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Truly, Madly, Deeply (DVD)

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Genre: Drama / Theatrical Release: 1991 / Actors: Juliet Stevenson, Alan Rickman ... / DVD released 04 February, 2002 at MGM Entertainment / Features of the DVD: Dubbed, Full Screen, PAL

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    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    8 Reviews
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      07.08.2009 00:12
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      Recommended watch

      Truly, Madly, Deeply is a 1990 film written and directed by the genius that was Anthony Minghella. It is a beautifully told romantic story supported by a cast of fantastic British actors. Juliet Stevenson and Alan Rickman star in this moving BAFTA award winning film that is firmly placed among the favourites in my collection.

      Stevenson plays the part of Nina, an interpreter who is suffering with the grief of her boyfriend dying despite a year having passed by. In fact, things seem to be getting worse for the young woman. However, she appears to be granted a miracle when her beloved boyfriend Jamie(Alan Rickman) returns to her in the form of a ghost.
      Though at first Stevenson is overjoyed to see the love of her life back gradually cracks begin to appear in their relationship. This is not helped by the fact that Jamie must stay in the flat all day whilst Nina has another life outside. It is in this other life that Nina meets Mark, a psycholosist with a penchant for magic. However, Nina has Jamie waiting for her at home. Will she move on with her life or continue to cling to her love for Jamie?

      This is truly(see what I did there) a beautiful film where both the script and acting are allowed to shine. The story builds up gradually and we are allowed a glimpse into the way grief affects different people. The dialogue is superb and never feels cheesy or forced. Minghella has done a fantastic job with his direction allowing us to see all of the different relationships without feeling that we are imposing upon something that is really very intimate and private.

      There is little action in the film and it relies almost entirely on Juliet Stevenson's ability to portray the character of Nina which she does wonderfully. She shows us the real aspects of grief not the few days of crying then picking up where you left off method so often seen in cinema. Stevenson portrays a woman who is heartbroken and often moved to tears by her loss. However, she also portrays a woman who tries to be strong for others and partake in life no matter how little enthusiasm she feels for it. We empathise with Nina but don't feel sorry for her as she is such a strong woman. In my opinion, this is Juliet Stevenson's finest piece of acting as she displays an ability both for comedy and drama. She is both believable and likeable and it is her who makes the film what it is.
      Alan Rickman plays the lead male role of Jamie but really he is there to support Stevenson's. He plays his part very well and is especially good with his sarcastic one liners. Rickman appears to be much less emotive but I feel this fits in well with the idea that he is there to help Nina get over his death rather than weep together. It shows what a versatile actor Rickman is as you would never for a minute think that this is the same man who plays the cruel Severus Snape in Harry Potter.
      Michael Maloney takes on the part of Mark and I found him to be a good actor though for me the film really was all about teh relationship between Nina and Jamie. Though he was technically playing the "other man" Maloney created a nice character who the audience can easily like and get behind so to speak.

      The only downside I can think of is that the film possibly moves too slowly for some people. There is not a whole lot that actually happens so if you're someone who likes action and a fast-moving plot than this is probably not the film for you.

      I think this is one of the best romantic films ever produced in Britain especially with the comedy edge frequently appearing throughout. The romance shown fits in well with british sensibilities as it isn't too over the top and there are no public declarations of love. However, there is no question of the love being real and I much prefer this understated way of doing things to Hollywoods rather more loud and over the top approach. Rickman and Stevenson were excellent and Minghella showed us why he will be sorely missed in cinema. I was genuinely moved by this film but didn't find it difficult or challenging to watch. It approached very serious topics such as death and grief with a little light heartedness and a sense of realism(though the story itself might be quite fantastical.) After I finished watching I was a little sad but I also felt uplifted which is exactly what I was looking for in a film like this.
      The DVD is strangely expensive and the cheapest I could find it on amazon was £26.99. I have no idea why this is the case but obviously this is a very high price for a film that has no extras and is not a special edition. Therefore, I won't advise you to buy it but to borrow it from a library, a friend or a relative. All that matters is that you watch what is a truly amazing film.

