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14 Reviews
  • Poor sms set up
  • still doesnt have the Nokia cache
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    14 Reviews
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      03.12.2002 02:20
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      • "Casing Easily scratched"

      Having owned numerous phones, from the modest Phillips Savvy, a Nokia 3210, 8210, 7110, and a NASTY NASTY Vodaphone Sagem, this T39 came as a nice suprse to me. I only came across this phone because it was offered to me at ludicrously low price (brand new, and not 'hot' before people assume) and my dad had his eyes on my nice and sleek 8210. So I took the plunge. And i'm flipping happy i did! Aesthetically, the phone is very nice to look at. It has a crisp sharp appearance and it 'feels' expensive to the touch. The battery is extremely thin, but thats not to say that its life suffers. I havent charged mine for about 4 days now, and it still says that i have 160 hours of standby time left. Not bad at all. Featurewise, its packed, but it obviously shows its a 'grownups' phone. It has everything the business user could require - GPRS, Bluetooth, WAP, email, fax capabilities, etc etc. THe user manual is a fairly hefty affair, and its all in one language. It makes you realise why they included the (still thick) quick start guide. The user interface is good - the typefaces that ericsson use are very good and the phone's menus are very easy to read. Getting to the various functions is a tad slower to use than say a nokias (lets face it - Nokia has more or less got the best UI about on mobiles) and being a heavy nokia user and a heavy SMS user, its a tad annoying to plod your way through the menus just to read your messages. However, there is a function to allow you to add your most fequently access menus (number 7 for you owners out there). The vibrate optiion is very good, its does silently alert you as opposed to sound like a chainsaw, and also i like the text message alert sound. Saying that though, the ringtones have a bit of explaining to do, they are pretty naff, its a a job to get hold of anything decent sounding if you want your own. What i do like about the phone are the lit
      tle things. The indiglo lighting system is fantastic, it means you have a good bright even coverage across the screen allowing you to work the phone in complete darkness - i also love the way the light gently fades in and out as you open the flip and close it after a period of non use. The screen saver function is useful too as most of the screen is shut off save for the core things to be monitored, such as network and time. The grayscale screen is very welcome too - makes a nice chage from monotone screens, and adds a touch of style esp if you use one of the better backgrounds off the supplied CD. Overall i like this phone a lot. This is one that im going to hold onto. As a university student it appears that there's an unwritten rule tat says you have to have a nokia phone and i am enjoying the fact that i can gently sidestep this and be that little bit different. Plus your mates get baffled when you beat them all the time on the built in tennis and erix games. If i am gong to nag about something it's the aerial. Granted, due to the blue tooth and GPRS the aerial has to be bigger but it adds a dent to the phones overall style. Saying that though it does provide fantastic reception and even if you are in a underground club like i usually go to, you alway have some reception to make that call, unlike my stubless nokias which are usually left struggling. Overall, great stufff.

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        28.11.2002 18:18
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        I FIRST CAME ACROSS THIS FONE ABOUT 7 MONTHS AGO. I LIKE ITS FEATURES SO MUCH THAT I BOUGHT IT.I FOUND THE MENU DIFFICULT TO USE BUT THOUGHT TO MYSELF ILL GET USED TO IT.BUT IT SHOWS AFTER 7 MONTHS I STILL FIND SOME FEATURES A LITTLE DIFFICULT TO USE.I LIKE THE LOOKS OF THIS FONE BUT THE HANLDING IS AWFUL.THE SHAPE OF THE PHONE AT THE BACK DOESNT FIT INTO YOUR HAND VERY WELL.BUT APART FROM THESE COMPLAINTS THE FONE IS GREAT.ITS GOT EXCELLENT RECEPTION (MUCH BETTER THAN MY OLD PHONE).THE FEATURES ARE GREAT .IT HAD JUST ABOUT ALL THE FEATURES AVAILABLE AT THE TIME I BOUGHT IT(OTHER THAN COLOUR).I ALSO LIKED THE DISPLAY EVEN THOUGH ITS NOT COLOUR YOU CAN CHOOSE FONT SIZES.

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          27.11.2002 14:56
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          I felt I had to write an opinion after Screechy's slating due to a bad experience with one phone - I've known an Aston Martin go in for countless repairs which shouldnt reflect too-much on the rest of the stock. I got my T39 for its tri-region and bluetooth capabilities which it has done well and first time all round (easy to setup). It was also free for me on a contract. I may also connect to GPRS one day. I was surprised and didnt expect it to get my emails from my pop3 server which is a bonus if I didnt fancy taking my PDA with me to whereever (or forgot it). The flip doesnt seem to be a flimsy as I thought it would be and the keys can be a little small if you've got big fingers. I love the size of the unit so this is not a major minus factor. ok..the niggles - there arent't that many except the chunky looking antenna on the top and small keys if you have long(ish) fingernails. My main bug bear is the voice commands - not so much the cheapish way it tries to recognise what you are saying (unlike the good PC package ViaVoice) but the issue of using the side push-up switch to activate it. You have to hold it for a couple of seconds otherwise you get the status screen on the phone, which when displayed doesnt let you enter a voice command. Bloody hate that - there's numerous times on the Motorway I wanted a call mother and I had to keep pressing cancel then that side button up! The button should have been given the one command. The battery seems to have gone from a six-seven day standby to three-fours days of power before getting low so I dont know if this is due to me keeping plug in the power socket most of the day - just hope its settled down to this level and doesnt get worse. Thats it for now.

