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Rush Hour 2 (DVD)

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      12.06.2010 00:33
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      A great, funny film for a night in

      Rush Hour was, to me, one of the funniest action buddy cop films I'd seen. The writing was excellent, the action was amazing and although the overall story wasn't that original or anything it wasn't really the point. We weren't meant to be enthralled by the mystery of the plot - just see Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan bounce one-liners off each other. And it worked perfectly. The cultural differences between the two major characters made the film, and it's something that came back in sequel. Rush Hour 2 seems to start off directly from when the first movie ended (although I might be wrong), with Carter (Chris Tucker) on holiday in China with Lee (Jackie Chan) showing him the sights. However, work gets the better of Lee and he is determined to track a Triad gang lord who might be responsible for the murder of two men at the American embassy. Lee learns that it involved involves Ricky Tan (John Lone), his late police officer father's former partner, who might have had a role in the death of his father, although nothing was proven. Tan, Lee finds out, is now leader of the Triads. With a fight of jurisdiction of the case between America and China, Lee and Carter decide to solve the case themselves. --- Rush Hour two is, all things considered, very much like the first one. It's got a pretty generic storyline - again, something we don't really care for when watching the film. Carter and Lee are just as funny as they were in the first outing, but this time, they're already friends, which means we don't have to suffer through the whole "I don't like you, now I do" bit which they did in the first one. Here we can see their friendship develop even more. It's still a riot to watch the two exchange dialogue and quips. The cultural differences in this film are all about Carter though, as he's completely like a fish out of water in China. With an incredibly limited range of Chinese to speak, he follows Lee around like a dumb dog. Granted, he's still packed with his usual light "racism" The action is just as good as the first one, with some pretty interesting new ideas from the action choreographer, who adds just a bit more to the fight scenes to make them just that much more entertaining. Jackie Chan still plays his comic "prop" kung fu very well. Rush Hour 2 is a fine sequel to the first film, and although it doesn't do a great job in terms of originality, it takes what made the first film so popular and really focuses on that. It's a laugh a minute, with some amazing fights thrown in for good measure. You could watch it a million times and it'll still make you laugh

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        29.01.2010 23:04
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        Lee and Carter find a vacation cut short when they get caught up with counterfeiters in Hong Kong

        After the success of the first film, it was almost inevitable that Rush Hour would spawn a sequel! (In fact it has spawned two!!!) Carrying on immediately after the end of the first film, it sees Detective James Carter travelling to Hong Kong with his new found friend, Inspector Lee, for a well earned vacation but, unfortunately for Carter, he fails to realise that Lee is a compulsive workaholic who refuses to let go of a case once he gets involved. Under the guise of showing his new pal around, Lee begins investigating a local counterfeiting gang working with The Triads. This leads into all manner of amusing comedy set pieces (including a visit by the pair to an underground karaoke bar infested with Triads and their henchmen) until Carter unwittingly realises what is going on. And when that happens, all hell lets loose as both cops unleash their own fists of fury both in Hong Kong and then, finally, back in L.A. The choice to split the action between two locations is the only thing that weakens this second entry in the series; much better would it have been in my eyes if the pair had remained in Hong Kong! That said, the film is equally as brilliant as its predessecor with just as many funny moments and no end of gripping and well choreographed cracking action sequences. Tucker here is far more bearable than he was in the original and the pace never lets up for a single instant. Not many action-thrillers inspire sequels as strong as this and there are lots of nice nods and references aimed at fans of the first film too! Once again, it is the chemistry between the two leads that makes the film as good as it is, the plot here being a little weak in places, and it is a film I would not hesitate to watch again; so much did I enjoy the banter between the two mis-matched Police Officers! All those who thought the first was just a fluke- prepare to be impressed a second time around! Once again Rush Hour 2 delivers on a wide variety of levels and is equally as good if not occassionally a little better than the original!

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          11.12.2009 23:55
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          Scant premise but worth it for the action and cast chemistry

          note: also appears in part on Flixster and The Student Room Rush Hour was a very entertaining film despite its scant and thoroughly procedural plot, delivering great chemistry between its two wily leads, as well as inventive and extremely impressive action sequences that hint at fun spontoneity despite clearly being meticulously crafted. It was prime material for a franchise after making a massive gross at the worldwide box office. The film re-introduces us to L.A.P.D. Detective James Carter (Chris Tucker), who is in Hong Kong visiting his now good buddy, Hong Kong Police Force Chief Inspector Lee (Jackie Chan). However, when the American Embassy blows up, his vacationing is put on hold as he has to tend to the tense political climate and fallout surrounding such an incendiary diplomatic move. The main plot revolves around trying to catch Ricky Tan (John Lone), the man believed to be responsible for the bombing, and a man who is also believed to have caused the death of Lee's father. Thus, for Lee, this isn't just his job: this is personal. Fortunately, the film never gets too bogged down in the drama and mostly delivers the fun, harnessed by a fun, if brief turn from Asian starlet Zhang Ziyi as one of Tan's henchwomen. A sequel that is funnier and more action-packed than the first, Rush Hour 2 is packed full of great moments and superb choreography. The plot is still quite procedural, but it packs more of a punch than the original, even if we get some familiar tropes here and there. On the whole, it builds on the parlance between the two leads, even if it's still not the high wire classic that it had the potential for.

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          19.01.2009 19:35
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          A great sequel that was worth the wait and doesn't disappoint

