Welcome! Log in or Register

Sainsbury's Basics HM822-V Hand Mixer

  • image
6 Reviews

Brand: Sainsbury's / Power: 100 Watts / Setting: 5 Speeds / Design: Hand Mixer

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    6 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      13.05.2013 20:46
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      1 Comment

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Great small mixer

      I've powered through wisking as long as I can despite having very weak wrists in both arms when suddenly I decided enough was enough and if I was going to continue baking I needed a light-weight mixer that would prevent any more pain and difficulty. I purchased this from the basics range because I don't have a huge budget and often less doesn't always mean less quality. This cost me from memory around £4.99 or maybe less which is excellent value. It is very small and lightweight, with everything you need in a very compact area. The box manages to easily slot every component in and I've kept it even though I've owned the mixer for well over a year as its so convenient for storing the main body of the mixer as well as the beaters. It is very simple and easy to use, although it did come with an instruction manual still of course. Its as simple as plugging it in, flicking the switch on and sliding the speed from 1-5 depending on what you require. Before this however there is a little setting up that is required. You take the beaters out of their plastic and slot them into the holes where they very easily just click in. Its so convenient to just click them in and out for both storage and cleaning purposes. There is a button on the front of the machine which allows you to remove the beaters, however this doesn't work when it is in use which is good for safety. I was grateful there wasn't loads of wastage as I already have enough though I try my best to cut down (and of course recycle in addition), it was simply the box, the plastic wrapping and the instruction manual. The mixer is very simple comprised of a plain white body and metal beaters. The wire is 1m long which is a little short for me if I am not on the counter nearest to the socket as I have quite old wiring in my house and the plugs are very inconveniently placed. This means I'm forced to stand in the same spot always and having little counter space enough this is a little annoying. However for most people the length should be adequate. The beaters are only very use which is good for my own personal use as I only tend to make very small quantities for myself and my boyfriend however if you wanted to produce a larger batch the size of the beaters may mean it will take much longer or just be very difficult altogether. The sizer of the mixer means it is lightweight which eases use. When I have used bigger varieties (such as the one my Mum owns) it leads to my arm aching and having to switch them frequently. It is very easy to store because of its size which is great as I have a tiny kitchen as it is. Many of the positives of this mixer in fact are its convenience. Overall I would recommend this mixer as it does everything a more expensive brand might but for a fraction of the price. I manage to bake with it with ease and cleaning is also a doddle because of how easy it is to click out the metal beaters. I would definitely recommend this and at under a fiver you can hardly go wrong.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        10.04.2012 22:03
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        6 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A budget electric mixer which is great for students and occasional use but not for serious bakers.

        For most of my adult life, I've cheerfully been making do with an electric whisk that's probably older than time itself. It was made of Bakelite, was originally white but had gradually yellowed with age and had go faster stripes down the side. It looked about as un-snazzy as it's possible for a kitchen appliance to get. But I didn't mind that, because I'm not arsey about these things and it did the job pretty well. And then I dropped it. At first, I thought I could gaffer tape it back together, like I've done with 90% of everything else in my house, but sadly it was not to be. Any time it was switched on a smell of electrical burning emanated from it and the whisks had an awful habit of dislodging themselves at speed and poinging off into the distance. In short, it had become a pretty effective missile launcher, but an awful whisk. Now, I'm far more of a cook than I am a baker, so while I'm quite happy to spend upwards of £50 on a really good, cast-iron pan, I absolutely refused to spend more than a tenner on something that would only see occasional use. With that in mind, I decided a cheapo electric whisk from the Sainsbury's value range would do the job just grand, and I was right. ~*~Appearance~*~ Well, there's no point in mincing words: it looks like a cheap and nasty piece of kit. I appreciate that Sainsbury's have made some effort with rounded edges and the like, but really, you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear. It matters little though: who really wants to display their mixer as an objet d'art? ~*~Ease of Use~*~ Even really stupid people could figure this out as all you get in the box is the appliance itself and two beaters. No dough hooks or any of those kind of fripperies, so all you have to do is slot the beaters in until they click, plug it in and whisk yourself into a frenzy. To that end, you're offered a variety of 5 different speed settings although the difference between each of them is so negligible that they're really better counted as three: quite slow, moderately slow, and getting up a bit of speed. Should you happen to own one of those gloriously envy-inducing mega-big kitchens with acres of worktop space, you may be disappointed to learn that this has a power cable of just 35 inches long. Still, if you're in aforementioned kitchen then probably you can afford one of those ginormous shiny electric mixers that Nigella has. If you're a bit of a pleb like the rest of us then the power cable shouldn't bother you too much. The relative lack of power might, though, as this is not a mixer with a great deal of oomph. I was making lemon cake the other day and as I was beating the mixture I could hear the motor starting to struggle and the whisks visibly slowed down. Everything was still well mixed but it's worth bearing in mind that this little beastie is likely to lie down and surrender if faced with the bad boys of the baking world, like Christmas cake. I hate all fruit cake and only really like sponges, so it's grand as far as I'm concerned. Now, what else can I possibly need to tell you? Oh yes, there is a quick release button for the beaters, but it just loosens them allowing you to pull them out a bit easier. In an ideal world, it would eject them at speed allowing you to fire them at your partner in the manner of a gunfight in a Western, except you'd leave a big cakey mess on their chest rather than a bullet hole. ~*~Where and how much?~*~ I'm not telling you where. If you haven't worked it out by now, well, you're too stupid to be allowed to make cake. The price was a fiver when I bought it; I think it's around 6 quid now.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          20.05.2011 10:48
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          7 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          A great value basic mixer from Sainsbury's!

