Welcome! Log in or Register

A Christmas Carol (DVD)

  • image
£8.03 Best Offer by: betamonline.com See more offers
8 Reviews

Genre: Science Fiction & Fantasy - Fantasy / Theatrical Release: 1984 / Director: Clive Donner / Actors: George C. Scott, Frank Finlay ... / DVD released 05 October, 1999 at 20th Century Fox / Features of the DVD: Closed-captioned, Colour, Dolby, DVD-Video, NTSC

  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

    More Offers
  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    8 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      14.01.2010 08:33
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      7 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      Scrooge has visist from 3 ghosts who try to get him to mend his ways

      There has been so many different version of this classic film but for me this has to be by far the best. It does star my favourite actor, Sir Patrick Stewart (yes he became a Sir in the New Years honour list!) so this really does make the whole film appeal more to me. This version was made in 1999 as see Patrick Stewart taking the lead role of Ebenezer Scrooge.

      FILM ONLY REVIEW

      London in the 1840's sees Scrooge being a hard man and not a festive bone in his body. He runs his own business and has a young Bob Cratchit working for him. He is very tight with money and even more so since he lost his business partner Mr Marley. It is now Christmas eve and Scrooge has reluctantly given Cratchit Christmas day off work and he is now making his way home. Once at home Scrooge gets a visit from the ghost of Marley who is covered in chains and in a very bad way.

      Marley explains to Scrooge that he must mend his ways or he will end up like him once dead and he tells Scrooge that on the strike of 1am he will be visited by 3 ghosts. Scrooge does not like the idea of this and begs for it not to happen but Marley says it must. Later that night when Scrooge is sleeping he gets his first visitor in the form of Christmas Past, he later receives visits from Christmas Present and Christmas future. Will these ghosts be able to show Scrooge that he must mend his ways or end up a very lonely sad old man and never rest in peace or will he go on with his old ways?

      The film for me is wonderful. It shows a darker side to the story than other versions which I have seen in the past. I always have to sit through this film on Christmas eve and have done so for the last 10 years now as hubby sees it as a tradition but when I know it is coming on I always get disheartened about having to watch it again but I can say that once it starts these feelings do go away!

      I know I am slightly biased as I love Patrick Stewart but he really does give an amazing performance in this his role as Scrooge. He manages to come across very mean and I like to see him grow and soften as the film moves on. I think he has a wonderful Shakespearian voice which suit's the role exceptionally well and he looks the part in the old fashioned clothes. There are a lot of supporting actors in this film including Richard E Grant who plays the role of Bob Cratchit. I like the fact that this is a British film so we have so many know British actors and actresses in it who I recognise from other shows such as the Vicar of Dibley and a few of the soaps.

      The films settings are excellent as it is set back in 1840. I love the costumes which are worn and think a lot of time and effort went into making them look as authentic as possible. I do feel sorry for the women in the film as the dresses may look nice but they must have been so uncomfortable to wear! The music throughout the film is also very good and in keeping with the old fashioned settings. I fits very well and help with the emotions of the storyline.

      For me there is one part of the film which I do not like and that is the part with the ghost of Christmas future, for some reason the big black faceless figure scares me! I think it is a very good interpretation of Scrooges future Christmas' but I just do not like the character. Also there is one character which really does get on my nerves and that is the one of Tiny Tim. Nothing personal but I find him very weak and weedy. I know he is supposed to be a cripple but this does not take away from the fact I find his voice annoying and the cheesy lines he says pathetic. (Bah Humbug!)

      Despite this being a story with ghosts there are some good fun parts to the film, especially in the scenes where Scrooge is a young man and when he visits his nephew, I think these help to balance the film and don't make it too depressing.

      As this is a film only review there are no bonus features to mention. The running time is 95 minutes and I think this is just long enough. There is no rating guidelines on this film that I can find but I would say that it s appropriate for children over the age of 12 as younger viewers may find some parts scary like I did! Also they would be too young to full understand the story.

