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Sorted (DVD)

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2 Reviews

Genre: Crime & Thriller - Thriller / Theatrical Release: 2000 / Director: Alexander Jovy / Actors: Jason Donovan, Tim Curry ... / DVD released 28 July, 2003 at Prism Leisure / Features of the DVD: PAL

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    2 Reviews
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      27.06.2006 19:33

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      Probably Tim Curry's worst film!

      A story about London drugs culture and how it led to the premature death of a young man. His brother, from Scunthorpe comes to London to collect his deceased brother's belongings and gets himself involved in some trouble.
      I believe the storyline is farfetched, as there is no reason for the brother to even want to find out any more about his brother's life. It just... happens. The story pretty much goes too quickly, aspects are too convenient and the story is quite depressing. Not wanting to ruin it for any potential viewers, a brief lowdown of the film would be that it has lots of drug references, few secenes of a sexual nature and some club music.
      Look out for Jason Donovan as the camp transvestite! He plays a good character - quite likeable in fact, but perhaps a little creepy at first!
      Tim Curry plays the 'drug baron' and comes out with a load of gibberish really, which is quite unnecessary and I could barely understand what his point was most of the time.
      Although it may have a slightly disappointing storyline, I actually enjoyed it, I liked some of the music tracks and found a few scenes amusing and a few very emotional - which is pretty good.
      An average film.

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      11.09.2001 16:59
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      The advertising blurb for this film claims that it has sex, drugs and garage music by the bucketload, and that is a searing look into the dark recesses of the London club scene. Quite a claim, and one that it fails miserably to live up to. It did start quite well, but tails off so badly by the end that we were sitting talking about anything to take our minds off the film, only pausing to laugh at another preposterous plot ‘twist’, or marvel at the wooden acting. That sounds pretty harsh, but the only actor to escape from this cinematic turkey with any sort of credit is Jason Donovan. He plays Martin, a Customs official at Heathrow, who by night is transformed into a drug-snorting transvestite DJ, yet still manages to be a sympathetic character with some genuinely funny moments. The plot seems a fairly simple one at the outset – Carl (Matthew Rhys) is in London, sent south from Scunthorpe by his mother to investigate the mysterious death of his brother Justin (a cameo role for Tim Vincent of Blue Peter fame). It appears that Justin fell to his death, drowning in the Thames with a not insignificant level of intoxicants in his body. However, all is not as it seems, and after he meets up with Justin’s girlfriend Sunny, a friendship develops and as they investigate the circumstances of the mysterious death, it becomes clear that Justin was mixed up in a lot of things that his family and girlfriend knew nothing about. There are some good scenes and some decent music set in the clubs the Carl frequents on his search the truth, and there are some eye-opening scenes depicting the scale of drug use in the clubs, but that was never going to be enough to rescue this film. I did feel somehow sorry for Tim Curry, as he must have been struggling not to laugh at some of the lines that were put into his character’s mouth – then again, he opted to play the role of Damian Kemp, club owner and drug baron, so perhaps my sympathy sh
      ould be limited. Kemp is ridiculously overplayed – he lives in a north London mansion, carries a silver-topped cane everywhere, and runs a drug processing and selling network in his clubs, whilst spouting Shakespearean couplets at every opportunity. Completely implausible, and not very threatening at all. After Carl is introduced to Kemp, any tension that had built up at the start of the film is swiftly eroded – what could have been quite a taut thriller instead becomes little more than sequence of events that really don’t hold your attention very much. There is a little sub-plot involving Tiffany, a close friend of Justin who is also involved with Damian Kemp in quite a sordid way, but in the end she comes across as little more than the obligatory ‘tart with a heart of gold’. As if that wasn’t bad enough, the big showdown with the bad guys is predictable, and the final scene of the film is so mawkish as to be almost unwatchable. This could have been good, but there is so much missing – and the disappointing thing is that it starts quite well, only to fall away spectacularly at the end. It seems like another attempt to cash in on the British film phenomenon that swept the movie world a couple of years back, and it is as if people think that simply slapping a label saying ‘British drugs/crime/gangster film’ on the box will somehow produce a decent film. Not so – that requires effort, plotting, and credible characterisation. This film has none of that. Avoid.

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    • Product Details

      Featuring an outstanding cast of rapidly rising talent, Sorted is a hallucinogenic cocktail of thriller and insider's eye view of the London club scene. Debut director Alexander Jovy has promoted raves and is a qualified lawyer, so it's unsurprising his club scenes, filmed on real nights at the Ministry of Sound and other clubs, are completely authentic. The story has young lawyer Carl, Matthew Rhys, coming from Yorkshire to investigate the death of his high-flying (in every sense) brother. Jovy portrays the gulf between Carl's world in his relationship with classy, conventional Sunny (Sienna--Take a Girl Like You--Guillory), and the hedonistic fantasyland of the club scene represented by fallen Pre-Raphaelite angel Tiffany (Fay--Eyes Wide Shut--Masterson). Straddling the two worlds is a remarkable Jason Donovan as Martin, customs officer by day, glam transvestite by night. Unfortunately atmospheric drama soon gives way to lightweight thriller conventions while Tim Curry's camp villain (surely a parody of DeNiro's Louis Cypher from Angel Heart), creates expectations of a much darker conclusion. Sorted is ultimately old-fashioned, romantic and soft-centred where it needs far more edge, but is nevertheless so luxuriantly stylish it may mark Jovy as his generation's answer to Ridley Scott. A word of warning: several scenes feature very powerful stroboscopic lighting effects. --Gary S. Dalkin On the DVD: The expansive, beautiful colour-saturated cinematography is well captured by the 2.35:1 anamorphic transfer and the Dolby Digital 5.1 sound mix is stunning. There are 10 text profiles of cast and crew, together with seven video interviews comprising over 45 minutes of footage. Also provided is a 26-page electronic press kit, the original trailer and 10 minutes of deleted scenes, with optional director's commentary. The featurette is actually a montage of behind-the-scenes shots edited to the movie's haunting love theme, while the outtakes edit assorted gaffs to the main dance anthem. The alternately informative and trivial director's commentary also features producer Mark Crowdy; together they make good company. --Gary S. Dalkin