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The Quiet Man (DVD)

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Genre: Comedy / Theatrical Release: 1952 / Director: John Ford / Actors: John Wayne, Maureen O'Hara ... / DVD released 15 January, 2001 at Universal Pictures UK / Features of the DVD: PAL

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    2 Reviews
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      09.07.2009 15:53
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      Sean Thornton has to adjust to the ways of Ireland

      As I have quite enjoyed John Wayne's film when he has not been plying a cowboy I was quite looking forward to seeing this, yes I cant believe t myself but I was looking forward to it!!!!

      John Wayne plays the role of Sean Thornton, he was born n Ireland but lived his life in America where he was a boxer. He has decided that he would move back to Ireland to the town where he was born as he has now ended his career after he killed a man in the ring.

      When he arrives in town he finds things are very different to his way of life in America and after some persuasion he persuades an old lady to sell him an old cottage and land where he was born and his family lived. The arrival of Sean is not welcomed by Will Dansher as he wanted to buy the land but was never sold it.

      Sean meets a beautiful lady called Mary Kate and he falls for her the only problem being she is the sister of his now rival Will and as the town is very old fashioned Sean has tog et the permission of Will to court her. With the help of the drunk Michaeleen, the town marriage broker and taxi driver and all round drunk he tries to get Will to change his mind but when he point blank refuses Sean gives up.

      Will the townspeople be able to change Will's mind and will the two rivals ever make peace?

      I was quiet impressed with this film as it is far from being a western or cowboy film. The storyline was very good and I did learn from it, the ways of the old fashioned dating experience was new to me and I did find it interesting how they had to ask permission to from the man of the house to date a lady and how they were not allowed to be on their own when courting. This did lead to some funny moments in the film.

      The character which John Wayne played, Sean Thornton was indeed very good and think he did a good job and made the character believable and did try to make him different from other roles he has done. He did have his American accent which I was pleased about as I could not imagine him trying to do an Irish accent and think this would have completely spoilt the film. Maureen O'Hara played the role of Mary Kate and I thinks he did a great job of playing the loud, fiery red head but despite the two being love interests there was no chemistry between them on screen and they looked quite wooden together.

      There were a lot of supporting actors and actresses in the film and my favourite was Barry Fitzgerald who played the role of Michaeleen Flynn, the drunk and marriage broker and taxi driver, he did bring a fun side to the film and I did find I was chuckling at some of the things he got up to. I did like how he would only give messages out if he was given a drink and how he could never drive his cart past the pub but always had to go inside! This role did bring a light and fun side to the film. Also Victor McLaglen who played the role of Will Dansher was very good sand I think he worked well with John Wayne on screen and I liked how they were reunited in this film as they have made films together before and also have a great on screen chemistry.

      The film was set in Ireland in the 1920's and I think that the settings and costumes were all very good and did look authentic. There were some lovely shots of the countryside which did add to the film for me but the only let down was the backdrops. One minute we would be seeing the horse and cart riding through the countryside shot on location and then we would see the characters close up on the cart and a very bad painted back drop added behind them. Yes the film was made in 1952 but I have seen older films than this that did have much better backdrops. They did get so bad in places that it was quite laughable. The music in the film was very good and did help with the emotions and setting of the scene throughout the film.

      The film has a running time of 2 hours and 9 minutes which I felt was long enough and the certificate on this film is a Universal which means that it is suitable for all. I do agree with this rating but I don't think any children would have an interest in the film.

      The DVD which we have does not have any bonus material and we bought it several months ago so I cannot remember the price we paid. It is available from both Amazon and EBay for under £5 though.

      I do recommend this film as it does have a good storyline and features some great actors and actresses and John Wayne is quite good in this one!