          I got married last year and we received quite a lot of money from relatives and friends for wedding presents. We decided to upgrade or replace some of the electrical items in my kitchen with part of the money. One item that I had never owned was a hand mixer for making cakes and muffins. As I tend to do very little baking nowadays, except perhaps for special occasions such as Christmas, I didn't want to spend a lot of money on a hand mixer as I knew it would only get used a handful of times a year. Thus, I was delighted when I was shopping in a local branch of Sainsbury's and saw within their 'Basics' range of household appliances a rather petite-looking little hand mixer that looked as though it was going to meet my requirements quite nicely. I was further delighted to discover that the price tag for this little gem was a mere £4.79. (Although I do believe that the price varies from store to store, I have never known it to cost over £5). The Sainsbury's mixer is indeed very basic, as the product name would suggest, and consists of the 'machine' part of the appliance as well as two metal beaters. The white hand-held part of the mixer should of course not be immersed in water as it is an electrical item, and there is sufficient warning to this effect printed on the packaging for the item. Whilst I am on the subject, I will quickly mention that the Sainsbury's hand mixer was not especially difficult to remove from the packaging within which it was contained, nor was the packaging excessive; this seems to be something of a rarity nowadays, and during the course of replacing the electrical items in my kitchen lately I have come to find that a lot of electrical goods are extremely over packaged which only results in me feeling guilty at the increased waste I have produced. The Sainsbury's mixer in comparison, is rather simply packaged in a very plain looking cardboard box, inside which the electrical plug and the metal beaters for the mixer are all wrapped up for transportation and protection purposes. It took only a mere moment to remove the mixer from the box and I managed to do all of this by myself, even with slightly impaired mobility. Back to the mixer itself, and I cannot stress enough that this is a very basic, simple item in both its design and its concept. There is nothing complex or difficult about the appliance at all, and whilst that is not a negative point for myself personally, those consumers with a love of gadgets or hi-tech equipment in their own home will probably be unimpressed with the plain white and very basic-looking plastic 'body' of the Sainsbury's hand mixer. This plastic 'body' appears to be quite robust as I would expect from an appliance like this. As I've already mentioned, it cannot be immersed in water for obvious reasons, but I have found that a hot soapy cloth (that is of course only damp and not soaking wet) rubbed quite vigorously over the mixer is usually enough to remove the worst of the splashes and cake mix residue that are evident after it has been used. There are two metal beaters supplied with the mixer, which are made of stainless steel, and these must be inserted into the two gaps at the front of the mixer before using. This is very easy to do, and there is no need to apply excess force or pressure to the beaters to make them slot into place. The beaters are quite small in comparison to the beaters on my mother's hand mixer (which I used to borrow on occasion as I did not have my own) but then again, my mother's electrical hand mixer is much bigger in size overall and it cost around £40, being a slightly more 'hi-tech' model than I would have bought for myself. Another very important point to mention here is that whilst the Sainsbury's hand mixer is smaller and quite petite-looking in comparison to some other models that are available on the market at present, the upside to this is that the smaller the mixer, the lighter it becomes... in most cases, at least. I can honestly say that after a few minutes of using my mother's larger hand mixer, I often need to switch hands as my upper arm usually starts to ache after a short time. Also, it is often the case too that I need to stop the 'beating' or 'mixing' process altogether for a few minutes to give my aching arms a break. This has very seldom been an issue with the Sainsbury's mixer, so