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The Children (DVD)

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Genre: Horror / Suitable for 18 years and over / Actors: Rachel Shelley, Eva Birthistle ... / DVD released 2009-03-30 at Contender Home Entertainment / Features of the DVD: PAL

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    8 Reviews
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      14.11.2011 18:44
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      This British horror rises above the average

      This is a movie I had been vaguely meaning to watch for a while, but I was somewhat put off by the creepy doll image on the DVD cover art (dolls are scary!). I started watching fully prepared for it to be the hokiest of cheesy horror, and I was pleasantly surprised.

      The film starts in typically cheery style; two sisters, their husbands and children are meeting at a remote country house for a Christmas weekend. The only bleak spots in their unadulterated joy are a) the sulkiness of Casey, the teenage daughter (come on now, you don't have to be a teenager to see a weekend of "bourgeois parents with their children" as hell, do you?) and b) the fact that one child is "coming down with something."

      Family dynamics begin to show themselves as we see the perfect sister (Chloe, played by Rachel Shelley) able to bribe her children with gold stars, while Elaine (Eva Birthistle) struggles with her kids, especially Casey ("the abortion that got away," as she describes herself.) Jeremy Sheffield makes an appearance as the husband who would be perfect if he didn't seem to be taking part in some low-key flirtation with his teenage niece, while Elaine's husband Jonah (Stephen Campbell Moore) doesn't really fit in with the middle class values on display, and has to be reminded "We don't hit children here!"

      As you know, this snowy idyll is not to last, and the (apparently highly infectious) illness makes children appear shadowy eyed and pale. Scary, huh?

      For about the first half hour, I was somewhat scornful of the film. Sinister children are such a cliché, aren't they? And while Village of the damned is a kitsch classic (only the original - the remake was beyond redemption) it was never a particularly great movie. Damien, Esther from Orphan....not to mention Little Lord Fauntleroy; fans of horror movies will know that certain kiddy themes are shorthand for creepiness - children singing nursery rhymes, for instance, or the sound of a carousel, or a blank eyed doll - all are used often as clues to imminent death.

      This movie may not be the most original premise, but it is refreshingly done. For instance, rather than just being incredibly stupid and doing things no human being would ever do, the characters react much as you would expect them to. Accidents do happen - and children who seem as traumatised as anyone are hardly likely to be suspects. When the truth does begin to dawn, it is met with shock and disbelief, and a mother's instinct to protect her own children will always win against a half baked theory about children being "ill."

      This movie plays it too straight to be satire, but there is a delicious sense of irony in the fact that nobody is paying any attention to the cosseted children, so their first forays into weirdness are ignored, while parents brightly suggest going out to play, with the bribe of gold stars. (I had to wonder "who actually talks to their kids like this?")

      The editing is razor sharp and makes the difference between an average schlock horror and a slick production worthy of Hollywood. The film as a whole is, in fact, superior to much of what pops out of the sausage machine of LA.

      There are elements borrowed from the wonderfully spooky kiddy film "The other," (not to be confused with the also quite good Nicole Kidman film "The others") particularly in the way the violent scenes are put together and the apparent mental workings behind them. (If you haven't seen this one, check it out. It is eerie and will creep you out for some time after your first viewing.)

      The rather brilliant thing about this film is that, well, children are little monsters anyway. Even without being totally psychopathic, they seem to spend a lot of time shrieking and being annoying. How often do parents refer to them as little horrors? Yet it seems like the most natural thing in the world to protect them - and the last thing you'd ever do is suspect them of a crime.

      On the negative side, I thought there was a slightly exploitative element to Casey (Hannah Tointon) spending most of the film in stockings, but hey, teenage girls do dress like that.

      It was nice to watch a film in which there is an element of ambiguity - the last frame in particular will have you questioning what will happen next. And these days, when two hours is standard and films often appear at a bloated 150 minutes, it was a novelty to watch a film which was skilfully and tightly squeezed into around 1h 20 minutes.