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        09.03.2009 10:53
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        Lovely film with a strong message and a big heart !

        ~Who~

        Anthony Minghella (The English Patient) directs Juliet Stevenson as Nina and Alan Rickman as Jamie in this story of love and loss, life and death. Michael Maloney plays Mark a living person attracted to Nina.

        ~The Movie~

        This film is a moving and funny story about Nina who is a professional translator who had unexpectedly lost the love of her life - Jamie- to a sore throat. This movie shows us how her life falls apart after his death and how she manages to pull it back together. Her flat is also falling apart, something that was always hers and never 'theirs' she is inundated by repairmen and offers of dates by the various men who come over to 'help' out. Nina who refuses to go on without him goes to grief counselling and tells the counsellor she can feel his presence around her. After a particularly bad day Nina sets herself at her piano and can hear Jamie playing the Cello.

        This is the start the best day of Nina's life. As Jamie 'comes back from the dead'. Think 'Ghost' without the Hollywood stars and the pretty people. At first she cannot do anything but be with him. As time goes on and as Jamie has to hide from the living, brings his dead friends in to watch films and turns her life upside down, she realises it's not the 'perfect man' she thought Jamie was who has come back. She realises all his faults and flaws and she had a perfect picture of him when he was really dead.

        Nina meets Mark, who is sensitive and genuine. Nina is torn between her love for Jamie and a 'real' man. Juliet Stevenson gives a performance of a lifetime sat with the therapist and goes through a rollercoaster of grief, torment anger and peace in about 5 minutes. It is overwhelming her tears, dribble and snot all look real you can't help but watch as she melts down and as any strong person, puts herself back together again.

        ~Conclusion~

        This movie is brilliant; it is what Ghost should have been without all the pretty people. To read any blurb about the movie it sounds a touch stupid, High Spirits meets Ghostbusters, but Jamie comes back as a 'real' man, there is no walking through walls, you believe he is there. There is no science, you don't know whether she is going mad and seeing things, or whether he is really there (I believe the latter) .The very last scene will have you crying like a baby. There is no forced sadness within the film, you don't see anyone dying or suffering, except the emotion of Nina, which makes it such a strong film. When you lose someone who is young and it is an unexpected death, as this film shows you, and with any death you immortalise that person as a saint. When, everyone has their flaws, this film basically is a moving on film and that no one is perfect.
        Although there is no violence or very strong language within this film nothing really happens, but you are following the emotions of a young woman who has lost the love of her life and how she gets over it.

        Beautiful!

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          06.11.2008 14:53
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          A fantastic film

          **The Plot**

          Nina (Juliet Stevenson) and Jamie (Alan Rickman) were two people very much in love, and this continued even after Jamie died. Nina is left emotionally paralyzed by the death of Jamie, unable to live her life as she should. She cannot let go of her perfect man and starts to fall apart at the seems.

          Jamie comes back to Nina as a ghost. She is absolutely delighted that he has come back to her, and things go back to how she remembers them, perfect. Until Jamie starts to bring home his "friends" and start to behave slightly less like the perfect man she remembers. Jamie is acting exactly how he used it, and Nina starts to realize that everything wasn't as perfect as she remembers, that her and Jamie, whilst they were in love, they were not the be all and end all of everything.

          When Nina feels able to move on from Jamie, his ghost leaves her. But was it actually Jamie's ghost or was it all just in Nina's imagination?

          **My View**

          I only saw this film recently as my sister bought it and has always loved it.

          Within the first 5 minutes of the film I was crying my eyes out. Juliet Stevenson's grief as Nina is absolutely overwhelming. Its not done prettily as is the case with some Hollywood films, it is done with a raw feeling that is so powerful. The whole way through the film you feel the sense of loss with Nina, and the happiness when Jamie comes back.

          The film is quite a slow moving one, where nothing major happens, it does feel a bit like a fly on the wall documentary at times, but then again this film isn't meant to be hyper with lots of explosions etc. It's a simple, sweet film about loss and grief.

          Alan Rickman as Jamie is brilliant. I love him as an actor and think he plays different characters so well. He is the lovely gentleman at the beginning, but then the normal not so perfect bloke towards the end.

