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thisisablackout

thisisablackout
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Member since: 24.01.2011

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      03.02.2011 12:18
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      Great as an occasional treat

      Cadbury's fingers have been around for as long as I can remember. I particularly remember them around Christmas time, and in all the years that have passed since, I'm pleased to say that these are still around and still taste as good as ever! Cadbury's describe these as "delicious finger shaped crisp biscuits smothered in yummy Cadbury milk chocolate".

      I saw a box on my local shop shelf yesterday, on a special manufacturers offer for £1. I couldn't resist.
      They look as taste just how I remember them, except maybe a little shorter in length. The packaging hasn't changed much either. The background colour of a royal purple turning into a lighter shade with the Cadbury logo, product name and a picture of the fingers. Down to side of this particular box is a yellow strip announcing that these are on offer. Inside the box, the fingers are lay in a black, grooved plastic tray, covered with a sealed film for freshness.

      Fingers can be eaten in a variety of different ways. I prefer to nibble continiously until the whole finger is in my mouth, crushed and melting. My brother however, simply shoves them into his mouth, while my mum bites them in half.

      The first thing you noticewhen eating fingers is the crunchy biscuit, and then the chocolate begins to melt in your mouth, releasing that much loved Cadbury's taste. The biscuit itself to baked to a perfected art.

      As with the large majority of sweet treats, they are nutritional Hell. With a "per serving" calorie count of 120 (6%), 7.6g's worth of sugar (8.4%), 6g of fat (8.6%), 2.4g of saturates (12%) and salt at 0.08g (1.3%). Doesn't sound too bad for being a chocolate treat, but consider that Cadbury think that a serving size is just four fingers and it becomes a problem. An average box contains 24 fingers and I can easy polish off half a box before I even really notice. 12 fingers later and I'm 36% into my daily allowance of saturates!

      Fingers are suitable for vegetarians but contain wheat, milk, soya and may contain traces of nuts.
      Apart from the nutritional value (or lack of!), there is nothing else I dislike about these.
      Fingers are available at a large variety of different places, more commonly in the supermarket, local shops and even the sweets stall on some markets.

      The RRP of these is set at £1.45 but can be found on offer.

      Overall, I will be buying these again, but not anytime soon. It's impossible to eat just one and with GDA stats like that, I think it's best to leave these to special occasions.

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        27.01.2011 21:01
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        4 out of 5 stars

        I'm not soup's biggest fan, I often walk past it without a second glance in the supermarket. Put last week, I was pulled towards the mountains of cans packed onto the shelf. It was a little overwhelming, actually. All the different brands, flavours, price, special offers... I didn't know which to choose. I eventually settled on Tesco's own brand of Potato and Leek soup.

        Opening the can, I was hit by the strong but pleasant smell of soup. Pouring into the pan, the consitantcy was quite thick. As the soup warmed, it thinned out but never became watery and runny.

        The soup comes in 400g recyclable cans with a ring pull lid for ease. The label is quite simple, green with a picture of the soup and what looks to be a chalkboard behind it, stating the product name. On the back of that is the standard cooking instructions, ingredients and nutritional value.

        Upon tasting, I was quite impressed for Tesco's own brand. It tasted creamy, and not as bland as I initially expected. The potato pieces were diced and very soft, you could see and taste the green bits of leek and herbs.

        I don't usually find soup very filling but the generous amount of potato in this helped to hit the spot.

        The nutrional value of this soup is okay, hitting just 80 calories (4%) for just half a can of soup, 2.6g of sugar (3%), 1.6g of fat (2%) and 1g of saturates (5%) but a whopping 1.6g (27%) of your daily intake of salt.

        You can pick up this soup for just 52p, or on regular offer for 5 for £2.

        Overall, I think this is excellent value for money and I will be buying this again in the near future.

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        • Self Harm / Health Problem / 50 Readings / 44 Ratings
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          27.01.2011 16:58
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          -

          Self harm is such a sensitive and taboo subject and one I'm all too familiar with. Self harmers are often misunderstood and even ridiculed.

          I began self-harming at 12. Such a young and delicate age, bordering adolescense, going through some major changes in my life, inside my body and out. I was a difficult child due to an undiagnosed mental helth condition, later it turned out I had a very early onset of bipolar, but this wasn't know until I reached 20. It wasn't until 13 that it really began to take hold.

          I was at boarding school at the time. A place for teenagers who had emotional needs. It wasn't a nice place, to be honest. It often mirrored a prison.

          Self-harm took hold of my life. I began to hurt my arms with anything that was sharp enough.

          Soon, I was kicked out of the school as they feared for my safety.

          You don't need to know my whole life story, but this is how it began, and soon it was out of control. I managed to stop when I was 17, only having one relapse since.

          I've been left with some very deep and noticeable scars on both arms. But I'm not embarrassed of them. I don't hide them away and I know that makes people uncomfortable. I'm not proud of them, I don't like them, but they're there. And they're not going to go away any time soon.

          These scars are a part of who I am. In a way, they've made me who I am. I didn't do this to myself for attention, I didn't do this because of some "emo" culture. At the time, it felt like it was the only option I had. It's hard for people who don't self harm to understand.

          I used feel a lot of pain. A lot of raw, emotional hurt that sometimes knocked me for six. That would literally take my breath away and make it difficult to breathe. That would make my chest feel like it was being ripped apart. The kind of emotional hurt that would turn psychical. The kind where you mind is screaming at you and all logic and sense is lost.

          I used to feel it a lot, and I was an emotional mess through my teenage years. I had very horrible things happen to me while growing up which caused to early onset of my bipolar at 9 years old.

