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Black Sunday - Cypress Hill

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Genre: Hip-Hop & Rap - Gangsta & Hardcore / Artist: Cypress Hill / Explicit Lyrics / Audio CD released 1998-08-24 at Columbia

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      03.05.2010 13:58
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      5 Great Songs and lots of Dope Beats (Literally!)

      For me this was one of the seminal hip hop albums of the nineties, with its heavy beats and rough rhymes, it was a classic album which melded Hispanic rap with some blunt beats.

      It was released in 1993 and was the second and most commercially viable of all of the albums.

      The album has a number of stand out tracks with, there are a number of good songs but I'm really going to pick out the 5-6 songs which are pretty awesome.

      I ain't going out like that - This is an awesome song which is really pumped up, the beat flies by and it really is mental. The song is fast paced, the lyrics are rowdy and make you want to jump around and it really sets the tone for the album.

      Insane in the Brain - This is possibly their greatest song, it came out around the same time as 'Jump Around' and has the same mad energy which makes you want to go crazy when you hear the song, it makes me want to bounce, jump and really enjoy myself. The Mc'ing on this song is brilliant.

      When the Shit Goes Down - Another fast paced and fun song, I really like this is keeps with the pace of the previous songs and contrasts perfectly to some of the slower doped out songs on the album.

      Lick A Shot - Another fast paced track which is really cool, I love this song and this along with the other fast paced songs are the ones I always go to.

      There are a number of other tracks which are slower paced and seem to be influenced by things of a herbal nature, which are fine and contrast well to the crazy fast paced songs, but for me the 4 songs above are the ones I'll always go back to, they remind me of fun times, make me want to jump around and dance, the others are good tunes to chill to but I can take or leave them really.

      Track Listing:

      I Wanna Get High
      I Ain't Goin' Out Like That
      Insane in the Brain
      When the Shit Goes Down
      Lick a Shot
      Cock the Hammer
      Lock Down
      3 Lil' Putos
      Legalize It
      Hits from the Bong
      What Go Around Come Around, Kid
      A to the K
      Hand on the Glock
      Break 'Em Off Some

      The DVD is £3.93 on Amazon or 99p on Marketplace or Ebay.

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      15.11.2009 21:50
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      Well worth a look for hiphop and rock fans alike

      Rap/Hip hop is not something I can normally abide with a couple of exceptions, namely the efforts of vocalist Mike Patton with Faith No More (who hold the dubious honour of helping to pave the way for the emergence of Nu Metal), the vocals on Rage Against The Machine's debut and finally Cypress Hill's 1993 album 'Black Sunday'

      'Black Sunday' features two vocalists in the form of B Real and Sen Dog, one of whose rapping style consists of a rhymical, nasal sniping whilst the latter interjects here and there to mirror and empahasise the lyrics expressed by the former with his own unique brand of constipated-sounding expressions.

      Its a combination that works brilliantly, and there are myriad inventive vocal arrangements employed throughout, whilst the lyrics are both atmospheric and often darkly humourous, depicting the nihilistic existence of gang life and extolling the virtues of marajuana at ever opportunity. The music itself meanwhile consists of clever, choppy use of samples, both vocal and instrumental (as well as sirens, rainfall and the like), alternating from up-tempo and dynamic to slow and unsettling.

      It all comes together to make a memorable, engaging and suprisingly dark listen, - the artwork looks like it should belong to a doom or black metal album rather than a hiphop album- and stands as Cypress Hill's best album to date, with a crossover appeal that will likely make it of interest to rock fans as well.

      Tracklisting-

      1."I Wanna Get High" - 2:55
      2."I Ain't Goin' Out Like That" - 4:27
      3."Insane in the Brain" - 3:33 (edited to 3:29 on some versions)
      4."When the Shit Goes Down" - 3:08
      5."Lick a Shot" - 3:23
      6."Cock the Hammer" - 4:25
      7."Lock Down" (Interlude) - 1:17
      8."3 Lil' Putos" - 3:39
      9."Legalize It" - 0:46
      10."Hits from the Bong" - 2:40
      11."What Go Around Come Around, Kid" - 3:43
      12."A to the K" - 3:27
      13."Hand on the Glock" - 3:32
      14."Break 'Em Off Some" - 2:46

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        27.11.2008 10:25
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        All rap fans should own this.

