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6 Reviews
  • Atrocious menu
  • Long in the tooth
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    6 Reviews
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      08.02.2003 02:48
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      I bought my Motorola about a year ago when I was in hot water: I was on the verge of losing my job. They needed a small excuse and so they were watching me pretty closely. For my part, I had to begin secret preparations for quitting, get in touch with employment agencies, the revive contacts with some people that might be of help, and, eventually, begin talks with potential employers. Under the circumstances, a mobile phone was indispensable. It did play a crucial part in helping me out of the mess. Before deciding on a model, a payment scheme and a provider company I consulted with: a) my colleagues who would demonstrate their cell phones in so an ostentatious and proud manner that still makes me smile with amusement; b) materials of this site; c) materials from Runet (Russian sector of Internet). I found data posted at gsmarena.com particularly useful. It was an opinion posted at this site where I found the link; the author gives otherwise useful information in his opinion. (Credits will be given at a later date). So I chose Motorola Timeport 192 and a subscription scheme with MTS providing company. I have had nothing to complain ever since. My mobile phone proved useful in a number of additional ways. For instance, I take it along on my prolonged business trips abroad, and it assures that I am in touch with my family in case of an emergency. Secondly, when I am back home in Moscow where crime rate has been growing continuously over the past 20 years and has reached dramatically high proportions (and in this respect my crowned op on Moscow cries out to be amended), it comes in handy to inform your family of your whereabouts in the evening. Tomorrow I am going to Paris where I intend to visit Louvre for the first time in my life. It won't be my first visit to Paris, however, but those visits were rather short and the schedules were so hectic that I had only a few hours to do the sights. The world has changed since Septemb
      er 11, 2001, but you can hardly get used to heavily armed patrols in Paris railway stations and underground. So, if they detain me for questioning on any grounds whatever, or if something unpredictable happens to me, I hope I will be able to contact my friends easily with my Motorola. Thirdly, when I browse the Internet for hours on end on weekends, nobody can get through to me or my family, because the line is busy - unless they know my mobile phone number. The connection that MTS provides in Russia and across Europe is costly but good enough in terms of quality for me. I use the phone as an alarm clock. Besides, you may use the answerphone function: so when you are busy, you may listen to a friend's message (up to three-minute long) and contact him later on. The battery life is sufficiently long for round-the-clock operation - 4 to 5 days. I am completely satisfied with preset ringtone options. Judging by my experience, however, it is easy for one to miss a call on one's mobile, especially in a standard office environment with its numerous fax machines, copiers, PCs, telephones, bosses and… mobiles! So, if you wear a cell phone on your belt, it is worthwhile to opt for a "double vibration + ringtone" signal. The thing has many different functions, including WAP that I haven't explored yet. I do not expect any unpleasant surprises from my Motorola. I count on it. For clouds are gathering once again - this time, they make it hot for my fresh corporate employer as a whole, not for me in particular. So I might want to resume making those secret calls when I come home.

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        13.04.2002 22:20
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        • "Atrocious menu"

        I was given my T250 by Cellnet as a free upgrade from a Nokia 6110. I wish I hadn't bothered. Its main benefits are that it has tri-band, useful in parts of South America and the US where I travel frequently, and in fact the main reason I got it. It also has a built in answering machine which means that you don't have to pay BT Cellnet's iniquitous outbound call charges, for example £2.98 a minute from Chile, and £0.99 from Europe. On the down side, the build quality is poor, the phone is light and flimsy, the user interface is the worst of anything I have ever owned, the user manual is an example of how not to write user documentation, and worst of all is the sound quality. If you turn the volume up to maximum, which is very modest compared to other cellphones, the sound is so distorted as to be unusable. I thought this was a fault and had the phone changed and the replacemtn was the same. I compared it with a friend's and hers was worse! An annoying little fault is that the alarm clock doesn't work if you have the phone switched off (most will activate themselves if the alarm is set), which means that incoming calls are returned to the UK and the above mentioned call charges apply as the answering machine is inoperative when the 'phone is off. Also, battery life deteriorated very quickly. Fortunately it's due for renewal next month and I shall never get another Motorola. Nokia is the one for me. Also I'd like to conmmend Cellular Operations for their professionalism and support during the problems I had with this 'phone.

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          07.03.2002 20:22
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          I've had two motorola's up to now, and I kind of got into a habbit of buying one. This time I decided to get a T-250, boasting new features and a blue backlight. The first thing that really gets you, if you're into these things is the color of the screen and the design of the phone, not too much change from the L series yet enough of a facelift to make it different. Now since I've been using motorolas for some time now, Im used to the menus and options and get along quiet fine, but I know from a lot of other people that they do not like this approach and find it hard to navigate so I will not give my opinion on this since Im not the person to ask. The battery life if the first drawback, it runs dry after two days if you used it moderatly, but perhaps if put on power saving mode could come up to three days without heavy traffic! The options are good enough, you have plenty of useful things. The voice memo, up to three minutes of recording, and this time motorola provided us with the ability to erase voicenotes one by one, rather than erasing the whole lot as it used to be. The answering machine, so you don't have to contact those painful voicemail machines. The games are not too much fun, but since this is advertised as an ultimate work tool, I didn't expect 3D graphics and stereo sound. The 3-band option is also very handy if you travel around, especialy for the states. To make a long story short, this is a pretty good price/performance phone with handy features, not too small yet light, with a nice touch of design to it!

