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A Pleasant Shade Of Grey - Fates Warning

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Genre: Hard Rock & Metal / Artist: Fates Warning / CD+DVD / Audio CD released 2007-08-27 at METALBLADE

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      08.07.2008 21:44
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      Fates Warning's eighth album (1997).

      If 'Perfect Symmetry' was a little dull and repetitive, 'A Pleasant Shade of Gray' is among the most tedious progressive metal albums I've heard, though still one that has its moments. What sets out to be the band's magnum opus ends up failing in many respects, the twelve songs that listeners are invited to view as sequential movements of a single fifty-three-minute song actually being more truthfully revealed as separate and largely unrelated tracks containing very few ideas, that might as well have been given individual titles.

      Kevin Moore's keyboard overture in Part I is instantly memorable, though sounds a little derivative of eighties horror film themes ('A Nightmare on Elm Street' in particular). This song is perhaps the best here, as it works excellently as an introduction to set up what would ultimately fail to be achieved thereafter, concluding with Ray Adler's haunting oration. After this, the album flirts with weak industrial rock in Part II before giving over to a few too many ballads in Parts IV, V and VI consecutively, and after this the album never really recovers. This isn't even massively experimental, and the listener's patience is never rewarded.

      1. Part I
      2. Part II
      3. Part III
      4. Part IV
      5. Part V
      6. Part VI
      7. Part VII
      8. Part VIII
      9. Part IX
      10. Part X
      11. Part XI
      12. Part XII

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    • Product Details

      Disc #1 Tracklisting
      1 Part 1
      2 Part 2
      3 Part 3
      4 Part 4
      5 Part 5
      6 Part 6
      7 Part 7
      8 Part 8
      9 Part 9
      10 Part 10
      11 Part 11
      12 Part 12