        Black Sunday is the 1993 album by one of the biggest ever rap acts in history Cypress Hill. Consisting of B-Real, Sen Dogg, and DJ Muggs, all three members have a Latin/Hispanic influence they represent in their music. Black Sunday on release debuted at #1 on the US billboard album charts, the first ever rap band to achieve this, and has since gone 4 times platinum in sales, one of an elite few hip-hop albums to do so, and they became the first ever rap act to have two albums in top 10 US billboard charts simultaneously.

        The group originally was called DVX and included Mellow Man Ace, but after his departure in 1988 they re-named themselves. Cypress Hill broke onto the music scene with their self titled debut album (that has also gone 4 times platinum) and a series of successful tours, after their unexpected success pressure was put on them by their label Columbia Records for them to get another album out whilst they were in the limelight. The group hastily put together Black Sunday and a legend was created, even though the band members themselves believe with more time the album could have been better. One of the most influential albums in alternative music, Black Sunday sent shockwaves through both the rap and the rock world, inspiring artists from Rage Against the Machine to the Wu-Tang Clan, with the single 'Insane In The Brain' being particularly notable for turning up in both rap and rock circles, as well as being a huge influence on the Latino music and culture. The band have never been scared of controversy and in 1993 were banned from the US TV show Saturday Night Live after smoking weed on-air and smashing their instruments up during a performance of 'I Ain't Going Out Like That'. The album booklet has 19 positive facts about marijuana which are worth the read.


        The Album

        (Sample information taken from Wikipediea)

        1 - I Want To Get High

        One of the mellowest tracks you could ever hope to hear, and a song that perfectly describes what the Hill's favourite pastime is. Like I said the beat couldn't be much more laid back, very slow and melodic, the raps work very well and you can really tell B-Real loves smoking, just a cool song.

        Samples

        "Get Out Of My Life, Woman" by The New Apocalypse
        "Taxman" by Junior Parker
        "One Draw" by Rita Marley

        8/10

        2 - I Ain't Going Out Like That

        After the laid back first track we switch up to a faster paced, more aggressive song going right back to the gangster rap roots of Cypress, the tracks basically about life in a gang and the things gangsters do, love Sen Dogg's raps on this one, he has a crazy voice, great production on this.

        Samples

        "Wicked World" by Black Sabbath
        "The Wizard" by Black Sabbath

        7/10

        3 - Insane In The Brain

        The legendary track that launched Cypress to super stardom, not many people know this song is a diss track aimed at Chubb Rock who B-Real felt had mocked their style on his 'I Gotta Get Mine Yo' album, the song has a pumping baseline mixed with psycadellic sounds and some unusual samples samples, the beats one of the bounciest in hip-hop, the lyrics aren't exactly thought provoking but its still a great song.

        Samples

        "I'm Black And I'm Proud" by James Brown
        "Good Guys Only Win In The Movies" by Mel & Tim
        "All Over The World" by The Youngbloods
        "Life" by Sly & The Family Stone


        8/10

        4 - When The Sh*t Goes Down

        The first ever Cypress Hill song I heard when I bought a rap compilation album at the young age of 12, I love the beats to this one, another head nodding track, love the samples, B-Real sounds even more nasal toned than usual here, love the story telling, just a great song all-round with little to no faults.

        Samples

        "Stratus" by Billy Cobham
        "Deep Gully" by Outlaw Blues Band


        9/10

        5 - Lick a Shot

        A fast paced, aggressive sounding track that for me sounds like it was put together in a rush, I do like it but the production doesn't sound very polished and the raps don't really do much for me.

        6/10

        6 - Cock The Hammer

        A wicked gangster rap song, I've loved this track since the first time I heard it, Sen Dogg kicks the song off with some of my favourite raps from him ever, quite a dark sound, you can hear the latino influence in the beats, not a happy track but a great one none the less.

