Welcome! Log in or Register

Museum of Modern Art MoMA (New York, USA)

  • image
£5.66 Best Offer by: amazon.co.uk See more offers
8 Reviews
  • Not so nice children
  • Sort by:

    * Prices may differ from that shown

  • Write a review >
    How do you rate the product overall? Rate it out of five by clicking on one of the hearts.
    What are the advantages and disadvantages? Use up to 10 bullet points.
    Write your reviews in your own words. 250 to 500 words
    Number of words:
    Write a concise and readable conclusion. The conclusion is also the title of the review.
    Number of words:
    Write your email adress here Write your email adress

    Your dooyooMiles Miles

    8 Reviews
    Sort by:
    • More +
      07.12.2009 17:11
      Very helpful
      (Rating)

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      A must see attraction in NYC

      The MoMA is one of the most famous galleries in the world and contains modern art from all areas of the arts, including painting, sculpture, design, music, video and architecture.

      *Location*
      The Museum of Modern Art is located in Midtown Manhattan, and is very easy to find with a map (it is marked on most street maps of New York) especially as Manhattan streets are mostly completely straight and numbered! This is a busy area of New York, between the Rockefeller Centre and Central Park, and not far from Times Square, the Theatre District and all the other major NY attractions.

      *Layout*
      The gallery has a large lobby with a reception desk, a sculpture garden outside on the first floor, and 4 further floors with open areas leading to gallery rooms. Free maps in several languages are available downstairs which are easy to follow once you have orientated yourself.

      The exhibition rooms lead into further rooms and it can be a bit confusing to follow the exhibitions around in order to make sure you don't miss anything! They are very large.

      *Contents*
      This is the best art gallery I have been to with a huge collection of both famous classic painters and more obscure modern art, and there is something for everyone in all of the exhibition rooms.

      The upper two floors are mostly dedicated to classic famous artists like Warhol, Matisse, Miro, Kandinsky, Picasso, with many famous paintings such as Monet's Water Lily's, Van Gogh's Starry Night, Paul Cezanne's The Bather, and Frida Khalo's Self-portrait with Cropped Hair.

      Other exhibitions included a history of design exhibit which included lego and the slinky amongst cutting-edge designs for mass produced products; an exhibit of book illustrations; a fascinating room dedicated to the small 60s Fluxus art movement; and an extensive collection of modern "drawings" (drawings, paintings, sculptures and collages). There were also video art exhibitions, which in the future are set to include a Tim Burton exhibition. Though the exhibitions are constantly changing, I'm sure that my visit was probably reprsentative of the high quality of all of their exhibitions as they are such a large and valued institution.

      I would recommend looking up the exhibitions online before you go so that when you you get there you have an idea of your priorities - there is too much to see it all in one visit!

      *Visting information*
      Opening hours: 10.30am to 5.30pm Mon, Weds, Thurs, Sat, Sun
      10.30am to 8pm Fri
      Closed Tues
      Admission prices: Adults (12+) $20
      Children under 12 free
      Over 65 $16
      Students $12
      Admission is free Friday nights 4-8pm.

      Notes: the museum is quite busy at all times and all year round, especially on Friday nights when admission is free.
      You can get free entry by purchasing a CityPass for $79 for adults which gets you into 6 attractions (Empire State Building Observatory, American Museum of Natural History & Rose Center, Guggenheim Museum, The Metropolitan Museum of Art and The Cloisters, Circle Line Sightseeing Cruises OR Statue of Liberty & Ellis Island as well as the MoMA).

      Though we used the passes, I think $20 is still worth it for this unique and extensive attraction.

      I would suggest leaving aside 2 hours to go to the museum if you are a fast mover in galleries, or anywhere up to whole day if you are a slow mover. There are cafes inside to keep you fed!

      *Conclusion*
      If in New York, you have to go to this gallery. There really is something for everyone and it is a great attraction for introducing children to art that will inspire them, rather than stuffy paintings.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
    • More +
      22.10.2009 08:20
      Very helpful
      (Rating)
      6 Comments

      Advantages

      Disadvantages

      The art really is modern.

