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Eat Pray Love (DVD)

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9 Reviews

Genre: Drama / Parental Guidance / Director: Ryan Murphy / Actors: James Franco, Julia Roberts, Javier Bardem, Billy Crudup, Richard Jenkins ... / Features of the DVD: PAL

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    9 Reviews
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      30.08.2012 00:57

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      Read the book instead of watching the film

      Having never read the book I went into watching this dvd with an open mind. I dread to think what I would of made of it had I known more about it!

      The title of this review says it all! I wasn't impressed with this film in the slightest, very disappointed. The best part was the ending not because it finished but the story took that long to get good. Very slow moving film. There were parts of the film I was willing something exciting to happen, it felt like a drum roll going on forever but you never got to hear the announcement!

      Loved the travelling part of it and learning about different places, but then again if I wanted to know about places I would have just watched a documentary. The story could of easily of been told in and hour rather than 2!!

      If your a fan of Julia Roberts feel free to watch it but its not like any of her others really.

      I probably wouldn't waste your time, I've just lost 2 hours of my life that I ain't getting back!

      On a positive note, I have since read the book and can say the book is well worth a read, 100% better than the film.

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      27.12.2011 11:47
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      A bit dragged out!!

      My mum loves Julia Roberts so I thought I'd get this for her and ended up watching it.

      ~~~DVD COVER~~~
      The DVD cover is pretty fun, of Julia Roberts eating ice cream in Italy with a semi smile on her face, which does make you smile and already makes you 'feel good', the second picture of her with Javier Bardem, which annoyed me a bit as it kind of gave it away that he will be the one she will 'love again' with.

      ~~~THOUGHTS ON PLOT~~~
      On a business trip to Bali, medicine man Ketut tells Liz she will lose all her money and that she will have two marriages, a long and a short one. Liz (Julia Roberts), realising she is unhappy in her marriage, leaves her husband. After her divorce with Stephen (Billy Crudup), and a directionless fling with David (James Franco), Liz goes on a trip of self discovery to Italy, India and Bali.

      Through meeting friends and being with their families, eating good food and forgiving herself, she learns to let herself go and opens herself to love again.

      I thought the pace of the movie was pretty quick to begin with, then began to drag after she leaves Rome. With three places to visit, you constantly wonder when she will leave and move on. At just over 2 hours long, sometimes you'd wish it would hurry up. I sat there counting down to how many places she had to visit left.

      That said, the sites shown were beautiful and it did make you want to go there. The people, scenarios and things Liz sees is quite eye opening and deals with a lot of issues which affect her and the subtle clues and ideas she picks up from each place does contribute to her self discovery. The ending brings together everything she's seen and in this way finishes well, leaving you content and "feeling good".

      Whilst it is claimed to be based on a true story and adapted from the book, some of the things that happens seem really bizarre and I wonder if it really did happen.

      ~~~CAST~~~
      Julia Roberts- Liz Gilbert
      Billy Crudup- Stephen
      Hadi Subiyanto- Ketut
      James Franco- David
      Javier Bardem- Felipe

      Julia Roberts, in some scenes, did not look like Julia Roberts, which was really strange given her iconic face, but anyway, she did a good job. There were a few scenes I thought she was very believably emotional yet genuine.

      ~~~OVERALL~~~
      Eat, Pray, Love is a heartwarming film for anybody, though it is a tad too long and dragged on for a bit. Also agood holiday commercial for Rome, India and Bali.

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        10.12.2011 15:34
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        Julia Roberts' navel-gazing pity party

        Eat Pray Love is a 2010 film co-written and directed by Ryan Murphy (Glee, Nip/Tuck, American Horror Story) and produced by Brad Pitt's company Plan B. Its running time is 133 minutes.

        I took a bit of a mental blank recently when adding titles to my LoveFilm rental list, and this film caught my eye because Javier Bardem and Billy Crudup are in it. Billy Crudup is in my all time favourite film, Almost Famous, and I also love Charlotte Gray, which he also stars in. For some reason I have an irrational dislike of Julia Roberts and used to avoid her movies like the plague (I think it was Runaway Bride which finally finished me off) but as I haven't watched her act in anything for about 10 years, I figured that perhaps nowadays I'd be able to tolerate her, especially if it meant I got to look at Javier Bardem, Billy Crudup and James Franco.

