Welcome! Log in or Register
6 Reviews
  • Shape
  • aerial
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    6 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      30.12.2003 02:26
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      • "Design rather too unsual and slightly old-fashioned"

      Before I bought an MW 3020 for a friend about two months ago, there were only two categories of Sagem phones: terrible and excellent. The former category contained my old Sagem MC 920, which was the first phone I ever owned, and just slid lower and lower in my estimation with every day that I owned it. The latter category included my current Sagem MYX-6 camera phone, which is probably the best phone I have ever owned, and is so far removed from the old MC 920 that is is sometimes hard to believe that they could be made by the same company. Now, I have to had to change that opinion. After using the MW 3020 for a couple of days, I can certainly report that there is something in the middle, and thus this very phone could be considered as mid-way between the two extremes. A lot of the old problems with the MC 920 had been solved, but there was still a long way to go before surprising the European mobile phone market with the excellent MYX-5 and MYX-6 in 2003. The MW 3020 is thus an intriguing phone which certainly merits further investigation. First impressions are bad. The styling resembles a normal mobile phone which has been squashed and bent into a funny shape, which does not exactly make for admiring glances in the street when text messaging! The MW 3020 was released in quite a few colours, but mine was dark grey/black, and none of the colours are as good as those which were released with the MW 3020's superior relation, the MY 3020, which came with a blue screen, and was provided with two different covers as standard in the box. The MW 3020 has a traditional green screen, which gives the impression of being cheated every single time it is in use, since one is always aware of not having spent a little more money to get the much nicer MY 3020. Although the plastic sticker was still on the screen of my phone, the screen underneath was already cracked, and the back cover did not fit as snugly I was expecting. Worse was to come. The phone did turn on at a
      single press of the green on button, which also doubles as the answer key, and activates the loudspeaker function during a call, but immediately I could feel that the French flimsiness so prevalent in cars such as the Citroen AX and Peugeot 106. Upon using the keypad to enter text in the phonebook, the impression of less than solid build quality is reinforced, since the rubbery keys have a distinct lack of positive feel about them, which is so present in Nokia, Siemens and Ericsson phones. Sometimes the keys require multiple presses to peform simple functions such as deleting a letter, and every time the keypad is used the phone creaks alarmingly. Although the phone has a good weight about it, and thus it would not necessarily fall apart if dropped in a car park (it has this in common with my old MC 920), it is still irritating that even simple operations cannot be completed in silence. The internals of the phone are another thing to get used to. The menu system is a cross between the ancient interface of the MC 920 and the slick modern software of the MYX-5. The central round key moves in four directions, up and down as normal, but moving the keypad left or right clears text or moves back a step and confirms the current action respectively, labelled 'C' and 'OK'. On the MC 920, this was perfectly easy to understand, and the only problem was that things which could be done in the current step were quite limited, as with the four-button Nokias like the 3210 and 3310. The three 'hot keys', if they can be so named, above the 'answer' and 'hang up' buttons and the central D-pad were actually used merely for short cuts on the standby menu, so were pretty much useless in most situations. However, Sagem obviously took note of this in the design process of the MW 3020 and MY 3020, as the hot keys now work all the time. When entering text, for example, the three keys will show various options, some of which are repeated by usi
      ng the 'C' and 'OK' keys, but not always. In an attempt to bring shortcuts to the menu system to make certain operations quicker, Sagem has produced one of the most inconsistent interfaces I have ever used. The central 'hot key' is now labelled with an @ symbol, since in standby mode, this takes the user directly onto the Internet, but it is also used during the menus to perform operations such as toggling vibrate on and off, which really did confuse me at times. I suppose that extensive use of the menus, which are helpfully numerically labelled with each step in the Nokia fashion to enable fewer key presses to get the most useful functions, would eliminate this problem somewhat, but it does not seem to make much sense. Fortunately, all the colour screen Sagem models have a refined interfaces which is much easier to use and far more conventional, so this brave experiment has been confined to its monochrome screen models. In the same way as there is a scroll bar in many menu systems these days, the MW 3020 uses a circular diagram to indicate one's position within each menu, which is just as well, as there are quite a few of them! Another gripe concerns text input. Instead of using the standard method for putting in text, which is known as Multitap by most people (pressing the 7 key three times produces an R, for example), Sagem have stuck to the same old system that they had on the MC 920. Instead of pressing the key repeatedly until the desired character appears, one must hold the key down until it presents itself. This means that putting names into the phonebook, for example, is both counter-intuitive and slow, especially if the name contains a great deal of Ss. Fortunately, those who use T9 predictive text will be overjoyed to hear that the MW 3020 is so equipped. This completely eliminates the need to use old MC 920-style method of text input, and saves the phone from being a completely useless text machine. I, for one, had to