      MOMA-The Museum of Modern Art. A relatively famous art museum in New York City. It is located in a rather non descript building on 53rd Street, between 5th and 6th Avenues. It is not to be confused with the grander looking Metropolitan Museum of Art (MMOA), which is located on 5th Avenue, set into Central Park.

      Now, I am not an art lover by any means. In fact, I would go as far as saying it does bore me slightly. This does not put me off having my mind changed or trying new things, so on our recent trip to the city, we found ourselves heading for the MOMA. I shall be honest at this point though. We only found ourselves entering this art place, as it was free to get in. Between 4pm and closing every Friday afternoon, the museum is free to enter. At all other times, the prices to get in are : Adults $20, Over 65 $16, Students $12 and under 12's free. The museum opens at 10:30am and closes at 5:30pm, except on Friday, when it is 8pm.

      As we went when it was free entry, this review shall focus on that. Having looked on the MOMA website before visiting, it advises arriving an hour to 2 hours after 4pm on the Friday, as the queue at that time is rather large. Now, taking that advice, we arrived at 5:30pm and found no queue, but the place was absolutely rammed with people. I did find it odd that you can't just walk straight in. We tried to go straight through the security barriers and were informed we needed tickets. So a little walk back down to the main lobby and grabbed 2 tickets off the side (as they are just printed out and placed on the side?!) and away we went.

      Like I said, the place was rammed with people. Now, I have a strange disliking of people at the best of times and when it's crowded, it does get my goat up. We perservered though and after a 5 minute walk up some stairs, round some corridors, we found some exhibits. As I have said, I am not an art person, so it did all go above my head rather easily.

      I only remember a few exhibits, mainly because what I did see was pretty dire to be honest. I really don't understand art at all. One exhibit was 3 different coloured straight lines on the wall. Seriously!!!! I can draw that. Another was a American Army Land Jeep, nothing done to it, just sitting there. Then there was a room of light shades, all of which I had seen in Ikea before.

      Now, there were 2 pieces of art that I did like. The first was a picture of a person. Picture of a person you say. This was different in that it was made entirely out of cigarettes. All bent and unbroken into call shapes to make the person. It was very cool looking. Then there was a picture titled Mr Penis Head. I think you can draw your own conclusions of that picture, but it did amuse the inner child in me.

      As the place was so packed, we decided after an hour of trying to get in everywhere that we would leave. If you enjoy art and understand it, then I would expect you will enjoy visiting here. If you are like me however, I would give it a miss, unless you go when it's free on the Friday.

      I've given it a generous 3 stars, as it is a good place, but something that I don't enjoy. I can't fault something just because it's not my cup of tea.

      Comments

      Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        30.05.2009 13:55
        Very helpful
        (Rating)

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        one of the best days out on plant earth if you like art

        MOMA, at W 53rd Street between 5th and 6th Avenues, had a fabulous facelift a few years ago. The recent renovation, courtesy of Yoshio Taniguchi, created exciting fresh public spaces, with greatly improved facilities for visitors and expanded galleries that can hold more of this museum's outstanding collections.

        It's a bewildering experience, especially for the uninitiated and so it is best to pick up a trail or speak to the staff about what to see if you have limited time. It's a bit of an art sweet shop with every major modern artist covered here from Picasso, Matisse and Mondrian to Dali, Pollock and Warhol.

        The fifth floor contains 19th century work from the Post-Impressionists to the Surrealists. Down one floor you'll see mid -20th century works, which includes Warhol's soup cans and Marilyn Monroe. The third floor contains photography from the 20th century, architecure and design (including iconic images from Frank Lloyd Wright) and drawings by mega stars such as Willem de Kooning and Lucien Freud. Down on the second floor, MOMA has displayed more contemporary pieces from artists such as Jeff Koons.

        Beware it's a bit like visiting Florence, you will need to sit down and take things slowly to absorb properly. Don't expect to take in everything on one visit. The cafes are very good for drinks and quality snacks and there is more formal dining on the ground floor. The shop is outstanding and you will need to factor this time in too. Basically MOMA is a whole day of sightseeing.