        The film is based on Eat, Pray, Love: One Woman's Search for Everything Across Italy, India and Indonesia by Elizabeth Gilbert. I have never read the book, so I didn't start watching the film with any pre-conceptions or prior knowledge of what happens in it.

        The main character, Liz, is played by Julia Roberts. She's a writer whom, after divorcing her husband (Billy Crudup) goes straight into another relationship with a younger man (James Franco) who is acting in a play she wrote. Despite being successful, with a good home and relationship, she is still unhappy and ends up lying on the floor, wailing and crying a lot. Billy Crudup's acting is very funny, if underused. For some reason he doesn't want to divorce Liz. Why? Beats me. Similarly, James Franco's character also seems to love his self-obsessed girlfriend. He is clearly stupid.

        Liz decides to go travelling for a year - to Italy, India, and then Bali, where she had been the previous year. On her first trip to Bali, she had gone to see a medicine man who told her that the next time she returned, he would teach her everything he knew.

        Liz's travels are split into 3 sections. In Italy ('Eat'), she makes friends who teach her to enjoy the pleasures of life, such as simple food and wine. She rents an apartment in Rome, learns the language, and spends most of her time seemingly sitting outside restaurants with red wine and plates of pasta. This means lots of annoying close-ups of Liz/Julia's big wide mouth slurping up spaghetti. She also travels to Napoli to eat pizza and has to buy new jeans because she is enjoying her food so much. Look ladies, she's just like us because she stands in changing rooms unable to zip her jeans up! Oh Liz, aren't you just so NORMAL.

        Italy looks beautiful in the film - golden and rustic. However I have been to Italy and know that it isn't all cobbled streets with washing hanging from balcony to balcony, as is portrayed in the film. Liz's apartment has no proper running water and is held up by scaffolding. I'm sure she could have afforded a small studio instead.

        She then travels to India ('Pray') where she attempts to find her spirituality by scrubbing floors and praying to a guru a lot. Again, visually it is colourful and stunning, especially the scene where Liz attends a wedding, where she spends all her time thinking about her own wedding, being so self-involved and all. In India, she also befriends a former alcoholic from Texas, played by Richard Jenkins (who played the father in Six Feet Under). Richard Jenkins is excellent in this, and his scene where he emotionally describes how his alcoholism affected his wife and child was absolutely the stand-out part of the whole film for me.

        Finally, Liz ends the year in Bali ('Love'). There, she basically behaves like a student on a gap year, getting drunk on tequila and riding around on her bicycle. It's on one of her twee bicycle rides that she meets Javier Bardem's character, Felipe, a local Brazilian factory owner. When I say 'meet', I mean that he almost runs her over in his landrover. She falls off her bike and cuts her knee, but is fine. Better luck next time, Javier. An hour or so into the film, I too would like to mow Julia Roberts down in my car.

        You don't need to be a genius to work out what happens between Liz and Felipe in the film. In fact, she spends so much time having sex with him that she gets a UTI (why do we need to know this? Why?) and doesn't spend much time with the medicine man. This sadly means that he isn't able to make her less self-obsessed or self-involved, or make her realise that she has no right to be miserable about her comfortable, wealthy lifestyle.

        The film ends with some waffle about her learning to love and forgive herself, blah blah blah. She goes off in a boat with Felipe. I hope it sank.

        Maybe I am just too cynical to have enjoyed this movie. It tries to show Eastern mysticism and new age thinking, but really Liz comes across as spoiled, self-indulgent, histrionic and whiny. This has not helped with my negative feelings towards Julia Roberts but I don't think I would have liked the character no matter what actress it was. She actually reminded me of Sarah Jessica Parker/Carrie Bradshaw - another whiny, needy, mess of a creature. I mean, if she really wanted to appreciate her own life and become happy, then perhaps she should have thought about going away for a year to do charity work rather than lying around under palm trees in Bali.

        The male leads in this film were the best thing about it, although there didn't seem to be that much point to James Franco's character other than to show how she threw both him and her husband away on seemingly a whim. I also didn't buy into her relationship with Javier Bardem at all as he seemed much too laid back to tolerate that neurotic mess for long.