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            19.02.2002 02:23
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            • "Long in the tooth"

            The Motorola Timeport has been around for a while now. Aimed originally at the business market it has since been superceded by the T-280, so why bother reviewing it at all? Well, for people prepared to buy a slightly older phone (and we're talking less than a couple of years old here) there may well be a bargain to be had, especially if you can grab one in an end of range clearout or 2nd hand. At 130x46x23 it's not the smallest phone you could get, and Motorola admit this by including a belt clip (as well as a hands-free kit and some fancy computer stuff) in the package. The screen is a soothing blue and most menu control is by a little waggly joystick (sorry I don't know the proper name) which is much easier than up/down buttons. 210 mins talktime and 110 hours standby are reasonable although not outstanding by the latest standards, but the list of features is what this phone is all about. These start with the internal answerphone; it can record up to 3 minutes of calls and means no more phoning to check your messages. You're informed if a message has been stored by a little icon on the screen, just like a text message. The recording capability of the phone means you can also use it as a memo recorder. The nifty bit is that this is done by one button on the side of the phone. You can also do this mid-call: no more looking for a bit of paper to write an address, just press the button before the caller says it. There's also a button on the other side of the phone that activates the voice menu. First record the names of 9 features that you use regularly (e.g. "new message"). Then just press the button and say the name of the menu location you want to go to; hey, presto, no more scrolling through menus. The system is intelligent enough that the same button also deals with voice dialling: just one button press and one word and you can call anyone voice-recorded in your phonebook. Also w
            ith a 300 slot memory (not including another 100 on the sim card) you're unlikely to run out of space. All the more lighthearted features are also present such as SMS with predictive text, a massive selection of ringtones, a ringtone composer and 3 games, although, being a business phone these are pretty terrible. WAP is catered for as is tri-band access (the reason I first got this phone was because I was travelling to America) although both of these are of limited use to most people, including me. This phone definitely won't appeal to kids or those concerned with phone oneupmanship, but they'll have stopped reading this by now. If you use your phone as a tool rather than a fashion accesory and are looking for an outstanding range of features (and I can't emphasise enough how useful being able to record important parts of calls and having an internal answerphone are), but aren't willing to pay 3-digit sums on top of signing a contract, then this phone could be just what you need. The only thing that prevents a 5-star rating is the size.

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              10.04.2001 17:24
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              You may have read my Timeport review. If you did you will understand that I really did not like that phone, however I am please to say that this phone is a vast improvement. I mean it's not great but it's getting better. The phone certainly looks more stylish, it comes in silver and looks kind of futuristic. It is certainly more aesthetically pleasing than it's predecessor. It also comes with a blue backlight screen. I'm not sure about the weight but it's similar, it is quite lightweight. The button layout on the new Motorola is very similar to the older versions of the handset only this time we have a new navi-roller style button for easy access to the menu's. This is in a similar vein to the Nokia 7110 method, however this time it just doesn't feel as sturdy or responsive as the Nokia effort. The menu layout has also been updated, and instead of a purely text based system there is now an Icon based system more like the Ericsson phones. This system is ok but I just feel that the Motorola phones is in need of a menu re design as the layout is just not particularly intuitive and menu access speeds are slow, perhaps due to these new icons. On the data side it is very similar to the Motorola Timeport, it has a built in modem and can be connected to a PC via IR or the SmatCellect2000 cable and soft modem solution. It still has it's pitfalls like the Timeport, for example calls being dropped for no particular reason etc. But it WILL generally work with enough patience. Other than WAP access the phone lacks any additional features, it has no calendar option, poor games and very little else to make it individual, oh other than a voice momo recorder which will record three minutes of voice. The battery life is also lower than average on the new Timeport. It seems a couple of days of light or a day of heavy use is enough to flatten the battery. I would say for the busin
              ess user who may be travelling Europe and the States and may want PDA connectivity it is an ideal companion. For the regular user in the UK who just wants a mobile phone, there is so much more on offer. 6/10

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              31.03.2001 11:34
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              I will openly admit that I am not an avid fan Motorola's, usually using them as a bookstand or a doorstop. But I have to admit (reluctantly) that Motorola are on the road to recovery with the launch of their T250 model. The phone itself has a stylish, futuristic look and feel to it (and for the benefit of Sexy Kay, yes you can make calls on it ;-) xxx). But the characteristic that draws the most attention is that the boys and girls at Motorola have introduced the greatly desired blue LCD screen (with many phone users still clambering after the legendary Nokia 8810). Once you actually start using the phone things actually go from good to better. Motorola have adopted an easy to use navy key, located just below the screen that allows you to scroll up and down the interactive menus with ease. The menus themselves are exactly the same as the V50, with Internet (wap) being the first option and then Phonebook, messages etc. Navigation within the menu's themselves is easy enough, again by using the scroll key. However, true to the phones predecessors, Motorola have once again included the graphic Icon menu for ultra quick access. As well as these features you also have a quick access button on the left hand side of the handset taking you directly into your the phone book, and a dedicated voice note recorder button located on the right. Other features of the phone include an alarm, vibrating alert for calls and text messages, the usual ring tones (need to develop these guys!) and some games to pass the time. My favourite I have to admit is 'The Towers of Hanoi', and this is because it is the only one I could work out.....duh! Downsides to the handset are that the menu scroll rate is extremely slow, making it hard to get anything done in a hurry. Battery life on the handset is not extraordinary; I averaged about 3 days on standby, and about two days when I was making the very occasional call. And finally the new
              message alert needs to be seen the minute that a new message comes in otherwise the phone will not take you directly through to the text. Meaning that you have to go through all the menu’s to get to your text message. Other than these minor points the handset is a sturdy contender in the mobile market, pushing more I feel to the business user rather than good old Joe public. I would recommend this phone to anyone who is loyal to Motorola, if however you have never bought a phone by them before, well I would keep to this tradition for the time being!

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