          Self harm gave me a temporary escape from that. It gave me the opportunity to escape from that pain for a few seconds. People who harm themselves often say it doesn't hurt. And it doesn't. Because the pain you were feeling a few seconds earlier was so much worse and the new psychical pain had brought your mind some relief, a new sense of panic. An immediate problem that forces that hurt away for a while. Self harm gives the mind something else to focus on. An injury to your body is enough to release certain chemicals and endorphins and suddenly, whatever was hurting you becomes secondary and your brain tries to work out how badly you're injured. And those chemicals can become extremely addictive.

          It's not easy to stop self-harming. It's addictive, its degrading, and feeling like a sharp object is the only thing that will ever make you feel better is the lonliest time of your life. But it does get better and you can overcome it.

          It's not easy and it hurts. It's like saying goodbye to your safety net.

          In a way, I'm proud of having this experience, because I now help people overcome their self-harm addictions. I give advice and help to those who ask for it on several website.

          And if you're a self harmer yourself, seeking advice and help because you want to stop, or find the courage and strength to stop, this next bit is for you.

          I think it's best to take your time and wait until you're ready. I guess it also helps to find something else to focus your energy into when you feel sad. A close friend of mine had recently stopped, she did pretty much the same thing I did, which was to literally take it one day at a time, which sounds like really crap advice now I've typed it out. But it's the same for when I quit smoking, I only looked at the short-term picture. Stop harming for just one day. And then maybe another. And another.

          Relapsing doesn't make you a failure, or mean you're not strong enough, it just means it got too much and you stumbled for a moment.

          Finding your triggers help. Seeing self-harm - on myself or other people - was a trigger for me. And evenings were always difficult. So I used to do something different to avoid the situation. I never used to visit the same websites I did before, I ask people to warn me of trigger warnings, most people are happy to comply.

          Being around friends really helps too. It's not easy to hurt yourself around people who love and care for you. Even if the emotional aspect don't help, you won't just be able to harm yourself in front of your friends.

          Always have something to look forward to. This is what gets me through these days. I still have really horrible days where I just want to pack it all in, but having something to focus on always helps. Going to a gig, going to see friends, going to the cinema, going on a weekend break. Anything that is suitable to you and you'll look forward to. It's easier to have hope when you have something to look forward to.

          Rewards help. A friend of mine was really struggling a few months ago after going a week without harming. And I told her if she could make it just a few days more, I would get her the t-shirt she really wanted. She struggled but she managed it and she said she felt better afterwards because the t-shirt serves as a reminder that she can overcome it when she puts her mind to it. She found something she wanted more than hurting herself and focussed on that instead.

          Then there's obvious things like throwing away any self-harm paraphernalia. I'm a complete hypocrite saying that because I kept a razor blade in my room until 18 months after I stopped. I guess I just personally felt better knowing I had it there. And when that urge came, I knew I had it ready and wouldn't panic, only making me worse. I'm on the fence about this one, but if you feel it would help, throw it all away.

          I also went to group counselling via my doctor. It sounds stupid and juvenile but having someone tell you "well done" when you've gone a whole week without doing it feels amazing. And the thing is with group counselling is it's not as awkward if you dont want to talk, there's always someone else to fill the silence and give you motivation and tips. It isn't for everyone but there's no harm in trying. If you're not comfortable with your doctor knowing, check online for self-referral groups in your area.

          You can find some way of stopping. It won't happen overnight and it's a long hard battle, but I swear there's better things and you won't feel this way forever.

          You can do this, positive mental attitude.

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          • Tesco Chicken Fajitas / Ready Meals / 52 Readings / 48 Ratings
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            26.01.2011 17:42
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            I won't be buying this again

            For £3.30 you can purchase 450g's of Tesco's Chicken Fajita's, found in the ready meals section of the refrigerators. The picture on the box looks appetizing enough which tempted me away from my normal cook-from-scratch method.

            When you open the box, you find 4 tortilla wraps in a plastic wrapping and a tub of ready-cooked chicken, salsa, onions and peppers, along with a pot of sour cream, all sealed in with a film lid.
            The cooking instructions are simple enough, and these fajitas could be ready in 16 - 18 minutes by oven cooking, or just 3 minutes in the microwave. I chose to oven cook.

            Once cooked, the smell of the chicken and salsa mix was bland.

            The taste test came next and I was less than impressed. The chicken was tasteless and watery even though it has clearly been marinated, the onions were still raw even though it had been cooked for the appropriate amount of time, the peppers didn't quite taste like peppers and the salsa... well, I've never tasted salsa like that. It was bland, had a strange texture and was quite watery. I'm not a fan of sour cream so I didn't try it. The tortilla wraps, however, were soft and delicious.

            Overall, this wasn't worth the money paid for it. Either the food was bland and tasteless or doesn't taste like what you expect. I won't be buying this product again and don't recommend anybody else does.

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              24.01.2011 23:54
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              Good wipes but I personally don't think they're worth the price tag

              My daughter is two yeards old now, and the novelty and need for brand name wipes has long since worn off. I've found that some store's own brand wipes work just as well and are usually a third of the price. However, I saw Johnson's on offer in Boots and decided to stock up.

              The wipes claim to protect from redness and irritation using aloe and willow herb, and while my daughter has been much less irritated, redness sometimes remains. The wipes themselves are fragranced, which although not unpleasant, does linger. White and green in colour, the wipes are strectchy and do the required job well. They don't tear easily and are adequately thick. I think these wipes can sometime sit on the moist/wet border as it is possible to easily wring them out, however I don't find this to be a problem and can even assist you in some difficult nappy changes.

              The wipes come in a resealable trademark pink and green packet of 64 and are easily separated from one another.

              Normal retail price is usually in the region of £2.44 and is available at chemists, supermarkets and at some local shops.

              Although they do their job well, I don't see them as being anything special. I would buy these again when they're on offer.

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