        Good luck, it's a stimulating if tiring experience.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
      • More +
        14.11.2001 15:06
        Very helpful
        (Rating)
        3 Comments

        Advantages

        Disadvantages

        • "Not so nice children"

        Dancing festivals may not seem the most normal place to start increasing your vocabulary, but believe it or not, it was during one of these long drawn out affairs, whilst sitting in pink church in costume with full stage make up waiting to go on stage that I learnt a thing or two. In dancing festivals you have categories for style, as well as for age and level, so you might find “Baby Ballet” or “C Tap”. On this particular day I noticed that as well as Modern, they were offering Contemporary and not knowing the difference, I turned to Mummy dearest to ask. Do you know the difference? Sorry if you do, just skip to the next paragraph. If you don’t, though, bear with me for a few, well, words. Contemporary, it appears, means modern to the time. Modern means modern now. See? So while all modern dances are currently contemporary, not all contemporary dances are modern. This does tie in to the museum, but you have to read on a bit first to find out why…. Anyway, onto the MOMA. The MOMA is famous – so famous it got mentioned in 3 of the Babysitters Club Books, a Sweet Valley High special, several Paula Danziger ones and a number of others I’ve forgotten. Knowing I was off to the States this term, I arrived back at uni with every book I owned that mentioned the city in question, and believe me, there are a lot (even if most do have a target reading age or, erm, age 10). So now you know it’s famous, and I’m guessing you know what the initials stand for (Museum of Modern Art – see, you do now), so what else do you need to know? ### Getting There and Getting In and not Getting Kicked Out ### 11 West 53rd Street is the official address. Basically it’s just off 5th Avenue, not too far from FAO Schwartz and the lovely little Lindt Shop. Catch the Subway to 53rd St (line E and F) or Rockefeller Centre (lines B, D, F and Q). Busses M1, 2, 3, 4, 5 all stop at 53rd
        Street too. There are carparks nearby, but with rates starting at $12 per hour I’d recommend not driving. Current entrance prices are $8.50 for students (no ID needed in my case – maybe I just look young – but take it to be sure) and $12 for adults. Senior citizens (age 65 + ) also get discounted entry and under 16 s are free if accompanied by an adult. To avoid getting kicked out – well, go when they’re open and staying open for a bit. The opening hours are: Monday 10:30-5:45 Tuesday 10:30-5:45 Wednesday CLOSED Thursday 10:30-5:45 Friday 10:30-8:15 Saturday 10:30-5:45 Sunday 10:30-5:45 I went on a Friday just after lunch and although it was fairly busy, it wasn’t unpleasantly crowded. The museum is closed on Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day but apart from that are open all year round. ### Works On Display ### This is where the linguistic note above comes in. On offer you can find everything from 17th and 18th century pieces right through to works created last year. Surely the former cannot be counted as “modern”?Still, I’m not complaining because they did have some incredible things to see. It might be overhyped but I liked Picasso’s “Les Demoiselles D’Avignon” (the hooker one) – we even had a copy of it done by our head of Art on the common room wall in 6th form. As well as that there’s Van Gogh’s “Starry Night” (most bon) and Monet’s “Water Lillies” which is either so wonderful or just so large (3 full sized canvasses) that they give it a room of its own. There were a lot of “proper” modern pieces too and one name that sticks in my head (because I like it and, ok fine, bought the postcard) is “Broadway Boogie” by a chap called Mondrain who I think is Dutch but might not be….. <br>### Not Picture Pieces ### There are a number of temporary displays on throughout the year, the current one being some of Alberto Giacometti’s sculptures. These were a bit like the El Greco exhibition in Vienna’s Kunsthistorisches Museum – over advertised and under impressive. There was a nice sculpture garden though which is permanent and well worth a glance and bits and bobs dotted around the place. ### Layout ### The walls are white, the floors are brown. Anyone who knows German might think that sounds like a certain little children’s rhyme but it’s not (and how dare you for thinking my translation skills are that bad :p ) But it’s true, the place it like that. More importantly, there are places to sit and, well, look at the paintings. The works are spread over 4 floors, with most being situated on the upper 2. The place is airy, the staff isn’t scary. Sorry, just had to get it out of my system. ### Boring but Necessary Details ### There are toilets on all floors – if you’re desperate go straight to the top floor since it seemed to be the only one with no queues. Lifts are available but if you are physically mobile then the escalators are a better bet as they deliver you straight to the centre and take a lot less time. Shops (‘hang on – how can they come under “Boring but Necessary” ?’ you ask) are boring (See – you asked too soon). There’s a main one when you go in, and a little mini thing up on the first floor but as museum shops go, neither is wonderful. Postcards start at 75c, but be warned - don’t buy first and then go looking for the works in question, as a lot are “temporarily unavailable” as the lovely signs say. Aside from these, there are books and posters and other art stuff, but nothing particularly inspired.
        Terrorism-wise (ah, I love writing that) not much seems to have changed – large bags need to be checked (and although you can’t take pictures, you have to keep any cameras with you which I found a bit cheeky) when you arrive but that’s basically it – no searching or x-raying that I could see at any rate. There is a restaurant but it’s a bit too fancy (the food and the prices and the outfits of the waiters) for my taste. Then again, the type of people who go into art galleries for 3 course meals could probably afford it. ### Can you believe it ? ### They accept cash, travellers cheques and credit cards. This I can cope with. The thing is, they are desperate for you to become a member of the museum (which results in free entry for you, and money for them) – so desperate in fact that they have complicated little brochures available which detail the many, many ways in which you can do this. For example there are retirement plans and bequests and life income plans all set up for you to help them. The best bit, though, has to be the page when they start explaining the tax deduction benefits to you of donating to them – as if they’re doing you a favour by taking your money…… OINY I guess. So there you have it. Some wonderful pieces of art in a wonderfully modern setting (even if the pictures themselves aren’t). Much better (and more affordable) than the Guggenheim, but only gets 4 stars as it’s really not a patch on the Met.