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            16.08.2002 23:36
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            Why I got an T39 I received an e-mail that said GRATIS, like the majority of people I read it and thought ‘free’ then thought ‘junk mail, hit delete’. Fortunately I didn’t listen to me, instead I opened it, which was damned lucky, as any Swedish person would read GRATIS and think ‘congratulations’. The person who had sent the mail was in fact Swedish. He worked for Ericsson and was informing me that I had won an Ericsson T39 with luxury accessory pack. At the time I was using a Motorola cd160, ‘great’ I though ‘there IS a God!’. That was back in August 2001. Techie Stuff I won’t go into details here, you can get the full low down from the official web site and the other reviews but if you need a phone that is really mobile, then this is a good one, it is capable of GPRS triband (working on GSM 900/1800/1900) or High Speed Circuit Switch Data (HSCSD). It also includes a WAP 1.2.1 browser, email support (complete with POP3 and SMTP support) and Bluetooth. It weighs in at a meagre 86g, runs (and runs and runs) on a flat Lithium-polymer battery which boasts a standby time of 300 hours and 11 hours of talktime; Features, where do you start? Personal Information Manager that allows you to manage your daily events. SyncML support for wireless synchronisation of contacts and calendar events to your PC via WAP, Bluetooth or IR. Enhanced security for the WAP browser. Enhanced Messaging System, you can send sounds and pictures in SMSs. Games, you can play solo or with other Bluetooth users. There are some nifty things you can do with your voice, leave yourself a memo or set the phone up to either answer or reject a call by voice, for example if the phone displays ‘Boss’ you might feel the need to tell the phone to ‘shut up’ and it will reject the call, or maybe ‘Mum’ and you’ll tell the phone ‘in a minute’ or ‘wh
            at!’ and it will connect you. Plus there is all the usual standard stuff alarm clock, phonebook etc., There is also loads of chat stuff, but I don’t know much about that, so if you are a chat fanatic check the other reviews. You can tell already cant you, I love this phone :0) What I like about it Apart from the obvious fact that it didn’t cost me anything, the first thing that I like about the T39 is the size. There’s no point having a mobile phone if it is too large to conveniently take with you, it’s small enough to fit in any pocket without leaving an unsightly bulge or squeeze into the smallest evening bag. Yet it’s not silly small and likely to be lost if placed in a large bag. Another feature that has proved useful is the design of the belt clip. You open a clip on the clip to attach it to your belt pocket, whatever, then there is another catch to attach the phone onto and off of the clip. I’ve made it sound complicated maybe, but it isn’t, it is effective however, twice I’ve caught people trying to lift the phone off the clip to no avail, only an embarrassed ‘sorry mate, just going to borrow it’ – yeah – my eye! Another thing I like is the flip cover that means not having to lock the phone and unlock it to avoid making accidental calls. The flip top appears quite flimsy, but I’ve dropped my phone on several occasions and it has skittered across s the floor and in one instance bounced off a shelf, the phone is still good as new though. I like the add ons, the radio and the MP3 could have been combined into one though in my opinion. And the battery lasts seemingly for ever, despite constant MP3 player use, I’ve never had it run out on me during all the months I’ve used it. But what I really like is the fact that I’ve never had any reception problems and the voice quality has always been good, after all, at the end of the day, a phone is a pho
            ne and if you can’t make and receive calls...forget it. Draw backs The buttons are a little small, but I don’t like to use the add on chat board and they aren’t so small that I can’t use them, also the phone itself is small, so what else can you expect? Also, if you’re going to make a big thing of including WAP capability, then you should arrange a way to include a decent sized screen. Ericsson haven’t. I don’t use the WAP or e-mail facilities, because I’m economical that way and have 24 hour cable Internet connection so it’s cheaper and more convenient to SMS and e-mail from my machine, but if I needed those facilities on the move, then I would want a slightly larger screen or a PDA. Conclusion I like to use e-bay, and from my experiences with the T39, I wouldn’t be afraid to buy a another second hand T39 should (God forbid) anything happen to this one. I can’t think of anything else that would make me switch or change phones. Of course, there's always it’s big brother the Ericsson T68. But we’re talking a lot of Mullah for a colour screen! So if you see one up for grabs in a competition...drop me a line :0)