          Written by Ross LaManna and Jeff Nathanson, and directed by Brett Ratner, Rush Hour 2 was the long awaited sequel that was released on 3 August 2001. ****Story line**** Detective James Carter (Chris Tucker) is on vacation and heads out to the Far East where he plans to stay with Chief Inspector Lee (Jackie Chan) and take in the sights, fun and excitement that Hong Kong has to offer. Partying and women are the only things on his mind. Unbeknown to Carter, Lee has a complex case to solve. Triad, and ex-cop, Ricky Tan () is thought to have blown up the American Embassy and killing two Americans in the process. In addition to this, Ricky Tan is in collusion with Steven Reign (), a Los Angeles crime lord, in a money laundering operation. To add to the mix there is a power struggle within the Triads and Inspector Lee discovers something about Ricky Tan that personally affects him. ****Other characters**** As with the original film Jackie and Chris are the main characters, and there are loads of others. Most of the other characters do not give memorable performance, or really stick out however there are two that does: Hu Li(Ziyi Zang) is second in command of the Triad gang and answers to Ricky Tan. Her martial arts performances are great (although not up to the standard of Bruce Lee) and she does her own stunts. In addition to this I think she is absolutely gorgeous. For those of you that don't know she also stars in "Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon" and "Memoirs of a Geisha". Isabella Molina (Roselyn Sanchez) is a Los Angeles agent that is working undercover. She has managed to get in with the money launderers and is collecting the final pieces of evidence to close the assignment. Her final battle with Hu Li is fantastic and I have never seen one like it before, or since. The choreograph is great and it has everything. ****My opinion**** It took nearly 3 years for the sequel to Rush Hour to be released and when it was announced it was so hyped up by the media that there was no way that Rush Hour 2 could live up to it, or was there? In my opinion this film exceeded all expectations (even my very high ones) and was one of the films of 2001 for me. It was right in the middle of the teen movie era, so this film made a refreshing change. As with the first film the main story was nothing special, nor was it original or different but it didn't matter that much. The Jackie Chan/Chris Tucker partnership was back and that is all that mattered. However, unlike the first film there are some twists and smaller side stories that adds to the overall film. I think that Rush Hour 2 is better than the first, something that I did not think was possible at the time. The relationship between Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker had flourished and developed, and was better than in the first film. Despite this, there was still the language barrier (Jackie Chan's English had improved but not to a great extent) but this is a plus side of this film. Once again, there are loads of great (and classic) one-liners and memorable scenes. One scene that sticks out for me is when Carter is singing a karoke classic in a Triad club where he was told to "lay low and blend in". This film also contains the best woman fight of all time, where there is full body contact with no hair pulling or scratching in sight. ****Bonus features**** Like the original DVD this one comes complete with bonus features. Those of you that have read my other film reviews will know that I am not a great fan of bonus features and very seldom watch them. I did watch the bonus features of Rush Hour and I have also seen the bonus features of Rush Hour 2 (from start to finish) and I must admit that they are brilliant and I would definitely recommend watching them. The bonus features include; i) Out takes ii) Jackie Chan's stunts iii) Deleted scenes iv) Extended scenes v) Much more ****Price and availability**** This DVD can be bought from many offline and online retailers, and since it is quite old it can be picked up for little money. At the time of writing Rush Hour 2 can be bought for £3.99 (with free delivery) from Play.com. This is a bargain price and represents great value for money since it is a film that is easily watched over and over again. ****Other**** Run time - 90 minutes Certificate - 12 (cut) and 15 (uncut) 10 awards and 17 nominations

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            22.11.2008 12:43
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            If you liked the first then watch this!

            Only some movies can match their sequels. I am sure the biggest example of this is the first two Godfather movies, and whilst Rush Hour is no Godfather, it definetily is the Godfather of the comedy genre. It took Jackie Chan nearly three decades to crack Hollywood and this was finally achieved with Rush Hour and with the film making 250mil dollars worlwide, a sequel was guaranteed and a sequel was released in 2001. Chan and Tucker recreate their appeal which made them electric in the first movie and participate in a plot which sees them racing from Hong Kong to Las Vegas, via Los Angeles, on the trail of some ruthless Triad counterfeiters. Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon's Zhang Ziyi makes a decent enough villain and female villaine aren't too apparant in films these days, so that was a good chancge. and Hotel Rwanda star Don Cheadle makes a very funny short appearance, and this film should be watched for this scene alone. Tucker's motor mouth may not be too everyone's appeal and I am certain a lot of people who have seen Chris Tucker in action will compare him to Eddie Murphy, but I do not feel he needs this comparison yet as he has only made a few movies. He provides the perfect foil for Chan once again in a partnership formed on comcal chemistry that not many actors have. Ben Stiller and Owen Wilson also jump to mind in this instance. As mentioned above, this movie is like godfather, in the sense that it is as good as the first.

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            22.08.2006 23:36
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            The follow up of 'Rush Hour' is even bigger, better and beefier than the first

            The follow up of ‘Rush Hour’ is even bigger, better and beefier than the first. The plot thickens with the formidable detective duo James Carter (Tucker) a fast talking black American and Inspector Lee (Chan) a short Chinese Kung Fu king as they attempt to take on the world single-handedly. After successfully completing a case in the USA, the pair head to China on holiday, which is the home of Inspector Lee, but to the large disappointment of Carter, Lee is quick to latch on to a case involving an explosion. Carter is more intent on checking out he women and hitting the dance floor. The case continues back in Los Angeles, in an attempt to resolve a dispute involving a large quantity on counterfeit bank notes together with the bombings in China. The situation gets from bad to worse in this somewhat farcical situation. This action-comedy has moments of rib-tickling comedy and some nifty martial arts moves, with 90 minutes of continuous action it is very much like an exciting football match, except without the half-time break. The viewers will be glued to their seats. Admittedly, if you haven’t seen the first one various jokes will be of little relevance. From the shanty towns of China to the lively streets of Las Vegas, this film is sure to float the boat for the viewers. The exhilarating car chases and police work creates adventure, you never know what’s going to happen next.

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              23.06.2004 00:54
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              Two cops, one from L.A and one from Hong Kong, are on a break from work, however Li (Jackie Chan) keeps taking cases and the break turns out into work. The triads, led by Ricky Tan are running a counter fit money game from a printing press he finds on the black market, it's both the F.B.I and Li's job to prove it's them. Initially Tan gets away and Li gets thrown off the case. So Li and Carter (Chris Tucker) take matters into their own hands when they go back to L.A. They follow the path of the triads and get captured and eventually find themselves in Las Vegas to see how the money that was smuggled in was being used, through a casino, The Red Dragon. Disguised, they make their way inside the casino and try to retrieve the plates used to make the counter fit money. They prevail in a quite dramatized ending and afterwards they take a well deserved break once again. This is a very funny film, where both actors compliment each other quite strangely, to provide a film of comical genius. It beats its predecessor Rush Hour and what is great about this film is that you can watch it again and again and keep laughing. I would recommend this film to anyone.