        9/10

        7 - Lock Down

        Interlude.

        8 - 3 Lil' Putos

        A slow track that I hated the first time I heard it but now its another I love, the very slow and almost systematic beats only amplify B-Real's tone leaving a sound like no other band/person in hip-hop, this track for me is one of the truer sound of the group and is a prelude to the darker sounds to come from their next album.

        Samples

        "I've Told Every Little Star by Linda Scott
        "Remix For P Is Free" By Boogie Down Productions
        "Ode To Billy Joe" by Lou Donaldson

        8/10

        9 - Legalize It

        A interlude with clips from different people talking about weed.

        Sample

        "Hallelujah, I Love Her So" by Gene Chandler

        10 - Hits From the Bong

        What a cool song, love this track, its in my top 5 all time Cypress Hill songs, the music borrows heavily from "Son Of A Preacher Man" by Dusty Springfield and sounds just as good, in case you don't know a bong is a pipe with water used as a filter/cooler to smoke marijuana through, B-Real will often smoke a bong on stage when this track is on (it was a massive joint when I saw them), the song is all about smoking and a great one to kick back to and get a bit hazy.

        Samples

        "Son Of A Preacher Man" by Dusty Springfield
        "Get Out Of My Life, Woman" by Lee Dorsey
        "Don't Cha Hear Me Calling To Ya" by Junior Mance


        10/10

        11 - What Go Around Comes Around Kid

        Another very Hispanic sounding track and another about gang life, more great production, both rappers sound very laid back when rapping despite the violent subjects they are speaking about, the song is basically about getting revenge, love the music and the raps.

        Samples

        "Get Out Of My Life, Woman" by Grassella Oliphant

        8/10

        12 - A to the K

        A very violent song unsurprisingly about gun violence, a very dark sound, the siren/alarm sample that is distorted in the background really adds to the track in a way I'm struggling to describe, Cypress came into criticism for this track and the fact it supposedly glorifies violence but its just music not hate propaganda.

        8/10

        13 - Hand On The Glock

        A good song but nothing different from anything else on here, they already have 2 or 3 very similar songs on here that are at a higher level, more lyrics about gang violence, and more good production.

        7/10

        14 - Break 'Em Off Some

        This one makes me bounce every time, love this track, what a great way to end the album, the story telling in the lyrics is excellent and the beats always lift my mood, a perfect track to finish things off with.

        Sample

        "Money In The Pocket" by Joe Zawinul

        9/10

        Overall a 9/10 for me, this is one of the most influential hip-hop albums of all time and will forever be remembered as a classic, in my opinion they do have better work but considering this was made in 1993, still sounds fresh and can be picked up very cheap I recommend this to all rap fans.

        Further Reading

        http://www.cypresshill.com/
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cypress_Hill
        http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Black_Sunday_(album)

        Buy the album for £3.98 -

        http://www.amazon.co.uk/exec/obidos/ASIN/B000024A38
        /shoppingco0a3-21/ref=nosim

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          04.09.2008 20:17
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          'Black Sunday' is a hip-hop album which everyone should own.

          'Black Sunday' is the super second album from the American hip-hop group that is Cypress Hill. The album was released in 1993 and consists of a grand total of fourteen tracks; it's a great little album from Cypress Hill and one which comes complete with a high number of top tracks. I'm not exactly a massive fan of hip-hop, I do however have a great appreciation for the genre at times and when I'm in the mood for the music there are a couple of albums that I almost always reach for; 'Black Sunday' is one of those albums.

          Beginning with 'I Wanna Get High' the music immediately makes its impact, the beat is absolutely infectious and the vocals always are excellent to listen to here. The chorus is brilliant, the track just works and in every area is just absolutely fantastic to listen to. 'Insane in the Brain' is the next excellent track that the album has to offer, coming third on the album the music once more impresses massively here and I have in fact loved this track right from the very first time that I heard it. The beat is powerful, there's some fine mixing present here, and vocally again the music is always exceptional. The words hit hard, they're powerfully sung out and always the music has much to offer here. It's a great track to relax to, a fine piece of music and one which I'd recommend all to listen to.