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              17.07.2002 20:12
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              Given the price and market position of the T39m, I don?t believe I?m out of line for being rather demanding. If this were only a $200 phone from Fido, I think I would be more than happy with it. Also note that due to similarities in many areas, some of this review is taken word-for-word from my earlier review of the Ericsson R520m. The Ericsson T39m is not presently available from any of the GSM providers in Canada, but if you feel just have to have one, they can be purchased over the Internet, or if you happen to be visiting other countries. You?ll need to buy an unlocked version, since anything else would fail to operate with any of the Microcell Connexions providers here in Canada. After shipping costs and conversion to Canadian funds, the price will come out to about $600 to $800. Much of the excitement surrounding this phone seems to be due to the fact that it supports GPRS. This is the new packet-switched data format recently introduced into Canada on Microcell Connexions, and will soon be made available on Rogers once they launch their GSM network. GPRS is better than the old-fashioned circuit-switched data because: A) it?s faster, B) you are always connected, and C) you only pay for the data your transfer. However, with Fido offering this service at prices starting at $75 per month, only a handful of users are going to actually want it, so we?ll deal with the phone based purely on its other merits. This is also a ?world phone?, meaning that it supports all three of the present GSM bands: 900 MHz, 1800 MHz, and 1900 MHz. You should be able to use it anywhere in the world that there is GSM service. Overall Size and Construction In terms of size and appearance, the T39m is a dead ringer for the T28w. The display is a bit larger, and there are other subtle differences you can easily note if you compare them side-by-side. However, at a quick glance, it is unlikely that a casual observer would know that you didn?t have
              a T28w. The same type of ultra-thin lithium-polymer battery found on the T28w provides power for the T39m. The battery fits flush into a rectangular opening on the metallic back of the phone. Even though the battery only provides 600 mAh of capacity, Ericsson have done wonders at squeezing some truly useful talk and standby times out of it. Nokia should definitely consider sending industrial spies over to Ericsson to find out how they do it. Due to its similarities to the T28w, anything that can be said of the T28w in terms of physical attributes can be said of the T39m. However, there is one very obvious difference that may please some, and distress others. Unlike the T28w, the T39m does not include a spring-loaded flip. The flip is fully manual on this new model. I personally thought the spring-loaded clip was a terrific idea, and it was one of the things that made the T28w seem just that much more user-friendly. However, people who have used the T28w for prolonged periods of time have reported a high incidence of flip failures. Perhaps that is why Ericsson abandoned the idea. Display The display is certainly larger on this model than on the T28w, but it isn?t that much bigger. However, it does pack a lot more pixels, and quite surprisingly it is able to display just as much information as the much larger R520m screen. Unfortunately, unless you have excellent eyesight, you?re going to be squinting to read that much info in such a small space. Fortunately however, the T39m also includes the font size feature found in the R520m. I switched the fonts to medium, and I found them much more readable. However, you don?t get anywhere near the amount of information on the screen at one time as you do with small fonts. Backlighting is provided by an electro luminescent device, which means smooth, consistent lighting and good contrast. However, the backlight isn?t bright enough, and I found that it didn?t do the job well enough to
              make the display readable in the dark (without using up a lot attention). The key lighting is also rather poor. Unlike most phones, the T39m supports 4 levels of ?darkness? on each pixel. They use this grayscale scheme throughout the menus, and they make a half-hearted attempt at applying anti-aliasing to some of the icons. However, I didn?t really find that this feature added much value to the phone. It?s certainly a great novelty, and it should impress your friends with phones that can only draw black pixels. Electrical attachments on the bottom of the phone continue to use Ericsson?s style of connector. As I have said before, I believe this is one area where Ericsson has the right idea, since flexing or pulling does not readily damage their connectors (as it does with the Nokia?s). It is a shame that they didn?t provide the industry-standard 2.5mm jack for the headset. You?ll have to try and find an adapter, assuming that getting one that will fit the T39m is easy (hopefully, it uses the same connectors as the T28w). User Interface Ericsson has revamped their menu system, and it?s markedly better now than it?s ever been. I find it vastly more intuitive, and they?ve even provided numeric shortcuts (ala Nokia) for rapid location of a specific menu. They also have a 7th main menu that you can customize with 8 of your most commonly used menu items, thus making it slightly easier to access them. However, even though their top-levels menus are second-to-none, the T39m fails to provide much in the way of secondary menu support. By this I mean the ability to perform certain peripheral tasks while in the middle of performing a primary task. For example, not all the prompts where a phone number is required allow you to access the phone book. It?s missing details such as that which can annoy users over time. It is even worse than the R520m, since it doesn?t have the options keys found on that model. The keypad itself is