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                29.11.2003 02:58
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                When ever a Jackie Chan is on TV It's almost a certainty that I will be sitting down to watch it. So having decided to watch a film last night, I decided not to go for my 2 new additions, The Recruit or Shanghi Knights, in favour of Rush Hour 2. I loved first film and most of Chan's other films so really the first time I saw it I had no hesitation in parting with my money. So following on from the original Rush Hour, Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker team up again in the hope of making another decent film. The films always mix action and fight scenes with light-hearted easy going Comedy. So is this film any good? Well there?s only one way to find out. The action starts of pretty quickly as the Triads blow up a large chunk of the American Embassy killing 2 translators. We then switch to Lee (Chan) and Carter (Tucker). Carter is taking a vacation in Hong Kong following Chan?s visit to the States, but the whole time he is there Chan seems to be working. He gets a lead on who was actually behind the bombing and thus ensues some hilarious scenes, One on the side of a building and the other in the massage Parlour. The lead is Ricky Tan (John Lone), a former policeman and now head of the Triads. He was Lee?s fathers partner and was responsible for his death, which makes it even more personal for Lee. So they both head of for a party on Ricky Tan?s boat separately after being split up after the fight in the massage parlour. When they find Ricky Tan who of his own people, Hu Li (Ziyi Zhang), bursts through a door and shoots him. He falls into the water and Lee and Carter chase her but she gets away. So for medalling in a Chinese police operation, Carter is s ent home on the first flight out of Hong Kong. Lee catches him at the airport and explains his reason for hating Ricky Tan and what he actually did and all of a sudden there on the plane on the way back to LA. Where things get even more carried away but I won?t go any further i nto it, don?t want to ruin the film for you, now do I. This film sees Brett Ratner return into the directors chair to follow up the success of Rush Hour with this sequel. Ratner hasn?t really done that much film wise with Red Dragon (Hannibal Series) probably the best film he has made so far. The choice to cast Tucker and Chan for the first film as the leads has proved to be the main drive behinds the films success. The actual feel of the film is a little smoother than the original Rush Hour, as Retner gets the best out of the actors. All scenes are worked well in this film, which adds to the enjoyment, with the fight scenes well choreographed. As for the actors the main two are just brilliant, Tucker has his usual fast paced wit and superb comic timing. While Chan has the straight-faced comedy approach that really helps to develop the friendship side of the film. The interaction between the characters is superb and Tucker seems to be picking up a lot of Martial Arts moves from Chan, which also helps within the film. John Lone is an actor I?m not too familiar with but I have to say he was quite good as the evil plotting genius in this film. The funniest scene of the film has got to be in the karaoke bar towards the start of the film though with Carter getting up on stage performing a Michael Jackson track whilst everyone looks on. Eventually he gets loads of girls out of the audience up on the stage, it really is something that has to be seen. Of course like all Chan films this ends with the bloopers being shown with the end credits, with some of them being funnier than the actual scene in the movie. So Chan now over 50 has made another film to keep people laughing and having just checked on www.imdb.com the third film has entered production with Chan and Tucker resuming the lead rolls and Ratner again taking the Directors chair. A superb film for any day of the week, anyone who hasn?t seen it and likes this sort of mindles s comedy I definitely recommend it.

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                  16.09.2002 03:08
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                  As i seem to do these days is either work or watch TV! I suppose though working for a cable TV firm this is par for the course, as the job overlaps with my favourite pastime - watching films! Yet again boredom struck last night, over 100 channels to watch and nothing at all! God how did we ever survive with only 4 channels all those years ago LOL! So yet again a trip through the onslaught of Sky Box Office and, wahey, something I haven't watched yet (shouts of "Oh my God" from the faithful readers, a film even Paul has not seen!). Yes, it is true. But not any more. Hold on to your hats, cos' Rush Hour 2 is headin' your way (in a way of a review that is!). CAST Jackie Chan - Inspector Lee Chris Tucker - James Carter Ricky Tan - Zang Zhiyi Nobody else is really important......read on! Directed by - Brett Ratner Running time - 1 hour 30 mins Rating - 15 Any for a quick Chinese? From the moment the opening credits have begun, this film swings into action quicker that Tarzan with his nuts on fire trying to find a nearby lagoon! Action, comedy and mayhem are abound for the next 90 mins as Chan and Tucker carry on from where they left off in the original film. You remember, Chan has been assigned to LA to partner up with Tucker. Anyone crying "Lethal Weapon rip-off" would be quite right to do so. This is a buddy/buddy film, no doubt about that readers. So how on earth can it be any good? Well it is........... This time around our fast kicking comedy double act are in Japan. On vacation Tucker has decided to enjoy himself, no crime to fight, just plenty of R & R and boy is he going to make sure he gets it! However this gets unduly spoiled when our veteran ass-kicker Chan gets pulled into a case that even he cant say no to -the chance being to avenge the death of his father, also a previous servant of the Japanese police (nice twist, cheesy, bu t nice all the same!). Tucker however is not convinced, as obviously this will spoil his targeted aim of his vacation, that being to do as little as possible and visit the local Japanese massage parlours! Sounds like my kind of holiday LOL! After two American translators in the US Embassy in Japan are suspiciously murdered, Lee (Chan) is given a lead to follow. However, this lead is in the form of notorious Triad leader Ricky Tan. This poses a problem for Lee, as Tan was his father's police partner and was responsible for his father's death before he left the force (nice twist eh?). Thus giving Lee the moral dilemma of going after his quarry with an objective mind - not! Carter (Tucker) is not going to let all of this spoil his holiday, and so in a vain attempt to get all of this intrusion done with agrees to help his partner in finding Ricky Tan as quickly as possible so he can enjoy the rest of his time off. Something tells me it's not going to be that easy somehow.....hmmmm CHOP SUEY TO GO PLEASE! From the start of the film as I said earlier this is a roller-coaster of a film, and I strongly suggest that you go to the loo before you start to watch this as you really don't want to miss a second of it. The action is fast and extremely furious (whoops, sorry, another film I need to watch!). The opening scene is a letter bomb going off in the US Embassy, so I think you get the idea. The film jumps across time zones from Japan to Las Vegas, as our heroes go in pursuit of Tan. However there is more to be uncovered, as a counterfeit money ring is at the heart of the crimes being commited. We're not talking nickles and dimes here either, more like hundreds of millions of dollars. Something tells me things are gonna hot up along the way, hold on to your seats ladies and gentleman, this is a fast ride waiting to happen..... Any film starring Jackie Chan is always going to include two vital elements - Ma rtial arts mayhem, and a comic mentality. Chan does not relent on either as usual, although he has got to be pushing 50 year old now, if not more. I ain't got a clue how he does it, but he does. The fight scenes are, as is par for a Jackie Chan movie, exceptional, well choreographed, and amazing to watch. If I can move like he does when I turn 50 I will be more than a happy man indeed! It is all testament to the gruelling routine he must go through for all of his films (he does all of his own stunts by the way). He also a great talent for comic timing, an art which blends beautifully with the fast-mouthed Chris Tucker. that guy does not even appear to draw a breath even after a 10 minute monologue! This time around though he has been given a further element to his character, that of martial arts training (of sorts) to put him on more of an even keel with Chan. It's actually very comical watching trying to stay on a par with Chan, making the movie nore enjoyable than the first outing in "Rush Hour". I said earlier that there was no point in mentioning the other characters in this film for the simple reason that they really are bit-part players and nothing more. The whole film surrounds and absorbs itself around Chan and Tucker. Everything else seems to be employed on a part-time basis, with little chance of a full time contract. Can two characters alone make a film worthwhile and enjoyable? Well the answer is a resounding YES. OK, it is very much like "Lethal Weapon" in it's origin, no doubt about that but the formula works, although on a slightly different basis. Out two heroes bounce of each other better than two sumo wrestlers fighting in a bin-bag! And as with most comedy films these days the out-takes whilst the end credits are rolling are absolutely hilarious to say the least. Fast, madcap action, funny, great action scenes and stunts makes Rush Hour 2 an absolute must to watch, even if your not a fan of Jackie Chan. Much better than the first in my humble opinion. A bit expensive to watch on Sky Box Office at £3.50 perhaps, better of renting it out on Video/DVD if you've not seen it yet, but well worth the money. Enjoy! Regards Paul (c) 11-09-2002