        At just over 2 hours long, this didn't captivate me and I did lose concentration at times. I watched it until the very end though, which I guess makes me a masochist.

        Good points? It looks beautiful, the scenery is gorgeous, and it does make you want to travel. There are some great songs on the soundtrack too, by Eddie Vedder and Neil Young in particular.

        Maybe some people would find this film inspirational. I don't know who.

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          25.07.2011 15:51

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          I really loved this move and would definitely recommend it to anyone!

          I have been wanting to watch this movie for ages, but only recently did after ordering it on love film, and I'm so glad I did! It is even better than I expected and had heard from other people that it was.
          It is about a woman who is unhappy in her life and in her marriage and relationship which she dove into after her divorce. She decided because of this, to take a year out to do what visit the places she had always dreamed of going to, spending the year in Italy, then moving to India, and then Bali. She does this to try and find herself again, and to find the balance which she was told she needed in her life by a medicine man in Bali.

          Eat Pray Love is such an inspirational film! It made me want to do exactly the same thing, and just take a year out on my own to travel the world and to find myself and make new friends and a new life for myself. I really related to Liz (the main character) and would love to take a year out in the future. It even inspired me to try and relearn the French language which I did at GCSE but never fully tried to understand the language!

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          11.05.2011 13:26
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          An ispirational chick-flick!

          Eat Pray Love is an American Romantic Comedy movie. It was released in the United Kingdon in 2011, and so is very recent. The movie stars James Franco and Julia Roberts. The movie is a 15 which means that it must not be viewed by persons under the age of fifteen.

          Plot: Liz has everything every woman dreams of having: a good job, a husband, a house. Although, despite this, she still feels confused and lonely. She ends up divorcing her husband and sets off travelling around the World wheres she discoveres how love can reveal itself in different ways. What will happen? Watch Eat Pray Love to find out!

          I really liked the character Liz who is played by Julia Roberts. I thought that she was a very interesting character, and think that a lot of women will be able to relate to the character and I also think that they will find the character to be really inspiring too.

          One thing that I like about this movie is that it is quite 'real-to-life'. By that I mean: well everyone knows that women' dreams or goals are supposed to go along the lines of ; getting a good job, buying a house, getting married' and so the fact that the main character in this movie has all of these 'dream' things, she is really unhappy, which proves that 'dreams/goals' don't equal happiness.

          I like the message that this movie sends out, which is all about being true to yourself. I think that this is a great message to send out, as nowadays we seem to be more focused on pleasing others, rather than being a little selfish and focusing on ourselves.

          I thought that the plot was really interesting. I liked how the character travelled the World, and discovered how love reveals itself in different way. I also loved the scenery in this movie .I want to travel the World now!!

          This film is based on the book of the same title. I have not read the book and therefore cannot comment on whether the film sticks to the book, or whether one is better than the other.

          If you are looking for some inspiration then I would definately recommend this movie to you!

          Thanks for reading!
          May 11th 2011
          xd-o-n-z-x (also posted under xdonzx on ciao)

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          14.10.2010 08:06
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          Roberts is as radiant as ever, but the director doesn't know what to do with the complex material

          If you happen to have an ounce of cynicism in your body, avoid this like the plague. Because for the cynics amongst you, "Eat Pray Love" will no doubt be the most self-indulgent, self-satisfied and self-important film you will see all year. But for those who are truly romantics at heart, one woman's pretty looking journey across the colourful globe to find the meaning of life, searching for a true connection, physical, mental and spiritual, will be something to marvel at, admire and cherish. Is she brave for venturing out into the world, following her dreams? Or is she simply deluding herself and being selfish, materialistic and falling into excessive consumerism? Are the problems in her life really that big of a deal? The film's theme will no doubt split the audience and it's not something that appeals to a wide demographic.

          Liz (Julia Roberts) is a middle-aged woman going through a divorce after disastrous years of trying to make her marriage work and is looking for some sort of consolation from a much younger man (James Franco). But the love affair is cooling off significantly, and she is once again left alone, bored and unenthusiastic about life. She needs a change of scenery, and being a travel writer, she decides to take an entire year out to do some effective soul-searching. Her first destination is Rome, where she is to do some eating. Then she plans to move on to India, a place suited for praying. Finally, she will end the year in Bali, Indonesia, where she may, just may, find the much-needed love in her life.