      This is a genuinely frightening film which may leave you watching children a little warily. I'd recommend strongly that you don't put it on while you're babysitting....

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        21.03.2011 21:00
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        Understated low budget British horror that stays with you

        The Children 2008 directed by Tom Shankland.

        If there is one thing a good horror needs it is weird children and these kids are among the scariest you will see in horror.

        It is Christmas and family get together to celebrate the holidays. The youngest child of the group is introduced already suffering from an "illness" that will soon infect all of the children in the house. Seemingly small incidents begin to happen around the house beginning with the disappearance of the family pet. This is quickly followed by what seem unfortunate accidents occurring to the parents. But are they accidents at all? The children become increasingly strange to the point where their psychopathic behaviour is undeniable. As the infection spreads and becomes stronger the children completely turn on their parents leaving them fighting for their lives. A sinister ending tops of this great film.

        This is a typically understated low budget British horror that stays with you. I found it really entertaining and it kept both me and my boyfriend on the edge of our seats as we wondered just how far the children would go. My boyfriend is not into horror movies but he really enjoyed this one. There are lots of very gorey moments and after watching this when you see you own children staring in to space it will send a chill down your spine. I am always a bit dubious about child actors but the kids in this film are really good in fact they are probably better than the adults.

        On the whole this is a great little film that is definitely worth a watch.

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          17.08.2010 11:32
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          See Review

          The film called The Children came out in 2008 and it is directed by Tom Shankland. I watched the film on Sky Plus so it is a review of the film and not the dvd.


          The film is a horror film about two families who decide to spend Christmas together. The family whose house it is consists of mum Chloe, dad Robbie and their two children Nicky and Leah. They live in a big house in the countryside. The family who are going to visit is Chloe's sister's family, mum Elaine, Dad Jonah, eldest daughter Casey, and two youngsters Miranda and Paulie.


          As soon as they get to the house, one of the children, the little boy Paulie, starts being sick and starts to act strrangely but they think it is just the journey that has upset him but things start to go badly wrong and their idyllic Christmas in the country starts to fall apart and become a massive nightmare.


          Casey, played by Hannah Tointon, is a typical moody teenager who has already decided she isn't going to enjoy herself because she has had to miss out on a party. I thought Hannah played the part really well, having a moody teenager myself I could see her saying the kind of things Casey said and acting the way she did at the beginning of the film. She was really good later in the film too when things were going wrong.


          The man called Robbie is played by Jeremy Sheffield who I recognised immediately but is one of those actors who I know from somewhere but couldn't place where I had seen him before. After looking it up on IMDB I realise I remember him from Dancing on Ice previously. I thought he played the part well although in places I wasn't sure whether he was supposed to be a bit over friendly with his wife's sister or not. He certainly took an interest in the teenager Casey but it didn't seem inappropriate.


          His wife Chloe was played by Rachel Shelley, I thought she played the part well too although her part didn't seem to stand out much.


          Her sister Elaine was played by Eva Birthistle and I thought she was really good in the part. She had a terrific relationship with her eldest daughter which came across strongly, you could really feel the bond between them. She also shone out when the children started acting strangely.


          Her husband (or may be boyfriend) Jonah played by Stephen Campbell Moore was not the father of Casey but he was the two younger children's dad. He had a special relationship with his eldest daughter Miranda.


          The real stars of the film though were the children. They played their parts so well, they changed from being just normal happy children into something quite scary. The little actors were as follows


          Miranda - Eva Sayer
          Paulie - William Howes
          Nicky - Jake Hathaway
          Leah - Raffiella Brooks


          I found this film very scary in places, especially as it was to do with the children. It was very bloody and gory and I was surprised it was given an 18 certificate as it is a 15 and I wouldn't want my 15 year old daughter to watch it. It was a bit disturbing in places as well but altogether I did enjoy watching it.


          The film lasted for 84 minutes.