          I loved the ending of the film, it was done with such passion that I felt so caught up in it. Some people say that Nina was imaging the whole thing with Jamie, but I do feel that Jamie did come back to Nina to help her move on. Unlike Ghost, it seems more realistic and something that people could relate to a lot more.

          I really did enjoy this film, even though it left me a little bit of an emotional wreck!

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            22.04.2008 17:48
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            A film that is well worth watching

            - TRULY, MADLY, DEEPLY...PASSIONATELY -

            Released in 1991. Written and Directed by Anthony Minghella (The
            English Patient) Stars Juliet Stevenson & Alan Rickman. BBFC Rating: PG. Running Time: 106 Minutes. Originally a 1990's BBC Screen Two Series set in two parts, Genre: British Romance. BAFTA Winner for best original screenplay. -

            This film has such a wonderful premise. - Jamie and Nina are a young couple who are very much in love. One day Jamie dies quite suddenly from a virus, and Nina's life comes crashing down around her. Jamie, a cellist, was the love of her life; they were best friends, lovers, absolutely everything to each other. So in one foul and cruel swoop she had lost a huge part of herself and she is totally beside herself with grief. Nina is in deep mourning for her dead husband, and spends her whole time crying and wishing he was back with her. Another bond that they shared was their love of music. They would have impromptu concerts. Nina would play the piano and Jamie would accompany her on the cello. The house now seems soulless to her and very empty. Time goes by and Nina just cannot get over the loss of her husband and she withdraws more and more into her own private world where she feels safe. Friends try to rally round and suitors appear on the scene, but Nina cannot and does not want to let go of the past and all its powerful and poignant memories.


            Her house is in need of much repair as nothing seems to work just as it should. There are quite a few leaks and lots of odd jobs that need doing, but it all seems too much for the emotionally and physically distressed Nina. Time has stood still and Nina functions basically within this bleak existence. She is rather eccentric and forgetful by nature and she struggles with her grief on one hand, and on the other she tries to hold down her job as an interpreter. But she seems to be fighting a losing battle. A friend calls round and tells Nina she has got to pull herself together. He starts to fix all the little things that need attending to, whilst trying to snap Nina out of her depressed and isolated state...One day whilst Nina is playing a piece from Bach on the piano, she is suddenly aware that she is not alone. As she turns around she hears the bow playing the warm tones of the cello and she suddenly sees the ghost of her dead husband accompanying her.-


            I thought about this film recently and wondered why I hadn't already reviewed it yet. I love 'Truly Madly Deeply'. It's an exceptional film. It's simple but it has 'Huge' impact. Anyway I am reviewing it now and I'll try not to give too much too away, as is my want. I have watched 'Truly Madly Deeply' quite a few times now over the years and I never tire of it. Although the film is about death, mourning, and ghosts, the film is not all doom and gloom. There are some wonderfully poignant and moving moments throughout the film and there are many tear jerking and heartbreaking scenes for the viewer to go through. But alternately there is some lovely humour running through the storyline also, black humour maybe but a welcome respite from all the sorrow. When Jamie comes back to Earth, he doesn't come alone, and it is this theme which brings with it some gentle comedy moments. This theme has been done before in 'Ghost' but unlike Ghost, 'Truly, Madly, Deeply' is not at all slushy. This film is easy to relate to as it is acted very naturally and brilliantly, in particular by Juliet Stevenson as Nina.


            Her portrayal of the recently widowed Nina is sensitively played out, and completely understated. She played the grieving woman perfectly and I for one believed she was just that. I love this type of method acting and I felt total sympathy for her character, my heart went out to her in the scenes just after losing her husband, when all she could do was cry uncontrollably, and what a convincing display she puts on. She is one hell of an actress. The part was specially written for her by Anthony Minghella as a vehicle for her to display her fantastic acting range. I also loved Alan Rickman in the role of Jamie, her husband. He has a great cheeky quality to him, with a devilish smile, and an impish sense of fun, and these qualities brought the dark humour to life throughout the film. He is constantly playing pranks on her and practical jokes. The whole film is shot very simply with no fancy camera work.