        Comments

        Login or register to add comments
        • More +
          27.03.2001 06:22
          Very helpful
          (Rating)
          13 Comments

          Advantages

          Disadvantages

          When the Museum of Modern Art opened in 1929, it was viewed as an experimental operation: Previous to this, It was almost impossible to view late nineteenth and twentieth century art works, let alone the work of a LIVING artist. Museums were still considered to be the indulgence of the elite and the cultured; they were still sober institutions that reveled in history and pomp. Three art collectors brought this Museum into being: Lillie P. Bliss, Mrs Cornelius J. Sullivan and Mrs John D. Rockefeller Jr. All of these women had progressive and contemporary tastes, and the influence and energy to challenge conservative traditions. Bliss was an avid collector of Post-Impressionist work, Sullivan was rather fond of investing in up and coming artist and Rockefeller was highly influenced by European art museums during her youth. Rockefeller and Bliss met in 1928 while touring in Egypt, where they began discussing seriously the need for a modern art museum in America; they joined with Sullivan on their return to the States. They propositioned the president of The Allbright Art Gallery, A. Goodyear, and the first plans of the museum were put into motion. During its first few years, the museum experimented with exhibitions and programs, slowly beginning to build its permanent collection: Edward Hopper, Aristide Maillol, Dufy and Brancusi were among the first acquisitions. In 1935 Rockefeller boosted the collection with a large donation of 181 works - specifying that any one of the paintings she was donating could be exchanged or sold to further the permanent collection. In 1939, a very generous donation was made by Mrs Simon Guggenheim - Picasso's Girl before a mirror, and Rousseau's The Sleeping Gypsy - and in 1939, the museum acquired one of its most historically influential piece - Picasso's Les Demoiselles d'Avignon. The museum found its permanent home in 1939, in a building designed in the'International Style' (a six s
          tory building, constructed from aluminum and Thermolux), by Philip L. Goodwin and Edward D. Stone. Within two years of the new premises opening, America was well and truely involved in the second world war: The museum supported the war effort by holding exhibitions, special programs, films and posters for the government, the armed forces and later, veterans. Post-war, the American Abstract Expressionism movement began to grow and influence Europe: The museum decided to to shift their focus to this market, acquiring works by Pollock, Motherwell, Gorky and Rothko. The museum was also one of the first to hold a photography exhibition and open a photographic department - 1940. The film department benefited greatly from the donations of Stanley Kubrick (at the time a young director - he often came to the museum's screenings) and Joseph Levine. In 1958, a serious fire caused considerable damage to the museum and its collection: Two Monet's (one being one of the Water Lilies paintings) were lost, and so was a Candido Portinari mural. There was also considerable smoke damage to Pollock's No. 1, but it was successfully restored at a later date. There were problems again in 1981, when the museum had to hand back Picasso's masterpiece Guernica, and its preliminary studies to Spain; they had been on an extended loan, from Picasso, since 1939. After the fall of the Franco regime, Picasso's heirs decided that the pieces should be returned to Spain, and Guernica remains in The Prado, Madrid, to this day. Other paintings and sculptures you can view at the Museum of Modern Art: Cubism (or rather Braque and Picasso): Picasso - Woman Dressing Her Hair, Two Nudes, Boy Leading a Horse and The Kitchen. Braque - Road near L?Estaque and Soda. Futurists: Umberto Boccioni - States of Mind and the superb Unique Forms of Continuity in Space (1913 - bronze). Gino Severini - Dynamic Hieroglyphic of the Bal Tabarin. Carlo