      Overall I am definitely going to recommend this film as for me it is the best interpretation of the classic story and stars some wonderful actors. Suppose I will have to wait now until next Christmas eve to see it again!

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        03.02.2009 13:17
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        2 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        A miserly man, with the help of ghosts, manages to turn his life around.

        Directed by Clive Donner
        Screenplay by Roger O. Hirson
        Based on a story by Charles Dickens published in 1843
        Drama / Fantasy
        Released November 1984 (UK)

        MAIN CAST:

        George C. Scott as Ebenezer Scrooge
        Frank Finlay as Jacob Marley's Ghost
        David Warner as Bob Cratchit
        Susannah York as Mrs. Cratchit
        Anthony Walters as Tiny Tim

        The story begins with a glimpse into the wretched life of miserly Ebenezer Scrooge as he goes about his daily activities on Christmas Eve. After a perfunctory and cold discussion with his nephew, who has come to visit him at his office in order to invite him to a small fete he and his wife are organizing for friends and relatives on Christmas Day, a discussion which ends by Scrooge remarking on his nephew's stupidity (of a sorts) for marrying a woman with no dowry, his nephew gives up on Scrooge, and on his way out, pauses to greet Bob Cratchit, who is Scrooge's long-suffering assistant, in order to wish him and his family a Merry Christmas. It is during this scene that Scrooge is heard to mutter his first, and now most famous; "Bah humbug!"

        Scrooge is then visited by charity workers who are collecting money on behalf of the poor and destitute, and with Ebenezer's brusque and thoughtless comments, the evilness of his character is further revealed. (quoted from the movie) "Are there no prisons?" - "And the Union workhouses?" - "The Treadmill and the Poor Law are in full vigour, then?" Aghast by Scrooge's implications, one of the men responds; "Many can't go there, and many would rather die." To this Scrooge unashamedly replies: "If they would rather die, they had better do it, and decrease the surplus population." Upset by Scrooge's remarks, the charity workers beat a hasty retreat.

        The end of the workday sees poor Mr. Cratchit having to suffer through yet another angry tirade when Scrooge approaches him at the end of the day and says: (quoted from the movie) "You'll want all day tomorrow, I suppose?" To which Cratchit responds, "If quite convenient, sir." As expected, Scrooge angrily expounds: "It's not convenient, and it's not fair. If I was to stop half-a-crown for it, you'd think yourself ill-used, I'll be bound?"

        Of course things go from bad to worse as Scrooge makes his way home in the gloom of an approaching night, and when the doorknocker attached to the front door of his home appears to change from a lion's head to that of a ghostly Jacob Marley, Scrooge's dead partner, Ebenezer is, for a moment, taken aback, but he quickly composes himself and enters the building. The house is silent and dismal, no excess furniture, no decorations; it is simply an empty shell (much like Scrooge himself) with only a large 4-poster bed with heavy bed-curtains and a single chair flanking a cold fireplace. As Scrooge settles down in the chair with a bowl of hot soup, the sound of moaning and heavy chains being dragged across the floor can be heard... the sounds grow louder, and Scrooge, startled, stands up in order to face the locked bedroom door. At this point, the Ghost of Marley, covered in heavy chains, makes its appearance, and the story begins to unfold.

        When Scrooge remarks on the heavy chains, Marley explains that he himself, in his wretched lifetime, unknowingly forged each and every link of the chain (the links are literally bad deeds), and he is now forced to carry them as punishment for what he did when he was alive. Marley goes on to warn Scrooge that his own chain is much longer and heavier, and alludes to the fact that unless something is done, he too will have to carry it around after his death as punishment for his bad deeds. However, Marley hasn't appeared simply to warn Scrooge, he has come to help him... and he explains this by telling Scrooge that he will be visited by three spirits. The Ghost of Christmas Past, the Ghost of Christmas Present and the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come. For obvious reasons, Scrooge is upset by this bit of news, and attempts to convince himself that Marley's Ghost is simply a figment of his imagination... or, as he puts it himself... (quoted from the movie) "You may be an undigested bit of beef, a blot of mustard, a crumb of cheese, a fragment of an underdone potato. There's more of gravy than of grave about you, whatever you are!"

