Login or register to add comments
                          1 2 3 4 5 6