            Most of the action takes place in the house where you are enveloped by the heavy atmosphere of grief, broken at intervals by the other dimension of the story which brings with it some very amusing scenes. But of course in the end something has to give...and give it does. Delightful and funny with great pathos and tragedy; 'Truly, Madly, Deeply' sums up the feelings that Nina and Jamie had for each other; and Jamie took these feelings with him to the grave and beyond. A study in grief; and a light hearted glimpse of the after life. I recommend this film as a beautiful story of a deep love between a man and a woman, and what turmoil the human spirit goes through when one partner loses another, when deeply in love with one another.


            An all British cast and a real gem of a film; Unique and bold it confronts head-on the subject of deep grief and loss. It is sensitively handled and at no time is it ridiculed or made less of. The comedy comes through gently and it is fitting and in keeping. There is quite a bit of use of metaphor and symbolism and you are never too sure if Jamie's return is in fact actual or merely in Nina's imagination as way of coping with her loss, so you do end up viewing the whole thing with an open mind. Brilliantly and subtly acted out by the two main players. There is some supporting cast with minor parts but hardly worth mentioning as they bear no 'real' relevance to the main story. The film is about a couple who loved each Truly, Madly, Deeply and what a stunning and emotional film it is. -


            "The title 'Truly, Madly, Deeply' comes from a word game played by the main characters in which they challenge each other to take turns repeating and adding to a series of adverbs describing how much they love each other".


            -Starring-
            Juliet Stevenson
            Alan Rickman

            Directed by
            Anthony Minghella
            Written by
            Anthony Minghella
            Music by
            Barrington Pheloung
            Cinematography
            Remi Adefarasin

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              27.01.2006 10:14
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              Simply superb

              Introduction
              I remember watching this film in the early nineties while still at university and being so impressed that I had to go back the next day to see it again. I've seen it countless times since, thanks to finding a copy on video. This is a truly underrated film; one that awoke me to the acting skills of Juliet Stevenson and Alan Rickman - to be able to play both comedy and tragedy in the way that they do is really amazing. If you haven't seen it, especially if you're British, then you should try and get hold of a copy.

              The director
              Anthony Minghella is a name I am very familiar with, but didn't know that he had directed either this film, or the others for which he is perhaps more famous, including Cold Mountain, The English Patient and The Talented Mr Ripley (another of my favourite films). He also wrote some of the Morse episodes. Minghella was born in 1954 on the Isle of Wight and was awarded the CBE in 2001.

              The story
              Nina has recently lost her partner, Jamie, who died of a sore throat. Despite the passing of time and offers of comfort from potential partners, she is unable to get over Jamie's death and has put her life on hold. One day, while playing a piece of Bach on the piano, she suddenly hears Jamie's cello join in and realises that he has come back to her as a ghost.

              Their new-found time together is precious and much-enjoyed…until Jamie begins to let his ghost friends move in with Nina too and Nina is reminded of the way that Jamie used to annoy her. Slowly, Jamie's presence forces Nina to interact more with friends outside the flat. Then one day, while out with a Spanish friend, she meets a magician, Mark, with whom there is an instant attraction. Yet she is not quite ready to let Jamie go…or to give up on the idea of a new relationship with Mark.

              The characters/actors
              Juliet Stevenson as Nina and Alan Rickman as Jamie are both fabulous. Nina is a scatterbrained interpreter/translator, who has lost the love of her life. The most moving part of the film for me was when she breaks down during a session with a therapist. The crying and tears are so realistic that I get a shiver down my spine just thinking about it. I've never yet managed to watch it without crying and I'm not one to cry easily at films.

              Jamie brings a more comic, light-hearted atmosphere to the film, which stops it from being too tragic. Despite this, his love for Nina and need to help her through life without him is totally realistic. You don't get many actors like these two. Stunning.

              The other characters, including Nina's handyman, her boss, her potential new boyfriend, Mark, and Jamie's dead friends also bring a humorous angle to the film, but again, the caring that they show for Nina is touching. Somehow, the humour does not in any way undermine the sorrow that Nina is going through after Jamie's death.