        When Marley disappears out the window, rattling his chains and moaning as he goes, Scrooge quickly shuts and bolts the window, and scurries to his bed in order to hide behind the heavy curtains.

        Scrooge has just barely managed to fall asleep when the clock strikes a single, resonant and foreboding toll. At this point, Scrooge peeks behind the curtains, and standing there is the Ghost of Christmas Present, a spectacular apparition bathed in bright lights, wearing a thin white robe and holding a branch of green Holly. When Scrooge asks her who she is, she responds that she is the Ghost of Christmas Past... to which he asks, "Long past?"... and she responds, "No, your past." The ghost then proceeds to take Scrooge back to his younger days (set during past Christmases), the sole purpose being to discover which events have moulded him into the man he is... and to remind him of who and what he used to be.

        No sooner is Scrooge returned to his bed after having been forced to remember his past, that the clock strikes two and the Ghost of Christmas Present appears outside his bedroom door. This ghost is a jolly bearded giant of a man, dressed in a thick forest green robe which flows down to the floor, and trimmed with white fur, and sporting a crown of leaves interspersed with what appears to be jewels. This ghost fairly bursts from the screen, so vibrant is this character. This ghost will take Scrooge on a tour of what is happening in the present (or will be, in a few hours time)... and Scrooge will discover that regardless of how bad he treats people, a few of them have not given up hope on him. The ghost shows him the home of Bob Cratchit (his assistant) and the manner in which they will be celebrating Christmas... with a very small and pitiful goose, a spot of cider and a small Christmas pudding... a very small meal for a very large family! But Scrooge discovers that food and wealth are not important... what IS important is family. Scrooges then takes an interest in Tiny Tim, Bob Cratchit's youngest son who is a cripple, and asks the ghost what will become of him... to this the ghost gives a dire prediction.

        The final ghost, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come, takes, for obvious reasons, the shape and form of the Grim Reaper. This ghost, in short, will show Scrooge his own dismal future, and he will be forced to contend with the fact that he will die a hated, miserly man, and that none will miss him. Scrooge will also be given a glimpse of a grieving Bob Cratchit, grieving not because Scrooge has died, but because Tiny Tim has died and he cannot reconcile himself to life without his tiny son. This ghost terrifies Scrooge, and Scrooge admits it himself in one scene, telling the ghost that he fears him the most out of them all. Although the other ghosts have succeeded in softening Scrooge's attitude, it is this final ghost who becomes the turning point in Scrooge's life. When the hour is up, and Scrooge is returned to his bed... he is no longer the man he used to be.

        OF INTEREST:

        There have been approx. 35 cinema and television versions made to date, from cartoons to television and cinema adaptations. Not included are the various radio show broadcasts and theatre adaptations.

        A Christmas Carol has been made into musicals, used in countless television sketches and been made into numerous short cartoons by Disney over the years. The theme itself has inspired countless films such as "It's a Wonderful Life" with James Stewart in 1946 (basically the theme has been reversed in this movie, with the main character starting off as a good man before losing his way). There has also been "The Family Man", with Nicolas Cage in 2000, about a cold-hearted businessman who learns the true meaning of Christmas. In short, over the years, dozens upon dozens of movies, plays, musicals and cartoons have been made that portray Christmas as being a day for changes and miracles.

        COMMENTS:

        The very first time I saw 'A Christmas Carol', I was 6, and the nuns (our teachers were nuns back then) had noticed that the 1938 MGM production of 'A Christmas Carol' was showing at the local cinema, and decided it would be good for the pupils' souls to go view it. It didn't matter that newer versions had since come out in colour, nor that the movie was already over 30 years old (black & white), THIS was the version they wanted us to see. I realize now that they preferred this version because there were no scary bits... it was all a bit bland really. Regardless of this, as a sweetly innocent 6 year old, this was the most amazing movie I had ever seen. I sat there in total awe, fascinated by Reginald Owen's portrayal of Scrooge, and 41 years later, I can still remember exactly how I felt at that moment. It wasn't just Scrooge who became a changed man... it was me, too!

