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Piaggio Typhoon 125

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    6 Reviews
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      02.01.2007 16:21

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      by far the best 125cc scooter out there, has been and from what i can see will remain to be

      ever since first riding a typhoon 125 i've always wanted one. the accelleration and speed are unrivalled, the manouvreability on this machine is great and its as light as a feather. i recently sold my gilera runner vx and got a typh and the differences are blatently obvious, the 2 stroke typh would eat the 4 stroke gilera for breakfast its much quicker off the mark and top end, its just as if not comfier which came as a surprise seen as the gilera boasts upsidedown forks and dual springs at the rear, i guess those chunky typhoon wheels play a part in this. the typhoon is not as economical on the petrol, mind you it doesnt hold as much fuel (around £5 compared with £8-9 on the gilera) and it is a bit smokey for first 3-5 mins, probaly due to oil and petrol mix. it also is not fond of cold mornings can take a few mins to spark up so be very careful not to overdo the electric start you may kill the battery. on the whole i am extremely pleased to finally own a perfect example of a nearly extinct bike they are becoming increasinly harder to get hold of in peak condition and as they are discontiued are actually worth more nowadays thanks to their cult following myself included. this is a classic bike that will never be out of fashioned ,outdated or out performed by anyother 125cc in its class, its smooth style combined with raw power and ability will ensure that the piaggio typhoon, even though discontiued is far from dead, long live the king of scooters.
      the main downside is that they are targeted by thieving b£$*&%ds, they are easier to hotwire and if its not locked down to an immoveable object might just go walkabouts so be careful the best thing is to install some sort of deterrent either alarm/ immobiliser etc. be careful when buying as alot of people are duped into buying dodgy ringers, if there is no v5 dont buy it, if the panels are'nt sprayed or the engine is off another bike ask questions, be sure to do a hpi check . i've been searching for a typh for well over a year, i've had 2 bikes in between but it was worth the wait.

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      23.11.2003 04:17
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      • "Performance when restricted"

      pretty poor... certainly expensive and shoddy build quality. bought a barely used typhoon 50 for £1000 three years ago - being a student at college with a fairly long commute route with a poor bus service. the typhoon's main advantage is its size - it is bigger than most 50s and as i am a tall guy (6'5") this does come in handy, other than that the scooter has little to recommend it. where do i start - in 2 years of ownership the bike has cost me £600 in repairs and i have recently sold it for £400 - plus insurance and tax costs that isn't great (do the maths!). i always looked after this scooter, buying top quality oil, washing it and checking its tyres once a week and getting a full service history, the scoot has mostly been covered also and i rode it sensibly. what has gone wrong - paint peeling off overnight, 2 switches corroded, exhaust rusted through in 4,000 miles, lights erratic in their operation, the whole of the front inside light setup collapsed, weird radiator problem, centrifugal clutch (supposedly maintenance free) broke, brake discs locked to the front wheel for no apparent reason (leaving me stranded 20 miles from home) and umpteen problems with the start switch and kick start - this bike does not necessarily start on the first, second, third or fourth time. phew. performance good without restriction (45-50mph) but very poor with restriction, and at the hills 35mph became 10-15mph (!) very quickly and the bike slows down very fast - this i found disconcerting particularly on busy a/b roads as the cars whizzed past. i suppose performance is not really an issue with a 50cc bike but the scooter handled nicely enough and good for weaving through traffic, but then again so is a cub 90 and they would be much more reliable. fuel economy not great either - 50-60mpg for a 50 isn't too great. overall the typhoon is the biggest selling scooter in europe and perhaps i just got a bad 'un.