              a huge improvement over the junk they provided on the T18z, and it feels even better than the T28w. The keys all press easily, and they provide a reasonable level of user feedback. Volume control is provide by the same hideous slider that they saddled us with on the T28w. I don?t know what drugs the engineers had to take in order for this scheme to look good to them, but I?m certain possession of it would get you in big trouble with the law. The call log was typical of Ericsson?s previous models. It lumped incoming and outgoing calls into a single 30-entry log. Although I can see this being an advantage over discrete logs sometimes, I personally prefer to have my incoming, outgoing, and missed calls kept separate. When viewing entries, no easy way is provided for extracting call information. You must wait while that information is sequentially displayed on the screen over a period of time. Phone Book The Phone Book in the T39m will remember up to 510 entries, which can consist of a first name, a last name, a company name, a job title, and an e-mail address. Apparently Ericsson figures that ONLY business people will use this phone, and that business people DO NOT have personal contacts. If you think you can put someone?s street address in either the Company or Title fields, forget it, since they only allow 15 characters each (okay, 123 Main St. should fit). The phone book also allows up to 5 telephone numbers per name, but each of those entries MUST be designated as a different type (business, home, mobile, fax, etc). If your contact happens to have multiple home numbers for example, you?ll have to store the others under erroneous headings. In contrast, the 7190 allows each of its 5 numbers to be re-classified as any of the supported types. Ericsson should have allowed this. One thing about the phone book that is useful is the ability to sort the list by first or last name. Again, this seems to be a business-orie
              nted idea, but I?m sure that would be handy for personal contacts. However, I?m not sure what it does with single named people, such as ?Mom?, ?Dad?, or ?Sis?, which are common in personal phone books. Text Messaging If you need a phone to do a lot SMS work, the T39m is definitely NOT for you. SMS handling can best be described as stone-aged. It is barely improved over the earlier Ericsson models, with only the slightly larger screen making it any better. Compared to the 7190, the T39m provides SMS merely as after-thought. There is no user-definable mailboxes, messages show up as indecipherable lists of dates and phone numbers (or names if the number matches an entry in your Phone Book), and access to messages is intolerably slow once you get more than about 6 or 7 messages in your inbox. However, the T39m does have a number of unique features for making SMSing with friends a bit more fun. Along with text, you can also insert images and sounds. The phone even includes built-in editors for both graphic images and sounds. The catch is that these features are only useful if you know someone with a phone capable of receiving this type of message. Right now, that appears to be the T39m ONLY. So, the feature is a great toy to play with in your spare time, but its usefulness is rather questionable. Deleting messages can be nightmare. Although a command exists to delete all messages, it only deletes message in the phone?s memory (not in the SIM). The SIM-stored messages must be removed individually. That wouldn?t be so bad if the phone removed them quickly, but it doesn?t always do this. I tried clearing 15 messages from the phone, and it took me literally 5 minutes. Perhaps I removed them from the wrong end. To its credit, the T39m does include a reasonable implementation of the T9 predictive text input system. However, unlike the 7190, it does not support contractions (words such as ?I?m?, ?don?t?, ?weren?t?, etc). You can?t ev
              en add them to the dictionary, since there is no key to represent the apostrophe. You could compose messages that didn?t include contractions, but that?s hardly the point of T9. This is a weakness that Ericsson should consider fixing. Another thing that?s difficult to do is enter numbers in your text. At first I thought that the T39m didn?t provide a ?123? input scheme, but it apparently does. However, you must manually activate it before you can use it, and the user guide isn?t very clear on this matter. Once it?s activated, getting at it is a royal pain. First, you must press and hold the # key until the menu appears. You must then scroll down to the Language option (4 keystrokes), which you then select with the Yes key. You must then scroll to the ?123? option (minimum of 1 keystroke) and then select that. So, including the # key, that?s a minimum of 8 keystrokes. Yuck! The SMS input system does not include any cut-and-paste operations as you have on the 7190. If you need a name or phone number from your phone book, you?re out of luck. Yes, this is how virtually all other GSM phones are, so compared with them the T39m is no better or worse. However, now that I?ve seen a better way on the 7190, I naturally expect others to follow. To enter such information you?ll have to exit the message entry, read the information you want, memorize it (or write it down), and then return to entering your message. Fortunately, the Ericsson phone remembers all the messages you have entered (partially or completely), so you can always return to an aborted message. Perhaps this is why. I should note that the T39m includes a feature that is not technically SMS, but does come under the heading of "text messaging". With this phone you can read and write e-mail directly from your POP3 server. This is done using a data connection (circuit-switched or packet-switched, your choice). The manual doesn't provide any information about the maximu