        Since that very first time, I have fanatically made a point of viewing 'A Christmas Carol' every year on the 24th of December without fail. If during the season it plays (in different versions) more than once on television, then I will watch them all. At last count, I had viewed 'A Christmas Carol' a whopping 123 times! I purchased this 1984 version when it was released (originally in video format, later purchased in DVD format), and have watched it over two dozen times... and I will continue to do so for as long as I live... probably much to my husband's disgust, as he has had it up to his armpits with watching this movie every single year! Last year he miraculously disappeared from the room and locked himself in the washroom for nearly 90 minutes! He obviously does not appreciate Scrooge the way I do. For me, 'A Christmas Carol' is synonymous with Christmas... the two are one and the same... there is such hope, such magic, such a sense that everything is possible... it is a time for second-chances, and in this dismal world we now live in, it is nice to think that we too might be given second chances, or that someone we love might someday change and find happiness.

        Anyways, this movie is beautifully performed, George C. Scott perfectly suited to play the dour, sour-looking Scrooge... he does, after all, possess that strict and fierce look to him. His acting is smooth and sleek, the witty and often brusque dialogue seemingly made to measure just for him, and he gets away so brilliantly with the snide and rude qualities of his character, that you wonder just how much is fictitious, and just how much is innate! Added to this, a wonderful cast of experienced actors... all the way down to a sweet (sometimes sickeningly so... must be because I've seen this so darned often) Tiny Tim who limps along in his ragged clothing, a perpetual smile pasted onto his face, and the wisdom of a 90 year old twinkling within his eyes.

        Jacob Marley makes for a suitably ugly-looking ghost what with that length of fabric tied around his head that keeps his mouth from sagging open. Then there are the chains... and that slightly transparent effect... it is brilliant, if you remember that the movie was made in 1984 and not 2009! So much can be forgiven, simply because the scenery is so beautifully gothic, an odd mixture of dismal and Christmassy... a splendid Victorian spectacle shot in a Dickensian world that is just soooooo authentic... from the costumes to the props, and on to the accents of the actors. This movie simply flows, and where it goes nobody knows... except you, of course.

        Now... having stated that this 1984 version of 'A Christmas Carol' starring George C. Scott was wonderful... I must absolutely tell you that an older version, made in 1951 and starring Alastair Sim as Scrooge, has long been hailed as the very best version that was ever made (I've seen it at least 30 times). It is a true classic, and I have been searching desperately for the DVD for years, but it is so rare that everywhere I go it is either out of stock, or simply was never available. Why is this movie the best? Simply because of Alastair Sim... that's why. No one has ever been able to capture Scrooge as he has... that dark, foreboding character with a twisted and cruel core, yet possessing somewhere deep deep down a soft filling.... all the way to the extremes of excited, childish giddiness. Alastair Sim IS Scrooge. I have long thought (although I am not totally certain) that Mr. Burns in the Simpsons series, was inspired by Alastair Sim in his role of Scrooge... the physical resemblance (sorry Alastair, I tell it as it is) is just so uncanny, not to mention the way the character is so intensely wicked, yet childish all at once. If ever you get the chance to see the 1951 version... grab it! What a treat you will be in for. If not, then you can easily pick this 1984 version up, and although it is only second best... it is an extraordinary second best!

        If you are purchasing this dvd, the special features are sparse and boil down to scene access and multiple language settings... all to be expected, as this movie is an oldie.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          14.08.2008 17:06

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          classic that must be watched every year

          This is a fantastic version of a christmas carol, it is set in England and is completely absorbing to watch. Scrooge is played by George Scott, and plays the role to perfection. I was completely in awe of george scott, and i found him as ebenzer scrooge completely believable.