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        07.11.2002 18:41
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        I've had my typhoon for just over three months and have really enjoyed riding it. I've mainly used it for getting to and from work which is a 7 mile journey in either direction and it has generally coped very well. Having said that the engine did seize after only a month and 1000 km of riding, this was attributed to the 2 stroke oil I had been using (Castrol TTS fully synthetic) not mixing correctly with the oil which had been in the scooter when I bought it. The two oils had apparently turned to a kind of jelly which clogged the oil pump and thus starved the engine of oil to lubricate itself. It was fixed under warranty but I would warn anyone with a 2 stroke engined scooter or bike to stick to the same oil from the moment you ride it away from the dealers or if it's a used bike ask the previous owner which oil they have been using and stick to this. I think I was just unlucky. I've just finished running in the new parts so have been testing out the full performance of the scoot and I'm pleased to say it's good. Top speed is just under 70mph on the clock but in reality is probably 60-65, acceleration is very brisk and it's good fun to beat cars and other bikes away from lights. Sports bike riders in particular get pissed off that you've out accelerated them and tend to cut you up in a dangerous manner when they catch you up. Fuel economy's not that great if you ride it at high speeds I've recently discovered, but it's not that terrible. The only real criticisms I have are that the seat's not that comfortable over longer distances, the quality of the panels is a bit flimsy and not that well finished and the fuel tank is a bit small and awkward to fill. All in all it's a fast, fun but basic scooter that's one of the cheapest 125's on the market and is very well worth the money.

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          25.10.2002 02:29
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          Great fun, but not totally reliable

          I've had my Typhoon for about 6 years {2008}, and covered around 9,000 miles. There's now 12,000 miles on the clock. As far as performance goes, it's fast enough to beat most cars away from the lights (unlike a 50cc!). Cruising at an indicated 55 mph is no problem. Top speed is 65 mph.

          For short journeys around town the Typhoon is great fun, even better than a motorbike. The lack of gears makes getting through traffic easy, parking is no problem, and with a top box and room under the seat it's quite practical.

          Long journeys aren't quite so good. Although quite nippy for a 125, most cars are faster on A roads, and a long ride can be tiring due to lively handling and the constant noise of the exhaust. However, the seat is comfortable, and there's not much vibration. It's much better to stick to back roads if possible, and avoid motorways and dual carriageways. The furthest I've ridden it in a day is a round trip of 120 miles, which was more than far enough.

          Petrol consumption is not very good at about 60 mpg. The fuel light comes on after about 75 miles. A bigger petrol tank would be nice. The Typhoon has a complex fuel tank arrangement with a second tank under the floor. After filling the main tank the level drops as petrol slowly gurgles into the second tank. An extra litre can be squeezed in if you wait a minute or so!

          Handling is not bad (for a scooter), but the front forks are way too soft and there's virtually no damping. I find that I have to sit near the back of the seat to stop the forks bottoming out over bumps in the road. The brakes are excellent, especially the front, though of course applying a lot of front brake bottoms out the forks... I fitted new springs and bushes to the front suspension, but it made hardly any difference.

          The automatic clutch gets a bit snatchy in heavy traffic, probably due to overheating. {Update 8/2008: The snatchy clutch became so bad that I removed the clutch flywheel and cleaned it out. The clutch assembly was hardly worn and appeared in good condition. Putting it all back together, it was then just as bad as before. I then fitted a new clutch (£35), which completely fixed the problem... what was wrong with the old clutch, I don't know.}

          I've fitted car steering rack gaiters over the front forks and rear shock absorber, to keep crap out.

          The rear tyre wears out more than three times quicker than the front. A Taiwanese no-grip block-pattern rear lasted just 1,200 miles. I think block-pattern tyres are best avoided. Michelin Boppers have a decent tread pattern and proper grip, and last about 2,000 miles on the rear. The front Bopper has so far lasted 7,000 miles.

          The front brake pads last about 3,000 miles. The rear shoes are still the originals.

          When I first bought the bike, with 2,000 miles on the clock, it didn't run very well as the carburettor intake rubber was perished and split. At 9,000 miles the headlamp reflector needed replacing... unfortunately that meant a complete new headlight for nearly £50. At about 9,500 miles, the electronic ignition unit went pop. A new one was £70, about £70 more than I wanted to pay, but a bit less than I expected. Luckily, it conked out outside my house.