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      • More +
        07.08.2001 05:05
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        “Now, I'll begin at the beginnin'. A fine soft day in the spring it was when the train pulled into Castletown three hours late as usual, and himself got off. He didn't have the look of an American tourist at all about him. Not a camera on him. And what was worse, not even a fishing rod." These are the opening words spoken by Father Lonergan (Ward Bond), in John Ford’s classic film The Quiet Man. Filmed in 1952. It was nominated for seven Oscars, winning two, one of which was Fords fourth Oscar for best director, setting a record as yet unbroken. Filmed mostly in Ireland, it is the story of boxer Shaun Thornton (John Wayne) and the collision course between himself and the local bully, Squire Red Will Danaher (James McLaglen). The plot becomes further entangled when he falls in love with the man's feisty, red-haired, sister Mary Kate (Maureen O'Hara). She is insistent that her dowry is collected from her brother, whilst Shaun who has made his fortune as a prize boxer, wants nothing to do with it. From this unlikely setting comes a rollicking comedy/love story and one of our best-loved films. The gentle humour of the entire cast shines throughout the film, with memorable performances by not only the stars, but the supporting actors as well. The scenery is stunning, winning an Oscar for Best Cinematography. The film at times appears to be painted rather than just filmed and gives a depth and feeling not perceived in movies of today. John (Duke) Wayne is normally associated with cowboy and war movies and has been immortalised by numerous performances in this genre. This however is one of his rare performances without a gun in his hand. Maureen O'Hara plays the part of Mary Kate Danaher to perfection and her entrance is breathtaking. The pastoral scene of a beautiful, flame-haired colleen, herding sheep across a meadow, is captured perfectly with the use of colour an
        d lighting. Other actors include Barry Fitzgerald who takes the part of the elfin Michaeleen Oge Flynn. He is the local matchmaker, taxi driver, bookmaker and any other job that takes his fancy. His quips throughout the film bring his character to life. Ward Bond plays the part of Father Lonergan. An unforgettable scene is that of him losing the “biggest fish in the river” due to Mary Kate’s interruption of the good fathers concentration. Who can forget the famous fight scene between Thornton and Danaher, that is the finale of the movie. The rules of this fight are read out to the contenders, “The Marquis of Queensbury rules, gentlemen if you please.” Immediately, Danaher manages to kick Thornton in the face, and the greatest fight in movie history begins with Michaeleen taking bets on the outcome from everyone there. The fight continues unabated until they fall into the village pub. There it is deemed half time. Taking a swig at his pint, Will says "You know yank, I've taken quite a likin to yuz." He winks at the barman and continues, "Yer widow, me sister, could have done a lot worse." At this point Shaun knocks Will clean through the door and into the street. The fight continues. A scene to watch out for is the last in the film. Mary Kate and Sean, wave from the stream at front of their cottage. She touches his shoulder and whispers something in his ear; he smiles and turns to follow her as she runs to the cottage. Their figures disappear and we realise that this part of the fairytale is over and reluctantly we must leave them and the people of Innisfree. Maureen O’Hara revealed in an interview much later that Ford gave her a line to whisper to John Wayne in this scene. She was not sure about it saying “ I can’t say that to Duke!” But he insisted saying that it would get the reaction he was after. Apparently it was
        so shocking that Maureen forever kept it a secret, and John Wayne did likewise. This is a film that is shown on television from time to time, but it is worth keeping a video of it handy for that occasion when you hanker after something to uplift your spirits. “The Quiet Man” is one of that rare breed, a true classic film.

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      • Product Details

        Blarney and bliss, mixed in equal proportions. John Wayne plays an American boxer who returns to the Emerald Isle, his native land. What he finds there is a fiery prospective spouse (Maureen O'Hara) and a country greener than any Ireland seen before or since--it's no surprise The Quiet Man won an Oscar for cinematography. It also won an Oscar for John Ford's direction, his fourth such award. The film was a deeply personal project for Ford (whose birth name was Sean Aloysius O'Fearna), and he lavished all of his affection for the Irish landscape and Irish people on this film. He also stages perhaps the greatest donnybrook in the history of movies, an epic fistfight between Wayne and the truculent Victor McLaglen--that's Ford's brother, Francis, as the elderly man on his deathbed who miraculously revives when he hears word of the dustup. Barry Fitzgerald, the original Irish elf, gets the movie's biggest laugh when he walks into the newlyweds' bedroom the morning after their wedding, and spots a broken bed. The look on his face says everything. The Quiet Man isn't the real Ireland, but as a delicious never-never land of Ford's imagination, it will do very nicely. --Robert Horton