I do think that this is down to the weight of the mixer itself, rather than the fact that I am something of a weakling! There's no doubt in my mind at all that the Sainsbury's mixer is very light when compared to other mixers I have used before, and for me personally, this makes it easier to use, easier to control and of course I can use it for a little longer as my poor arms need less recovery with this model. The two metal beaters at the front of the mixer can be removed very easily at the touch of the button. This button is located at the rear of the mixer, just above the speed control dial. The 'release' button simply pushes in and the beaters at the front of the mixer pop out of their respective slots at the front, allowing them to be washed (or licked!). The beaters should be removed before the mixer is stored away and there is a safety function on this mixer in that the beaters cannot be removed whilst the appliance is functioning. This gives me peace of mind as I know I will be wanting to bake some cupcakes and cookies with my young nephew when he is a little older and I know how curious children can be! When it came to using this little mixer for the first couple of times, I will admit that it took a little getting used to, mainly because I was so used to using my mothers rather heavy, bulky mixer and I found the more lightweight Sainsbury's basics model much easier to control and easier to manoeuvre in comparison. Furthermore, I found it strange to get used to having five speed settings instead of only three. The speed settings are easy to adjust by simply moving the little plastic dial at the rear of the mixer along to the speed you require. The speeds are numbered 1 to 5, with 5 being the fastest speed. I usually start out at the lowest speed (1) and then gradually move up the dial until I find the speed that is most suited to whatever I am mixing or baking. Personally, I find that the fourth speed is more than ample for anything I have been mixing so far, although this is of course down to personal choice. It is as easy to decrease the speed of the mixer as it is to increase it, and I have experienced no problems with either. As with all hand mixers such as the Sainsbury's Basics model, it is normal to experience a little mess in the form of splashing and cake-mixture escaping from the bowl whilst the mixer is in use. One way to control this mess is to avoid lifting the metal beaters from the liquid or mixture in your bowl whilst they are in use. Instead, the mixer should be switched off before the beaters are removed (or indeed before they are placed into) the bowl of flour, cake mix etc. Doing this, and indeed controlling the speed of the beaters (an over-zealous speed setting will ensure an increase in splatters also!) has not been at all difficult to manage with the Sainsbury's Basics mixer, and I believe that I have experienced no more mess from baking than I would with any other brand of mixer. Perhaps the only negative point I have to make about the Sainsbury's mixer is the fact that the metal beaters are quite small. They are actually only about 16cm in length from one end to the other, which is quite a bit smaller than other models of mixer I had been considering before buying this model. To be fair though, this model is smaller overall than other models I had been considering, and the petite size (and of course lighter weight) of the Sainsbury's Basics mixer is something that works to my advantage personally, so I won't be deducting any marks from the product rating for this little detail. I mention it purely for the information of fellow consumers who may well bake a lot more than I do or require a larger or heavier model of kitchen mixer than I do. It is worth pointing out too that the smaller the mixer, the less room it takes up in your kitchen cupboard, and this is something that is extremely relevant to yours truly, given my rather crammed storage units! Overall, I am delighted with this purchase and it has actually inspired me to do a little more baking than I would normally have done. I think I got an absolute bargain price with this little appliance and think it offers great value for money, particularly as it is a kitchen appliance that is not used all that often. I would wholeheartedly recommend this little mixer from Sainsbury's and give it full marks!