      abandon my principles of only using Multitap on mobile phones because of the various languages and complicated words that I need, and it certainly worked very well for what it is. There is good news for those who are still considering this phone after reading this far, however. The ringtone selection, something of a Sagem strong point, is even improved from the already impressive selection on the MC 920. Some of the 41 ringtones of the aforementioned model make a reappearance on this one, and they now have been given names as opposed to numbers, as is preferred by today's phone users. Others are so good that they have been retained for even the top-of-the-range MYX-6, and certainly do not sound old-fashioned on my own phone. It is difficult to describe the quality of the ringtones without using the word quasi-polyphonic, as the MW 3020 does not support polyphonic ringtones, but nevertheless the melodies are played so rapidly that it is easy to fool someone into thinking that they are polyphonic. There are 43 in total, some of which are extremely well-programmed and certainly a long way from anything monophonic produced by Nokia or Siemens. There is also a ringtone composer and the ability to download extra ringtones, but I do not think that anyone in my experience has managed to do this. There are also other useful features on the MW 3020, such as a currency converter, a calculator and three games. The office tools, such as the currency converter, work just as well on this phone as on the MYX-6, and can provide useful shopping advice when abroad. The games, principally the original version of Megabox Conquest, now a Sagem perennial, and Minigolf, are really not that bad. Megabox Conquest is a certainly a challenge, and the game moves at a much faster pace than on my MYX-6, and Minigolf, although quite difficult and confusing at times (it is yet another occasion where the keypad layout lets the phone down), does provide ample distraction on lon
      g journeys by public transport. The MW 3020 also has a speakerphone, which being a Sagem is one of the best in the business. It is possible to put the phone down next to a computer or on a coffee table and manage a perfectly audible and clear conversation without the need for one of those absurd handsfree-kits. Unfortunately, the speakerphone can suffer from distortion at the top end of the volume, like a bad speaker when played too loud, and this can also affect the ringtones, which is a shame, as they are quite good. I suppose that this is yet another example of the inherent cheapness that one can feel sometimes oozing through the phone. In terms of components, there is no doubting that whilst the external aerial on the MW 3020 does the phone no favours in the looks department, it does ensure that it gets a decent signal just about everywhere. This is one of the strengths of Sagem phones, obviously looking back to the time when mobile phones were not very widely used in France and it was hard to get a signal, and has continued with the MYX-6. I did not get much of a chance to test the battery life since I only had the phone for about three days, but I would not imagine that it would be any better than average, since it is only a Nickel Metal Hydride one as opposed to the more modern lithium examples, but it is still acceptable at least. In order to conserve battery life, it is possible to enable screensavers, and this may just be one of the saving graces of the MW 3020. These are not just screensavers in the Nokia sense, but full animations, one of which concerns an aeroplane flying over land, and another which has a coyote getting caught in a trap. The French have always been into comics (or Bandes Dessinees as they are known over there), and this is a good example of that. The phone is also WAP enabled, although I did not get much of a chance to test it, since I only had a Pay As You Go SIM card inside, and was not feeling like spending money unnecessar
      ily. Overall, the MW 3020 is not actually a bad phone. It certainly provides good value for money, as these days they can be picked up for under 30 pounds, and there are some useful features inside, such as the speakerphone, along with WAP, some decent games and predictive text. Unfortunately, fundamentals such as design, build quality, ease of use and text input have been somewhat neglected, which is a real shame, otherwise this phone would have sold much better than it did. It is excellent to see, however, that the newer Sagem models have answered some of these criticisms and built on the phone's own strengths.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      13.05.2003 02:56
      Not Helpful
      (Rating)
      2 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      • aerial