          It is hard to make a film out of a book that relies heavily on internal monologue. "Eat Pray Love" is based on an enormously popular bestseller written by Elizabeth Gilbert whose autobiography was an instant hit for the readers. She was looking for balance and the meaning of true happiness, and before we are able to see Julia Roberts going on the rather expensive looking trip (which Gilbert's publisher paid for in advance, a bit of detail the film decides to ignore completely for some reason), the film needs to establish that Liz is going through hell and is leading a miserable existence. This is where the casting of Roberts really pays off. Roberts, being the international superstar that she is, does not disappoint in her "solo comeback" (this is the first time she has had to carry a film by herself in nearly 7 years), with her subtle glances of sadness and vulnerability setting an effective tone at the beginning of the film. She is essentially depressed and needs something different in her life. She has spent years worrying about her future, and now she needs to have fun.

          And it's a timeout that anyone would die for. In Rome she decides to stop worrying about gaining weight. She's in Italy, there are sumptuous dishes of pizza and pasta and she is not about to let a few pounds from enjoying the endless amount of fantastic food that is on offer. She does need to buy a few more pairs of jeans that fit the grown waist but who cares when the food tastes that great? There's a particularly memorable scene where Roberts tucks into a rather simple looking Spaghetti Pomodoro, which in fact, turns out to be amazing. Accompanied by "Der Hölle Rache," the famous Queen of the Night aria from Mozart's "The Magic Flute," the scene will make your tummy growl as Roberts slowly but surely finds a brief moment of true happiness with that plate of Spaghetti.

          Then she's off to India, where she stays in a Hindu temple, finding peace, praying, trying to connect with God. But being a Western woman, it's not easy to sit still, pause, and meditate for hours and hours. There are flies to distract her and she has too much going on inside her head which doesn't help since the whole point of meditation is to clear your head of any unnecessary, complex thoughts. Time literally seems to stop and each minute feels like an hour for our heroine. But like most events in this film, as enough time goes by, she gets immensely good, almost too good, at everything. Sure she does have some help. She meets a friendly man from Texas, Richard (Richard Jenkins), who helps her get rid of the burdens that are pressing down hard on her shoulders. Jenkins provides the only stand-out supporting performance and in one intimate scene that is handled perfectly by the often underrated and underused actor, his monologue will surely tug at the heartstrings. The friendship between the two is often humourous as well as deeply moving, and a lot of credit should go to Jenkins.

          Good-looking men surround Gilbert during her travels, most noticeably in Bali. She almost hooks up with a man who must be at least ten years younger than the middle-aged divorcee, but the one that threatens to steal her heart is the conveniently divorced Felipe (Javier Bardem), whose business apparently lets him be wherever he wants to be (his words). So the audience is confused when he also goes on to say that his business is in Bali, so he cannot leave when Gilbert eventually plans to. Other than that slight hiccup, Felipe seems to be the perfect man for her. He's loving, caring, a great kisser...basically he's got the full package. Gilbert took this trip to be away from complications, to liberate herself, but it appears she needs a man after all to keep her happy. She visits Ketut, a medicine man whom she visited before and his words of wisdom supposedly give her Balance. She finds security and stability at long last.

          Despite the excessive use of voiceovers, the film fails to show any depth relating to this woman's year-long journey. It has a lengthy running time, but spends very little bit of it trying to explain to us just how some of the events occur. The disjointed feel is partly the editor's fault, but also the careless script should also share the blame. So she's praying in India. What about? She connects with God on some level. How? She finds Balance in Bali. Again, how? By doing some charity work and raising money for a pharmacist who cannot afford to buy her own place? The soul-searching; did she succeed in the end? Was Felipe it? The whole point of the trip? The message is never clear, and the film tends to forget a lot about the previous places Gilbert had been to. When she's in India, she forgets all about Rome, when she's in Bali, India is history. The calm, soothing voice of Julia Roberts tries to explain everything. And there are some philosophical elements that try to give clever answers to the many questions that have been opened in the beginning. Because director Ryan Murphy is so focused on showing solely the beautiful, breathtaking aspect of her adventure, all that "Eat Pray Love" boils down to is nothing but a shallow and sweeping drama with a fantastic leading actress but not much else.