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                    26.07.2002 01:18
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                    Comically mismatched for the first time three years ago, Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker pair up again to crack (or possibly demolish) another case and to wreak havoc on each other?s cultures in the action comedy, Rush Hour 2. The teaming of motor-mouthed LA cop, James Carter (Tucker) with Hong Kong detective, Chief Inspector Lee (Chan) in 1998 turned their first movie into a hit. Unwittingly thrown together, these two chalk-and-cheese personalities initially got on each other?s nerves until they combined their very different investigative methods to solve a case. Now the best of friends, Carter and Lee are on vacation and this time Carter is on Lee?s home turf in Hong Kong. When a bomb explodes in the American Embassy killing two men, thoughts of a holiday start to fly out the window. The two dead men, US Customs agents, have been investigating a counterfeit ring that has been shipping out millions of bogus US bills. One of the chief suspects is Ricky Tan (John Lone), the head of a deadly Triad gang. Once a cop himself, Tan?s partner used to be Lee?s father, so there?s a personal link between the inspector and the mobster. As in the first movie, Carter and Lee set out to do their own thing to find Tan and solve the crime while authorities in Hong Kong and the US haggle about who has jurisdiction of the case. Among the two cops? adversaries are Tan?s associates, the deadly and beautiful Hu Li (played by Zhang Zi Yi of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) and billionaire casino owner, Steven Reign (Alan King) as well as a mysterious Secret Service agent, Isabella Molina (Roselyn Sanchez), who may or may not be a double agent. Watch out, too, for some familiar faces in cameo roles. As the story moves from Hong Kong to LA and finally to Las Vegas for a kick-ass climax, the high-kicking action is punctuated by all-out hilarity, especially as the fish-out-of-water Carter attempts to inflict his over the top personality on the startled Hong Kong locals. He?s at his most outrageously strident in a gangland karaoke bar where he belts out a Michael Jackson hit. Genre: Action Director: Brett Ratner Main Cast: Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker, John Lone, Zhang Ziyi, Don Cheadle, Alan King Distributor: New Line Pictures Rated 12

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                      28.06.2002 03:43
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                      Rush Hour 2 is the sequel to the high-powered hilarious Jackie Chan film, with co-star Chris Tucker, that smashed box offices in 1998. It provided that exciting yet light-hearted change of pace that many crave from a movie, and made the original an instant hit. All of the movie's elements are perfectly balanced. There's enough serious situations, peeks at the character's pasts, humor (oh, is there humor), and Jackie Chan movie action in all the right places. Even Chris Tucker joins in on the awesomely choreographed fights that will keep you holding your breath, but not for too long, because you'll have to let it out to laugh. The story isn't The Usual Suspects caliber but it's better than you would expect from an action comedy. The plot twists and turns, and you're always thinking to an extent but are still able to enjoy the movie without getting a headache. Zhang Ziyi (of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon fame) joins the Rush Hour cast and performs some of her marital arts magic in the name of evil. About half of the movie takes place in Lee's (Jackie Chan) native Hong Kong, and rest takes place in Los Angeles, home to Detective Carter (Chris Tucker). There's also a visit to the City of Lights approaching the end as the two become increasingly tangled in a criminal conspiracy involving a deadly triad of Chinese gangsters. Chris Tucker provides the most hilarious performance of his career, though he perhaps used lines about "slappin' you" a few too many times. But it's just as well, you'll hardly notice. It may be odd of me to say, but Chan, aside from his jumps, flips, kicks and other wise, would have pulled the film down were he a better actor. When he chokes out English slang, or questions the usage of Tuckers', your funny side can't help but to be grabbed a hold of. Not too long, not too short, not too action packed, and not too hard too f ollow. You'll leave the theater with a smile on your face. Especially if you stick around for the out-takes.