          Carra - Funeral of the Anarchist Galli. The Dada and Surrealist movements are well documented: Paul Delvaux - Phases of the Moon. Rene Magritte - The Menaced Assasin and The False Mirror (a comment on inner vision; the painting is of a cloudscape within the pupil of an eye). Salvador Dali - The Persistence of Memory - probably the most well known of his works, this is of a bleak, trompe l'oeil landscape, melting watches and scurrying ants. Joan Miro - Dutch Interior and The Birth of the World. Giorgio de Chirico - The Seer. Marcel Duchamp - Bicycle Wheel and Fresh Widow. Man Ray - Cadeau, this is the iron with thirteen nails attached to the base. Abstract Expressionism: Franz Kline - Painting No.2. Mark Rothko - Magenta, Black, Green on Orange and Red, Brown and Black (my absolute favourite Rothko piece). Hans Hofman - Cathedral and Memoria in Aeternum. Ad Reinhardt - Abstract painting, Red and Number 107. Jackson Pollock - One, Echo and Full Fathom Five. Also within the permanent collection are plenty of works by Georgia O'keeffe, Joseph Cornell, Andrew Wyeth's spectacular painting - Christina's World, Alberto Giacometti, Willem de Kooning, Robert Rauschenberg, Cy Twombly and Odilon Redon's always perturbing - Spider. The museum also houses a collection of design; furniture, textiles, cutlery etc. This is a truely wonderful collection, highlights are: Pinin Farina - The Cisitalia 202 GT (the first car to have entered the collection of any art gallery), designs by Frank Lloyd Wright, a cup and saucer designed by Josiah Wedgwood, a vase by Louis Comfort Tiffany (son of the founder of the New York jewelry store), audio designs from Jakob Jensen and my favourite (probably because I have one), David Gammon?s Transcriptor Turntable. The photography department is excellent, it is one of the largest collections in the museum but unfortunately only a small selection are on public display. The collection sta
          rted soon after the museum's foundation with a photograph by Walker Evans; it continues through the decades with work from William Henry Fox Talbot, Paul Strand, Man Ray, Ralph Steiner and Edward Weston. More recent acquisitions have been from William Eggleston, Michael Schmidt, Thomas Struth and Cindy Sherman. * General Information This is a VERY, VERY busy museum (there, I warned you), so the MoMA offers you an alternative way of viewing its permanent collection and current exhibitions: By reservation for a private, guided tour an hour before normal opening times (at the end of the opinion), or on Mondays, after hours, from 6.00 - 7.00 pm, followed by a wine tasting session from 7.00 - 8.00 pm. These are expensive - $36 and $39, respectively. A self guided tour (I can highly recommend this), is $3.25 on top of the entrance price. The museum has two venues for eating: The Sette MoMA is an seriously overpriced contemporary Italian restaurant, but there is the added benefits of live Jazz on Thursdays and Saturdays, from 6.00 - 10.00pm. The Cafe/etc. is the more innovative of the two; you can sip your cafe lattes while surrounded by video and film installations, the book shop is also situated here. All programs and services are completely free to special needs visitors, wheelchairs and walking frames are provided by the museum. MoMA: 11, West 53 Street, between 5th and 6th Avenue. Opening times: Thursday to Tuesday, 10.30 - 5.45pm. Price: $10.00 Public Transport: Bus - M1, 2, 3, 4 and 5. Subway - E and F. Website: www. moma.org