          The bike takes ages to start after leaving it standing for more than a week, as the vacuum petrol tap doesn't let fuel through quickly enough to fill the carburettor. I keep a short length of petrol pipe and a pair of pliers under the seat, so I can remove the vacuum pipe from the fuel tap and suck on the vacuum inlet to the tap (yuk), to fill the carb. Also it smokes like crazy on start-up. Maybe due to oil passing through the oil pump, when the engine is not running?

          The silencer rusts like mad; it's a real nuisance. I had to buy a new one last year, and it wasn't cheap... about £130. In spite of regular cleaning and painting, I don't think it will last more than another year. I've also had to replace the short pipe that leads from the cylinder to the silencer, which cost £30. {Update 8/2008: I have just fitted a new 'Sito' pattern quick-rust silencer (£130). I found some stainless silencers, but none of them were street legal.}

          I took the cylinder head off at 10,000 miles for the scheduled decoke, but there wasn't a trace of coke on the head, piston or exhaust port. I just put it all straight back together again.

          I've twice had problems with the variator.

          Just after I bought the Typhoon, I was bombing along on a motorway at about 65 mph when the variator pulley nut came loose. The kickstart mechanism was mincemeated as the outer variator pulley fell off; the bike screeched to a halt, frightening me to death. I thought the piston had seized. Fortunately I only had to push it 5 miles back home, and it was quite easy to fix. A new outer variator pulley was £30... I can't remember how much the other bits cost.

          At 11,000 miles I tried to remove the variator in order to grease the rollers. This is supposed to be done every 2,000 miles. However, the inner variator pulley would not come off. The inner pulley had been moving on its splined hole, damaging the spline on the crankshaft. Presumably the nut on the end of the crank had somehow loosened, although I had used thread-locking compound when I last tightened it, and it didn't seem loose when I undid it. Anyway, I though this was the end... The crankshaft was damaged, which made the bike possibly not worth repairing.
          I eventually removed the inner pulley by drilling four holes in it (damaging the rollers), tapping the holes, threading bolts into the holes and using a flywheel puller to pull on the bolt heads.
          I decided that it might be worth buying a new inner pulley, rollers, etc. and putting it all back together again. After all, the crank spline, though worn, had not actually given up the ghost. There could be years of use left in it. Maybe.
          Then one of those amazing things happened... I bought a new inner pulley assembly (about £50), which, on removing from the box, looked like the wrong one. Its rear was more 'dished'. The miracle was that Piaggio had changed the design of the pulley to eliminate a crankshaft spacer... which meant that when I fitted the pulley, the splined hole was now on an undamaged part of the crankshaft spline! So I put it all back together, as good as new, and the Typhoon lives to fight another day!

          At 12,000 miles the throttle cable broke in the splitter box under the floor. Not the sort of thing that can be fixed at the side of the road. Obviously a broken cable could happen to any bike.

          A few weeks later the petrol pipe split, emptying petrol all over the rear wheel, which gave me a bit of a fright on the next corner. Again, this could happen on any bike. Except perhaps replacing the petrol pipe every few years might have been a good idea.

          {Update 2012} I have now sold the Typhoon for 'spares or repair'. Unfortunately I didn't notice that the frame was getting rusty around the front engine mount and centre stand. Poking around with a screwdriver made several large holes. Not good.