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                        24.06.2002 07:16
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                        2001 may go down as the year of the moderately-surprising blockbuster. The films that were supposed to dominate the box office generally did well, as flicks such as Planet of the Apes, Jurassic Park III, and Pearl Harbor all earned grosses that neared the $200 million mark. However, those movies showed no legs; they grabbed boohoogles of bucks right out of the gate and then faded quickly. On the other hand, a few films did better than expected. Flicks like The Mummy Returns and Shrek were supposed to earn decent returns, but they surpassed the anticipated grosses and earned well past $200 million. Also in this category was Rush Hour 2. The sequel to the 1998 surprise hit, the sequel took in scads of money; In November 2001, RH2 has earned $224 million, which currently plops it in second place for the year, between top-grosser Shrek and third-place hit The Mummy Returns. So far, those three are the only 2001 films to pass the $200 million plateau, though I doubt they?ll be the last. Personally, I thought the first movie was mildly entertaining but never really understood its success. I was open to the possibility that the sequel would be a more interesting affair. All the participants have more success under their belts, so it seemed feasible that the result would be a more self-confident and compelling piece. Unfortunately, that wasn?t the case, as RH2 was little more than a generic rehash of the first movie, and it offered little entertainment, In Rush Hour, Hong Kong Detective Lee (Jackie Chan) came to Los Angeles to solve a kidnapping case. There he was paired with loudmouth cop James Carter (Chris Tucker) to keep both out of the hair of the allegedly more competent investigators. Of course, they saved the day, and after a rocky start, they became friends. At the end of the first film, we see Carter and Lee as they head toward Hong Kong for Carter?s vacation, and the sequel seems to pick up immediately where the original c oncluded. Much to Carter?s annoyance, Lee continues to take on cases instead of having fun, and eventually he works on an investigation that relates to a bombing at the US Embassy in Hong Kong. Due to the American connection, Carter grudgingly goes along with this, and they largely pursue Ricky Tan (John Lone), the former police officer partner of Lee?s dead father who seems to have taken a turn for the criminal. In addition to Tan, we meet a mystery woman named Hu Li (Zhang Ziyi) who uses different disguises and has a nasty habit of blowing up various locations. Anyway, Lee and Carter blunder through their investigation, an endeavor complicated by Carter?s aggressive style and loud mouth. Eventually they find enough facts to get somewhere, though, and this leads them back to Los Angeles to chase after mega-tycoon Steven Reign (Alan King) and some missing ?Superbill? plates that will allow the possessor to produce almost perfect counterfeit US money. They plod through more detective work there as they get involved with an apparent government agent named Isabella (Roselyn Sanchez). The pair aren?t quite sure on which side her loyalty resides, however. Eventually Carter and Lee wind up in Las Vegas. That?s where all of the loose ends come together and we get our requisite slam-bang finale. All of this was presented in a fairly aggressive manner as Rush Hour 2 offered a nearly non-stop assault of action and alleged comedy. As I already noted, I wasn?t terribly amused by the efforts of the original film, and the new one didn?t do much to expand its horizons. Many of the same gags were repeated here, and the ?fresh? jokes seemed sophomoric at best. The emphasis remained on wacky culture clash ideas, such as when Lee tells Carter that some baddies will cut off their ?egg rolls?. The story seemed convoluted and nearly nonsensical at times, though I will admit it came together in a fairly satisfactory manner by the end. Not that it really matt ered, for RH2 was all about Jackie and Chris and their gags. I?ve never much cared for Chan, and he did nothing here to change my mind. He?s starting to look old and a little tired, and it seemed odd that Lone played the former partner of Lee?s father; to me, that should mean that Tan and Lee the senior should be fairly equivalent in age, but Lone?s only a couple of years older than Chan, and he actually appeared younger to me. Chan?s fans will undoubtedly continue to enjoy his work, but he really didn?t seem very invested in the process to me. As for Tucker, I?ve liked some of his performances, with my favorite being his infamous work in The Fifth Element. Perhaps the ultimate ?love it or hate it? piece of acting, many people absolutely loathed his turn as Ruby Rhod, but I thought - and still feel - Tucker was hilarious. Unfortunately, his work in both Rush Hour flicks just points out how badly he steals from Eddie Murphy. The similarities appeared frequently, and Tucker often came across as a poor imitator. At times Tucker still managed to be funny; a casino rant was a serious rip-off of the scene in Beverly Hills Cop where Murphy tried to check in to the hotel, but Tucker made it seem mildly amusing. Otherwise, much of Tucker?s material simply felt like recycled Murphy. Director Brett Ratner also stole baldly from many other flicks. A chase scene at the end blatantly took from Indiana Jones and the Temple of Doom, for example, and many additional examples will be noted throughout the film. As I relate when I discuss his audio commentary, Ratner happily acknowledges his theft, but that doesn?t make the segments seem any less stale. Clearly the movie-going public really likes the combination of Tucker and Chan, but I honestly don?t get it. I felt the two displayed very little chemistry together, and it often seemed like they were acting in different movies. They didn?t connect well and they came across as if they had totally different agendas. I thought this would be less of a concern for the sequel, but if anything, the pair appeared more disjointed than ever. On the positive side, I will say that Rush Hour 2 was a painless enterprise to watch. No, it didn?t do much for me, but it seemed pleasant enough to see, and I didn?t mind the experience. The action sequences weren?t terrific, but they came across as reasonably creative and involving most of the time. Some of the supporting actors were fairly good. Ziyi added a nice Bond girl flair to the crazed assassin role, and Sanchez provided sexy style if nothing else. RH2 also included some interesting cameos from actors who?ve worked elsewhere with Ratner. I won?t spoil them, but at least one of them surprised me so much that I didn?t even believe it was the actor in question; I thought it was a guy who just happened to look and sound a lot like this performer. (Yes, I admit I?m an idiot.) As with the first film - and pretty much all of Chan?s flicks, I believe - RH2 provided outtakes during the end credits. If you?ve read many of my reviews, you?ll know I generally dislike these. They usually show the actors flubbing lines and giggling, and they get old very quickly. However, some of the clips for RH2 were darned funny. While one in particular - in which Tucker simply cannot remember and/or say the phrase ?gefilte fish? - was hilarious, and some of the others were very good as well. I?d hazard to say that the outtakes were more entertaining and amusing than the movie itself. Not that such a comment puts me out on a limb. At best, Rush Hour 2 offered a little fun and some reasonably solid action sequences. However, as a whole it seemed long on the same old stuff and short on inspiration. The original Rush Hour felt like little more than warmed-over clichés, so it came as no surprise that the sequel was even farther removed from creativity. Lots of people clearly liked Rush Hour 2, and more power t o them, but it did very little for me. The DVD: Rush Hour 2 appears in an aspect ratio of approximately 2.35:1 on this single-sided, dual-layered DVD; the image has been enhanced for 16X9 televisions. Though not without some minor flaws, the picture generally looked quite good. Sharpness consistently appeared accurate and distinct. A few wider shots came across as slightly soft, but these occasions were rare. As a whole, the image remained crisp and detailed. I saw no signs of moiré effects or jagged edges, but some light edge enhancement seemed to crop up at times. Print flaws appeared to be totally absent, as I witnessed no signs of speckles, grit, scratches, blotches, or other concerns. However, I did notice some mild artifacts at times, and those occasionally gave the picture a slightly grainy look. Colors appeared absolutely terrific throughout RH2. Considering that Hong Kong and Las Vegas - two of our three locations - offer copious amounts of bright neon, the film popped with vivid and distinctive hues. In addition to all those lights, clothes and other elements added very vibrant and attractive colors, and they always looked very clear and bold. Black levels seemed to be deep and rich, while shadow detail appeared appropriately dense but not excessively thick. Essentially, were it not for some artifacts and edge enhancement, this would be a stellar transfer. As it stood, Rush Hour 2 still earned a well-deserved ?B+?. Also solid were the soundtracks of Rush Hour 2. The DVD provided both Dolby Digital EX 5.1 and DTS ES 6.1 mixes. To my ears at least, I thought the two sounded virtually identical. If any differences occurred, I didn?t notice them, as both mixes offered reasonably strong auditory experiences. However, I should note that the soundfield seemed a bit more restrained than I expected. Though RH2 was an action-comedy, the sound designers appeared to take their cues mostly from the standard ?comedy? soundtrack, as much of the movie?s audio remained focused in the front spectrum. From the forward area I heard a nice little atmosphere during the entire movie, as the front speakers offered good general ambience. Lots of little elements popped up from the sides, and the score also provided very solid stereo imaging. Sounds blended together neatly and they moved across the spectrum cleanly. As for the surrounds, they reinforced the music particularly well, as lots of Lalo Schifrin?s score emanated from the rear speakers. Effects information tended to fall into the category of general support for the most part, though some of the louder scenes came to life fairly nicely. Explosions spread most effectively across all five channels, and some other aspects perked up the surround speakers. However, the track stayed moderately oriented toward the front. Audio quality consistently sounded strong. Dialogue was natural and warm, as I detected no signs of edginess or problems related to intelligibility. Effects came across as accurate and distinct, and they showed good dynamics. Again, explosions worked best of all, as they demonstrated fine depth and impact, but other elements also seemed clean and vivid. The score also provided some solid sound. The music was reproduced with good clarity and fidelity, and it offered positive bass and bright highs. Ultimately, the soundfield seemed a little restrained for this kind of flick, but the audio of Rush Hour 2 still was good enough to merit a ?B+?. Rush Hour 2 appears as the fourth official entry in New Line?s ?infinifilm? line. Thirteen Days stood as the first release, and both Blow and 15 Minutes also fell under that heading. (Little Nicky included the infinifilm format as well, but it was not officially slated as part of the line.) The upcoming segment of the review will discuss the basics of the infinifilm format. If you already feel acquainted with it - or just don?t care to re ad my ramblings about it - skip ahead to the point where you see some underlined text; that will note the start of my discussion of the supplements found on RH2. According to the insert that comes with the DVD: An infinifilm DVD is a unique, one-of-a-kind viewer-directed experience. You?re in control of what you watch and when you view it! Since the infinifilm DVDs disable some normal functions and only intermittently allow others, that statement seems ironic. It also makes little sense; when have I not been able to choose when and what I?d watch on a DVD? As far as I recall, none of my other discs came with a little man who put a gun to my head and forced me to check out certain segments. Nonetheless, the ?infinifilm? does offer a somewhat different form of presentation. From that same booklet blurb, here?s how the studio describes it: The movie can also be experienced with the infinifilm option enabled, allowing you to access content specifically relating to the scenes via pop-up prompts that appear. Explore. Escape. Interact. Take your movie-watching experience to a whole new level. Go Beyond the Movie and discover the fascinating facts and intriguing stories surrounding your favorite films! Afterwards, you are returned to the movie right where you left off. Once we get past the marketing hyperbole, what does all of this mean? In essence, the infinifilm feature functions along the same line as other ?interactive? features that crop up during a movie. Other discs like the special edition of Dogma, Me, Myself and Irene and Dinosaur used similar functions: when an icon appears onscreen, you press a button and get to watch something that relates to that part of the movie. In the case of the infinifilm titles, this function becomes more extensive. The icon appears more frequently, since it pops up once per infinifilm chapter stop. While the non-infinifilm version offers 16 chapters, the infinifilm ed ition provides a whopping 39 stops, and different options appear with each one of those. How useful is all of this? Moderately, I suppose, but