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            04.10.2010 14:12
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            If you really want to watch it, wait for the DVD.

            I was looking forward to watching Eat, Pray, Love because after seeing the trailer and reading a synopsis of the film I thought it would be right up my street...

            Julia Roberts plays the part of Liz Gilbert, a woman that leaves her marriage for seemingly flippant reasons (she wants to travel, he wants to study, so their marriage could never work, yarda, yarda, yarda). Liz then falls into the arms of David, who works as an actor. However James Franco that plays the part of David does so badly and I found his character cringe-worthy and very unconvincing.

            An unhappy Liz soon decides to leave New York on a voyage to rediscover herself and she decides to visit Italy, India and Bali. In Italy Liz eats - a lot - and takes in culture, sights and sounds of the country. I really enjoyed the Italian segment of the movie - the characters were good, there were some really funny scenes and the country was portrayed as a beautiful, vibrant place to visit.

            Next, Liz goes to India, to visit the guru that David (the ex-boyfriend) worships back in New York. This part of the movie was really dull. I don't feel like the protagonist saw India, she just did a lot of meditating and as a viewer I was bored. Next, Liz goes to Bali, because an old man told her she'd end up returning to the country during a previous visit. Surprisingly the film picks up slightly during this segment, because a few different characters are introduced, but still, I couldn't wait for it to end.

            At 140 minutes this film is too long and although it is filmed in amazing locations I didn't really invest in the character of Liz and I don't think the writing was strong enough to carry the film over a two hour period.

            I was really disappointed with Eat, Pray, Love, so I can only award it two stars. I only hope the book is better...

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              03.10.2010 20:46
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              A self-indulgent and boring depiction of a wasted journey

              The beautiful trailers for this film tempt you into an illusion that Eat, Pray, Love is a dizzying and intoxicating blend of colour and substance, and while it is indeed beautifully shot, the plot is sadly lacking.

              Based on the bestselling book by Elizabeth Gilbert, this film tells the story of Liz, a woman who has realised her marriage is over and instead of trying to solve the problem she jumps ship (quite literally) and embarks on an adventure, which takes in Italy, India and Bali.

              The first problem we encounter is that there really is only one main character and that's Liz. It's pretty clear from the outset that the other characters are meaningless and secondary, which incidently is how Liz treats them, flitting between love interests and friends like both are going out of fashion.

              Our self-absorbed traveller decides to start her journey of self-discovery (yawn) in Italy where she indulges heavily in arts, culture and the simple pleasure of stuffing her face. This section of the film is beautifully shot and I'm sure the Italian tourist board would not be disappointed at its depiction. Liz enjoys making new friends and spending time getting to know herself before taking another fickle flight of fancy and heading to India.

              It is here that our main character decides to learn the art of meditation and discover religion, which is not only patronising to followers of all faiths, but also hugely boring to watch. Liz comes across as a shallow, undedicated person, who seeks out the benefits of enlightenment, but is reluctant to put in the time, effort and general hard work involved.

              When Bali beckons the viewer is treated to a more chilled-out and relaxed Liz, but how could she not have mellowed with her beautiful surroundings demanding it?

              The film seems to have been divided into very distinct segments - the Italian new beginning, a slight struggle with her choices in India, and finally a series of realisations in Bali. This format is obviously meant to show the different stages of liz's journey, but it does not help with the flow of this film and is inconsistant and disjointed. One of the problems is that as a carefree traveller, Liz sucombs to country cliches such as eating in Italy, praying in India and relaxing in Bali, and seems hellbent on avoiding finding a new, unique way of doing things.

              Again the cinamatography is fantastic and that makes the whole spectacle watchable, if not enjoyable. At one point there is a minor road collision, which made me wish for a tragic but convenient end to this film. Sadly it carries on for a good while longer...