              m length of a composed e-mail message, but I would imagine it can be much longer than 160 characters. If e-mail is important to you, then this feature could easily be a decision-maker for you. Since many people use SMS for e-mail functions, the lack of polish in that department might not be an issue if you choose to use the e-mail client feature instead. I didn't get a chance to try it myself, but assuming it works as stated in the manual, it should be of great value to those wishing to use their phone for e-mail functions. Communicating with Your Devices On the positive side, the T39m has plenty of options for communicating with the outside world. You can use a data cable, an IR port, or Bluetooth. Bluetooth is a new technology that allows devices to talk with one another wirelessly using a 1-mw transmitter in the 2.4 GHz range. Unlike IR, you don?t need to point the phone at the other device; it just has to be within approximate 10 feet of the phone. I didn?t have any Bluetooth devices to try, so I can?t comment on how well it worked. The T39m is one of the first phones to include Bluetooth built-in. Earlier Ericsson models required a bulky add-on that plugging into the bottom of the phone. As Bluetooth devices begin to proliferate, I?m fairly certainly that you?ll be glad to have a phone that also supports it. This is especially true of using GPRS with your laptop. Imagine keeping your T39m in your shirt pocket while you used your laptop on the Internet. That?s the sort of thing that Bluetooth allows. Sundry Features The T39m includes a WAP browser, but I couldn?t get it to work on Fido?s home page (WAP.FIDO.CA). It would work fine on other pages, including a sample I set up myself on TAGTAG.COM. It has been suggested that Fido simply doesn?t support the necessary pre-sender for this phone. Since Fido doesn?t officially support the T39m, this could be why. Otherwise, it worked about as well as any
              other WAP browsers I?ve seen. The phone also supports calendar and to-do lists. These features worked extremely well, and mirrored most of the features offered by Nokia (going back to their 6190). I personally find the calendar feature useful for recording audible reminders, and I feel lost when I have a phone that doesn?t support it. The T39m also supports voice dialing, though this is nothing new, since most modern phones now support this feature. However, Ericsson goes a step further than most manufacturers by offering a voice code to answer and reject calls, and a "magic word" that can be spoken at any time to get the phone's attention. The "magic word" makes it possible to voice dial the phone without ever having to lift a finger. When used in conjunction with an in-car kit or headset, this could be a very useful feature to safety-conscious drivers. The phone includes two games. One is called Tennis. Well, Tennis my elbow, it?s actually PONG. You know, the video game that started everything back in the mid-70?s. That doesn?t mean it isn?t fun to play around with, but it?s not the sort of game you?ll find yourself running back to time and again. The other game (called Erix) was much more interesting. It consisted of a small cross that bounced around the screen. Your job was to fill in areas of the screen without letting that cross hit an unfinished area. RF and Audio Performance To test the RF performance of the T39m, I took it to my favorite testing grounds for Microcell Connexions, namely the stretch of Bancroft Drive between Silken Laumann Way and Creditview. Coverage of this residential area is horrendously bad, and so it goes a long way to demonstrating how well a particular phone will behave under less-than-idea conditions. To establish a baseline for comparison, I maintained a call on my Nokia 7190 as I drove in both directions along Bancroft. The audio on the 7190 bro
              ke up about 50% of the time, and on at least one occasion, it sounded like I was going to lose the call (though I never did). Next I took the T39m along the same route, and the results were shocking, to say that least. The audio broke up at least 90% of the time, and phone dropped the call on 3 different occasions. On one of those occasions, I found the phone displaying the dreaded ?SOS Calls Only? message on the display. I pulled over to the side of the road at that point, and I waited for the phone to re-find Fido service. After waiting 2 minutes, I finally powered down the phone, and then I turned it back on. It found Fido service immediately, so it would therefore appear that the T39m suffers from the same problem as the T28w when it comes to loosing Fido signals and then hanging on to Rogers signals thereafter. In other situations where the signals were a little iffy, the T39m seemed to have enormous trouble maintaining a half-descent signal during a call. It also lost service fairly easily when the phone was taken into places where the signal dropped quite low. In this regard, it was at least as bad at the Seimens S40 I tested a few weeks ago. Note on RF performance: Keep in mind that I can only test the T39m at 1900 MHz. This is a world phone, supporting 900 MHz and 1800 MHz as well. It is quite possible that the T39m could perform much better (or much worse) at those frequencies. It is therefore strongly recommended that you consult reviews written outside of North America for performance data at 900 MHz and 1800 MHz. Sound quality was another sour point. Although the earpiece speaker provided plenty of volume, along with pleasant tonal balance, the overall reproduction can best described as fuzzy. Have you even listened to any of those talking greeting cards with the tiny little piezoelectric speakers in them? If you have, then you know what I?m talking about. The sound of the T39m is very reminiscent of this (though cert
              ainly not that bad). Outgoing audio was quite nice though, and the phone includes Ericsson excellent noise suppression system. Even when used in a car travelling at over 100 km/h with its windows open, the background noise heard by the caller was fairly subdued, and the voice quality remained mostly unaffected. Conclusions If they plan to use GPRS, or if they are just dying to use Bluetooth devices, then I suppose they might be able to justify buying this phone. However, when it comes to the phone?s ability to be a phone, the T39m is no improvement over the T28w, nor is it particularly good compared to other phones on the market. Even Ericsson?s own T18z had vastly better RF performance, and arguable better audio qualities. In it?s defense, the T39m has wonderful potential as an adult TOY. If that?s what you are buying a phone for, then the T39m is an excellent choice. It has many extra toy features over the R520m (with which it shares many other attributes), and it should keep you amused until the next great toy phone comes along. For those of you who want or need a serious PHONE, then you are much better off looking elsewhere. The RF and audio qualities of the T39m are sub-par, and if you place a high value on these two attributes, the T39m can be nothing less than a huge disappointment.