          'Black Sunday' is such a terrific album to relax to, the music is incredibly laid back and always the beats are excellent and the vocals powerful also. There's not a single bad track present on this album and with all fourteen the group always grabs your full undivided attention. The music is incredibly raw and it is this that really strikes you when listening to the album; listening to 'Black Sunday' provides for a fine 44 minutes of music and never does the groups raw edge fail to impress.

          'A to the K' is a great track from this album, 'Hits from the Bong' another; when listening to this album there's top quality at each and every turn; never does 'Black Sunday' leave you in the least bit disappointed and at all stages of the albums progression in fact the music is absolutely masterful. The tracks often lack lyrical depth, you don't listen to Cypress Hill for lyrical supremacy however; you listen to the music for an incredibly relaxing, chilled out listening experience. When you play this album you can forget about your worries and for 44 minutes just let the beats roll, the vocals flow, and enter the care-free world of Cypress Hill. Listening to this album is a great way to relax, and whenever you're feeling a tad stressed you can't beat a good Cypress Hill session.

          Closing track 'Break 'Em off Some' leaves you well and truly wanting for more, it's a terrific track and a fine way for the group to end the album here. It's a busy track, very raw, and always full of fun to listen to. The beat is brilliant, the vocals excellent as ever, and it just brings the 'Black Sunday' album to an absolutely excellent end. It's a thoroughly enjoyable piece of music and marks the end of what has been a brilliant album; a perfect closing anthem.

          If you like your hip-hop then the chances are that you'll love this album; it's a great fourteen track release of hip-hop, and with beats as excellent as these it's really very hard to find fault with it. Obviously the lyrics could perhaps offer a little more, that's not the Cypress Hill style however and the group merely keep it real and rap purely about what they know. 'Black Sunday' is a great fun album to listen to; it provides for a supremely relaxing listening experience and is an absolutely perfect album to chill out to. 'Black Sunday' is an album that I recommend listening to 100%.

          'Black Sunday' can currently be purchased from Amazon.co.uk for the mere price of £2.98; an absolute bargain in my opinion and at that sort of price there's really no excuse not to own it.


          Label: Ruffhouse Records
          Release Date: July 20th 1993

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            15.03.2002 02:58
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            This album is a classic from Cypress Hill, being their second album released. If you are looking for an album that contains 'explicit lyrics' then this, or one of the other albums i have reccomended (see my opinion on 'rap') is definately for you. Every song either refers to cmoking weed or killing people, and all in a very lyrical form. Non-stop this band manages to produce master pieces, and this album, which as a bonus contains a number of cypress hill classics (like insane in the brain) is another one of them. I reccomend it. Buy it and endorse their weed supply!!

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              25.09.2001 00:14

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              Ever since its classic, self-titled debut introduced Cypress Hill to the world back in 1991, the Latino crew from East L.A. has held a special place in the blunted heart (and lungs) of the hip-hop nation. Like any group that's been in the game as long as it has, Cypress has seen its share of career highs and lows -- and one of the biggest highs was its sophomore album, 1993's Black Sunday. The album revealed Cypress Hill as a hip-hop triple threat: tight beats from DJ Muggs, vocal shuckin' and jivin' from Sen Dog, and a natural flow from B-Real. The combined brilliance of everyone involved in it created a sound that's as fresh today as it was when Black Sunday was originally released. Such classics as "Insane in the Brain," "I Ain't Goin' Out Like That," and "Cock the Hammer" still sound brand new. Cypress Hill was also ahead of its contemporaries in the sampling department, and Black Sunday was no exception. Any hip-hop act that has the cojones to use Dusty Springfield's "Son of a Preacher Man" -- as Cypress Hill does here on "Hits from the Bong" -- truly understands how much fun a sampler can be. Black Sunday doesn't waste a track, either. Where most hip-hop albums have so much filler and skits sandwiched between a few singles, this one goes in a completely different direction. All 14 songs follow a general theme and, thanks to Muggs, are musically consistent -- which makes Black Sunday the kind of sustained listening experience you want in a classic album. In addition, Cypress Hill thankfully kept the pointless skits (which ruin so man of today's hip-hop discs) to a minimum.