      i have ordered a ringtonefrom Sagem but can't work out how to get it on and i have been trying for 3 weeks!!! this phone is messing with my head!! it's driving me nuts!!! it looks pretty good but believe me it doesn't look as good from my point of view if anyone can help me please email me at xlx_kitty1_xlx@yahoo.com and let me know as for sagem i am serioysly considering getting a nokia or an ericsson phone which i promised myself i would'nt i used to have a motorola and i wish i still have t now blah! blah!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        15.02.2003 02:00

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        • Shape

        Excellent Phone - Advantages: Cool Games, T9 mode in txt messaging, Cheap! - Disadvantages: Buttons sometimes dont work, No snake 2, Shape

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        04.01.2003 21:52

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        sagem mw3020 rewiew - Advantages: small, vibrate alert, good battery life - Disadvantages: nasty ringtones, flimsey

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        29.06.2002 18:32
        2 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        One year ago i decided to buy this mobile Phone,for a lot of reasons. 1. i really like the shape of the Phone, it was just the right size 2.I was told i would have cheap calls, 5 p a minute. 3.The prize of the phone was very good. The only ploblem with this phone is the calls are very expensive,and also i have a lot of ploblems with people trying to call me. I have always needing a phone for work, thats why i pick up this one, its was a good size,good prize. But i have very bad connection with talking to people,when i brought this phone the man had said its one of the good phones,to me it was just a phone, its not bad but i would not buy it for someone else. If you want to buy a phone like this find out more about it first, that was my mistake. Everybody needs a Phone,but just be warm you buy one take it hone and then not work.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          15.01.2002 23:45
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          8 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Six months ago I hardly knew how to use a mobile phone. A friend had given me her old pay-as-you-go but I rarely used it. Hardly ever turned it on even. My daughter’s were mobile mad, sending text messages to everyone and anyone (or so it seemed) but it all seemed rather silly to me. Six months seems like a long time ago now. I’m now totally dependent on my mobile and get very stressed if I go out and forget it. Why? Because of those silly text messages. They’re a great way of staying in touch, and staying in touch is high on my list of priorities right now. Anyway, as my interest in text messaging grew, I realised that the phone I had just wasn’t up to the job. I couldn’t send messages directly from the phonebook, and I couldn’t reply without typing in the number. What a pain! Into the phone book, look up the number, write it down, back to messages, find the one I was intending to reply to, read it again, key in number and send. No, that just wouldn’t do. I would’ve liked a Nokia, but couldn’t afford one, so I off I went to the shops to find out what was available within my price range. As I wanted to keep my old number, and wasn’t sure whether pre-pay phones are locked to networks or not (some say they are, some say they aren’t), I didn’t want to take any chances and needed a phone on the One2One network. If you're happy with the operator, why change anything? As Argos had the Sagem MW3020 for around £70, and the phone seemed to have all the features I wanted for text messaging, I decided to buy one. After using this phone for 4 months, this is my opinion of it: BODY Small and compact, measuring 105mm x 45mm x 20mm. The body is slightly tapered towards the middle (it sort of has a waist) so it’s very comfortable to hold. The aerial is 16mm long and although some people have warned me about how easily aerials can be damaged,
          my phone has so far lived through 4 months of being in my handbag, pocket and left on chairs for somebody to sit on, and the aerial hasn’t been damaged. The phone weighs 112 grams and comes with a choice of two covers, one silver, one a deep metallic red. I like the red one. It’s sexy! I haven’t seen any others available anywhere, but there may be some. If you’re after a phone that you can put a Winnie the Pooh cover on, this isn’t it. SCREEN Large and clear, with blue backlighting. Both of my daughters have Nokias and I find the Sagem screen to be far easier on the eye, especially if it’s being used in a dark place. The font size can be changed to fit 8 lines of text on the screen. This is evidently useful when using the WAP functions, but as this isn’t something I’ve made any amount of use of, I’ve left mine on the standard setting of 4 lines. RINGTONES/ALERTS Hmmm…. let’s put it this way. Every time my phone rings, people think the ice cream van has arrived. That’s what they sound like. Or perhaps an electronic organ grinder would be more apt. Whatever way, it’s not the kind of sound you’d usually expect from a mobile phone. Whether that’s a good thing or not depends on whether you like ice cream van music. You decide. There are 40 “ringtones” to choose from, although as some of them are simple bleeps, they’re more useful as text message alerts than actual ringtones. From what I’ve understood, it should be possible to add new ringtones (there’s space for 5 user defined ringtones), but after spending £1.50 to have one sent to my phone, I’m buggered if I know how you add them. The instruction manual doesn’t have any information related to it, and the instructions I found on the web didn’t work. There is also a composer, but my one and only attempt at composing any
