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  • No ringtones accepted
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    3 Reviews
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      23.03.2003 19:17
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      • "No ringtones accepted"

      So what does that title mean? Gay / Straight / Both? Left wing / Right Wing / Green? Cats / Dogs? You know the answer to that one! The reason for the title is that at this precise moment in time I am not sure about my thoughts on my Motorola V2288e mobile phone. This isn?t because I am a new user of the handset ? it?s just due to the fact that I?ve had so many pros and cons during our fourteen months together. Usually when posting a review to the Dooyoo database, I know that the product or service deserves and merits the rating that I will give so freely at the end of my review. This instance is different though?.throughout my piece I will be using my thoughts to help me to decide whether or not I will recommend this product to a friend. You will therefore find a compact for and against list at the very bottom. CIRCUMSTANCES OF PURCHASE Until the beginning of the year 2000, I fell into the category of mobile phone user who rarely makes an outbound telephone call. I paid BT Cellnet (as they were known then) in the region of £17 per month for the pleasure of having a phone for emergency use only. I then got started a new peripatetic role which meant that I was provided with a Siemens C35 mobile phone through work. I am unable to make personal phone calls from it but can use it in an emergency. Great! That meant I could cancel my BT Cellnet contract and save myself the monthly subscription. However it was not so great, as I realised the benefits of having a mobile phone at hand and got used to carrying one with me. This meant that I felt the need for my own handset that I could use freely to talk to friends and family ? hence the need for a pay as you go Orange Just Talk V2288e. INITIAL PURCHASE PULLER I walked into Dixons after trawling through various stores in Bournemouth. I tried to compare service providers and their rates but in the end I went for the best and most ?different? lookin
      g phone that I could find for £50. As this review is about the phone as opposed to the service provider (in this case Orange) I shall not be expanding upon their tariff, customer service and other details. The v2288e is exactly as depicted by Dooyoo in the product picture ? except that mine is white! I love to have lots of gadgets and buttons on things that I use! God that sounds odd doesn?t it?. The reason that I was drawn to the v2288e is that it had WAP and Radio facilities all included for under £50, which I thought to be a great bargain in comparison to some of the other phones I had seen. In my opinion Motorola is a good name and I felt that the phone would provide me with good service. GETTING IT HOME, UNPACKED AND CONNECTED I?m always like a big kid whenever I get a new toy and this was no exception. I arrived back into my hotel room and eagerly unpacked the box. The contents were packed inside very snugly and instead of using plastic packaging the items were held in ?cardboard egg box? holders ? much more eco-friendly than many of today?s bubble wrap protective cases. There were two items enclosed that I have only unpacked today ? yes today ? fourteen months later. They were two hideous looking handset protectors / covers. Are you familiar with ?jelly shoes? that young children and some adults where on the beach? That is exactly the same material that the ?oh so trendy? mobile phone covers are made out of. One is a bright pink colour and the other is purple / deep blue. The texture is nasty ? very, very squidgy although I can understand how the texture of the cover would provide good grip for people who permanently have a phone to their ear and in their sweaty little palms. Still on the subject of the plastic cover, it does not protect the whole phone but acts exactly as those jelly shoes do. It grips the front of the phone and has a band that stretches around the back to keep it in place ? Ugh so
      rry but these aren?t for me. As with all mobile phones the initial installation involved inserting a SIM card and then registration with my service provider. This process was very straightforward and I found the phone to be very user friendly in this respect. The back of the phone is silver and off-white. The off-white section is the battery cover and has six ridges in it to enable the operator to easily slide of the battery case. I thought this to be particularly useful, as I?ve seen many people struggling to ?unclip? or release their battery case. When first peering into the battery area, a black latch is apparent for housing the SIM card (phones number memory and identity). The latch is very easy to open whilst at the same time being sturdier than my Siemens at holding the card in place. This is very important, as if you drop a phone and the SIM is damaged, it is awkward to rectify. THE BATTERIES Once I?d inserted the SIM Card I looked at where the battery would fit! This is where I got a bit of a shock! The three batteries resembled the AA type that are available and they were in my box with the other accessories! Uh oh, this didn?t look too good. Thoughts of how they?d hold the charge zoomed through my mind, as I had not seen this before in a mobile phone. I've learnt that although they look like AA batteries they are special phone batteries of a different specification. The batteries are red and green and the mobile phone has stickers inside which indicate which end of the battery goes where (a nice touch). I had absolutely no complaints at all about this alternative method of power until after eleven or so months my phone started to fail. It intermittently cut out and