it depends on your tolerance for interruptions. All of the materials accessible during the infinifilm edition can also be found in the standard roster of supplements; there doesn?t appear to be anything exclusive to the infinifilm feature. The advantage to accessing these via the infinifilm function stems from the fact that they?ll relate specifically to that section of the movie. It?s a cool way to make the movie more informative and immediate. However, it could also be a distraction. It?s hard to get involved in a movie when you leave it every couple of minutes to see something else. Ultimately, however, I think the infinifilm concept is a good one. I can?t say that I?d want to use it while I watched a movie, for I think it?d disrupt the film too much. Nonetheless, I always support additional options, and since I?m not forced to use the feature - and since it makes none of the DVD?s extras exclusive to infinifilm, which would really irritate me - I?m more than happy to see this kind of feature. One oddity: while the DVD offers menus for both the normal ?Select a Scene? and the ?infinifilm Select a Scene?, the latter features the same 16 chapter stops. While it?s nice that the disc broke down the sections in a more detailed manner, it makes no sense that 23 of the infinifilm chapters fail to appear. One annoyance: while the infinifilm process is supposed to make DVDs even more interactive and user-friendly than ever, New Line omitted subtitles on Rush Hour 2. For one, the movie includes no subtitles of any sort. Yes, it offered closed-captioning, but all DVDs really should have at least English subtitles available. Rush Hour 2 introduces a few other stylistic innovations typical for the infinifilm line, all of which are intended to make the DVD experience more comfortable fo r folks new to the format. Strewn throughout the disc you?ll find little ??? icons. Click on any of these and you?ll learn about the feature at hand. For example, if you enter the ?Filmmaker Commentary? area, you?ll discover a little blurb that tells you about audio commentaries. There?s also a main ?Need Help?? menu on the front page. Yes, a lot of this information is very basic, and veteran DVD fans won?t need it. However, we were all newbies once, and this kind of gentle introduction will be welcome for those who aren?t so familiar with the format. The special features split into two different areas: Beyond the Movie and All Access Pass. Under the Beyond the Movie category we found six different short video programs. ?Jackie Chan?s Hong Kong Introduction? essentially acted as a promo piece for the city. As we watched shots of Hong Kong - provided by the town?s tourist board - Chan told us how terrific the place is. During the 118-second clip, we learned that we must visit Hong Kong, and when we do, we?ll return repeatedly. Next we got Culture Clash: West Meets East, a four-minute and 50-second piece that looked at the issues related to filming in Hong Kong. It mixed lots of shots from the set with interview snippets from director Brett Ratner, executive producer Andrew Z. Davis, producer Jay Stern, and actors Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker, and Roselyn Sanchez. Overall, the piece included some fluffy comments, as the participants made generic remarks about the challenges and pleasures of working in Hong Kong; I liked the information about complaints from the crew, but most of the rest of the material seemed somewhat bland. On the other hand, the behind the scenes shots were excellent, as we saw lots of raw footage. This made the program entertaining and useful despite the mediocre comments. Language Barrier ran for four minutes and 17 seconds and greatly resembled the prior piece. It offered more excellent behind the scenes material alon g with interview bits from Ratner, Sanchez, Chan, Tucker, editor Mark Helfrich, and second unit director/stunt coordinator Conrad Palmisano. Again, the comments remained a bit light, though they added some decent information about the challenges of dealing with language differences and how Ratner dealt with the actors. The footage from the set made it more compelling, and it was a generally interesting piece. During Attaining International Stardom, we found a seven-minute program that essentially told us how great Jackie Chan is. It mixed shots from the set and interviews with Ratner, producer Arthur Sarkissian, Chan, executive producer Davis, Stern, Tucker, and actor Zhang Ziyi. We also saw clips from both Rush Hour movies. While the behind the scenes material was decent, it wasn?t as good as seen during the prior pieces. The comments were exceedingly superficial, as they told us little more than how amazing Chan is and how much fun the set was. Kung Fu Choreography presented a bit more depth. The piece ran nine minutes and 28 seconds as it mixed the standard behind the scenes footage and interviews with Ratner, Helfrich, Chan, Sanchez, Stern, and Palmisano. Much of the focus still stuck with how terrific Chan is and how great a piece of work the movie was, but we found some decent notes about the creation of the fight scenes, and the behind the scenes shots added a nice layer of depth to the package. A very different piece, Lady Luck showed a short student film Ratner shot while at New York University film school. The two minute and 35 second piece provided a black and white silent mini-thriller, and Ratner added commentary on top of this. The movie seemed mildly interesting but not great, while Ratner contributed some good remarks about his early work. It merits interest as a curiosity. The Beyond the Movie area finished with a Fact Track. This text commentary used the subtitle area as it provided small factoids that appea red throughout the movie. While it offered some information about the movie and the participants, it usually gave us comments that fell into background territory. For example, we learned about the Triads, and also got facts about Hong Kong, Las Vegas, and a bunch of other small aspects of the film such as Michael Jackson?s career. A few mistakes occur along the way; the track can?t decide if Tucker stands 6-1 or 5-11. However, for the most part this seemed like an interesting and useful little addition that fleshed out some parts of the movie?s background. Next we moved to the All Access Pass domain, which started with an audio commentary from director Brett Ratner and writer Jeff Nathanson. Both men were recorded together for this running, screen-specific piece. Overall, I found this to be a very interesting and useful little track. Not surprisingly, Ratner dominated the piece, and he provided a lot of solid information. He?s matured a lot since his commentary for the first Rush Hour movie, and he seemed less concerned with second-guessing the audience; in that track, he often appeared strongly influenced by his perceptions of the fans? desires. He showed much less of that tendency here, as he indicated more what he thought was best. Ratner also avoided the pseudo-intellectual trappings that mildly marred his commentary for The Family Man; not once did he use the word ?organic? during RH2, which felt like a minor miracle after the Family Man piece. Nathanson added a fair amount of nice data as well, though he mainly pointed out the ways the film varied from his original script. The two maintained a reasonably honest and frank attitude throughout the commentary. Though the track definitely featured a fair amount of praise, it didn?t get buried in those elements, and they included moderate amounts of criticism. I also liked the fact that Ratner happily acknowledged all of his influences. As I noted in the body of my movie review, RH2 st ole from many flicks, and Ratner openly relates all of these. He may not be a great filmmaker, but at least he?s honest, and I rather enjoyed this audio commentary. After that we returned to additional video pieces. Making Magic Out of Mire lasted eight minutes and 53 seconds as it looked at Ratner?s directorial style. We found more fine behind the scenes footage as well as interviews with Ratner, Stern, Tucker, Helfrich, Sanchez, Palmisano, and composer Lalo Schifrin. Although the comments largely told us how wonderful Ratner is, the material from the set added some very good stuff. Most compelling was the clip in which Ratner badgered Tucker to refer to Ziyi?s character as a bitch, but the rest of the images were also very interesting. Evolution of a Scene splits into three different segments: ?Chicken Chop? (5:01), ?The Bomb? (9:20), and ?Slide For Life? (5:47). These were some of the best aspects of the DVD, as they provided closer looks at the creation of these scenes. While a fair amount of narration discussed the snippets, the behind the scenes shots were the focus, and they provided excellent material. We saw the location scout for ?Chicken?, storyboards for ?Slide?, outtakes and working through the content for ?Bomb? as well as a lot of other interesting shots. Overall, I really enjoyed the ?Evolution? segments and thought they were very valuable. Another short video program, Fashion of Rush Hour 2 ran three minutes and 50 seconds as it gave us a brief look at the outfits worn in the film. This piece combined some images of the clothes and accessories along with a particular focus on the flamboyant character played by one of the movie?s cameo actors. We saw fun outtakes from his work as well as the period in which he ?got into character?. The segment was short but pretty entertaining. A Visual Effects Deconstruction begins with a 28-second ?Introduction By Visual Effects Supervisor Kevin Lingenfelser? that sets up t he embassy explosion scene, the sequence about which we?ll soon learn more. From there, you can examine that 12-second segment via four different angles: ?Backplate?, ?Miniature - with Window Treatment?, ?Miniature - Fixed Perspective?, and ?Final?. If you let the program run, it?ll display each in succession, or you can flip between them with the ?angle? button on your remote. While I barely saw a difference between angles two and three, this was still a good little look at some effects work. Deleted Scenes/Outtakes adds nine of the former plus five minutes and five seconds of the latter. The deleted scenes run between 20 seconds and 87 seconds for a total of seven and a half minutes of unused segments. If you choose the helpful ?Play All? option, the ?Outtakes? will appear after the final deleted scene. None of the nine deleted scenes seemed terrific, but a few were fairly interesting. The second one showed Phillip Baker Hall as he reprised his role from the first film, which made this the most compelling of the bunch. I thought the ninth clip - in which Tucker interacted with Alan King - came across as another Beverly Hills Cop - outtake, while the fourth one provided Tucker?s take on a Jamaican accent; don?t look for Chris to win Oscars for roles in different nationalities, for his Jamaican lilt sounded more British to me. As for the ?Outtakes?, they were fairly fun, but I could see why they didn?t make the end credits. Many of them echoed the same kinds of goof-ups seen during that reel, so while they?re entertaining, they?re somewhat redundant. All of the ?Deleted Scenes? can be viewed with or without commentary from Ratner. As always, he provided useful notes about the clips. He succinctly told us why he excised the segments, and he even related his displeasure with some of them. Lastly, the Theatrical Trailers area adds two teasers plus the standard theatrical trailer. All three offer Dolby Digital 5.1 sound . ?Cast and Crew? includes entries for director Ratner as well as actors Jackie Chan, Chris Tucker, Roselyn Sanchez, Harris Yulin, Alan King and Zhang Ziyi. Unlike the fairly detailed biographies found on the DVD for the first Rush Hour, these offer little more than filmographies. However, they do add information on the Chinese year in which each person was born, so we find some notes on the ?significance? of birth in the Year of the Rabbit, the Year of the Horse, and so on. This doesn?t substitute for real biographical data, but it?s a fun touch nonetheless. Note that none of the extras provide subtitles, but except for ?Lady Luck?, they do have English closed-captioning. In addition, all of them are enhanced for 16X9 televisions, which means that the 1.33:1 ?Lady Luck? is actually windowboxed. In addition to all of this, Rush Hour 2 adds some DVD-ROM materials. ?Script to Screen? lets you read the original script while you watch the movie; the video runs in a small screen on the left as the text displays on the right half of the screen. On other DVDs, the ?Hot Spot? sent you to a New Line site that apparently offers revolving pieces of information and activities. When I checked it out for other discs like Dungeons and Dragons, it went to a trivia game that asked questions about a variety of New Line films. However, as I write more than a month before RH2 hits stores, the link doesn?t work; hopefully it?ll become active when the DVD officially arrives. We also find a link to the official infinifilm Website. Crowds ate up Rush Hour 2 and made it the year?s second highest-grossing film to date. Frankly, I don?t get it, as I thought the movie was mildly entertaining but it offered little more than some tired culture clash gags and a few good stunts. At best the film was decent but unspectacular. As for the DVD, it?s another fine piece of work from New Line. Both picture and sound are quite good, and the disc packs a slew of extras. Some of these seem fairly superficial, but cumulatively they present a very solid look at the movie and appear fun and entertaining. My lack of enthusiasm about Rush Hour 2 as a film means I can?t offer much of a recommendation for it, but fans of the flick should definitely be very pleased with the DVD. Others might want to rent it if they think the stars or subject interest them.