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              15.09.2001 05:10
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              Ever since its classic, self-titled debut introduced Cypress Hill to the world back in 1991, the Latino crew from East L.A. has held a special place in the blunted heart (and lungs) of the hip-hop nation. Like any group that's been in the game as long as it has, Cypress has seen its share of career highs and lows -- and one of the biggest highs was its sophomore album, 1993's Black Sunday. The album revealed Cypress Hill as a hip-hop triple threat: tight beats from DJ Muggs, vocal shuckin' and jivin' from Sen Dog, and a natural flow from B-Real. The combined brilliance of everyone involved in it created a sound that's as fresh today as it was when Black Sunday was originally released. Such classics as "Insane in the Brain," "I Ain't Goin' Out Like That," and "Cock the Hammer" still sound brand new. Cypress Hill was also ahead of its contemporaries in the sampling department, and Black Sunday was no exception. Any hip-hop act that has the cojones to use Dusty Springfield's "Son of a Preacher Man" -- as Cypress Hill does here on "Hits from the Bong" -- truly understands how much fun a sampler can be. Black Sunday doesn't waste a track, either. Where most hip-hop albums have so much filler and skits sandwiched between a few singles, this one goes in a completely different direction. All 14 songs follow a general theme and, thanks to Muggs, are musically consistent -- which makes Black Sunday the kind of sustained listening experience you want in a classic album. In addition, Cypress Hill thankfully kept the pointless skits (which ruin so man of today's hip-hop discs) to a minimum.

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                14.09.2001 04:11

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                Ever since its classic, self-titled debut introduced Cypress Hill to the world back in 1991, the Latino crew from East L.A. has held a special place in the blunted heart (and lungs) of the hip-hop nation. Like any group that's been in the game as long as it has, Cypress has seen its share of career highs and lows -- and one of the biggest highs was its sophomore album, 1993's Black Sunday. The album revealed Cypress Hill as a hip-hop triple threat: tight beats from DJ Muggs, vocal shuckin' and jivin' from Sen Dog, and a natural flow from B-Real. The combined brilliance of everyone involved in it created a sound that's as fresh today as it was when Black Sunday was originally released. Such classics as "Insane in the Brain," "I Ain't Goin' Out Like That," and "Cock the Hammer" still sound brand new. Cypress Hill was also ahead of its contemporaries in the sampling department, and Black Sunday was no exception. Any hip-hop act that has the cojones to use Dusty Springfield's "Son of a Preacher Man" -- as Cypress Hill does here on "Hits from the Bong" -- truly understands how much fun a sampler can be. Black Sunday doesn't waste a track, either. Where most hip-hop albums have so much filler and skits sandwiched between a few singles, this one goes in a completely different direction. All 14 songs follow a general theme and, thanks to Muggs, are musically consistent -- which makes Black Sunday the kind of sustained listening experience you want in a classic album. In addition, Cypress Hill thankfully kept the pointless skits (which ruin so man of today's hip-hop discs) to a minimum.