          Comments

          Login or register to add comments
            More Comments
          • More +
            28.07.2000 19:49
            Very helpful
            (Rating)

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            The MOMA has just undergone an extensive refurbishment that divides the art into three floors. Oddly, the floors are not sorted by country, movements or time, but as People, Places and Objects. This means that Matisse and modern photographs share the same space, which is a bit unusual! However, as long as you are not looking for a specific artist or movement, it makes for an enjoyable experience, as you never know what's in the next room! The ground floor has an excellent cafe and giftshop, with an amazingly extensive book shop. There's also a small garden with large sculptures in, which is nice to sit in. When i went, there was also a theatre or cinema or something being built on a basement level, but I don't know how good it is. The building is beautiful, with huge glass walls and lots of seats in the galleries. As usual in NY art galleries, you have to leave most of your things in a cloakroom. This is really annoying because it has a big queue most of the time. However, it does make the galleries nicer when you walk around. There are lots of famous Picasso, Monet, Matisse and van Gogh paintings that are good to see. I really recommend this gallery because of the extensive collection.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            19.07.2000 09:19
            Very helpful
            (Rating)

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            New York's Museum of Modern Art, located on West 53rd Street, is another of New York's first rate modern art museums. Founded in 1929, the museum paved the way for the other contemporary art museums, challenging the very definition of art. The eclectic collection of styles, media and genres is extremely interesting and makes a visit intriguing for visitors. In addition to paintings and sculpture, the Museum of Modern Art features galleries of photography (in galleries on the second floor), and architecture and design (on the fourth floor). There is also a cinema in the basement, and a gallery devoted to prints and illustrated books. All of this doesn't detract from the superb collection of modern and contemporary art on display. There are several works by Dali, including his well-known "The Persistence of Memory", as well as works by other pre-war artists, such as Picasso, Braque, Mondrian, Miro, Van Gogh, Ernst and an entire room devoted to Matisse. Post-war artists include Jackson Pollock, Willem de Kooning, Mark Rothko, and a superb collection of pop art including Lichtenstein and Warhol. The museum also owns several works by my favourite contemporary artist, minimalist Donald Judd, but these are on rotation, and may not always be on display. This is an excellent collection of modern and contemporary art, and offers a worthwhile afternoon's entertainment for the lover of modern art. This is, however, the New York gallery most likely to make a non-fan of modern art wonder what all the fuss is about – so if you're not a fan, or not prepared to give it a try, give this museum a miss!

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments
          • More +
            01.07.2000 17:50
            Very helpful
            (Rating)
            2 Comments

            Advantages

            Disadvantages

            Its possible that this is my favourite Art museum in the world, it really is something special. There is a sculpture garden, which while not very big is a lovely place just to wonder around and with its high walls is a welcome break from the rest from the outside world of the city. There is so much to see here from impressionism, to surrealism, to sculpture. There are pieces by picasso, kadinsky, paul klee and loads more. It really is amazing being able to be inches from some of Picasso's work after you have seen prints and pictures of it before. The way the museum is set out is brillant, even as you walk up the stairs to other floors their are paintings on the walls or sculptures hanging from the ceiling. Some of the really modern sculptures they have there by lesser known artists include the use of neon lighting, bean bags, empty bottles, absolutely anything but I would say that as opposed to some of the Art galleries in london where you see a piece of 'modern art' and go what the hell is that for or whats the point of that, the pieces in MOMA cater more for everyone and are not so outrageous. On the top floor there is a design exhibit showing mainly highly modern designed furniture, with pieces from the 60's and 70's. In the basement there is a changing exhibition, when I visited it was an Alfred Hitchcock exhibtion, which was fascinating and they had managed to get hold of many original pieces to do with the films, including rare scripts etc. I believe there is something for everyone at this museum, our family has very different tastes when it comes to Art, but everyone found they wanted to spend a long time in the museum and each found their own favourite sections. As a last little note, there is a cafe/restuarant at MOMA which is also very well done as it keeps the modern art theme going with specially designed light fittings, stainless steel tables etc, difficult to
            explain really but while you are choosing your food you feel like you are looking at another exhibit.

            Comments

            Login or register to add comments