wouldn?t hold its charge. Upon reading the instruction booklet I quickly identified that the 3 1.2 NiMH batteries needed replacing at twelve months intervals. They certainly don?t under promise and over deliver on that do they? I tried to buy more batteries at local mobile phone shops but the sales agents kept on referring me back to Motorola. This led me to try accessing the company website www.motorola.co.uk. I was quite surprised to find that not all Motorola phones use this type of small battery as the idea of them still feels strange to me. I was able to order replacements quickly via the website and made the payment of £15.88 with my Switch card. Delivery was prompt and took no more than a couple of days. The reason that I am recording this as a con in my summary list below, is that many people dispose of their instruction books and I suspect that many users would assume that the phone was broken, when all that is needed is new batteries. I very nearly acted this way myself, and to be honest I was not 100% sure that the new batteries would actually solve the problem. NAVIGATION The v2288e (e indicates the phone is provided through the Orange brand) is quite easy to navigate. The main functions that I use are the phone book, text messaging service and answer-phone service. The phone does not have an ?Office? menu so has no capacity for showing the date or time; neither does it have an alarm facility or calculator. I?ve picked up particularly on these functions as my Siemens work phone does have those abilities and I use them frequently. Navigation is through the menu-based options. Pressing the MENU button on the front of the handset allows the user to scroll through the main options that are: Access Internet RSA provide the Orange WAP facility. Despite my initial high hopes for WAP capability I am quite disappointed with what is actually offered by the facility. It is my personal belief that WAP provide less information than a television Teletext service. As this is something universal that affects all phones I will not hold this specifically against the v2288e. Needless to say ? I do not use the function. Phone Bo
      ok Having the ability to store up to 90 personal numbers with a twelve-digit name field capacity, this phone has more than met my needs. Within the phone book menu is the option to view your last ten calls made and received and to check your own phone number. This is great except that if the last call received had the caller?s number withheld the phone doesn?t record that in anyway. So I?ve often seen ?unanswered call? on my mobile screen, entered into my last ten calls missed menu and phoned back the last person, just to realise it wasn?t actually them who phoned me. Oops! Call Related Features This section consists of three functions. Battery meter is very erratic and does not give a true reflection of the power in the battery. Even the permanent battery symbol on the main screen is unreliable and I find it?s pretty much pot luck as to whether or not I have enough ?juice? to see me through the day. Restrict my phone number function is great for those situations where you wish to be a phone pest and in turn the call barring facility works well when in the opposite position and on the end of the abuse. Messages This is awful. Only holds ten in messages in the mailbox although they do not automatically delete. I have messages stored on my phone from November last year, and do nothing to retain them there. Whilst I can send pictures such as the ?old thumbs up? or ?birthday cake? from my Siemens, I am not even able to receive them on this phone ? pretty disappointing really, especially as this adds to the frustration of no ring tones or logo downloads being accepted. Radio One little gimmick which is quite nice is a built in radio facility which is accessed by connecting an earpiece to the side of the phone (similar to an adaptor hole). It is an FM radio that is tuned by using the menu arrows. Reception is quite good for all the of the usual Radio 1 type channels. Volume is not very load though and usage can drain battery powe
      r. Overall though I find it more useful that WAP! Reception and Volume I initally though that the volume control was for the ring tone (one of a few which are preset into the phone) Instead the volume switches on the right hand side of the phone controlled the sound through the ear piece! I spent many conversations wondering why I couldn't hear the caller! PROS Was the phone with more features than any other in the price range Good support from www.motorola.co.uk - accessories and manuals available online Cheap in comparison to other phones with the same gadgetry Ability to store those extra special SMS messages for posterity ? but only up to ten messages mind! Radio is a nice little gadget. CONS Two not so trendy ?jelly shoe? mobile phone protectors Runs on 1.2V NiMH Batteries which require changing every twelve months Paying for WAP function isn?t worth the money at the present time Unable to accept mobile ringtones, logos or SMS text pictures CONCLUSION With five good points versus four bad, this phone has come in as pretty middle of the road. Which explains why I struggled to find which way to swing with my recommendation. Bearing in mind that the phone is quite large and bulky in comparison to the recent releases I feel that this can only be recommended as a ?once in a blue moon / emergency? phone ? which is what my intentions were at the beginning. I think that my relationship with the Motorola V2288E was one where I outgrew the phones capabilities. Writing this piece has made me appreciate that whilst it served my initial needs, my use of gadgetry has meant that I need something different now. I therefore recommend the phone to people whose needs are for an occasional handset with a few gimmicks, as opposed to regular daily users.