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          20.05.2010 23:16
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          One of the best horror films I have ever seen

          I bought this film from Play.com in their sale for £2.99. I like scary films and the idea for this film sounded really good. I watched the trailer on Play.com and that swayed me into buying it. The film was released in 2008 so it is still quite a recent film really but I don't remember it being in the cinema.

          Plot

          Elaine, her partner Jonah and her three children Casey, Miranda and Paulie go to spend New Year with her sister Chloe, husband Robbie and two children Nicky and Leah. Chloe and her family live in a huge house in the middle of nowhere and it is snowing when Elaine arrives. Casey is not very happy to be there as she is a teenager and is missing out on a party with her friends as she has been grounded by her step father. Chloe and Robbie are a very natural family, they believe in home schooling and nothing artificial for their children. Elaine and Jonah are very conventional and he is a high powered business man who se latest way to make money is through Chinese medicine.

          Miranda is very happy to see her cousins but Paulie seems a very quiet child who spends most of his time hitting his xylophone. Nicky is obsessed with aliens which seems to frighten Leah a bit. Robbie does his best to make Casey feel more comfortable and she obviously fancies him. Casey plans to escape to the party with her friend who she has arranged to pick her up. Leah starts coughing up blood when they go to bed on the first night. While everyone is asleep, Robbie is seen to be stood at the edge of his parent's bed just staring at them.

          The men, children and Casey have a snowball fight and play about while the women are preparing a roast. Paulie wanders off towards the woods and lets the sledge go. The sledge shoots down the hill, straight into Chloe's ankles as she is bringing the food out and the food ends up everywhere. During the makeshift meal all the children start to complain that they are ill. Leah starts to have flashbacks of her cat being killed. Chloe doesn't like the attention that Robbie is giving to Casey and drops it in to conversation that Casey has a tattoo which she was showing Robbie. Casey is livid as her mum and step father didn't know. Miranda lashes out at Chloe during the meal and scratches her face. Jonah carries the screaming Miranda upstairs and she just keeps on screaming. The film then flashes from Miranda going quiet to Casey falling down a hill on her way to meet her friends to Robbie falling on to the sledge and sliding down the hill into a hook. The children's screaming brings the adults out of the house to see Robbie covered in blood. Elaine and Jonah take the children indoors before Elaine goes back out to help her sister. The children try to force their way back out but are not allowed until Paulie cuts Jonah's arm with a knife and they escape into the woods. Miranda is still sat upstairs and starts screaming again.

          The film then follows the children becoming more and more sinister and attacking the rest of the family. The ending of the film leaves it open for a sequel.

          Characters
          Elaine - Eva Birthistle
          Jonah - Stephen Campbell Moore
          Casey - Hannah Tointon
          Paulie - William Howes
          Miranda - Eva Sayer
          Chloe - Rachel Shelley
          Robbie - Jeremy Sheffield
          Leah - Raffiella Brooks
          Nicky - Jake Hathaway

          My thoughts.

          This has to be one of the scariest films I have seen in a long time if not ever. I did wonder half way through whether I would be able to watch it all. I had my hands over my eyes quite a few times during this film. The scenery is absolutely stunning and the film crew found what I believe to be the perfect location for the film. Hannah Tointon who plays Casey is a brilliant young actress who does gives a perfect example of a stroppy manipulative teenager at the beginning of the film and then almost has the leading role by the end. She really grows with her character and I look forward to seeing other films with her in. The character of Paulie comes across as being slightly odd from the beginning and I didn't like him at all.

          The film is full of suspense and will leave you gripping your seat. It is cleverly shot especially the woods scenes where you get very quick glimpses of the children running through the trees. These scenes are so quick they almost leave you doubting yourself about whether you did see the children or not. The tension builds throughout the film and I believe that the characters were well cast even though I have never seen any of the actors/actresses before. They portrayed their characters well and in a believable way. Although there are quite a few sickening bloody scenes, the film uses psychology to scare you rather than gore. It was nice to watch a horror film where people don't fall over when they are running away from the enemy leaving you screaming at them to stop being so stupid and get up.

          The pace builds slowly throughout the film and was perfect for me. The camera angles used add to the suspense and you can really believe the parents unbelieving reactions to the fact that their children are trying to kill them and it's a case of kill the children or die. You can feel the almost hate between Jonah and Casey and this is built on throughout the film. The film is British made and is lower budget due to the lack of big stars which enhances rather than detracts from the film. The film is definitely worthy of a sequel but I am not sure I would be brave enough to watch it. Definitely not one to watch alone or in the dark

          Extra features

          Killing Children - The making of the children
          I found this quite and interesting feature. It allows you to meet the producer, director and the cast a bit more and to get their views on the film. It gives a little bit of information on the special effects used to create the injuries and explains how difficult some of the scenes were to shoot. You get to see that film making is not all exciting as the cast seem to be standing around a lot. I found the bit about how the stunts were shot very interesting. This is a great behind the scenes extra that has something for everyone.

          Locations featurette

          Paul Hyett talks prosthetics
          Paul is the special makeup effects producer for the film and he explains how they made all the different wounds and effects throughout the film. I found this really interesting and it is very clever how things are done for movies.

          Snow set design featurette

          Tom Shankland's Lair
          This extra shows where Tom Shankland stayed during the filming. It gives a good insight into the man himself along with how he gets his inspiration and ideas. I found this feature really interesting and Tom talks openly about how he copes with the stresses and anxieties of making a film. He comes across as very honest and down to earth.

          Working with children featurette

          Deleted scenes

          Directed by Tom Shankland
          Produced by Allan Niblo and James Richardson

          Rated 18
          Run time 85 mins

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            11.04.2010 11:54
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            If I were you I would avoid this like a walk in the woods alone in the dark.

            When it comes to my husband making the choices for dvd's it is usually films like this that end up coming through our letterbox.

            The Children is a British film which for someone who finds horror films never scary, hubby promised this would have me terrified after watching the trailer and being persuaded it finally dropped through out letterbox this weekend.

            The film is set around Christmas and New Year and Elaine, Jonah and their three children Casey, are driving to visit Elaine's sister Chloe who lives in a secluded house on the outskirts of an eerie forest.
            The film begins with the car journey there and Casey the eldest makes it clear she would rather be elsewhere and her distinct lack of interest in her family gathering has her creeping out to find a mobile signal to call her friend Lisa to come and collect her to take her to a more interesting New Year Party.

            What all appears to be a happy family gathering soon starts to come apart as we see Chloe;s husband Robbie have an unhealthy interest in his niece Casey who dresses a little more provactively than maybe she should.

            The children all play together friendly at first but at the end of the first evening things do not seem to be too well. Paulie the youngest seems very withdrawn and Chloe's daughter, Leah begins to be scared by his behavour as Paulie sits playing with his xylophone banging it in an unnatural manner and as Leah goes to sleep clutching her baby doll she wipes some blood from her hand that has mysteriously appeared.

            Miranda (Elaine's other daughter) and Nicky (Chloe's son) the other two children are blissfully unaware of the sinister changes going on between their cousins and continue to play happily before finally falling asleep for the evening.

            Casey takes a stroll with her Uncle Robbie to try and find a signal so she can make a call on her mobile and when he leaves her to return to the house she can make out the cries of a cat out in the woods, Casey calls out for the cat but returns to the house after calling her friend Lisa to arrange for her to pick her up at the end of the lane.

            The next morning the family gather together and play outside in the snow on sledges and throwing snowballs and what seems to be an idyllic picture of a family playing together soon turns bad and it is Casey that sees not everything is as it should be during a New Years Eve meal early that day the children all seem to become impatient and start lashing out but most suprisingly it is Miranda that causes the problems at the dinner table and lashes out at her Auntie Chloe scratching her face. Jonah decides to take his daughter out of the dining room and upstairs to try and calm her down but her behaviour is so erratic he just doesn't know what to do.

            Meanwhile Robbie takes the kids outside to play and away from the screams coming from Miranda, Casey takes this opportunity to disappear off into the woods again to check her mobile and it's here where the children really turn evil and they turn on their parents one by one.

            The film is boring and there is no tension, its gorey which is great for those loving eyeballs being gouged out and dolls rammed into intestines of half dead people but there is no real storyline to keep you entertained I found myself sat watching the film as if I was watching a normal drama, I didn't even flinch at the gorey scenes as they were nothing out of the ordinary. No suspense and you could see what was around the corner.

            The only two stars in the cast was ex hollyoaks star Hannah Tointon and ex Holby Star Jeremy Sheffield.
            The cast acted well but with a poor script I really don't see how this could be called a horror film. My husband thought this would be similar to the Omen where the children are possessed and yes the children do become possessed by something but we never quite find out what that is and even at the end of the film you are left wondering what on earth has gone on.

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              10.02.2010 20:25
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              Perhaps worth a watch with the lights off for a cheap thrill.

              I saw the trailer for this movie and expected it to be delightfully frightening. Sadly after watching this film, I was disappointedly bored. This movie is well shot, that's fair to say, however in its effort to be minimalistic / artistic, it was ultimately boring. Supposedly, against the backdrop of white snow, innocent children and a middle-class Christmas gathering, the horrorr should have stood out with chilling and gorey effect, but in my opinion, it ended up being comedic instead of ominous.

              I think this movie had potential. The whole idea of the inaccessible world of children and their innocent but sometimes bizarre and manipulative behaviour, mixed with the unconditional love of their parents, could have been a successful horror plot. I mean, what parent would believe their child was intentionally trying to murder them and consider killing their own offspring in self -defence? This could have been the premise of an interesting conflict of emotions which could have made the viewer more involved on a personal level. However, even the idea of a child being able to kill a group of adults is so ludicrous that is it not interesting or clever, but merely stupid. This whole movie slowly becomes more and more obvious and unbelievable, whereas if they had kept it subtle and dark they may have had more success.

              To enlighten potential viewers, the script follows two sisters who meet up with their families at richer sister's massive out-of-the-way and in the woods house for a Christmas gathering. Tick perfect setting for murder and mayhead, with restricted police / ambulance access on the sparse and icy roads leading to said house. Screaming kids laugh (but mainly scream) around the house and nearby woods, dressed like little 'George' by Asda cataloge models while parents drink wine and compare strategies. Tick cute kids and self-engaged parents. Cute kids get ill, stand by beds staring, stand in hallways staring, stand in the snow staring, pretty much if they are not screaming they might as well be staring. Tick cliched scare tactics. Cute kids begin picking off the adults one-by-one, using their cuteness as a way to avoid the adults killing them back ('but momey we love you give cuddles'- stab stab). Tick nonchelant kids killing with child-like curiosity and guilt-ridden parents too traumatised to fight back.

              Some scenes literally made me laugh, they were trying so hard to be scary but failed severly. An ok watch if there is nothing else to see, but don't tell me I didn't warn you.

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                09.06.2009 21:02
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                When phlegm turns bad

                A review of just the film, The Children was released on region 2 DVD at the end of March 2009.

                It's the Christmas holidays and Elaine and husband Jonah take their three kids to visit Elaine's sister Chloe, her husband Robbie and their two young children in a sprawling old house, deep in the English countryside. Everyone seems happy enough, except Elaine's eldest daughter Casey who would rather spend the time at a party with her friends. Initially pleasant enough, the cracks start to appear with friction between the couples and between Chloe and Casey largely as a result of Robbie's overt interest in his sexy young niece. The children spend the time happily enough but gradually start to become cranky and ill-mannered, resulting in some unpleasant tantrums. Distracted by their own irritations, the adults seem largely unaware of the children's changing mood until, suddenly, it's all rather too late. A terrible accident in the garden marks the beginning of a decidedly un-festive nightmare.....

                In W Delta Z, director Tom Shankland proved that he could 'sort of' do horror films. In The Children, Shankland has another go and proves the same 'sort of' skill that he had the last time. Unquestionably, the director has en eye for something a little unusual, but this time round, Shankland is his own undoing, cursing himself with a shoddy little narrative that seems intent on irritating the audience further and further until the whole thing descends into an implausible mess.

                The idea of children turning into little horrors is hardly anything new. Probably most triumphantly portrayed in The Omen, there have been whole series of films focusing on the idea (Children of the Damned and Children of the Corn to name but two) but very few directors have managed to do anything notable with the idea. Plagued with the censors' conflict of featuring little people well under the age of eighteen in a film intended for people over the age of eighteen, these films suffer from silly, pseudo-horrific scripts that never really get to the horrific heart of the matter. The horror concept is simple and should be entirely effective; the literal portrayal of mummy's little angel turning into mummy's little demon before her very eyes and the confusion of loyalty to your child and trying to stay alive should make for a very good story. Sadly, in The Children, it doesn't.

                As is very often the case in these films, it's the adults that are the problem. In The Children, they're superficially that kind of wholesome middle England bunch that pretty much deserves everything they get. Over-protective, over-zealous or both, they're the sort of parents that you dread spending any time with. Caught nicely in the middle is teenaged Casey who we learn, early on, isn't overly fond of her little siblings and before long it all feels rather like a rather tense ITV1 drama. When the poop hits the fan, the characters rapidly become divided into those who can see no wrong in their babies, and those who have immediately recoiled at the children's journey to the dark side and now see them as the enemy. This, inevitably, leads to confusion and conflict between the adults, only furthering the aims of the newly demonic infants. It's irritating stuff. People draw themselves into predictably perilous situations where even with no end of greyish make-up and sombre faces will we be convinced that the child actors were in any way responsible. Worse still, despite the apparent tenderness and fragility of the little ones, they seem capable of wreaking havoc and taking the adults apart with virtually no effort whatsoever.

                It's crammed with cliché. A cat disappears only to be heard screeching ominously in the night. The children manipulate and deceive the adults and even when very obvious evidence confronts them (a child's toy rammed into the intestines?) the parents still believe that they can kiss it all better. Shankland makes a few observations about parental responsibilities, damning the parents collectively with their naïve stupidity and individually with their very particular favouritisms. Like any good horror, things conspire against the family in a way that is never really convincing, complete with delayed emergency services, failed mobile phone signals and bolted doors and it's all very, very tiresome. Shankland's explanation for it all is reasonably satisfying, if not rather superficially explained and there is a bit of a twist in the tale that at least rounds it all off fairly well but it's not enough to excuse the preceding ninety minutes.

                Not surprisingly, as a British horror film, the cast largely comprises a selection of former soap and television actors and actresses. Fresh from Hollyoaks, Hannah Tointon makes the undemanding move onto the big screen via the horror route but is, at least, reasonably effective as a sulky, hormonal, screaming teenager. Her interplay with the lovely Jeremy Sheffield is quite predictable and Sheffield himself demonstrates that he can really only play himself, as he does here. Stephen Campbell Moore (Ashes to Ashes) is reasonably clueless and gets the honour of being the 'dark horse' of the movie (don't think for one minute that spoils things in any way. He may as well wear a T-shirt). Eva Birthistle does her best with a very limited role, but after a nasty accident in the garden, she's reduced to hobbling around helplessly and becomes rather ridiculous. Not as ridiculous, however, as her grasping, groaning sister (Rachel Shelley from the L Word). The children themselves are reasonably convincing, limited, as they are, to just a few words and a couple of sinister facial expressions but it's hard to be even remotely unnerved by their actions, purely because they're so small.