              Conclusion
              I have racked my brains for something about this film to criticise, but to no avail. Some may find the idea of combining the death of a loved one with humour, yet still dealing with the subject sensitively, hard to understand, but it is done so perceptively that it is a pleasure to watch. This is what makes this film stand head and shoulders over Ghost. Films about bereavement are all too common, but it is rare to see one that deals with the topic so very well. Like most people, I have lost relatives and friends close to me and there is always that wish that they could come back so that you can say sorry or explain something or just tell them that you love them and then you would be able to let go and get on with life. That is exactly what this film is trying to portray - sometimes a bereavement makes you see people in a different way, by idolising them and forgetting their faults. Not always a bad thing, but it can make life seem hard to understand and remembering people for the way they were is often the best way to cope.

              I highly recommend this film to anyone, regardless of age, gender and sensitivity. The humour takes the edge off the tragedy for those who find it hard to cope with sorrow and grief, without undermining it or belittling it in any way. Fabulous. A much underrated gem of a film - and it's set in the UK with British actors. What more can you want?

              Classification is PG.

              If you want to get hold of a copy, the DVD is available on Amazon for £5.97.

              This review is published on other sites under the same username.

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                16.09.2001 20:05
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                I have wrenched myself away from the world of Mr Harry Potter to share with you one of the sweetest films ever made in my not so humble quite forthright opinion. Unlike Hollywood schmaltz, this isn't full of artificial sweeteners but is without a doubt the really thing. The film was reviewed in original 16mm version premiered at 1990 London Film Festival as Cello, but subsequently became known as Truly, Madly, Deeply. Truly, Madly, Deeply is one of those films that I can't help but watch yet again , if I happen to see it in the television schedule. This film is also responsible for my yearnings towards Alan Rickman, which has been a great source of mirth to my friends, yes you Miss Donna Ford. This opinion however is not going to be an hormone charged Alan fest, as I do genuinely really like the film. The tedious trifles of details: Directed By: Anthony Minghella Written by: Anthony Minghella Certificate:PG Running Time:106 Mins Soundtrack: Orginal music by Barrington Pheloung, who also wrote the Inspector Morse music and featuring Johann Sebastian Bach(from "Adagio of Viola da gamba sonata) Crying is therapeutic.... The film opens with Nina (Juliet Stevenson) in a complete angst and snot ridden mess while talking to her therapist about her grief over the loss of her lover Jamie (Alan Rickman). Juliet Stevenson sure knows how to cry, a skill which she uses to such effect during the course of this film that you wonder if it's going to have a detrimental effect on her skin in the long term. Nina is not coping at all. Her flat is a plumbing nightmare, it is infested with rats and she can't tolerate her every day job as a Spanish translator without once again weeping buckets. The circumstances of Jamie's demise are unclear, all that is alluded to is that the cellist succumbed to a severe sore throat. Nina is existing in a twilight hell
                of loss where despite efforts from her landlord Titus (Christopher Rozycki)and friends Sandy (Bill Paterson)and Maura (Stella Maris)she remains unreachable, breathing only for the memories of her lover. Sometimes she thinks she can hear him talking to her in Spanish. Sometimes she thinks she can hear his key in the door, her mood shifts from the depths of despair to something almost akin to obsession. Jamie, returns not in a dazzling array of gimmicky Patrick Swayze effects, but in the very real shape of the sublime Alan Rickman. The chemistry between Stevenson and Rickman is almost tangible and ultimately a thousand times removed from Ghost's principle actors. Due to the year of release, this film is often regarded as a thinking man's Ghost, but I personally think that this is an insult to both films. Both films have their own little vibe penetrating the storyline. Rickman and Stevenson share a far less paced story , but this slowness, perhaps in turn shows illustrates the realness of the subject matter. We see pianist Stevenson and cellist Rickman performing heartrenching duets. (And yes that really is Rickman playing the cello) and being overjoyed at their reunion. Jamie is suitably po faced and charming about his demise, he explains his return by refering to the Dylan Thomas poem' And death shall have no dominion' hence the title of this opinion. The name of the film is derived from a game the two lovers play. The list adjectives that describe their ardour, i.e. I love you truly, madly, deeply and if one of them forgets the list it means that they don't mean the word. Yes a bit sentimental, but all couples have their own little cutesy rituals. Jamie remains in the flat , while Nina experiences a lull in her depression and begins enjoying life again. Jamie then proves that even dead boyfriends can be annoying, by inviting his fellow ghosts to stay over and watc
                h videos, because apparently that's what they like doing.... that confirms my suspicions about Barry Norman. Anyhow, the ghosts are a bit of a nuisance although the rats seemed to have departed due to all this supernatural activity, they aalso provide some of the lighter moments in the entire film, it always amuses me to see , them mouthing in unison the dialogue from David Lean's "Brief Encounter." Nina then meets the oh so too good to be true , butter wouldn't melt psychologist Mark (Michael Maloney). He is a quirky , loveable sort of man, who performs magic tricks and makes Nina smile. But how will Nina deal with this , when her past is still 'living'? Minghella deals with his debut directorial feature with sensitivity and charm. This is only further bolstered by an outstanding performances by Juliet Stevenson, who in my opinion is a very underated actress who deserves the same profile as Emma Tompson et al. After watching this film you will embrace your lover just a little tighter than usual.