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                12.06.2002 17:45
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                I LOVE THIS PHONE! I won't go over the features that have been mentioned in the other reviews, but one thing has been omitted- a feature that is unique to this phone, and is an *amazing* timesaver once you get used to it. On the left hand side of the T39 is a slider bar- during texts, if you slide it up and press a key, it types the second letter on that key (simulating pressing it twice), and if you slide it down, it types the 3rd letter. Sounds awkward, but believe me, I can bang out a text message faster than anyone using Predictive Text or just plain old pressing the keys a million times. To the reviewer that said you have to wait for the cursor to appear before you can type the next letter- that's nonsense- you can type away, and the phone catches up- the only proviso being if you want the first letter on a key twice in a row- eg. 'neTTing', then you have to pause. I went without my T39 for two weeks, and borrowed a friend's Nokia- I was so put off by having to go back to the old way of typing texts, I didn't bother at all. Predictive text was good, but not as fast as on the T39 with the slider. Bravo to Ericsson for this little feature- it's a God-send!! Add this the other features already mentioned- tri-band, GPRS ready, send POP3 emails etc etc, I won't be changing phones for a LONG time!! If you are thinking of bying one, then do. You won't be disappointed.

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                22.05.2002 21:29
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                • "Poor sms set up"

                I chose this phone over a sony z5. Mainly because of the features it had and the amount of accesories that could be bought. The Bluetooth technology intrigued me. I thought I would be able to use it on my laptop. I have had this phone for a few months now and it has done nothing but annoy me. I have owned an sony erricson j5, j7. a Nokia 5110, 3210 and one of those really old Motorola brick freebie type things. But I can say that this phone has the worst menu setup. Text messaging. When entering a multi tap text there isn't a button which will allow you to to enter a letter. Instead I have to wait for the cursor to shift after tapping in a letter. Initially I thought this was my own fault for not having read the instructions. But even after studying the instructions I havn'et found a function for this. Phone numbers. When someone calls you and there number isn't in the phone memory it will only give you the option to save the number right at the end of the call. This is not usually a convenient as for law breakers like myself I could be driving or in a hurry. The name itself has to be enterered with multitap which brings us back to my first complaint. Bluetooth. I didn't fully understand waht bluie tooth was but looking briefly on the internet it sounded very useful. A wireless form of communication. What it doesn't say and maybe I was a little thick, but it will only work on other blue tooth applications. Well I didn't know did I. and it didn't say so on in the instruction manual. The manual continually mentioned how easy it was to connect to other applications but it didn't say anywhere that the application had to have bluetooth technology. IU looked on the internet and studied BT. further to find that to have blue tooth on my lap top it would cost £300. for a pcm card. So bluetooth is now a redundant function on my phone. My advice would be to wait for bluetooth to be come more readily available
                . IO don't even know anyone else with a blue tooth phone so I cant transfer information with anyone. Belt clip The phone comes complete with a belt clip which I thought would be very good. but I found the clip would fall off if I sat down. which I didn't find useful. Screen goes weird during phone calls. I don't know if its just my phone but. I find the reception is very good until you try and make a call. To be fair this doesn't happen all the time but it happens enough for me to be weary of it every time I make a call. When I recieve a call or dial out the recieved voice would cut out. Thye I would look at the display to see if the line was still connected and 70% of the time the screen would be distorted and strange character would show. Also when dialling a number. There isn't a tone to say that the number isn't dialling. For some reason this phone doesn't always dial out. And I know with mobiles it isn't instantaneous before a ringing tone is heard. So with this in respect I usually find myself waiting for up to 2 minutes before I realise look at the display to see its not dialling at all. Very very annoying! But why have I kept this phone. I don't know. I tried to go back to the link where I pruchased the phone and tried to show the problems I had. I was hoping that the dialing problem could be higlighted if I called the shop, but it was fine so I walked out the shop with my phone Doh! I was told to ring the manufacturer but the manfacturer helpline number or address isn't in the instruction booklet. Other reasons why I still have this phone. It looks nice. I can communicate with my laptop via infra red alothough this doesn't always work. It looks nice (oh I mentioned that already.) Erm Nice size

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                  12.05.2002 04:36
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                  Dear Reader, My God I’m a sucker for things like mobile phones - you know, I’ve owned 6 phones in 4 years. I don't get through underpants that fast! Anyhow, my personal hygiene aside, I have owned 4 Ericsson's and 2 Nokia's, and do you know, both Nokia’s bit the dust before their year was out, whereas all but one Ericsson soldiers on to this day... So, the T39 - why is it good? It’s small enough to fit into a shirt pocket; it has several cool nautical ring tones (the sailor’s hornpipe, and what shall we do with the drunken sailor); it has a rubber coated aerial, which means that you can hold it in your teeth without breaking it; and most important of all... it has one of those matrix-stylee flip down button covers - this stops you from accidentally phoning your auntie whilst drunkenly discussing your new bit-on-the-side with your mates... In terms of functions, the T39 isn’t anything really special (but what phone is nowadays?) The phonebook’s pretty neat, in that you can store somebody’s home, work and mobile number under one entry. It has bluetooth and infra-red, so it can be used to get on line with pretty much any portable computer. And you get predictive text messaging for speedy textual intercourse. Disadvantages, then – not much really, except that it feels as though the hinge on the active flip part may be a bit flimsy (and boy, I bet these things are expensive to have fixed). Having said that, though, I’m not that kind to, err… anything I own, and the T28 (a phone of a very similar design) I had previously turned out to be as solid as a rock – I’ll keep you posted. Anyhow, dare to be different - get one of these! Thanks

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                    16.04.2002 02:32
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                    • "Software bugs"

                    I'm sorry but this is not going to be one of those reviews where I am harping on about how good the particular product is. I believe my title sums this little diddy up perfectly, but before I jump the gun and go to the Con?s of this product I will do the decent thing and merit its good qualities. Ianclark is absolutely correct when he says, "as far as features and technology are concerned this phone is ahead of it?s time," and apart from the very attractive appearance this is the main reason why I chose this particular model. It is full of great little features that will have any normal 'Techie' smiling for hours. There are other reviews that I have read here that go into the details of what it can do and exactly how it does it, so I won?t bore you with repetition, as these accounts are quite comprehensive. 'Smartrich' too, is quite correct when he states that "the user interface is a bit tricky." I have had about half a dozen mobiles before this, and this one has the least intuitive user interface. The Nokia's I find are particularly good with this feature in that you can take them straight out the box and use them fairly extensively without ever opening the operating manual. Still that said, a little reading never hurt anyone, but if you have kids (like mine who can't be bothered with any RTFM'ing, be prepared to do some explaining). The software also has a few bugs in it which are somewhat annoying. e.g. The alarm activation and recurrent alarm seem to have a mind of their own, but that is not anything too annoying and I'm sure nothing a software upgrade couldn't fix. Now the main purpose of any communication device is to communicate and that is where this unit falls short. 39% of the time (and that is probably an accurate estimate) the persons on the other end with whom I am speaking can't hear what I am saying. I can hear them perfectly but they say I am either so f
                    aint that I sound as though I am calling from the Serengeti or they hang up because they can't hear me at all. Half the time I end up shouting down the flip front with it held directly in front of my mouth, and you can't imagine what that does to my "Street Cred." There is no reason that I can determine for some calls to work and others not, I originally bought the phone from Phones4U in Watford High St and even though the problem was evident from new, I didn't receive that many calls on the phone so just assumed that it was a bad connection. When I eventually returned the phone after five weeks, (one week after the return and replace deadline) they refused to change it. Instead, it has been for repair twice and still has the same problem, they are not prepared to change it even though I have had two phones with them for five years, but that is another review! Suffice it to say, I am unable to communicate with the device so have retired it to the attic in favour of good old faithful Nokia 3210 at the ridicule of my son and his Nokia 8310. I will simply wait out the remaining nine months of the contract the get a new phone. (From a different supplier) I am not saying that all the phones have this problem and I would be interested to know if anyone else has experienced this so I can take more affirmative action, but if the Ericsson engineering centre have deemed it 'fit for duty' on two separate occasion, I can only draw the obvious conclusion that the phone itself is badly designed. If you have experienced similar problems with this phone please email me at screechy_jim@hotmail.com