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                10.09.2001 03:42
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                Cypress Hill’s hardcore hip hop sound on their sophmore long player was a style far removed from the NWA-themed verbal battering lamenting the state of the United States policing system. While CH’s own take wasn’t adverse to putting punks in their place, there was something about the incessant rhyme schemes of how many joints you could light in succession and B Real’s semi-surreal mixture of sucking in balloons and then pinching his nose, to create an idiosyncratic pattern of hip hop toked up to its eyeballs while whining like some kind of manic cartoon creation. Black Sunday probably gave a lease of life to those wanting to access music that while primarily harder pitched than its rivals, didn’t possess overly hostile attitudes honed on the West Coast, being more intent on wrapping bass-drowned chuggers around the Hill’s foliage of choice. While the breaks on Black Sunday distinctly stay on the midrange, there’s no doubting the ferocity, provocation and at times genuine unease being exhaled onto the masses. I Wanna Get High for example, sounds exactly like it’s been on the receiving end of a heavy session with its slouching, disinterested drums pierced by a tribal, almost alien loop hypnotically spinning off Real’s claims that he ‘wrote sh*t for the blunted ones to approach it.’ The menacing, car-chase basslines of the oddly similar I Ain’t Going Out Like That and Cock The Hammer up the urgency with moody, suspicious ruggedness; the former is certainly not a ditty to be messed with as that bass could knock fakes out at twenty paces, the latter equally unconvinced of proceedings on a faster paced pursuit through the back streets. The Hill’s singalong capability in producing memorable hooks is another unlikely string to add to their bow; rather than completely concentrating on verse content, B Real always seems to produce a line to lodge long in the memory, with naturally the eardr
                um-damaging drum slaps of Insane In The Brain still sounding fresh as it ever has, particularly with Sen Dog’s more comfortable flow echoing the choruses of a semi-constipated husk. As the police-as-pigs theories insist on interrupting this joint effort, What Go Around Come Around Kid repeats the dosage of wide-ended snares and an intense bass offering no room for cheeriness. Black Sunday also offers a maturer, ‘classier’ approach from its stringently stoned rantings, proven by the sheer class from the unsubtle Hits From The Bong that boasts a quality re-use of the Son Of A Preacher Man guitar riff on an ultra funky head nodder. Cock The Hammer, with more bass working overtime and eerie atmospherics strains colliding to produce a bad trip to the dark side and the snare-roll-exclusive 3 Lil Putos, plus the ever-present angst of A To The K with more lo-fi frequencies riding tandem with snarling drums, all demonstrate an unfeasible amount of funk unearthed from beyond the clouds of weed smoke. There are no indications of the rock ventures Cypress Hill would eventually pursue and have more success with, being that each track is a dense, vehement display of friction between drummer and bass player, with DJ Muggs, by far one of the most underrated producers on hip hop turf, throwing in the occasional dabbling of cut ups but more often than not letting the trunk rattlers take precedence. Hand On The Glock and the particularly nippy Break Em Off Some in concluding the Hill’s opening showcase conjure images of rolling heavy handed through the city in a bruiser of an automobile letting know passers-by just who is in the neighbourhood. The structure to this album is actually surprisingly rigid, a cornerstone of their future success that ensures production sounds bleary-eyed when it doesn’t decide to go wielding the axes. Sceptics would say that there’s only so much you can do with stronger-than-most drum patterns and the sn
                aking basslines Cypress Hill have made their trademark, but each cut stands out as being lively and volatile. B Real’s different delivery also contributes significantly; if his chosen tones were amongst those of the ordinary, who’s to say what path they would have taken? B Real is one of the rare examples of being able to hold an audience’s attention in spite of a concentrated subject matter because of that twang that warns as much as it makes you want to crack up with laughter. Think Joe Pasquale in a gangster flick and you're half way there. A lot of albums are labelled under the banner of classic nowadays and yet somehow never quite reach that status when it comes to dusting them off years down the line. Black Sunday though is a worthy recipient given its stamping of Latino authority onto the game. While the singles will spring to the minds of most trying to detail Cypress Hill’s high points, this album in its entirety is well deserving of its place in hip hop toke-lore…

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                  29.06.2001 19:30
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                  This has to be one of my all-time favourite items. If you are into rock, hip-hop or think cannabis should be legalised or decriminalised, this is an album you'll want to hear. Clearly the main point of the album is for Cypress Hill to show their love for guns and marijuana, much like The Chronic by Dr Dre. I would greatly recommend this album if you are on your own or with just one or two friends, and have a big bag of weed. Just put it on repeat and smoke until you sleep. You will wake up in a good mood with the sound of Cypress Hill in your ears. It's a guaranteed* cure for the blues. *This is not a legally binding guarantee.