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            12.08.2010 17:34
            Very helpful
            (Rating)

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Good value kitchen product for today's throwaway society.

            BASICS: Part of a little family of Sainsbury's basics products, including a lamp, kettle, toaster and hand blender - all of which can be picked up for around the £5 mark. Easy release two whisk 100 watt mixer with five separate speed settings (numbered 1-5). THE LOOK: Rather ugly, bulbous and more reminiscent of an iron than a hand-mixer, with a triumpherate of wart-like projections to stand it on. OK, so maybe it's not that bad. It's your standard white plastic kitchen goods colour with a stream-lined handle incorporated. 30cm high and around 20cm length, it would work well in combination with any standard sized mixing bowl and can be easily stored. The cable comes in on the right hand side, and is slightly on the short side if you're not positioned in the immediate vicinity of a plug socket. Both the speed settings and the easy release button for the whisks are to be found on the top of the product, immediately above the stainless steel whisks. These click and lock into two holes and can be released direct into the washing up bowl after use, minimising mess. FUNCTIONALITY: There's not a lot to be said. It's a mixer and it mixes. You're unlikely to bother getting it out for use with the lower settings, which could be used to mix flour into a cake mixture for instance (more easily done with a metal spoon in my opinion) but the higher settings (nearer five) are perfect for the hard-on-the-arm kitchen tasks like whipping egg whites or cream. It's not the most powerful unit, but does the job and I've now had mine for longer than the 12 month period and it's still functioning. Easily cleanable and although the motor gets warm after prolonged use, it doesn't get warm enough to be a concern.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            28.01.2010 14:23
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            10 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            A very useful gadget at a very affordable price.

            In recent months I have been studying the supermarket home electrical departments and I have come to the conclusion that there are bargains to be had. But just one word of warning - the Sainsbury's Basic electrical brand is probably not for you if you are an interior design fanatic. I have no objections to owning anything that is plain and simple to look at as long as it is functional and serviceable. Some months ago I had to replace our main television set and I went to take a look at what Sainsbury's had to offer but I found that they could not offer me what Tesco's could at that time, hence Tesco won hands down. But there are many small electrical appliances that we use frequently that are sitting on Sainsbury's shelves at a very competitive price, in fact the prices on some of the Sainsbury's Basics range verges on the ridiculous. The Sainsbury's Basics hand mixer costs just over £4, at the moment there is a reduction in price owing to a sale! Take a look at the next one up in price and you will find the Kenwood hand mixer which is priced at just under £15. I appreciate that the Kenwood model may well be a superior model but do I really need to shell out another tenner for the privilege of finding out, well I decided to give the Sainsbury's Basics hand mixer a go. If all else failed I had only lost less than five pounds so not a monumental sum of money at stake. The Sainsbury's Basics hand mixer is made in China, the mixer looks contemporary and the white plastic casing is easily wiped clean. The hand mixer comes complete with two beaters that are easily removed for cleaning purposes and by pressing a button which is situated at the top of the mixer ( very easy to access) you can release the beaters straight into the kitchen sink ready for washing. The Basics hand mixer has five speed settings and again the sliding control is situated at the top of the beater adjacent to the beater release button - so the two controls are right at hand. The 100 watt Basics mixer is not a streamline model but I do like the idea of the three small plastic feet that allow you to stand the hand mixer upright, if you are taking a break form using the mixer then it is really good to be able to rest it without making a mess. The sliding speed control is numbered from 1-5 so there is no room for mistake and the hand mixer is easy to use. Though it may look slightly on the bulky side it is surprisingly lightweight and easy to work with. The hand mixer is easy to hold at an angle, so that you can get right into the ingredients sat in the mixing bowl and the five different speeds are in my opinion a bonus. The lower speeds are good for blending sauces, folding in flour and blending cake mixture, the higher speeds are so useful for beating egg whites, that task can be really arm-aching. The Sainsbury's Basics hand mixer has an ample length of cable for a small appliance (0.8m) and the appliance comes with a years guarantee. On the box there is nothing to state that the beaters can be put into the dishwasher. Hand mixers always tend to get a bit mucky and this Sainsbury's Basics model is encased in white plastic and that does show up every mark but a good wipe soon puts that right. Hand mixers are definitely only for the grown ups, once the two stainless steel beaters are attached to the unit and the motor is switched on then you need to give the job in hand your full attention. Though the Sainsbury's Basics hand mixer is only 100 watt I find that that is plenty, the five speeds allow you to cope with most tasks - in fact the hand mixer seems pretty ferocious when it is put on the highest setting. I think that the Sainsbury's Basics hand mixer copes well and if you put it up against its nearest rival price wise ( the Kenwood hand mixer priced at just under £15 ) then for the extra ten pounds you are getting a 150watt motor as opposed to 100 watt with the Sainsbury's hand mixer. The manufacturers guarantee is the same, the controls on the Kenwood hand mixer are on more or less the same place and the machine operates in much the same way. So for a very small amount of money I have a new hand mixer that I am relatively pleased with. A hand mixer is not an electrical appliance that I use everyday, maybe mine comes out of the cupboard two or three time a week. The Sainsbury's hand mixer is small enough to store away neatly in a kitchen cupboard but I try to remember to make sure that the flex is totally free of kinks before I put it away. The Sainsbury's Basics hand mixer is slightly more bulbous than the Kenwood hand mixer but considering that it is not heavy to use and can be stored away easily then I do not see that presents any problems. I am sure that I remember someone telling me that most motors have so many `man hours` so naturally I would expect to get my moneys worth from the hand mixer. Sainsbury's have given it a twelve months guarantee so I am safe in the knowledge that I have that to fall back on. For under a fiver I am more than chuffed with my new hand mixer, it is not the latest state of the art kitchen gadget but it is functional and at the end of the day that is what counts.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              19.08.2009 20:19
              Very helpful
              (Rating)
              4 Comments