              Liz comes across as a vaguely likeable character but she has far too many unenviable flaws and a lack of commitment is one of them. It is impossible to feel empathy for a woman who runs away from her problems, and seems to have no loyalty to her relationships, or to herself, giving up when the going gets tough. I am not just referring to her choices with men, but also her half-hearted approach to most things, including her newfound but non-convincing faith.

              I must admit I spent most of the time in the cinema willing this movie to be over and thinking of Dooyoo reviews to write! It just did not hold my attention or interest which is a shame as I am a Julia Roberts fan, and rarely get a break from my baby daughter, so was thoroughly looking forward to this.

              The acting is good, the locations are beautiful but the story lacks strength as do the characters. I love the idea of travelling the world and experiencing new things, but Liz seemed to tred a well-worn path and was not really learning anything from it, preferring to pretend to be a changed woman, instead of actually becoming one.

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                30.09.2010 13:15
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                Eat before you arrive.

                Making films of books is difficult - even more so when said book is - a) an enormously successful, much-loved bestseller, and b) largely made up of internal monologue and restless soul-searching. This hardly seems conducive to a good time on screen, and so it proves with Eat, Pray, Love; a film that turns a good, if overrated book, into a bloated, vacuous, self-indulgent dirge that wastes the considerable talent that's been poured into it.

                The book is the tale of author Elizabeth Gilbert's year of searching for a series of intangibles and capital letters; Self, Peace, Forgiveness, Love, Understanding, Spiritual Somethingorother. Funded by a generous publisher (something the film glosses over rather easily), she travels first to Italy and eating to excess, experiencing pleasures of the palate and indulgence, then to India, where months of self-reflection and discipline encourage her to better know herself and her spirituality, and finally to Indonesia, where she seeks to track down Balance; the meeting point of the contrasting realms she's so far explored. It's a fine book that really gets into Gilbert's psyche (for good and bad, although you admire her honesty). The transition to film, however, has not been a smooth one.

                If the message of the novel was that easy answers and convention need sidestepping at times to find genuine, personal happiness and understanding of who one really is, then the filmmakers have firmly trod that notion into the dirt. Everything - from the landscapes to the food to the people - is beautiful and radiant here, but none of it means anything much at all. Gilbert the author could be irritating and self-obsessed, but you tended to fall for her integrity. Eat, Pray, Love has no such redeeming worth, taking every most superficial and shallow aspect of the book and treating them like they're transcendent wisdom. More than this, though, the film's just incredibly boring. The kind of boring that makes you wonder if you could bite your own finger off, or whether you'd need some sort of industrial equipment to achieve the same ends.

                At 140 minutes, this is looong. Offensively long, almost. The part of the story in the Indian ashram is the slowest section of the book, and this sense is here multiplied hundreds of times over. In one of the scenes that's actually similar to the book here (for some reason, much of the India section has been changed), Gilbert (Julia Roberts) finds herself trying to meditate, but upon opening her eyes and glancing at the clock, is dismayed to find only a minute's passed. We can sympathise - the film's drooping, sagging middle seems to defy regular conceptions of time, it lasts so long.

                Things pick up a bit in Bali (and the Italian section's pretty strong, if full of silly stereotypes), but by this point, you've lost the will. It's a shame that Javier Bardem (as Felipe, Gilbert's future husband - who is significantly older in the book) is introduced when the audience has been beaten into slumped resignation by the film - he's a fine actor, but can't turn around this unbalanced mess.

                There are - mercifully - positives to this film. Roberts is likeable, while James Franco is as good as ever, if underused in a minor supporting role. Arguably the greatest star of the story is the cinematography, which is exceptional - although it, along with the film as a whole, veers into cliché once too often, the visual sense of Eat, Pray, Love is a dazzling, dizzying blend that manages to capture something of the whirlpool meeting-place of hedonism, heartbreak and hippyish sensibilities that was Gilbert's year abroad. It says it all for the film, however, that its most praiseworthy aspect is that it looks good - a strength that underscores just how flimsy and insubstantial this project is. I'm not sure I expected an awful lot more, and those who were bowled over by the book will find this at least a passable skin-deep imitation of the story, but that's all it is. Which, for all its talent, money and staggeringly boring length, is something of a let-down.

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