          The story is all about Ebenezer Scrooge, a bitter and horrible man, who only thinkks about money. He is cruel to his employees, pays them the minimum and despises Christmas. However, things change when ebenezer scrooge is visited by 3 ghosts, the ghost of christmas past, present, and future. I have to say the ghost of christmas future is quite scary. A result of which, sees scrooge to take stock of his life, and leads scrooge to completely change. Its an inspiring and classic movie.

          The props are spot on, the acting is suberb, and the feel of the movie is completely realistic.

          My favourite part is when scrooge wakes up on christmas day and sings and skips down the road, its a complete delight from start to finish.

          This is a great film to wacth, and one i'd throughly recommend

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          25.10.2002 02:50

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          A all time christmas tradition - Advantages: family, giving, friends - Disadvantages: none

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          23.12.2001 01:06
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          14 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          Christmas wouldn’t be the same without a version of Dicken’s ‘Christmas Carol’ appearing on screen. Along with ‘It’s a Wonderful Life’ and ‘Miracle on 34th Street’ its essential viewing over the holidays, giving you a warm feeling inside which makes you want to hug all your friends and relatives and draw all your money out of the nearest cash point and distribute it to the poor and needy. But which version is the best? Over the years we’ve had the classical scrooges, comical scrooges, musical scrooges, Muppet scrooges and Donald Duck. Even Mr. Magoo, Bill Murray and Blackadder got in on the act. It’s a beautiful story, truly uplifting with an optimistic message nearly as relevant at this time of the year and in these secular times as the Christmas story itself. Here’s a summary of my three personal favourites: Scrooge (1951) Probably the best-loved and most-remembered version of Dicken’s book has to be this, with the veteran British actor Alastair Sim as London's cruelest miser. Alastair Sim started his movie career in the mid -1930s and ended it in the early 1970s, appearing in over fifty films, but this was the role that gave him true immortality. He is for most people the definitive Scrooge. From the start of the film, he absolutely radiates coldness and in the film his acting reaches incredible heights going through a range of emotions – callousness, contempt, sadness, anger, and particularly pity, as heartless employer, uncaring miser, frightened old man and mournful supplicant, until the end of the film when he shows contagious exuberance the remorseful merrymaker. Alastair Sim makes us really sympathise with Scrooge in a way that no other actor has been capable of. Even without his masterful performance, this version of Scrooge would still have been an incredible production. The plot is faithful to Dickens' orig
          inal tale. Ebeneezer Scrooge is easily the nastiest man in London. Money means everything to him and he certainly doesn’t believe in charity and only reluctantly agrees to give his clerk, Bob Cratchit, expertly played by Mervyn Johns, Christmas Day off. On the night before Christmas, Scrooge receives four visitations, all of who share the same mission, to teach him the error of his ways and show him the path to redemption. The first is Scrooge's former partner, the late Jacob Marley, played by Michael Hordern, who warns him about what happens to a man who dies after living only for money. Next is the Ghost of Christmas Past played by Michael Dolan, who takes Scrooge on a journey into the years gone by, reminding him of times when his wealth meant little. The third spirit is the boisterous Ghost of Christmas Present, played by Francis De Wolff, whose task is to show his charge how others are spending Christmas Eve. Finally, the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come lets Scrooge wander through the shadows of the bleak future that awaits him if he does not mend his ways. The fact that the film was made in black and white gives it an eery air of mystery which none of the colour versions have really been able capture. The support actors were household names in the 50’s and their individual performances are all excellent. Mervyn Johns appeared in over four dozen films over his career, including the cult classic The Day of the Triffids. Kathleen Harrison, as Mrs. Dilber provided the film’s comic highlight, had a similarly impressive career, whilst Michael Hordern and Francis De Wolff both became very popular television actors. The whole film is only 85 minutes long, but is one of the truly great films, with the strength and depth of its drama making it the most memorable of any adaptation of the tale. No wonder its still considered to be the best. A Christmas Carol (1984) This American, made for t