          thing failed miserably. It was easy to use though, it was just me that wasn’t much good at it. The phone has a vibrating alert which I find very useful. I don’t always want my phone making a noise, but would still like to know that a text message has arrived or that somebody is trying to call me. I easily feel it vibrate in my pocket without disturbing anybody. There is also a “vibrate then ring” option, but I haven’t found any use for that one. TEXT MESSAGING I love the T9 predictive text. Writing a message is done in a flash. However, there’s no facility for adding words to the dictionary, and there are some words that I use regularly which aren’t available. The message box holds 15 messages, 10 on the phone and 5 on the sim. Incoming and outgoing messages are all stored together, rather than in separate in and out boxes. Switching between T9 and manual (ABC) mode is relatively easy, but not done as quickly as on one of the latest Nokias. I sometimes use my daughter’s phone, and texting is easier with her 3310. The keypad is softer on the Sagem, but reacts too slowly. If you don’t push the key down hard enough, it’s easy to miss a letter. Messages can be sent directly from a phone book entry. If you write a message first, you simply press one button to go to the phone book on completion. For some reason, not all messages are given the “forward” option. Replying is also a very quick and easy process. STORAGE CAPACITY The phone will store the 10 last called numbers, 10 last incoming numbers and 10 last missed calls. It took me a few weeks to figure out how to get rid of the missed call alert, as this wasn’t in the instructions and I’m not very quick when it comes to things with buttons on them. It’s really quite simple though. You just press the main key (the big round one at the top) on the left
          -hand side where it’s marked with a C. The C obviously stands for clear. Why did it take me so long to work that one out? The phone book holds… err… phone numbers? 50 on the phone plus 100 on the SIM. Adding and accessing them is easy enough but can’t be done directly from a text message. Fifteen text messages can be stored, ten on the phone, five on the sim. Not a lot, but enough for casual use. WAP I can honestly say that I’ve never used this. I put enough money into my phone as it is, without bumping it up further by using the Internet through my mobile. I can only tell you that the phone has a version 1.1 WAP browser, if that means anything to you. But ok, being as I’m writing an op on this phone, I gave it a go. I keyed in www.dooyoo.co.uk and was connected to the site. I couldn’t log in though. I gave me the options to register, do a power search, read opinions and a couple of other bits that seemed to be the addresses to graphics. I chose to do a power search, but was told that the page had expired and would be updated. So much for that! Maybe DooYoo just isn’t WAP compatible, I don’t know. If you want to use this facility, you’ll have to sort it out yourself I’m afraid. Connecting was easy though, I can tell you that much. OTHER FUNCTIONS - Hands Free. This is one facility that I like and use quite a bit. By pressing the call button an extra time (or once if it’s an incoming call), the loud speaker is activated and a conversation can be held without the need to hold the phone. I’ve never had a problem hearing anybody when using this option, and they always seem to hear me too. - Currency Converter. Accessed through “Accessories”. No instructions for use of this facility were in the manual and I’ve no idea how it works. I’ve tried it and it seems that you have to key in the exchange rate
          and then key in the amount to have it converted to sterling. Probably useful if you travel a lot. - Calculator. Accessed through “Accessories”. This works fine, but again, there are no instructions for use in the manual. You simply key in the first figure, choose either plus or minus using the keys directly under the screen (the screen shows you which ones), but multiply and divide are not shown. The star key is multiply, the hash key is divide. OK will give you the answer. - Alarm. Accessed through “Accessories”. Easy enough to set, but unfortunately, the phone is somewhat unstable with regards to sound. Sometimes it will only beep a couple of times and then stop, so not really useful. - Call Forwarding. Accessed through “Call Services”. Calls can be forwarded to another number or to the voice box. - Clock. Accessed through “Controls”. The clock can be displayed either as analogue or digital. I like the analogue alternative; it’s large and clear so a quick glance at the screen tells me what the time is. The date is displayed on the right of the clock. - Customisation. Accessed through “Controls” There’s a choice of menu types, Essential, Restricted and Expert. There’s an energy saving option that turns the backlight off. Handy if you’re trying to save the battery power and don’t have your charger handy. There are four animated screen savers to choose from and you can choose how long a delay there should be between using the phone and the screen saver being activated. I have a coyote that wanders across my screen. Kind of cute! - Programmable keys. Also accessed through “Controls/Customisation”. The two keys on either side, directly below the screen can be customised to directly access the services you use most. I’ve programmed mine to access text messages and the voice box. This is a handy function, and