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              a great basic addition to your kitchen cupboards

              I've always enjoyed making my own cakes, but the process of blending the ingredients together can take a toll on my arm strength after a while. Being the weak woman that I am I decided to invest in a cheap hand mixer to help the process along and make my cake making faster and more enjoyable. I wasn't really worried about what I was going to buy so when I went into Sainsbury's to get my weekly shop; I just had a browse along the electrical aisles. Coming in at £4.99 Sainsbury's Basics version of a hand mixer was too good a price to turn my nose up at. What a bargain for something that would hopefully make my life easier. Into my trolley it went. There is nothing fancy about this mixer but if it can do the job as well as other brands then it would be good enough for me. Inside the basics white box with bright orange stripes sat my white mixer and two mixing blades, happily waiting to be brought out and used. The mixer is quite a small unit compared to some you can buy, but at 25 centimetres high with the mixers attached it was big enough to sit happily atop my mixing bowl without causing any wobbling due to being too big, or tilting due to it being too short. Attaching the mixer attachments is as simple as pressing into the holes underneath the mixer. I find sometimes you need to twist the poles but they seem to slot in fairly easily. Removing is just a case of pressing the large button on top of the mixer and waiting for them to pop out. Overall operating the unit is very easy. At 100wats the mixer is strong enough to cope with all tasks you will need this for in terms of cake mixture, Yorkshire puddings etc. As long as you're not trying to mix cement then you'll be fine with this unit. I do find the cable long enough for most places around my kitchen, but if I'm working in a small place then it can get in the way slightly. I shouldn't moan as I would only moan if the cable was too short. For reasons unbeknown to me this unit has five different speeds of mixing. I rarely find myself going above number two as the power is ample for the cake jobs that I do. I don't find it mixes any better when I turn the speed up. It's a nice feature to have and know you can use if you come across something a bit stiffer to whisk such as cream perhaps, but I think even three speeds would have be fine for this unit. Cleaning this unit is fairly straight forward. The only bits you need to actually wash up are the mixer blades. These aren't suitable for the dishwasher, but a quick rinse after use and then adding them to the washing up pile usually see them come back gleaming afterwards, depending on who is doing the washing up of course. The unit itself can get a bit grubby when using it at higher speeds. Often I have found uncooked cake mixture clinging to the base of the unit. A quick wipe over with warm water when unplugged sees this problem resolved very quickly. Being a basics model, I wasn't expecting anything great in the aesthetics department. It's not an attractive unit, but being white in colour then it will fit in any kitchen. I find that I leave mine in the box in a cupboard, but with this I know it won't sit there gathering dust. For the money I paid, I really couldn't have asked for anything better. It comes with a 12 month guarantee as standard and as such has lasted me a lot longer than this already, but even if it had broken after twelve months, I would have been happy knowing I had gotten my money's worth and just bought another. Overall I am really pleased with this hand mixer and would recommend it to anyone who thinks they may need one. Why spend a fortune on something if it works just as well as more expensive brands.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
            • Product Details

              Short name: Sainsbury's HM822-V