          elevision movie is another favourite version of mine, probably because it was filmed in Shrewsbury. I can actually remember them filming it. Shrewsbury was an ideal location, many of the shops and streets have a Dickensian feel about them, and when you look at the film, if you are familiar with Shrewsbury, you can actually pick out specific buildings and streets, which, helps you live the experience even more. Of course seeing the snow machine produce artificial snow does spoil the fantasy a bit, but nevertheless it’s a lovely film being very believable and sticking closely to the original text. It boasts not only the best of British acting talent but also a true American legend in the lead role - George C Scott. Ebenezer Scrooge, played by Scott, is an old, tight-fisted miser whose only goal in life is to make as much money as humanly possible and to hell with those in need. He pays his clerk Bob Cratchit, played by David Warner, the least amount possible, gives nothing to charity and ignores the loving wishes of his family. Then, one Christmas Eve, he's visited by the ghost of his long dead business partner Jacob Marley, played by Frank Finlay, who warns Scrooge that three spirits will visit him and help his redemption thus saving him from an afterlife in hell. George C. Scott gives a commanding and powerful performance, his accent slips now and again but his interpretation of this well loved character is a treat to watch. Similarly, Edward Woodward is huge as the Ghost of Christmas Present, and would bring a smile to anyone's face. Saying that, when he repeats Scrooges own word back to him, about "the surplus population" he delivers them with such depth of feeling that its enough to make anyone’s hairs on the back of their necks stand up. The arrival of the Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come is eerie and dark and you actually feel sympathy for Ebenezer in this very dramatic scene. David Warner
          and Susannah York as the Cratchit's give wonderful performances, whilst Anthony Walters playing Tiny Tim really milks it and tugs at the heartstrings. One interesting fact about this film compared to the others, is the lack of extras. I’d have though the population of Shrewsbury would have been queuing up to take part. Perhaps the producers were trying to save money. Still, this remains one of the best - a smart and faithful adaptation of the classic story. Scrooge (1974) This is my own personal favourite. The spirit of Christmas really comes alive when the family classic is transformed into a fun filled, singing and dancing spectacular chock full of music, action and excitement. It’s a real delight for the entire family. This time its Albert Finney in the lead role who is whisked away on three fantastic journeys into the past, present and future. In a trip that lasts but one night, Scrooge discovers what it takes most of us an entire lifetime to learn. The story is enhanced by the exceptional performances of the internationally renowned cast and the marvellous music score. The screenplay is faithful to the original story. Miserly old Scrooge, played very well by the multi talented Albert Finney, who loves nothing so much as his money and hates the good cheer of Christmas time, goes home one Christmas Eve to be visited by four ghosts. In this version, his dead partner, Jacob Marley, is played by Alec Guinness. His performance is brilliant and he plays it totally different to any of the others I’ve seen - unconventionally energetic and sadistically high-spirited, with bizarre mixture of the nasty and the good-natured. The second visitation, The Ghost of Christmas Past played by Dame Edith Evans, takes Scrooge on a tour of happier times long gone. The third, The Ghost of Christmas Present played very jovially and larger than life by Kenneth Moore, shows him how friends and family
          are spending the holiday this year. And the fourth, The Ghost of Christmas Yet to Come played by Paddy Stone, gives Scrooge a glimpse into a grim future of cemeteries, death, and Hell. Michael Medwin, another of my favourite actors, also fits in very well as Scrooge’s nephew. The songs and music complement the film and the acting performances. My particular favourites are ‘Thank You Very Much’ which I find myself humming for hours after the video has ended, and the truly funny scene when Scrooge is joining in with the ‘Minister’s Cat’. Not what you would call one of the great musicals, but Scrooge is without doubt a very enjoyable version of the timeless classic, and well worth a look for those who have had their fill of the more serious adaptations. It's entirely suitable for family viewing and its overwhelming sentimentality is entirely in keeping with the season it was designed for. So, there you are my three favourite versions of the most traditional of Christmas stories. I love the story probably because there's something in its message of spiritual rebirth and redemption that strikes a responsive chord, especially in an age when the focus of the holiday season has shifted more to material goods than altruism. Nearly everybody who watches them will I'm sure, recognise a little bit of Scrooge in themselves. Word of warning - lock up your money and your credit cards before you watch them, your in danger of uncontrollable fits of generosity shortly after the end of each of these films!