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                          03.05.2002 06:37
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                          I thought that Rush Hour 1 would be hard to beat as usually the follow ups aren't as good. This is an exception and I think Jackie Chan has a wonderful screan prescence and the stark contrast of him and Chris Tucker work well together. Although Chan is brilliant at his comedy we must not get away from the fact that he is a spectacular martial arts professional. He does all his own stunts in this film and there are some brilliant outtakes on this disc that prove that he does really do the stunts himself. He has been making martial arts movies for years and needed something spectacular to break him in to the American movie scene. Ruch Hour 1 and 2 do just that. This time the film is set in Hong Kong as opposed to Rush Hour 1 which was set in America. Breifly, Carter (alias Tucker) should be on vacation, only things don't go to plan and he ends up on the trail of a money smuggling ring. The fight scenes are really good and they are set in various different locations. One is in a casino with some really spectaular effects and another is set in a massage parlour. This scene took over 4 days to shoot, with a couple of hundred takes and 2 and a half hours of action. I think the final fight sequence was only on film for 2 minutes! You can really appeciate the time and effort put in to get the best possible results. There is a lot of humour in the film so it suits all tastes. It has an age limit of 12 but my daughter (who shall remain ageless)absolutley loves this film. Again I think that it should be watched by adults first to decide if you find it suitable for your children. It is definately one for the teenagers and adults and is one of those films that you will find yourself talking about. I don't think you would buy this film and then not watch it again as it is just too funny and action packed for that. Get it out once every couple of months and lift your spirits when you have had a bad day at work. ///////////////////////////////////////////// EXTRA'S There are over 85 minutes of extra's WOW! 1)Jackie Chan's Hong Kong Introduction: explore the dilghts of Hong Kong 2)Culture Clash/West meets East 3)Language Barrier 4)Attaining International Stardom 5)Kung Fu Choreography: detailing the various fight scenes and how Chan manages to put them all together 6)Lady Luck 7)Commentary 8)Brett Ratner Production Docmentary 9)Evolution Of A Scene 10)Fashion Of Rush Hour 11)Deleted Scenes/Outtakes 12)Visual Effects 13)Deconstruction 14)Trailers 14)Filmographies I would be here all day going through all these features in detail but I have to say that I was immpressd. I am not normally one for exploring extra's and simply watch the film. There are some intersting facts to be learned by watching these and a closer insight in to the man himself, Jackie Chan. All in all a well out together an action packed film. This retails for around £17 but is well worth it.