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            24.07.2001 00:38
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            Finally after 16 years the commuter blues have got the better of me and I can no longer stand the tube. So I set off on a search for an alternative means of commuter transportation. What are you gonna do Rob I hear you ask, well a motorbike was out, the car impractical, too far on the mountain bike and I don’t earn enough for a chauffeur so there was only one choice left; yes it had to be a Scooter!!!!!! Now we have all seen those Mediterranean folk on their scooters bombing round in the sun looking cool and we have all seen the poor guys and girls over here done up in their wet weather gear on their mopeds looking well not quite as cool, but for commuting in town a scooter makes a lot of sense. Let me put it simply even with the purchase of a brand new scooter this year I will save on the price of my annual tube ticket. Next year I will have only to buy insurance and road tax and even after petrol calculations I reckon on saving £1400 pounds! Ok so that’s the financial sense. If I told you I could also cut my journey time by 25 minutes and of course no delays due to signal failure, no pressed up against sweaty people (ok I’ll miss that bit obviously!!!) and no seeking alternative means of transport, making even more sense now? So what Scooter, after looking at a number of sites and shops I decided on a more modern looking bike rather than a retro Vespa type. This was mainly to keep the initial purchase cost down. My other criteria being a 125cc engine rather than a 50cc just to keep me amused playing in the traffic. This narrowed down the choice of manufacturer to: Aprilia, Peugeot, and Piaggio. The final analysis came down to purchase cost and the Scooter that did it for me was the Typhoon XR. So tell us about this scooter I hear you say, ok here it comes: The Typhoon has a modern angular appearance with chunky wheels designed to smooth the, shall we say not always so perfect r
            oad surface and provide good feedback to the rider. Combined with front telescopic hydraulic forks the ride is smooth and there is none of the older scooter trademark vibration through the handlebars. The seat is large and comfortable enough to accommodate a rider and pillion passenger but obviously you may only carry passengers if your licence allows. Under the seat is a large lockable box to store a helmet or a small bag and on the reverse of the front shield is a bag hook for the odd carrier. The shield provides good protection from the wind and rain for the lower body and the slim profile and floor allow easy access to mount and dismount. The second advantage of this profile is a more natural position when supporting the scooter at traffic lights. Climbing aboard we have electronic ignition, with a back up kick-starter should the battery ever go flat. Starting the bike is dead easy then and with “twist and go” transmission, power delivery is smooth through the range and the scooter is surprisingly reactive and nimble. This scooter is also extremely agile nipping through the crowded streets of London is a doodle the handling is sharp and cornering tight. This is due to the relatively short length of the scooter at only 1280mm. The air cooled 2 stroke single cylinder engine delivers 11.9bhp coupled with an overall weight of 106kg this is a pretty quick machine and is as much fun on a clear road as it is in town, although I still prefer my car for a good blast. While fun fuel consumption is a respectable average of 80 to 100 mpg and with an 8.5 litre tank my commute will mean very infrequent trips to the petrol station. The dash comprises of speedometer, fuel gauge, digital clock, and warning lights for main beam, indicators, oil and low fuel. Finished with a brushed aluminium surround giving a trendy look. Security is supplied in the form of a steering lock though I would advise utilisin
            g a sturdy chain to lock your scooter to something immovable and investment in an alarm that may put off would be thieves. Available in black, dragon red, or Aluminium and with a range of accessories to customise this bike to your personal taste the Typhoon XR is a total bargain at £1695. Especially with the free insurance and road tax deals being offered on new models. Having driven one for a couple of days just to see if I still enjoyed playing with the London traffic I have just placed an order with Motorcycle City for a nice shiny black one! Information For those of you who are now tempted to consider a scooter as a means of commuting and want to give it a try RAE Motorcycle training offer a range of scooters and motorcycles for hire they can be found at http://www.motorcycle-training.f2s.com/hire.html Motorcycle City can be found at http://www.carnellbikes.co.uk Piaggio Scooters http://www.uk.piaggio.com/ Update 3rd August Well alas due to popular demand Motorcycle City cannot supply this bike :-( but...... Scooters direct have just come up with a fab offer on a Peugeot Speedfight 2 a much more expensive scooter so I feel another op coming on!

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              09.06.2000 21:14
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              I bought mine over 1 1/2 years ago. 5500 miles later, i've got no complaints. Totally reliable, very cheap to run and fast enough to keep up with anything in town. Up to 75mph on the motorway but not very comfortable at this speed for more than a few minutes. I'd recommend this bike for anyone commuting in a large city who only uses motorways occasionally. Rear brake would be much better if it was disc. Smaller and lighter than its 125cc competition which makes it better in heavy traffic and easier to park.

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