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                      17.02.2002 23:25
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                      The Ericsson T39 is the predecessor of the popular T28. Anyone that owned the T28 knew that it lacked in essence and the T39 is basically a better and more sophisticated version of this model. The Ericsson T39 undoubtedly differs from the T28 in a range of manners. Concerning size wise the T28 wins the competition but only if you were to compare the two phones together. Yes when you place the T28 next to the T39 you can see the difference in size but in you were to actually measure it then it would be obvious that it is only larger by a few millimetres. Viewing the T39 you can see that without the pre impression of the T28 the T39 is definitely a thin and stylish phone, the difference being the concave display on the T28. The T38 also has an antenna, which is more compact and shorter. There has been an advertisement campaign on the Ericsson website that boasts that the T39 is a world phone and I will have to agree because of its range, second to none. It has a range of GSM 900, 1800, and 1900 networks, this may not sound like much especially if you don't know what the figures represent but considering the T28 only had the ability to cover GSM 900 and 1900 you can see the difference. The US uses GSM 1900 networks whereas Asia and Europe use 900 and the newer 1800 with a much wider range and thus the preferred network. Classic blue, rose white and icecap blue are the colours available for the new T39 and with the new stylish approach the Ericsson T39 is attracting a lot of Nokia previous customers. Although there is not the ability to change colours as with Nokia phones the stylish silver flip out face and the contrasting grey antenna creates an effect that is not bound by the changing fashions. Remember the hidden confusing button on the T28, the one that made it very awkward opening the cover face; this is all gone in the T39, the producers must have realised how much of an inconvenience it was and they have r
                      eplaced it with two extremely small latches at either side providing a lot of mobility but also a much more convenient way to access the phone. The keypad on the T39 has gone through a huge transformation, some for style reasons and some for convenience. For instance when one presses a key button the phone lights up, of the T28, this was a small and useless effect as the buttons were white and would cancel out the background colours but the T39 has clear transparent coloured button which allows the backlight to shine through creating a sophisticated and aesthetically pleasing look. The cancel button on the new phone has been reposition into the middle, between the yes and no buttons. What is the advantage of this, well basically apart from the convenience it allows it simply just looks better and fits in with the theme of transformation that Ericsson are currently boasting. In addition the arrow keys on the keypad are merged together intone individual button. It depends on your taste whether you shall consider this a disadvantage and deterioration or a step forward. The battery on the T39 is much more capable of longer life than the T28. 600mAh (BUS-11) vs. 500 mAh (BUS-10). The Bus 10 has a smooth dark finish whereas the Bus 10 has a rougher less attractive finish. The Bus 11 battery boasts 300 hours of standby and 11 hours of talk time. Yes I know what your thinking. Yeh right. And basically you would be right, as always the specifications in the booklet and the actual battery life experienced often differs and the T39 is no exception. This is because of other factors coming into play such as vibrations, which takes up more battery life. Owners of the T28 and the T39 will not have to go out and buy new accessories because the hands free kit connectors and the battery connectors are all the same although the indicator light as moved from its original position on the T28 to the top middle of the phone on the T39. The problem with a lot of new phones is the lack of stability that I experience with them; this is the case with the new Motorola phone. They are so small and compact that not only will they be easier to loose but in addition as soon as you drop them, you will find yourself in tears and anyone that has ever broke a phone knows that repair is something that is very unlikely. This is another advantage of the T39, although it is heavy it is packed with functionality and it doesn't break easily. Other extras to this phone also include the ability to have synchronization between your phone and your windows PC through infrared Bluetooth, alarms, timer, stopwatch, the ability to send animated pictures via EMS, calculator, POP3 email connectivity, and 2 games. The games on the T39 are Tennis and Erix, tennis being the most popular of course. Tennis is just basically pong but don't be put off, it can be entertaining especially when on long trips with nothing else to do. POP3 email connectivity is another extra that I don't really think is a true bonus for most of us PC and Internet owners. Anyone that has Sky digital will know that sending an email through a remote control used for typing numbers can be both irritating, frustrating and time consuming. The Ericsson is a great phone with a lot or functionality and durability. At around £170 it is a bargain compared to a lot of other phones on the market. The classy and sophisticated new designs really elevate the quality of the phone and an aesthetically pleasing phone and a truly functional one is a winning combination.