          quite honestly, I can’t even remember how to access the voice box through the menu after being used to using the programmed key. GAMES Ok, I don’t use them. Have never actually played them, but for the sake of this op, I gave them a go. Picture Puzzle – This is an electronic version of those little puzzles where your slide the squares around to make a pattern. You can choose between “easy” (9 cells), “medium” 16 cells or “difficult” which is called “sweetheart”. I tried this one, but it was both difficult and boring. I think the idea was to get the man and woman together, kissing. I’d much rather be doing it myself, than trying to get somebody to do it on my mobile screen! Mini Golf – Looked ok but I couldn’t for the life of me figure out how to play it. Maybe that’s just me, but there you go. It probably works. Megabox Conquest – This one was actually quite addictive. The idea is to box in the spaceship (I think it’s a spaceship anyway) by firing bombs from one of the screen edges to the other. The spaceship mustn’t touch the bomb on its way so it takes some skill. That explains why I haven’t got a high score to be proud of, but now I know it’s there, I shall keep trying! OTHER Standby time : 170 hours. That’s a week! I fully charged my phone before going on holiday recently, and it lasted 4 days even though I turned it off at night and had the screen lighting and vibration turned off. I did use it for text messaging, although tried to restrict the amount I sent, and for voice mail retrieval, but even so, the battery lasted a lot less than a week. Maybe it would’ve done had I not used it at all, but I doubt it. Talk time : 4 hours. Probably about right. Charge time : 2 hours. I’ve found that even if I charge my phone 30 minutes, it’l
          l hold its charge for at least a day, which is quite good. Indicators : Battery, signal, incoming text and voice messages are indicated on the screen. SUMMARY I’m reasonably satisfied, but not entirely. The main problem is that a “sim not available” message pops up far too often. I’ve no idea why this happens, but it’s very annoying when you’re in the middle of writing or reading a text message. It seems to happen a lot when a message is being sent. The phone has an option for receiving message receipts. Another handy facility. If I’m sending a message to my daughter to tell her I’ll be delayed, I want to know that she’s actually received it. Sometimes messages can take hours, even days to get through, and I don’t want to be thinking that an important message has been received when it hasn’t. Could lead to all sorts of problems. The sound quality from the phone isn’t particularly good. I’ve never actually made a call to it myself, but I’m told that I sound as though I’m sitting in a tin can. Lots of echo. It doesn’t bother me, but I’m sure it isn’t too good from the caller’s point of view. The menu system could be more intuitive, but once you get to know the phone, it’s easy enough to use. As I mentioned earlier, the alert tones are inconsistent. Sometimes mine doesn’t sound at all, which is VERY annoying. I could miss a text message! Worse still, the past couple of days, I’ve noticed that I’ve had a couple of missed calls because the phone didn’t ring. Seems ok again today, but for how long? The phone was launched on the UK market too early, as accessories weren’t available. I wanted a car charger for my holiday, but was unable to find one anywhere. However, I saw one on the net yesterday, so presumably they’ll be in the shops any day
          now. Quite honestly, if I had the choice over again, I wouldn’t have bought this phone. I’d have saved for a bit and opted for a Nokia. My daughter’s phones seem to be far easier to use and they never have a problem with the alerts. I like the shape and feel of the Sagem, but what good is that if it doesn’t ring? It simply isn’t stabile enough. ~~ One2One ~~ As I’m posting this under One2One/Sagem MW3020, I’ll tell you a bit about the pay as you go service. You can choose between buying vouchers, which start at £10, or by topping up an electronic swipe card. The latter option is very easy to use as credit is automatically added to the phone. No scratching cards with coins or keying in numbers. You can also register your credit/debit card details with One2One and use the automated system to top up from this, but there’s a limit of £20 per month for this option. No good for me I’m afraid. Calls to landlines and other one 2 one customers are charged at 30p per minute for the first 2 minutes, then 5p per minute. Calls to other networks are charged at 30p per minute. Text messages are charged at 10p per message. There’s no extra charge for message receipts. Voice mail retrieval is free. The service seems stabile enough. As with other service providers, they crashed on New Years Eve, but otherwise I haven’t experienced any real problems. Coverage has been good, although there are some areas where I’ve had problems getting a decent signal. However, these are few and far between. I’ve used the roaming service when abroad, and although I experienced no problems when sending and receiving text messages, making a call wasn’t so easy. It just wouldn’t connect. That was rather annoying as it was somebody’s birthday and I really wanted to talk to him, but it wasn’t to be. I was also unable to access my voice bo
          x, but I’ve a feeling this can be blamed on me doing something wrong. There’s a code that had to be keyed in first, and I may not have noted it correctly. Do be aware that it’s expensive to use the roaming facility. All in all, I’m satisfied with the One2One service. Shame about the phone! ~~+~~+~~

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments