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The Fly [1986] (DVD)

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Genre: Science Fiction & Fantasy - Science Fiction / Theatrical Release: 1986 / Director: David Cronenberg / Actors: Jeff Goldblum, Geena Davis ... / DVD released 15 August, 2005 at 20th Century Fox Home Entertainment / Features of the DVD: PAL

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    10 Reviews
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      27.02.2010 10:41
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      Good 80's horror

      The Fly is a pretty good 1980's horror film that stars Jeff Goldblum and Geena Davies. It has a rather far fetched plot but the whole thing still works and while it is not the cariest horror film you will ever see it still works and has some good tense moments in it.

      Goldblum plays a scientist called Seth Brundle who claims to have developed a machine able to transport matter, a rather eccentric individual he meets a journalist called Veronica Quaife and she is intrigued by both his claims and also feels a certain attractio towards him, she goes out to his complex to see his invention which he calles the telepod and while sceptical at first but her views on his invention change as the two start an affair.

      While attempting to transport live matter the sytem works with the successful experiment on a monkey and then while in the lab on his own one night Seth attempts to perform the process on himself hpwever he does not notice that a fly has also entered the chamber with him and now he is about to find out some horrifying implications of his experiment.

      There are a few grusome stomach turning moments in this film and for me I find flys' more annoying and creepy than I do spiders for some reason. Seth under goes an amazing transformation as his body literally comes apart at the seams and it is not just the physical changes but also the mental horror that is well portrayed in this film and what sucks the viewer in. This is a real shock to your senses at times as he has to mimic the behaviours of a fly including the way he has to ingest his food.

      The film has a pretty small cast and all perform really well, Goldblum is excellent in the lead role and while Davies hardly ever shines in her films she is competent enough as the innocent heroine in all of this.

      This is a good shock based horror and one that is worth seeing especially as the transformation does not rely on special effects but make up and models which is pretty impressive.

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        27.01.2010 16:37
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        Overall - A fantastic remake of the original

        For me when I watched The Fly it really made me feel slightly sick and uncomfortable but I was tranfixed by this science fiction/horror film that really does disgust you but at the same time captures your imagination.

        The story of the original is kept for the most part which it should be. Jeff Goldblum stars in this remake of the Fly as the scientist who designs a matter transporter. This means he has the capacity to disassemble matter in one location and move it and reassemble it in another place. So far he has only tried with non-human articles but it appears to work fine.

        His lover played by Geena Davis is disturbed by his whole fascination in the machine and quite wary. She is right to be, as one night he decides his curiosity will not wait and he tries the the machine out on himself. However, something terrible goes wrong and as he enters the transporter, so does a normal house fly. Therefore with frightening consequences his DNA is fused with that of the fly.

        At first the alteration to himself helps to enhance his senses as in the case of the fly so nothing too bad there. But gradually the battle between the two completely different genetic species takes horrifying effect. He begins to transform from a human into a fly with some particularly nasty special effects, including tough hair sprouting up in strange places and body parts dying and falling off to be replaced by mysterious new appendages.

        I found parts of this film stomach-churning to say the least but at the same time the movie is fantastic in as much as it shows the transformation's effects on his life. His lover struggles with the terrible transformation in front of her eyes and can't connect with the man she once knew and as for Goldblum, he struggles to retain his human feelings at all as his body is consumed by the characteristics of the fly. It is a fairly tragic tale and quite an emotional rollercoaster as things unfold.

        Still, despite the disgusting scenes of him turning into a grotesque creature it is definately a film that out of morbid curiosity a bit like the scientist in the story, I would watch again and again.

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        24.11.2009 17:26
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        very good

        This is one of those films which makes you shudder and go all tingly when you watch it. It starts in a genial enough fashion before gradually unfolding into a punishing display of gross out special effects. With horror meister David Cronenberg at the helm, you can be sure of an uneasy and horrifying ride.

        The plot follows scientist Seth Brundle (Goldblum) as he manages to perfect teleportation; meaning he can beam objects from one futuristic pod to another. This impresses girlfriend in the making Genna Davis, who is also following Brundle for journalistic reasons. One night, Brundle tests the teleportation with himself inside. All good so far, that is until he realises that a housefly had gotten into the pod with him and somehow merged into into his body. Brundle's transformation from human to fly slowly unfolds in a painful fashion, while Davis can only look on in horror.

        The film is well acted, with Goldblum delivering a delightful turn as the nerdy and quirky Brundle. He plays up the humour, even in stages of decay, which is great as it gives the film a darkly comic edge. Geena Davis is solid and sympathetic as the love interest and lights up whenever she is onscreen.

        The pacing is spot on, with a pleasing slow burning build of tension, before Cronenberg unleashes the monster. All dimly lit, dark and brooding, the film has his stamp all over it and just screams eighties horror. Although the computer and telepods look dated, the fly effects still stand strong and the film heads towards an horrific climax.

        A minimal cast, slick direction and a gripping performance from Goldblum hold the film together. It was followed by a lesser sequel, so if you want some classic horror, then dip into this. Just don't have anything to eat beforehand!

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        16.09.2009 19:38
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        A grim and gruesome classic

        note: also appears in part on Flixster and The Student Room

        The Fly is a remake of the 1950s horror film, but unlike most remakes, this actually improves upon the source material. David Cronenberg is perhaps best known and loved for his splatter films such as classics Scanners and Videodrome. The Fly also makes a star of Jeff Goldbloom in what remains his best performance, in this vile, gross, but also emotionally resonant and quite moving film.

        Seth Brundle (Jeff Goldblum) is a fantastic scientist who happens to be a little on the quirky side. Through his numerous experiments, he believes that he's found a way to teleport matter from one station to another. However, when he attempts it, a fly goes into the portal with him, causing their DNA to bond, and when he emerges the other side, he begins to notice a few changes. His fingernails begin to fall off, and spines begin to grow out of his back. His casual girlfriend Veronica Quaife (Geena Davis) begins to notice this. Also, his personality begins to change, and he becomes a lot more egomaniacal.

        It appears that he is transforming into a fly, and as the film progresses, this transformation becomes more and more vile and grotesque. It becomes a race to see if they can counteract the symptoms, or otherwise Brundle is doomed to continue turning until the metamorphosis is complete.

        Whilst it's easy to dismiss the film from first glance as simply a blood soaked horror, there's a lot more here than you might reasonably expect. It's quite a moving love story, and how Brundle turns from a maniacal psychopath into a victim of his own making is the stuff of Greek tragedy. A classic of the science fiction genre.

        A fantastic remake carried by Goldbloom's performance. Classic Cronenberg.

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          31.07.2009 09:36
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          The slow descent of a brilliant man into madness

          Jeff Goldblum plays unconventional scientist Seth Brundle a brilliant man terrified by travelling in vehicles, he makes it his lifes work to find means of self travel without vehicles a reality.

          He builds a machine to allow him to travel from one place to another in a manner of teleportation, unfortunately he doesn't notice that when he tries out his new contraption a pesky fly is in the machine also.

          This unfortunate accident means that Brundle's DNA becomes molecularly entwined with the fly's, and this accident can't be reversed meaning that Brundle has to come to accept that he will slowly turn into a giant fly.

          Obviously being an unconventional, brilliant scientist, Brundle attempts to find a way to reverse this and we follow the man as he slowly descends into the physical and mental hell of being a fly.

          The film is a remake of a low budget 1958 sci-fi film and takes the hammy action away from that film (which is a good film with some of the same themes and some terrifying thoughts on suicide and how our peers view us, but lacking in any logic whatsoever) and replaces it with a much more logical frightening film which focuses on the terrifying descent of a man from human being to something else, we watch as he tries to mentally come to terms with it, but can't, he tries to retain his relationship and semblances of his life but as his body and mind morph into those of a fly we see the pain, fear and suffering that he is taking on, all because a fly got into his transportation machine.

          The story is excellent and really does hold your attention, Jeff Goldblum is excellent on all levels first as the brilliant scientist but later as this strange being slowly losing his mind, body and life to something horrifying to us all, Geena Davis is good as the girlfriend and transmits the upset her partners behaviour is causing well.

          Generally I'm not a fan of remakes but I do feel that this one really improves on the original greatly, it looks better, has a more plausible and therefore much more terrifying story, the effects are good, watching Goldblum's characters slow descent into madness is humbling and really interesting, it is a film that questions what we are, what science does for us and how sometimes we should spend more time enjoying what we have and less trying to make it better.

          This is a great 80's film and it stands the test of time well, I'd recommend it to anyone who likes their films to hold an element of reality but also enough suspense and pathos to keep you thinking long after the film has ended.

          The DVD is available with the much less compelling 'The Fly 2' on Amazon for £5.58.

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          20.05.2009 20:46
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          Actually what you expect from David Cronenberg: pure awesomeness

          I have to admit that David Cronenberg is somewhat of a self-destructive vice for me. I know that his films will: a) make me feel sick, and b) twist the little sanity I have left into a small bow and play basketball with it, but I still watch them nonetheless.

          The Fly is a twisted tale of doomed romance, male rivalry, and science gone horribly awry. Seth Brundle (played by Jeff Goldblum) is a brilliant, although rather idiosyncratic, physicist, who gains the attention of a feisty journalist called Veronica Quaife with his new invention: teleportation pods. As their relationship intensifies and eventually becomes romantic, Seth becomes tormented by his machine's one and only fault: it's inability to teleport living tissue without horrific results. Driven by frustration and alcohol Brundle decides to take the ultimate risk and uses himself as the first human guinea pig. Little does Seth know that this single act of impatience has doomed him to a cruel and unusual fate, and that something else, something not human, was teleported and genetically spliced within him. Before long our unfortunate physicist is losing hair, shedding erroneous body parts, and has gained the ability to crawl on the ceiling. With every passing day he becomes less human and the heart-broken Veronica finds herself caring for the wretched monster, whilst Seth is forced to face the terrifying truth. The teleportation wasn't pure, and he is no longer Seth Brundle...he is Brundlefly.

          Although most horror remakes have a somewhat dubious history, I'm pleased to say the Davin Cronenberg's the Fly is not one of them. The Fly is definitely one of the cleverest sci-fi/horrors I have seen for a long while, a tale of heart-warming romance on one level, and a grotesque nightmare on another. Although I take no pleasure in seeing Jeff Goldblum quite literally fall apart on screen, since he is one of my favourite actors, he does take to the role of the disfigured scientist like a duck to water, and also manages to wheedle in a little bit of that classic Goldblum sarcasm we all know and love. In classic Cronenberg style the Fly is suitably gory and repulsive, capable of making even the most heavily de-sensitised viewer squirm in their seat, and the special effects are award winning. The Brundle to Brundefly transformation is done with such subtly and finesse it's often unnoticeable, at least until his fingernails start falling off.

          The Fly is a romantic tragedy with a twist, and like Romeo and Juliet I'm afraid it doesn't have the happiest of endings. Although the film's dark comedic edge does take a little bit off the brutal atmosphere, the Fly remains a very disturbing and hard hitting movie, which completely shatters everything you thought you knew about horror. This is, without a doubt, Cronenberg at his best.

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          03.03.2009 11:32
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          Not a waste of 2 hours by any means

          I thought this movie was great, no wonder it got nominated for two Oscars.

          Im not usually one for scary movies, as a few of my reviews have said before, but I didn't actually realise it was meant to be horror until I decided to write a review on it. So, it would be good for those among you who don't like to be scared too badly, but like a good jump. It is also very funny in places, though this isn't the main theme of it.

          Assuming that you already know the plot, (and because I have don't want to ruin the ending) I won't tell you, or at least try not to.

          The main characters' performance in this are superb. The main male lead, Jeff Goldblum, is obviously really into his character, and some of the scenes, such as when he tells her he might hurt her if she stays, really jabs into you. The way he shows he is a fly and a human at the same time is amazing, and the scene at the market is wonderful acting, when he is starting the transition. He still wants to be a scientist at the same time as being an insect, and shows this very well. The main lead female is also very good, her presentation at the ending great.

          The special effects for the time it was produced are also superb. (Especially when his ear falls off.)

          The story itself sounds quite comical when you first come across it, and the movie, though itself shocking and disturbing, is heart rending. I hated the ending of this, as it was so unsatisfying. I'm trying not to give anything away, but I always love a happy ending, although it is a personal preference, and I suppose this was the natural way to end it.

          However, this is very worth watching.

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            11.01.2009 03:14
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            A cult classic - gruesome but iconic.

            The Fly is a remake of a 50s B-movie which involves a teleportation experiment gone wrong. Somehow a fly gets trapped in the machine with the poor scientist, Seth (played by Goldblum). The after effects have him marvelling in some new-found powers but, far from Spiderman-like transformation, little does he know he's slowly and grotesquely turning into a monster rather than some superpowered hero.
            This film largely surprised me. It has definitely aged significantly but the fact that such effects from the 80s managed to make me recoil in disgust is quite an achievement. Quite often a little voice in my head was screaming at Geena Davis' character thinking 'You can't hug thaaat!'. Therefore I definitely applaud their special effects. There is nothing like seeing a man lose his arm and leg due to a creature vomiting acid.
            Another thing that surprised me about this film was the relationship between Seth, the scientist and Veronica, the journalist. It was actually quite touching. In some way I can see such deterioration of a man having some metaphorical significance in the real world outwith B-movie horror. Forgive me if you hate the comparison, but a lot of couples see their other half deteriorate due to diseases of the body and mind and it must be quite heartbreaking. Not that I am suggesting they then go on a deranged animalistic rampage involving their ex-boyfriend... Good film - Loving the B-movie style.

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              29.04.2008 21:53
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              A highly enjoyable film - just don't expect to be scared

              The Fly was released in 1986, and as is the case with most older horror movies, is hard to find scary once you've been exposed to modern special effects and gore.

              That doesn't mean that what's left can't be a good film though - perhaps the more so for having to rely more heavily on the script than special effects.

              To give you the story in brief, scientist Seth Brundle (played byJeff Goldblum) is working on a top secret project - the world's first teleportation device. He accidentally reveals this to journalist Veronica Quaife (played by Geena Davis) at a party without realising she's a journalist, then begs her to keep it quiet. She promises to do so, as long as she can have exclusive rights on the story once he has teleported a man for the first time. Meanwhile, she documents for him, and they start sleeping together (it's that sort of B movie).

              Unfortunately, after successfully teleporting a baboon for the first time Brundle is overtaken by a burst of enthusiasm, and decides to teleport himself without sending the animal off for testing first. Teleporting while alone in the lab, he doesn't notice that a fly has teleported with him, and doesn't realise that in the teleport its genes have been spliced with his.

              The rest of the film follows Brundle and Veronica, as she subsequently tries to hide all this from her editor and exlover Stathis Borans (played by John Getz), and then when it can't be hidden any longer, dealing with the fact that her lover is in fact turning into a giant fly (as the title might suggest).

              As I suggested earlier, the great strength of The Fly is in the script. Borans is particularly great, with such hilarious lines as "I'm sure Typhoid Mary would be a very nice person too when you saw her socially" and "Do I have permission to claim your body when this is all over?" but I also liked Brundle's "I'm an insect... who dreamt he was a man... and loved it".

              Don't expect a scare from this one, but do expect a very enjoyable film. It's £4.98 on Amazon - well worth snatching up.

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                15.04.2006 10:21
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                Groundbreaking 80s schlock horror that still bites

                When journalist Veronica Quaife meets Seth Brundle at a science reception, she is immediately intrigued by the charming and eccentric man. Lured by the promise of an invention that will literally change the world, Quaife goes with Brundle to a disused warehouse, where Brundle lives and works. Shortly after arriving he takes her into the main laboratory where his invention - the telepod - resides. Initially unimpressed by what she believes to be a magic trick, Quaife is soon convinced otherwise and realises that Brundle has actually managed to develop a system that can teleport matter from one location to another. Believing that she may have stumbled across the story of a lifetime, Quaife befriends the scientist. Their friendship blossoms into a passionate affair as they both become increasingly motivated to enhance the process to transport living matter.

                After some initial failures, Brundle finally perfects the process and teleports a monkey from one pod to the other without harming the animal. The only remaining task to complete is to successfully transport a human safely from one pod to the other and, alone one evening, Brundle is no longer able to stop himself from volunteering as a human guinea pig. As he closes the door to the telepod, nervous with the anticipation of what is about to happen to him, Brundle fails to notice that a fly has managed to get into the chamber with him. The system activates; the process is complete; and Seth Brundle is transported from one telepod to another. But what happened to the fly?

                David Cronenberg's 1986 schlock-fest has become something of a horror classic. A remake of the 1950s B-movie classic, in the late eighties, Cronenberg's vision shocked and enthralled cinema audiences. Even today, the film remains sharply effective, striking an almost perfect balance between drama and horror - and turning a few stomachs along the way.

                Whether you have seen the film or not, you will almost certainly be aware of the story but the film still has to be seen to be believed. Whilst we may all be familiar with the irritating, buzzing little critters, this film completely changed the way that people saw the creatures. If they disliked them before, they now found them completely repellent, thanks to Cronenberg's masterfully unpleasant storytelling. Seth Brundle's transformation from human to human / fly hybrid is rapid and unsettling both mentally and physically. Initially believing himself to be cleansed and invigorated, he soon realises the error of his ways as his skins starts to bubble and burst and bits of his body fall off by the hour. More famously - or should that be infamously - are Brundle's new found fly-like abilities. He can climb walls and suspend from ceilings; he sprouts tough insect-hairs and more unpleasantly, he finds that he has to digest food in a completely new way. It's pretty grim stuff, and Cronenberg doesn't waste a single opportunity to shock the audience. It is worth bearing in mind that although the film's events are now widely known and discussed, when cinema audiences first watched this film it was a complete unknown. Imagine the reaction when the audience saw Brundle's body start to disintegrate and watched him vomit digestive acid onto his food to help him digest it. The film's obvious 18-certificate is quite clearly still very appropriate.