                All in, Shankland's allegory to the nightmares of parenting is a pretty tiresome affair. The injection of a few gooey bits to keep the gore hounds happy just comes across as a little desperate and it's obvious he's using such things to paper over the obviously thin narrative. The ex-television cast members only really exacerbate the feeling that you've just watched a television drama and it all wears thin and wears out in a reasonably brief period of time.

                Not recommended

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                  05.06.2009 00:03
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                  Quality British Horror

                  hortly before it was out in the cinema, my sister caught sight of the trailer and put a link to it in her Facebook status. The trailer was quite alluring, without giving too much away, and I was determined to watch it in the cinema. Unfortunately, I didn't so instead got it on DVD when it was released recently. If you want it, you can get it for just £8.99 from play.com or hmv.co.uk.

                  The film was written by the director, Tom Shankland, he is rather small, having not directed any other films that I have heard of,
                  The Plot

                  It is New Years, and Elaine and Jonah, take their children to stay with Eliane's sister, Chloe and her family for new years. The first evening goes down fine, with the adults enjoying reminiscing and going through several bottles of wine. Casey, Elaine's daughter from a previous relationship, and much older than the other kids, is not having such a good time, and is bored, stuck with her family for New Years, and plans to get picked up to go to a proper party the next day.
                  The following day, the family are all playing in the snow, building snowmen, throwing snow balls, and taking it in turns to use the sled. As Casey sneaks off to get picked up, she hears the screams of the children, and returns to find blood all over the snow....

                  The Cast
                  Being a British film, it features an all British cast...

                  Starring in the film, is Hannah Tointon, as Casey, some people might know her from Hollyoaks, where she played Katy Fox. It's always a good plan to make the lead character rather fit :o) Just realised, that she is also the person who my sister has been speaking to on Facebook, along with her sister Kara, who plays Dawn in Eastenders...
                  It also stars Rachel Shelly as Chloe, and her husband Robbie, is played by Jeremy Sheffield. Eva Birthistle plays Elaine, and her husband, Jonah is played by Stephen Campbell-Moore. All four of them have been in other stuff, but no roles that I have ever really noticed, Sheffield was also in Holby City.

                  It then had a cast of children actors, who again, were nothing massivly famous. I think one of them had appeared in Eastenders or something.
                  What did I think?

                  I didn't actually know that it was a British film, I thought it was American, and was extremely pleased to see another decent British film. I didn't have any high expectations of the film, having only been allured to it by the trailer, rather than recommendation, and can genuinely say it's the best British film since 28 Weeks Later.
                  The plot was slow to begin with, simply toying with the general day, and there were several false starts, scenes where it looked as though something was about to happen then it didn't - it really kept you on the edge of your chair. By the time the first kill actually occurred, you expected it to be another trick, and that it wasn't going to happen.

                  From then on, it became intense, and the film really took off.
                  The killing was quite original, and by god the gore was good. In my horror films, I like a good bit of gore, some great kills, I like the films that really make me cringe, like the Saw films do each time. And this film delivered, drawing from me gasps and making me wince - just how I like it. The blood was real looking, which is always a good thing, and in general, the film was quite unexpected, and hard to predict.

                  The cast did a great job with their acting, I can't really fault it at all, it was great from start to finish. Hannah Tointon especially, really excelled and gave a great performance.
                  The ending of the film was great, I was wandering how they were going to draw things to a close, and they did it perfectly, bringing it to a close, whilst leading to a potential sequel, which could be done on a much larger, country wide scale. It is never explained exactly what has made all these Children become killers...

                  However, since in it's first week it only managed to gross £98,000 I doubt it will be made, especially when you compare it to the total of £6.1 million that 28 Days Later managed.
                  I seriously recommend this film, it is out on DVD now, and is well worth the £9 you need to pay. If you are a fan of films like 28 Days Later and other similar movies, then this is another one for you!

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