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                    03.03.2001 22:00

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                    What a follow up to there first self-titled album! The track listing reads like this, I wanna get high; I ain't goin' out like that; Insane in the brain; When the ship goes down; Lick a shot; Cock the hammer; Interlude; Li'l Putos; Legalise it; Hits from the bong; What go around come around kid; A to the K; Hand on the glock; Break 'em off some. Full to ther brim of the best rap sounds of 91, and with lyrics like Hits from the bong and Insane in the brain they are pushingf back the limits of rap and going places no others have or are willing to take rap. The bands sound is individual and unlike bands that seem to mellow with age Cypress Hill are becoming more aggresive and quite frankly better than ever before. B-real and Sen dogg have dug seep and kicked out another great album that has set teh trend not only for rap music but for the direction that cypress hill are set to take over the next few years! A must have album for all Cypress Hill and Rap fans! Buy Now Nice one

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                    17.02.2001 14:53
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                    In 1991, the climate for hip-hop, as it had in alternative music with the advent of Nirvana, was undergoing radical changes. Around this time, when Cypress Hill released their eponymous debut, George Clinton's influence on rap was becoming more apparent, most notably in Dr. Dre's 1992 G-Funk trendsetter THE CHRONIC. This album encapsulated many Parliament and Funkadelic-inspired elements, including the whining synth melodies (prior to this, it was rare to have melody at all in rap), deep funky bass grooves, and instantly catchy but with a decidedly eerie flavor. At a time when too many East Coast MCs were content to rap over James Brown samples and simple unsyncopated beats, the West Coast sound became truly innovative. Though the psychedelic, "one-nation-under-a-groove" party vibes that Clinton created and the violent gangsta imagery of Dr. Dre's and (to a lesser extent) Cypress Hill's work were worlds apart, no one could accuse the latter of being mere style plagiarists as they brought Clinton's acid-saturated hooks into the mix with their own view of how rap should be performed. Neither of them had to worry about lack of individuality among themselves as well. Their sounds occasionally bled into one another and were often likened to one another, but they did the opposite of the other. While Dre's debut did seem to hint at a new acceptance for drug use in the rap community but focused mainly on gangsta hedonism ("chronic" is a potent strain of weed), Cypress Hill were not at all ambiguous regarding their penchant for pot, but did dabble in gangsta-style amoralism if only to keep pace. The majority of their rhymes on the debut just glamorizes marijuana's use with titles like "Stoned Is the Way of the Walk" and "Something for the Blunted," sounding rather overdone by the end but Clinton's influence can still be felt subtly with every rumbling bassline and laid-back beat. The follow-up B
                    LACK SUNDAY uses the same formula of stoned beats and lazy low end courtesy of DJ Muggs (worked w/House of Pain and Funkdoobiest) coupled with the fierce nasal lead rhymes of B-Real, but the mix remains compelling if somewhat trying with the relentless herb references. The album's dynamic flow is as captivating as B-Real's raps, his lyrics snaking through the dense collage of spaced-out samples and doped-up rhythms. Though he is unquestionably a talented rapper, his incredibly nasal delivery sometimes appears exaggerated and even funny. But that just makes his style all the more unique and provides a good balance for the album's randomly violent nature. This does overshadow his partner in rhyme Sen Dog, whose raps are decent but forgettable after hearing B-Real's wild verbal antics. DJ Muggs like Dre is masterful at keeping the funk loose but focused at the same time, but the intricacy and variety of Muggs' sampling, scratching and programming does keep the listener guessing more than with THE CHRONIC, even tracks that concentrate on the instrumental side ("Legalize It", "I Wanna Get High," "Lockdown"). A few tracks falter along the way, like the back-to-back violence of "Lick A Shot" and "Cock The Hammer" which barely crawl along with short, boring samples and uninventive words. Ligt up relax and enjoy

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                • Product Details

                  Disc #1 Tracklisting
                  1 I Wanna Get High
                  2 I Ain't Goin' Out Like That
                  3 Insane In The Brain
                  4 When The Ship Goes Down
                  5 Lick A Shot
                  6 Cock The Hammer
                  7 Interlude
                  8 Li'l Putos
                  9 Legalise It
                  10 Hits From The Bong
                  11 What Go Around Come Around Kid
                  12 A To The K
                  13 Hand On The Glock
                  14 Break 'em Off Some