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments
          • More +
            20.08.2001 22:42
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            1 Comment

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            In this adaptation of the classic novel by Charles Dickens, Alastair Sim stars as Ebenezer Scrooge - the miser who learns who mean he has been when he is subjected to visions of ghosts. However, rather than portraying Scrooge as an en evil man, here we see an old man who is put through many emotions - he is heartless, but he is also frightened, and at the end, when he has changed his ways, he is positively jubilant, and the viewer believes in this characterisation throughout. It is down to Sim's skill that this is so. The story has been turned into film again and again, with perhaps the worst version being SCROOGED, starring Bill Murray, but this film from 1951 is the best one that has been made so far. Director Brian Desmond Hurst gives us a movie which deserves to be watched every Christmas, and although it never quite reaches the heights of Capra's IT'S A WONDERFUL LIFE, it is one of the best feel-good movies ever made. A must see.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              30.11.2000 22:50
              Very helpful
              (Rating)

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              This has to be my favourite Christmas movie of all time. I probably shouldn't admit it but it is. I know it's the old story of the not very nice person becoming the nicest person alive, but this movie tells it best. I watch this film every year without doubt and I never get bored with scrooge. Obviously he is the main and best charachter in the film. The film main focus is the christams theme of "goodwill to all men" and films nowadays do not do this justice. Even now when I watch this it reminds me of my childhood Christmas's and thats probably why I still enjoy it. You know how it's going to end but it's always fun in the right bits and sad in other bits. I checked through the T.V. guide for this year but I can't see it. It better be on or I will be gutted.

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
            • More +
              26.11.2000 02:33
              Very helpful
              (Rating)

              Advantages

              Disadvantages

              My favourite Christmas movie has to be “A Christmas Carol”, starring Alistair Sim as Ebeneezer Scrooge. There are other movie versions of this classic novel however, I believe this one, more than any other, captures the atmosphere and pathos that Dickens originally intended. It is a moral tale, containing many 'home truths'. It is a story of people and poverty which will touch the heart. Most importantly, it is a great moral booster as, after all the terrible events that Ebeneezer has to suffer, there is a happy ending. ( Thinks, “The happy ending occurs, only because Ebeneezer wants it to.” . . . Have I been studying psychology too much or what . . .?) Watching this movie, you feel that you can almost touch the pain of the embattled Scrooge, - as he is shown how his future might turn out - if he does not change his penny-pinching ways. You fell like cheering, when Scrooge comes to his front door, after all of the ‘visitations’ have passed. Cheering with him in his moment of relief and cheering with him out of pure unadulterated happiness. After all the black emotion of the previous nights, Scrooge bursts forth with such unrestrained exuberance, you just have to ‘seize the moment’ with him. After watching this wonderful movie, you can hear Tiny Tim saying, “ . . .merry Christmas, everyone”, for days if not weeks afterwards. Adding to the overall ‘feel’ of the movie is the fact that is in black and white. I’ve read that expert film makers can now ‘re-make’ a movie in such a fashion that you cannot tell that it has been ‘doctored’. With this 'doctoring' of the original film, the sound is perfect and the colours are as fresh - as
              though they had been there on the original film. If there is a way to re-make this movie, I hope they do it soon, as I want to be around to see the results. GG UPDATE ON "Christmas Carol". Now you can get, "Christmas Carol" the video. Yes, although the bad news is that, in my area at least, Christmas Carol, (at least the Alister Sim version) will NOT be on TV . . . BUT, if like me you would really like to see it this Christmas, then it's out on video in Woolies and such like shops. So, enjoy, I'm off to Woolies . . . GG

              Comments

              Login or register to add comments
          • Product Details

            An old miser makes excuses for his uncaring nature in this Charles Dickens classic before he learns real compassion when the three ghosts of Christmas past, present, and future visit him on Christmas Eve.