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      • More +
        19.09.2001 08:02
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        In this age of mobile mania, I believed I would NEVER succumb to the fate of owning my own phone. But for whatever reason a few months ago I went against all my previous reservations and became open to the world of communication. Of course deciding to buy one is the easy part, but choosing a particular model is where it can get tough. I’ve got to thank my ever-tolerant bruv for trailing around all the phone shops with me. As it turned out I bought the Motorola V2288e which he recommended I get in the first place, but I didn’t know that at the time. Me and my wee phone are inseparable nowadays, and we’ve grown quite fond of each other. Although less hi-tech than say a Nokia, the V2288e carries out all my communication needs with ease. Weighing in at 140g, it’s a fairly small, sleek beauty with 3 hours talk time and 5 days standby. The Just Talk – Pay As You Go package is accompanied with accessories, which include 2 rubber wraps to personalise the phone for individual moods. What mood I would need to be in to use the pink wrap I’ll never know. So as it is, my phone is either sleeved in blue or wrapless. Interesting idea though. Finding my way around the phone is fairly simple. Thanks in main to the quick access menu. This gives instant access to the most frequently used features – whether it be the text inbox, message editor or ringer on/off – the choices belong to the user, all just by pressing the upwards arrow button and the correct number corresponding to the feature. However, sometimes I find myself mildly lost in the depths of menus hidden deep within extended menus. While ring tones have become a major fashion these days, the V2288e keeps things limited and simple with just 11 ringtones to choose from. There’s nothing especially exciting here with the choice ranging from standard tone to British, French and German tones and the cringeworthy music to
        ne (yeuch!). The one thing that tempted me to get a Nokia at the time was the prospect of putting favourite rock ring tones and icons on it, but to spend double the price just for this privilege would be kind of dumb - well that’s what I told myself anyway. The phonebook set-up is nothing too complicated either. It’s just a matter of adding the entries, but each entry is also given a location number. This can cause problems when sending text messages if when locating the entry using the location number, you happen to have a momentary brainfade and choose the wrong figure, because the text message sends immediately without waiting for a confirmation of the telephone number. For this reason I don’t use this feature. The V2288e has access to multi media services via WAP, allowing the user to be kept up-to-date and interactive with current world information. Having said this, it’s a feature I’ve barely used. Apart from the cost (Orange WAP services – 10p per minute) I don’t tend to need information that I can get elsewhere for free (i.e. Internet). Although I did get distracted on a rare WAP visit, reading a whole bunch of exciting facts about Mika Hakkinen that I already knew – but hey it was fun! However, if I was stuck in the middle of nowhere I’m sure this WAP service would come in useful. Choices of info on the Orange menus include news and weather, sports, transport, entertainment etc. WAP also provides access to games which might be useful to those who are disappointed with the V2288e’s lack of games. The V2288e also boasts an in-built FM radio. The blurb advertising this ability describes it as “the chance to listen to favourite music while on the move”. Now considering that the only time my fave type of music appears on the airwaves is after midnight twice a week for a couple of hours – then the chances of radio overuse seems unlikely. But its n
        ice to know it’s there – even if it does drain the battery. Now what would have been clever, would have been a MW radio to allow me to hear Radio 5 Formula One commentary on the rare occasions I’m not plonked in front of a tv screen. Oh well can’t have it all I suppose – although having the radio means a personal handsfree kit is included with the phone. Niggly little jibes I have are only really that on a few occasions I’ve managed to accidently dial the Answerphone with a simple slip of the finger by lightly touching the direct dial answerphone button. The battery compartment is ever-so-slightly loose meaning that my batteries have been knocked out and have lied to me about having no charge an hour after fully charging them. Despite this, we’ve got on well and I’m slowly coming to terms with the fact that I’m extra contactable now than ever before. And with the purchase of the additional Orange Out Here package (one-off payment of £15 for Pay As You Go phones only) means that I can send 5 free text messages per day every day. Within a month of first buying this the cost of £15 is covered and you’re left texting for free 5 times a day until the phone packs in. Nice!