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                        18.12.2001 15:21
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                        Well I’ve had Nokia’s and I’ve had Motorola phones but now I’m on an Ericsson T39m – what a phone. I’ve have a lot of praise for this little phone, and only small criticisms so lets get those out of the way first. The User Interface is a bit tricky … but then after a Nokia Phone what could be easier? And the aerial sticks out so the phone doesn’t lie flat. They are my complaints. The good points? Prepare yourself. Firstly there is the size of the phone. It’s minute. It comfortably fits in your shirt pocket and doesn’t alter the shape of your clothing in the process. Normally a phone of this size with such excellent battery life would have a heavy battery … not the T39m! The battery is ultra slim (I’m talking millimetres here) and a full charge usually lasts me 4 days with heavy usage. Furthermore, due to Ericsson’s “Optimized charging” the battery re-charges in 30 mins if the phone is turned off during the charging process. The call quality, as usual with Ericsson handsets, is superb. People often ask if I’m actually on my mobile or my landline when I ring, it’s so difficult to tell. But these are just the basics. This phone is ahead of its time. It’s equipped with Bluetooth the alternative to Infrared that doesn’t require line-of-sight to another Bluetooth device. Currently there are few Bluetooth devices on the marketplace but 2002 should see whole new breed of Bluetooth enabled devices. Current Bluetooth accessories include: The wireless handsfree set, allowing you to use a headset without any tangled cables; Bluetooth cards for you laptop and PDAs. But there are a whole host of new tools on the way. If you don’t want to fork out for expensive Bluetooth kit, there’s an infrared port as well. Furthermore the 39m is GPRS ready. That means you can get an
                        internet connection of around 33.6kbps using your mobile phone, as opposed to the paltry 9,6knps offered by standard GSM handsets. This connection, which is “always-on”, can be used to browse WAP sites at faster speeds, or to surf the web if connected to you PC of PDA. The great benefit of GPRS, aside from its speed, is that you are always connected. This is possible since you do not pay for the time you spend on-line but simply the data you transfer. If you’re a txt addict then you’ll have great fun with the EMS capabilities on the phone. Rather than simply send a 160 character text message from your phone, the T30 uses EMS, which allows you to perform basic text formatting, as well as embedding pictures, sound or animation in your message … superb! Other extras on the phone include voice dialling and a voice memo facility that I’ve finally got around to using, And to top the whole thing of the T39 is Tri-band so you can use it in America and Japan should you need to. The phone’s memory is superb allowing it to hold 500 business cards … that’s while business cards, including name, company, work phone, home phone, mobile number and e-mail address, as opposed to simply name and number. To make managing these contacts easier there is even software supplied with the handset that allows you to synchronise you contacts, tasks and calendar items, in Outlook with your handset … bloody hell! I think I might just hold onto this phone.

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                          29.10.2001 04:04

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                          Vodafone do not recognise this phone as a GRPS phone and therefore have to use it as WAP. - Advantages: nifty little phone, very light - Disadvantages: vodafone doesn't like it

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                          10.10.2001 01:35
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                          • "still doesnt have the Nokia cache"

                          Sorry for the title, for those who do not know, ericsson have been guilty of building phones that are a little flimsy, the T28 has the tactile response of a childs play phone.... However, this is about the T39m, and what a leap forward it is...I have had the phone for around two weeks now and I am just about getting to grips with it, so here are my opinions... Immediately it is clear that the construction of the phone is in a different class to the T28, it is solid, has a great "feel" and balances perfectly in the hand, the flip feels solid and well made and the buttons are a perfect size and have good feedback. The features are a little overwhelming initially...those of us who are "turned on" by gadgets, and who of course will never open the manual, will have a hard time working out the features. Dont get me wrong, the basic features are simple and the navigation well laid out, but when you get to voice control, memos and master control words, things get a little complicated. Maybe I am guilty of skimmimg the manual, but I just cant seem to work out the GPRS internet connection, namely who my host is, but Im gradually working through the book so maybe I will get there soon. I have a horrible feeling that GPRS is not yet available, any thoughts readers? (note that I am in Spain, but any feedback re. the UK would be greatly appreciated.) A handy pocket guide is included that is only 13 pages long!! but is very clear and well laid out. Email can be set-up via the ericsson web site but new users should note that the site is in a state of change as it is being integrated with the sony site, things can be a little confusing. One minor point, but worth mentioning is that the box covers 5 languages including Spanish however the phone does not recognise Spanish as an option, worse still you cannot use Scandanavian!!! The included software is comprehensive (desktop organiser, phone
                          sync etc) and includes integration with outlook however the latest CD has an out-of-date version and the latest is a 10mb plus download, maybe a call to the ericsson call centre would produce a cd version. Finally, I did have to email the ericsson support centre for some advise about setting-up the email facility, this was ten days ago and im still waiting for a response... So, to conclude, this is a neat, well built phone, very attractive with great features but it really does take some getting used to even with the extensive manual...

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                            28.09.2001 16:03

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                            A very good all round phone, with the nokia gimmics just going to prove Ericsson can do them as well - Advantages: Easy to use, 50 voice dials - Disadvantages: Flip could break

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