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                  08.02.2001 23:21

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                  This is a very clever, yet very 80's film about a woman getting over the loss of her partner, played as a ghost by Alan Rickman. We meet Juliet Stevenson talking to her counsellor about her loneliness without Rickman, her partner. This key scene gauges the emotion of the film superbly. When she returns home, she discovers that he has returned as a ghost, and for a while, sghe is blissfully happy. At the story continues, we see that Juliet isn't able to grieve properly, with this ghost hanging around with his friends, watching old films. She meets someone else, and begins to realise that she is still clinging to the past, with old memories intact. The end of the film leaves you to ponder whether the ghost was real, or was created by Stevenson's loss. While the plot isn't up to much, and some of the acting is ropey, the two main leads and their script is just amazing. The lines are delivered with the passion you would have expected, and more. This film is about loss, but it is also about coping with loss, coping with the truth that life does go on, eventually.

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                  28.08.2000 21:00
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                  This is a film about a woman who has lost her partner and is grieving for him. He comes back as a ghost and tries to encourage her to move on in her life. The scenes that show her with her counsellor are harrowing at times and very moving especially if you are feeling low yourself when you watch it! It is also very funny in places and over the course of the film you see her meet someone else and grapple with her feelings about that and how her home is overtaken by her ghostly lover and his friends and how in time she comes to recognise that she needs to move on. Not everyone will like this film ........ but I did....... all I can say is try it and see.

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              • Product Details

                Truly Madly Deeply is an intelligent, moving, and deeply funny story about love and death. Nina (Juliet Stevenson), a scatterbrained professional translator, has lost the love of her life, Jamie (Alan Rickman). As her life (and her flat) slowly falls to pieces, she is inundated with an endless stream of repairmen and eligible suitors. But rather than go on with life, Nina dwells on her dead love, slumped at her piano, endlessly playing half of a Bach duet. Then, in a truly magical sequence, his cello suddenly joins her melody... and Jamie's back from the dead. At first it's bliss--think of the superficially similar blockbuster Ghost, only with real people instead of pretty faces Demi Moore and Patrick Swayze. But Nina gradually realises it's a thoroughly real Jamie who's back; complete with every annoying, argumentative fault she'd conveniently forgotten. (He might be dead, he explains, but he still attends political meetings.) Moreover, he has to hide whenever any of the living are around. And he's constantly ice-cold. And he invites his dead pals to her place at all hours. What's a living woman to do? Director Anthony Minghella went on to create the melodramatic period piece The English Patient--but in this film, he shows a far more sensitive, subtle touch. The photography is brilliant, capturing the simple beauties of suburban London. And the wonderfully acted characters, quirky and all too real, will keep you laughing--and always guessing what will happen next.--Grant Balfour, Amazon.com