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                            17.04.2002 03:58
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                            Wow! I was going to see this on the cinema but i didn't get the chance so i had to wait for it to come to video. As soon as it came out i got it and i have watched it so many times. I wouldn't say it was better than the first one, it was different. It starts in China. Carter has been there 3 days and all he has done is help Lee with his cases. Lee keeps taking him to different places and lying about why they are there. Chris Tucker is even funnier in this one than the first. When Carter finds out the reason why Lee is after a certain person involved with the triads he helps him out voluntarily, they go back to LA and the real fun begins. Full of all the usual kung-fu that everyone loves from Jackie Chan and even a bit from Chris Tucker this film is a must see for everyone. A lot of the one-liners from the first film have been used again to great affect. As in the first film no one wants them to help out with the case and try to keep them off the scent. Instead they just keep getting closer to solving the case and finally they do with a little help from 'a crooked customs agent'. At the end there are some great out-takes, probably some of his best yet, it is worth watching the film just for them.

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                              27.03.2002 00:58
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                              An amazing a sequal to the stunning 'Rush Hour'. Jackie Chan and Chris Tucker produce hilarious scenes, great acting and jaw-dropping martial arts. If you enjoyed 'Rush Hour' then you need to see this film. This has every thing a film needs and the enjoyment and laughter is endless. At the cinema it was incredible and on DVD it is just as good and worth buying as the special features add to the experience. This movie was a U.S. box office smash, and there is nothing which makes it seem otherwise. I love my DVD collection and this gem added to the pile. Over 85 minutes of extras added to the film to make it worth every penny. There are also 2 easter eggs on the disc. On the scene selection there are two pictures of red dragons. If you click on these, there are two different 5mins long trailers of 'Lord of the rings'. If you don' think martial arts, action, humour, or anything else is quite your cup of tea, then this film will completely change your oppinion!

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                            • Product Details

                              Rush Hour 2 retains the appeal of its popular predecessor, so fans will enjoy the antics of the returning stars, Chris Tucker and Jackie Chan. The action--and there's plenty of it--starts in Hong Kong, where Detective Lee (Chan) and his LA counterpart Detective Carter (Tucker) are attempting a vacation, only to get assigned to sleuth a counterfeiting scheme involving a Triad kingpin (John Lone), his lethal henchwoman (Zhang Ziyi, from Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon) and an American billionaire (Alan King). Director Brett Ratner simply lets his stars strut their stuff, so it hardly matters that the plot is disposable, or that his direction is so bland he may well have directed the film from a phone in a Jacuzzi. At its best, Rush Hour 2 compares favourably to Chan's glossiest Hong Kong hits, and when the action moves to Las Vegas (where Don Cheadle makes an unbilled cameo), the film goes into high-pitched hyper-drive, riding an easy wave of ambitious stunt-work and broad, derivative humour. However, echoes of Beverly Hills Cop are easy to see and stale ideas (including a comedic highlight for Jeremy Piven as a gay clothier) are made even more aggravating by dialogue that's almost Neanderthal in its embrace of retro-racial stereotypes. Of course, that's what makes Rush Hour 2 a palatable dish of mainstream comedy: it insults and comforts the viewer at the same time, and while some may find Tucker's relentless hamming unbearable, those who enjoyed Rush Hour are sure to appreciate another dose of Chan-Tucker lunacy. --Jeff Shannon, Amazon.com