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          05.09.2001 05:00
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          For some reason I kinda missed the whole mobile phone revolution, as if I'm quite honest the ability to phone people from anywhere doesn't appeal to me a great deal. I do like to keep in touch, I don't know where I'd be without Instant Messaging, but phone calls? I always just thought that I could do without phoning people on the move. Believe it or not, not every teenager in the country has or indeed wants a mobile phone! At times you just sit back and realise that the world has gone mad. You can't go to a restaurant, walk down the street or ride on a bus without someone shouting down their mobile, infact if evolution is much cop people will soon be born with a mobile phone glued to their ear! But anyway, this is a review of a phone and I'm saying I didn't want to buy one? Something doesn't make sense! You see, I forgot to mention text messaging! It's just too popular not to have it, and I'm afraid I would be a social outcast without being able to send them. Help was at hand though, the internet allowed me to send txt messages, and I could borrow my parents phone to receive them. Later ICQ allowed two way (ie. send and receive) text messaging so that did me for a while, but as I started using txt messaging more and more I realised that sooner or later I'd need my own phone. Saying as I'm off to Uni soon I thought now would be a good time to get one, so I took the plunge and got this phone, the Motorola V2288e. Of course I probably would have been better off plumping for the Nokia 3310 or 3330 which everyone in the world seems to have, but I resent paying £100 for something which I'm only going to use to send messages. And of course mobile phone prices have rocketed since the whole 3G license fiasco, so I resent paying money for something I could've got cheaper last year. So anyway, this one only cost £50 (from Argos) so I figured I may as well get it. The only reason I chose this one over al
          l the others was that it had a built in radio, and I'm partial to Chris Moyles so having a radio built in to the phone means that I never have to miss his show! I've had it for about a week now, and while I'm not disappointed with it, there are a few niggly points that annoy me about it, so let me finally commence the review proper...... First off, looks. Mines an off white colour with a silver back and silver buttons. It's of medium size, bigger than the Nokias but its curved stylings and light weight mean that it doesn't look like a brick. It fits in to your hand nicely, looks pretty decent, so on that front you can't really fault it. Cover wise you have a few options. I prefer it in it's natural white colour, but you can add either rubber wraps or clip on hard covers to it. Supplied with the phone are two rubber wraps in blue and pink, but a quick look at the Motorola website reveals a multitude of different coloured covers if you're willing to pay £6.99 for a bit of rubber. The thing is that the cover of the phone can't be removed, just covers fitted on front of it. This is OK with the rubber ones but the hard covers make the phone look a bit more clumsy. If anything the screen is a little small, considering the phone has WAP internet access you would've hoped for a bit more viewing space. It's taller than a normal phone display but rather narrow, still, it doesn't detract too much. It is backlit though, so you can use it in the dark should you so wish. Feature wise you have a bit of a mixed bag, and although it has some good things it shockingly lacks some of the basics. Firstly it doesn't even tell you the time, which is even more annoying because my watch just broke! Even more of a loss though is the alarm clock, which I found very useful on the odd occasions I borrowed my parents phone. Next up there's no games. Not a big deal as they are more of a novelty than a die
          hard necessity, but most phones do have games - so why not this one? Perhaps an even worse omission is the lack of customisable ring tones, coupled with the fact that there's only 12 built in and they're all bog standard and crap. While people with other phones get to have the latest pop tunes as their ring tone, I get the standard telephone ring. Last negative point for a while - the menus just don't seem right to me, the structure and organisation of them are a little bit weird, is it really too much to ask to be able to add numbers to the memory from a text message, rather than have to write down the number then adding it manually! Perhaps it's just me but I would've organised it differently. Oh and while I'm on it there's no predictive text messaging either, which is a little annoying too. OK, so enough of what it hasn't got, lets get on to what it has got. It's a WAP phone so you can use that great thing that is the mobile internet. Or maybe not. With the exception of emails, and getting a bit of info now and then, WAP is pretty useless. The most unique feature on the phone is the inclusion of an FM radio, but this too is far from perfect. It's FM only, but worse than that is the problem of headphones. The connector is non-standard, combined with a microphone to be used as a hands free kit, but never in my life have I seen such a cheap, shoddy set of headphones. I long for my nice sony headphones!! The radio works pretty well, it automatically searches for stations and the sound quality is acceptable. Apart from that it hasn't got a whole load of decent features, just the normal settings, memory and the like. Battery life is poor, even though it states a ludicrous amount of time (200+ hours I think) you'll be lucky to get anywhere near this out of them. You get a decent amount of kit with the phone, including hands free kit and charger, two covers, belt clips and more than enough bits of paper.
          The phone, when you actually use it for phoning people up sounds pretty good. It seems pretty stable in that calls aren't dropped often, although the quality is a bit poor at my house due to me living in the middle of nowhere. Better than Vodafone though, there's no signal here at all! Registration with Orange was an easy affair, with a few forms on a website all that was needed to activate the phone and get £5 free credit. Similarly your WAP email can be set up online, as well as a few other options to do with various WAP related features. Would all be good, but WAP is so crap no one uses (and not to mention a rip off!). You can also choose which tariff you use, and when your off peak hours are (for example if you work in the evening you can set your off-peak hours to the daytime). I was a little peeved however, that standard off peak is from 7pm-7am, as opposed to 6pm-8am which is the BT standard. Not to worry! Overall the phone isn't bad, and throughout all of my negativeness you must remember it only costs £50, which is half the price of the Nokia 3310. Of course it lacks the 'coolness' of the 3310, but then everyone has one, so I can console myself by saying I'm being unique. Plus that £50 can buy me something more useful, like 25 pints!!

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