                Even now, 19 years after the film was first released, it is startling effective. Unable to rely on computer-generated magic and trickery, the Brundlefly (as he becomes known in the film) is created almost entirely from make-up, costumery and models. In virtually every single scene featuring the Brundlefly, his transformation has progressed slightly further, and you do start to wonder what will happen next. Some of the more extensive make-up literally took four or five hours at a time to apply and the attention to detail is evident throughout. His mind is, not surprisingly, rather affected by the whole piece and what starts out as mild eccentricity (he keeps his discarded body parts in jars in the bathroom out of scientific curiosity) soon turns to complete insanity. Yet all throughout, Brundle is able to speak and articulate his thoughts, eventually discussing with Quaife the fact that insects do not have politics and warning her that she should stop coming to see him, if only to look after herself. Surprisingly, he seldom comes across as a genuinely bad person. What happened to him happens as an accident and throughout the picture he is largely concerned only with investigating - and eventually preserving - his humanity, as opposed to selfish aims of power or greed. Nonetheless, as he gradually becomes more and more disfigured it is hard to see him as anything other than a monster, as he clearly has become.

                In The Fly, quite what the moral of the tale is never really that clear. Given that the story revolves around a genuinely brilliant person, who simply makes an honest mistake, it is never really a good versus evil kind of story. It isn't really a morality tale either, in that Cronenberg doesn't create a tale that would act as a warning to anyone who would mess with nature, for it is nature who, ironically, messes with Brundle. For me, it all feels rather like a classic romantic tragedy, rather like The Hunchback of Notre Dame. The Brundlefly is largely helpless and misunderstood rather than being inherently evil, and even when he does start to act in a more malevolent manner, he rationalises this against the insect part of his make-up rather than the human. Quaife is never really able to stop loving him and as the film lurches towards its terrible climax, this becomes more and more tragic. The Fly is not exactly a happy little tale.

                The cast is very small. This is essentially a story about three people. Seth Brundle (Jeff Goldblum at his eccentric best) is a compelling character, driven by nothing other than scientific curiosity and a desire to learn. His realisation of the predicament is, perhaps, slower than you would expect but the impact is still the same and as he descends further into The Brundlefly, Goldblum truly wrestles with the character's humanity. Geena Davis (Veronica Quaife) is a classic tragic heroine, never exhibiting any real strength, but providing the perfect "pure" antidote to the horror of the genetic misfit that is the Brundlefly. Davis is never an actress who commands attention, but she does work pretty well in this particular film. The third part of the menage a trois - Stathis Boranz, played by John Getz - is something of an enigma as his part in the proceedings is not always as straight-forward as you might imagine. Sneering, cold and calculating he shows several different sides throughout the film and is an interesting example to help pitch human nature against insect nature.

                Another thing that I like about The Fly, much like any other "classic" film is that the more you watch it or read about it, the more "factoids" you discover. I'd spotted that David Cronenberg had a brief cameo himself (as Quaife's gynaecologist) but I didn't realise that the very famous tag line "Be Afraid… Be Very Afraid" is actually a quote from one of the characters in the film. Various scenes were scripted but never actually made - one of which sounds as though it would have made for particularly repulsive viewing. Lots of different people were initially associated with the project and it was only for various reasons - some of them personally tragic to those involved - that David Cronenberg finally took it on. If you're a film nerd (like me) then The Fly should keep you going for weeks.

                The Fly is a very good horror film. I didn't actually find it particularly frightening, given only that it is, of course, rather fantastical. But it is truly horrifying. Few audience members could fail to wince or grimace at certain parts of the film, several of which have become iconic moments. You should watch this film, if only to be very clearly instructed as to what that fly is doing when it lands on your freshly-made sandwich. Picnics will never be the same again…..

                Highly recommended

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              • Product Details

                Seth Brundle, a brilliant but eccentric scientist attempts to woo investigative journalist Veronica Quaife by offering her a scoop on his latest research in the field of matter transportation, which against all the expectations of the scientific establishment have proved successful. Up to a point. Brundle thinks he has ironed out the last problem when he successfully transports a living creature, but when he attempts to teleport himself a fly enters one of the transmission booths, and Brundle finds he is a changed man. This Science-Gone-Mad film is the source of the quotable quote Be afraid. Be very afraid.